Michael Vincent McGinnis

First Name
Michael
Last Name
McGinnis
Michael Vincent McGinnis, Professor, Image
Job Title
Associate Professor
Location
Craig Building
Phone
831-647-6615 x 8403

I am passionate about forging a more sustainable future that includes the protection of diverse maritime cultures and the ecosystems that we are irrevocably connected to and dependent on.

Expertise

Marine Policy, Climate Change, and Water/Watershed Planning

Faculty Program Tags
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Course List

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

IEPG 8503 - Resrch Strategies for Env Pol      

Environmental policy-making requires high quality research at every stage of the process. This course introduces students to the design and implementation of research, with an emphasis on applied research into contemporary environmental policy problems.

Fall 2014 - MIIS

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IEPG 8506 - Public Policy & the Environmnt      

This two-unit course provides a foundation in the paradigms, principles, and tools that shape public policy in the service of environmental protection and sustainable development. We will first explore the sources and dynamics of public policymaking and the fundamental principles of environmental policy, including sustainability, precaution and cost internalization. We will then examine three policy paradigms: 1) regulatory (command and control); 2) collaborative (stakeholder based); and 3) market-based. For each paradigm, we will consider case studies of global and national policy options for particular environmental problems, including forest degradation and carbon emissions. Examples of policy options include substantive and process standards; taxes; eco-system service payments; public investment; etc. Students will work in a team to produce a policy analysis of a major environmental problem.

Fall 2013 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS

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IEPG 8522 - Environmental Ethics      

This course introduces the major themes of environmental ethics. In the face of a generalized claim of environmental crisis, numerous authors and schools of thought have suggested a variety of ethical and political responses. The central focus will be on the various ethical theories that have evolved regarding the relationships between humans and the rest of the natural world, and how technology, a sense of place and community, the science of ecology, diverse natural values, and political institutions have shaped the past and present treatment of the natural world. We will also explore and discuss how these diverse ethical theories and beliefs are articulated in politics today, and will characterize the ecological and social movements that are emerging that reflect these ethical and value orientations.

Spring 2014 - MIIS

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IEPG 8591 - Applied Conservation Science      

This course is about saving life on earth. It provides the scientific foundation required to formulate sound environmental policies capable of addressing human population growth, habitat destruction, resource overexploitation, and other anthropogenic factors that continue to undermine the earth’s ecological systems. The course focuses on scientific underpinnings of conserving the world’s remaining biological diversity (aka “biodiversity”). It draws from biology, ecology, and other natural sciences to deliver the broad scientific training that future policymakers need. As a short survey course, the goal is not to transform you into a biologist or an ecologist, but rather to equip you with the basic knowledge you need to understand how the natural world works, speak the language with confidence, and use science to develop sound environmental policy.

Spring 2013 - MIIS

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IEPG 8611 - Sustainable Coastal Management      

The coast is the most dynamic landscape on earth. It changes every time a wave breaks, a tide changes, or streams flow. About seventy percent of the world’s population lives within 100 km of the coast. This course provides a foundation in the core scientific principles, governance frameworks, and economic challenges and opportunities related to the quest for sustainable coastal management and adaptation. A central theme of the course is the need to assess and respond to coastal climate vulnerability, including via adaptive policy and planning at diverse scales of coastal governance. The case studies in the course encompass both developed and less developed countries, and an emphasis on management of large coastal cities, coastal ecosystems, and other coastal land-uses.

Spring 2013 - MIIS, Spring 2014 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS

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IEPG 8615 - Intl Watershed Management        

The study of watershed planning is a subject that combines the biophysical and social sciences. It requires that we explore the relationships and linkages between coastal, marine and aquatic habitats and the human activities, such as water use, water pollution, and habitat loss that impact watershed ecosystems. As a consequence, this course will focus on a characterization of the ecology of aquatic ecosystems, and the impacts of human beings and climate change on these ecosystems across diverse cultural contexts. It will include a review of government and non-governmental watershed-based programs and plans that exist in less developed and industrialized countries.

The Course Outline describes the major themes of the course and associated reading assignments (including recommended readings and useful web links), and lecture topics, including case study materials. The goals of this course are: (1) to introduce the ecological factors that influence disturbance of watershed ecosystems; (2) to describe integrative watershed management principles; (3) to review state, federal and international policies and programs that support watershed-based ecosystem management and integrative planning; and, (4) to provide an overview of the major policy initiatives and planning tools that support watershed-based ecosystem management in diverse contexts.

Fall 2013 - MIIS, Spring 2015 - MIIS

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IEPG 8634 - NavigatingWickedMarineProblems      

NAVIGATING WICKED MARINE PROBLEMS

Commercial shipping is essential to international trade and consumer goods. Container ships use vessel traffic schemes (VTS) that often overlap with important marine areas, creating unintended pressures and associated impacts to marine ecosystems, including whales. In particular, ship strikes are a threat to endangered blue, right, humpback, and fin whales, and ship noise can affect important mating and feeding behavior of whales as well as other marine life. This course will use this case study to help students identify the threats, pressures, and policy responses of a complex, or “wicked,” ocean-based problem. In projects teams, students will complete a Pressure State Response analysis of the problem, with the goal of developing practical and professional skills necessary to participate in complex marine planning and decision-making in their post-graduate careers. Students will also gain exposure to and an opportunity to network with experts in the field through many invited speaker presentations and panel discussions. To enhance collaborative interdisciplinary problem-solving opportunities, this course will take place at a variety of locations in the Monterey Bay region, and include interdisciplinary students from multiple campuses.

Spring 2015 - MIIS

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IEPG 8635 - Intl Marine Science & Policy      

The study of marine science and policy is a subject that combines the biophysical and social sciences with a comprehensive overview of marine policies, laws, and planning tools. It requires that we explore the relationships and nexus between science, policy and planning across diverse maritime cultures. The course will first provide a general overview of marine science, with a particular focus on the role of marine science in identifying pressures, threats and stressors to marine systems. The emphasis will be on the various factors that contribute to marine ecosystem disturbance and the role of marine science in policymaking and planning. The introduction to marine science will be followed by a general overview of state and federal marine policy and management. The US marine policy framework will be compared to international examples of ocean governance, including small island countries, New Zealand, England, the European Union, China, and less developed countries.

Fall 2013 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS

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IPOL 8615 - Intl Watershed Management        

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Fall 2012 - MIIS

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IPOL 8635 - Intl Marine Science & Policy      

Fall 2012 - MIIS

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Extra Information

Research and Publications

Mike is interested in the interface between science and policymaking.  He has fifteen years of professional and academic experience in the area of large-scale environmental policymaking and planning in diverse cultural and socio-economic settings.

He has published over 100 journal articles, essays, books, government reports and technical documents on the subject of large-scale ecosystem-based planning and biodiversity conservation, with a focus on oceans, rivers, creeks, and islands.  His edited compendium Bioregionalism(Routledge, 1999) is the primary text in the field.  He has also contributed to federal and state policymaking and planning activities for marine sanctuary management plans and watershed-based plans across coastal California.

From 1993-2000 his research, funded by three awards from the USA National Science Foundation, focused on the role of worldviews, values, beliefs and science in the development of ecosystem-based planning. From 1999-2008 he was an advisor to federal agencies in the development of marine ecosystem-based planning in California. During this time, he assisted the National Marine Sanctuary (NMS) Program in all of the planning aspects associated with the designation of marine reserves within the Channel Islands NMS.  In 2008 he was a Fulbright Scholar in south-eastern Europe, and conducted a comparative study of marine governance supported by the European Union. In April 2012, he completed a two-year study on New Zealand's marine governance framework funded by the ministries of that country.  McGinnis is currently completing two books on the subject of the role of ecology and politics in large-scale ecosystem-based planning and decision-making.

Recent Accomplishments

  • Mike was one of the first Fulbright Scholars to the Republic of Montenegro in southeastern Europe in 2008. 
  • As a Senior Research Fellow at the University of Wellington New Zealand he has completed a comprehensive study of New Zealand’s marine governance framework in 2011; a study supported by the ministries of the country that offers a range of recommendations to improve New Zealand’s marine governance system.  This study will be revised as a major book on the subject of New Zealand’s environmental governance system.

Previous Work

Mike was Director of the Ocean and Coastal Policy Center at the University of California Santa Barbara from 1995-2010.  In 2008, he was a Fulbright Scholar to the Republic of Montenegro.  From 2010-2012 he was a Senior Fellow and Professor at the School of Government, Victoria University of Wellington (New Zealand).  He has published over 100 journal articles, essays, books, government reports and technical documents on the subject of biodiversity conservation and ecosystem-based planning.

Non-academic Interests

Mike has surfed since he was seven years old, and is enjoys hiking, sailing, and other ocean-going and backcountry wilderness activities.  He also in a painter and has been writing a series of vignettes and poems on the landscapes and seascapes of coastal California.

Education

Dr Michael Vincent McGinnis received a PhD in Political Science in 1993 from UC Santa Barbara.  His undergraduate degree was from UC Los Angeles.

Bibliography

Book, Marine Governance: The New Zealand Dimension. Victoria University Wellington Press. 2012 (December). (150 pages). mcginnis_ebook_nz_ocean_governance_victoria_university_wellington_press_2012
 
The Race for Marine Space: Science, Values and Aquaculture Planning in New Zealand,
Coastal Management 41, 5 (2013): 401-419. mcginnis_and_collins_coastal_management_2013_offprint

Adapting to Climate Impacts in California: The Importance of Civic Science in Local Coastal Planning, Coastal Management 39: 3 (April 2011): 225-241 (with C.E. McGinnis). 

Living up to the Brand: Greening New Zealand’s Ocean Policy, Policy Quarterly 8, 1 (February 2012): 17-28. policyquarterly_feb_2012final

A Bioregional Primer for Santa Barbara County, Funded by the Santa Barbara Foundation, December, 2012. (72 pages). regional_conservation_principles_final_mcginnis_nov201

Mindfulness of the Oceanic Commons, Pacific Ecologist 20 (Winter 2011): 55-60. mcginnis_pacific_ecologist_issue_201

Land Use, Agriculture, and the Environment, The 2010 Central Coast Survey, UC Santa Barbara, Published by Social Science Survey Center/Benton Survey Research Lab. 2010 (with Cleveland, David, Paolo Gardinali, Garrett Glasgow, John Mohr,
Eric Smith, Megan Carney, and Lauren Copeland). ag_report_ucsb

Protecting Climate Refugia Areas: The case of the Gaviota coast in southern California, Endangered Species Update 25, 4 (June 2008): 103-109. esu_vol_25_4

Negotiating Ecology: Marine Bioregions and the destruction of the Southern California Bight, Futures 38;3 (May 2006): 382-405.

The California Watershed Movement: Science and the Politics of Place. Natural Resources Journal 42, 1 (Winter 2002): 133-183 (with Woolley).

Bioregional Conflict Resolution: Rebuilding Community in Watershed-based Planning and Organizing, Environmental Management 24, 1 (1999): 1-12 (with Woolley and J.K. Gamman). 

Faculty Type
Regular Faculty
Dynamic Features
Course Catalog

Philipp C. Bleek

First Name
Philipp
Last Name
Bleek
Philipp Bleek, Professor, Image
Job Title
Assistant Professor
Location
205 McGowan
City, State, ZIP
Monterey, CA 93940
Phone
831.647.6509

Philipp C. Bleek is an Assistant Professor in the Graduate School of International Policy and Management and Fellow at the James Martin Center for Nonproliferation Studies at the Monterey Institute of International Studies (MIIS). His research and teaching focuses on the causes, consequences, and amelioration of nuclear, biological, and chemical weapons proliferation to states and non-state actors.

Expertise

Causes, consequences, and amelioration of nuclear, biological, and chemical weapons proliferation.

MIIS Tags
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Course List

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

NPTG 8531 - Wks: Writing & Briefing Memos      

Fall 2014 - MIIS, Spring 2015 - MIIS

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NPTG 8574 / IPOL 8574 - Intro to WMD Nonproliferation      

This course surveys the issues surrounding the proliferation of nuclear, chemical, and biological weapons and ballistic missiles. It also provides an introduction to nuclear and radiological terrorism, and an overview of the international nonproliferation regime.

The course is divided into three main parts: Part 1 provides an overview of the trends and technologies of WMD proliferation. Part 2 considers the nonproliferation regime in detail, concentrating on the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT), the conventions banning chemical and biological weapons, supplier regimes and export controls, and verification and compliance issues. Part 3 returns to challenges to the nonproliferation regime, including states of proliferation concern known or believed to be developing WMD outside or in defiance of the NPT, CWC, and BWC and tensions within the nonproliferation regime, and discusses the range of international, multilateral, and unilateral responses to these challenges

Spring 2011 - MIIS, Fall 2011 - MIIS, Spring 2012 - MIIS, Fall 2013 - MIIS, Spring 2014 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS, Spring 2015 - MIIS

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NPTG 8654 / IPOL 8654 - Sem:WMDProliferatnInMiddleEast      

This seminar examines the proliferation of nuclear, biological, and chemical weapons in the Middle East, including historical developments, the present context, and alternate potential futures.

Although the focus is on state actors, proliferation risks posed by non-state terrorist organizations will be discussed as well. The course will begin with overview sessions on why states do and do not pursue and acquire nuclear, biological, and chemical weapons and on the internal and intrastate politics of the region. Subsequent sessions will focus on key regional countries. The course will conclude with integrative simulation sessions allowing participants to wrestle with the prospects for proliferation and nonproliferation in the region. Students will prepare weekly short memos, conduct group work for integrative simulation exercises, prepare an independent research project, and have various presentation opportunities.
.

Spring 2011 - MIIS, Spring 2012 - MIIS, Spring 2014 - MIIS

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NPTG 8658 - Sem: CBRN Terrorism      

The goal of this seminar is to develop the skills necessary to analyze the motivations and capabilities of non-state actors to acquire and use weapons of mass destruction (WMD), more specifically chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear (CBRN) weapons and materials, for terrorist purposes. Through class discussions, simulation exercises, and individual research, students will review the technical aspects of CBRN, examine the history of CBRN use by terrorists, assess CBRN terrorism threats and vulnerabilities, and assess policy responses to CBRN terrorism. Students are required to have substantial background knowledge of either CBRN or terrorism before joining the seminar.

Students will prepare weekly short memos, conduct group work for integrative simulation exercises, prepare an independent research project, and have various presentation opportunities.

Fall 2013 - MIIS, Spring 2014 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS, Spring 2015 - MIIS

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Faculty Type
Regular Faculty
Dynamic Features
Course Catalog

Mahmoud I. Abdalla

First Name
Mahmoud
Last Name
Abdalla
mahmoud-i-abdalla
Job Title
Associate Professor
Location
IIRC Building 7
City, State, ZIP
Monterey, CA
Phone
831.647.4607
Language(s)
svenska

Mahmoud Abdalla earned his M.A. and Ph.D. in applied linguistics at Essex University and the University of Edinburgh in the United Kingdom. He has taught and lectured extensively on linguistics, Arabic language, and Arab culture and media in several universities and academic institutions in Egypt, Europe, and the United States. He was previously the academic director of the Arabic Language Flagship Program and the coordinator of the Arabic Program in the Department of Linguistics and German, Slavic, Asian, and African Languages at Michigan State University.

Expertise

Arabic language, Arab culture and media, linguistics, second language acquisition, language culture and identity.

MIIS Tags
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Course List

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

ARBC 6698 - Language Practicum      

This is a one unit course which is designed to give graduate students an opportunity to reflect on Arabic pedagogical theories and become familiar with a range of teaching strategies and techniques. The course includes class observation, lesson planning, a micro-teaching component and actual teaching demonstrations of the language skills. Students are required to conduct interviews with professional instructors during which they discuss the best practices as well as problems encountered in teaching the beginning, intermediate and advanced college level Arabic classes. To address the linguistic phenomenon of diglossia, students will practice teaching Arab dialect(s) alongside the formal varieties of the language. The course is offer in the last summer session towards the completion of the Master’s degree.

Summer 2013

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ARLA 8263 - Cultur/ComMedArabcSpkCountries      

Spring 2014 - MIIS

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ARLA 8270 - Intro to the Arabic World      

Fall 2010 - MIIS

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ARLA 8290 - Topics in Arab Culture      

Fall 2011 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS

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ARLA 8294 - Mediterranean Cultures      

Spring 2015 - MIIS

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ARLA 8305 - Soc &Culture in Arab Countries      

Fall 2010 - MIIS

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ARLA 8315 - Arab & Islamic Culture in Asia      

Spring 2015 - MIIS

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ARLA 8320 - Development of Arab Mass Media      

SThe course will offer an overview of the history of Arab mass media and the role they play in contemporary Arab society. Students will read, watch and analyze authentic materials from various Arab newspapers, magazines, satellite TV stations, online programs, cinema and the like. Students will be exposed to discourse that is presented in Modern Standard Arabic and dialects.

Spring 2011 - MIIS, Spring 2013 - MIIS

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ARLA 8331 - ModernEgypt &Role in ArabWorld      

Students who enroll in this course will study Egypt’s leading role in the region. The curse will focus on the political and social changes that affect this role. This will be done through reading a collection of literary works, historical texts and current editorials and articles. Students will also watch and discuss documentary films that shed light on the problems that Egypt encounters.

Spring 2011 - MIIS

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ARLA 8332 - Understanding the Arab World      

Fall 2010 - MIIS

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ARLA 8335 - Events in the Middle East      

Fall 2011 - MIIS

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ARLA 8341 - Economy of the Middle East      

The course focuses on the economic development in the Middle East. It will also focus on the effect of Arab Spring on contemporary Arab society including social justice and economic growth. The commercial, financial and business relations between the Arab World and regional and international organizations will be discussed in this class. Students will practice using the target language in activities and tasks that include interviewing local businessmen, preparation of business proposals and designing blogs or websites that provide useful information about how to do business in the Middle East.

Spring 2012 - MIIS

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ARLA 8343 - Glblizatn/Dvlpmnt InMiddleEast      

Fall 2012 - MIIS

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ARLA 8352 - Arab American Relations      

Fall 2011 - MIIS

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ARLA 8373 - ChangesInContmpraryArabSociety      

Fall 2013 - MIIS

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ARLA 8384 - Events in the Middle East II      

Fall 2014 - MIIS

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ARLA 8385 - Lang/ID:RoleSoclMediaArabWorld      

Spring 2014 - MIIS

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ARLA 8392 - Nat'l ID &Women's Status,M.E.      

Fall 2013 - MIIS

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ARLA 8393 - Politcs&Scurity-MultipolarWrld      

This course will be a part of a larger Monterey Model curriculum arrangement, which will consist of three groups of students specializing in Arabic, Chinese and Russian languages and Area studies. The Monterey Model curriculum will be devised in a way that would allow students from different language groups and areas of expertise to come together several times during the semester in order to exchange their views and acquired knowledge pertinent to selected themes. Students, professors and invited distinguished experts will be discussing differences in public, media and governmental views related to important international events and role of languages in regional politics. An effort will be made to integrate various approaches to better understand domestic politics and foreign relations through cultural, historical and political discourse. Students will watch jointly news broadcasts in Arabic, Chinese and Russian in order to better grasp the role of mass media in China, Russia and Middle East. Students will acquire practical skills of working with interpreters and will prepare their own presentations for some plenary sessions where they will have to rely on assistance of interpreters to generate the discussion of their topics. The joint coordinated curriculum will consist of the following topics:

1. Overview. Ethnic groups and minorities. Concepts of territory, geography, security.

2. Islam in country specific case studies. Political movements rooted in Islam. Religion and State in country specific case studies.

3. Security. Terrorism. Border Issues.

4. Language specific themes, for example: Arab Spring: media coverage, History and Present of Russian-Chinese diplomatic collaboration, Mutual perceptions : case studies of Chinese business and China’s economic presence in Northern Africa, Role of Shanghai Cooperation Organization, Chinese, Russian, Arabic media strategies covering several key political events, Differences and similarities in patterns of civil unrest and political/economic consequences in China, Russia and Arabic speaking countries.

Spring 2012 - MIIS

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ARLA 8394 - TopicsInSecurity&IntlRelations      

Spring 2013 - MIIS

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ARLA 8397 - Arab-African Relations      

Fall 2012 - MIIS

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Faculty Type
Regular Faculty
Dynamic Features
Course Catalog

Lisa Leopold

First Name
Lisa
Last Name
Leopold
Lisa Leopold
Job Title
Associate Professor
Location
IIRC Building 9
Phone
831.647.3599
Language(s)
Español

Lisa Leopold has taught at the Monterey Institute of International Studies, Illinois Central College, the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Joliet Junior College, and at El Centro de la Niña Trabajadora in Quito, Ecuador.  Her teaching experience includes instructing university undergraduate and graduate students, community college students, refugees, and children.  She has also researched and produced a proposal for an intensive English as a Second Language curriculum for a community college.

MIIS Tags
Faculty Program Tags
Expertise

English for academic purposes

Course List

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

EAPP 8320 - Communicatng in Context/Debate      

Fall 2010 - MIIS

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EAPP 8376 - Academic & Policy Writing      

Fall 2010 - MIIS, Fall 2012 - MIIS

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EAPP 8380 - Business Correspondence      

The aim of this course is to help you become a more seasoned writer, thinker, and communicator in the business world. In this course, you will analyze the rhetorical conventions of business discourse, learn strategies for tailoring your message to your audience, and revise your work in order to produce finely-tuned business documents such as letters, reports, and e-mail correspondence.

Spring 2011 - MIIS, Spring 2012 - MIIS, Fall 2012 - MIIS, Fall 2013 - MIIS, Spring 2015 - MIIS

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EAPP 8394 - Editing Writing      

Spring 2014 - MIIS

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EAPP 8430 - Publ Speakng for Intl Students      

This course is designed to equip you with the skills and confidence to deliver professional and articulate speeches in English. You will deliver informative, persuasive, panel, training, and commemorative presentations to prepare you for the wide range of speech styles you may encounter in your professions. Consistent practice, analysis of award-winning speeches, and detailed feedback on your performance will provide you with ample opportunity to improve your public speaking skills.

Fall 2010 - MIIS, Spring 2011 - MIIS, Spring 2012 - MIIS

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EAPP 8475 - Professional Presentatn Skills      

Fall 2012 - MIIS, Spring 2013 - MIIS, Fall 2013 - MIIS, Spring 2014 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS, Spring 2015 - MIIS

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EAPP 8494 - NavTheProcess/AdvStratRewritng      

Navigating the Process: Advanced Strategies in Rewriting is a course in rewriting, editing and proofreading available to all qualified international students. The course concentrates on giving non-native speakers of English the necessary tools to edit their own writing. We will use short in- class writing and papers from other classes to sharpen our editing skills.

Students can expect to ...

- learn the strengths and weaknesses in their own writing;

- increase knowledge and understanding of academic English usage;

- enrich style and expression; punctuate correctly;

- write more cohesively (and coherently);

- use transitions more effectively;

- reduce redundancy;

- research and teach a grammar point;

- work in small groups;

- and give and receive written feedback.

Spring 2013 - MIIS, Fall 2013 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS

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ESLA 8294 - EPTI Preparation      

Summer 2014 Language Programs

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Extra Information

Education

MA, TESOL, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; BA, Spanish and Psychology, St. Olaf College

Faculty Type
Regular Faculty
Dynamic Features
Course Catalog

Jinhuei Enya Dai

First Name
Jin huei
Last Name
Dai
dai_img_6839
Job Title
Associate Professor
Location
McCone Building 107
Phone
831.647.6570
Language(s)
中文

I joined the Institute after teaching at Middlebury College Chinese Summer Program and conducting research at the University of California, Berkeley.  I am a believer of Docendo Discimus and 教學相長 (jiāoxué xiāng zhăng: to teach is to learn;  teaching and learning promote and enhance each other), so during my teaching career I’ve never stopped re-investing myself as a life-long learner and as an innovator.  Since 2001, I have attended academic and professional development programs, including the Teaching Chinese Program at Ohio State University, the German-U.S.

Language Tags
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Course List

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

CHLA 8324 - Modern Chinese I      

Topics such as social phenomena, cultural differences and current issues will be introduced and discussed in this course. The objectives of the course are to develop the language proficiency of participants and to have a better understanding of Chinese world.

Fall 2012 - MIIS

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CHLA 8350 - Beijing Immersive Module      

Spring 2012 - MIIS

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CHLA 8368 - Chinese History Through Cinema      

Spring 2013 - MIIS

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CHLA 8380 - Politics & Media I      

Politics and Media I is a seven-week intensive course that focuses on the updated economic and political situation of Chinese-speaking countries. It also looks into the media coverage of presidential election, the impact of Arab Spring, financial and economic situation across the straits.

Spring 2012 - MIIS

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CHLA 8381 - Politics & Media II      

A continuation of Politics and Media I that focuses on the updated economic and political situation of Chinese-speaking ... read more countries. It also looks into the media coverage of presidential election, the impact of Arab Spring, financial and economic situation across the straits.

Spring 2012 - MIIS

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CHLA 8382 - Intro to Strategies in Chinese      

Recommend those students who take lower 300 level to take this introduction course in the same semester to gain more insights in idiomatic expression of Chinese strategies and more hours in practice and enhance language skills and cultural competence.

Fall 2011 - MIIS

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CHLA 8388 - Cross-Strait Immersive Module      

Spring 2013 - MIIS

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CHLA 8405 - Public Speaking in Chinese      

Fall 2014 - MIIS

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CHLA 8422 - Buildng anEastAsia Community I      

Fall 2012 - MIIS

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CHLA 8444 - ChinesePodcst&MIISChineseRadio      

Chinese Podcast and MIIS Chinese Radio is a course with a focus on Material Development and Methodology in Chinese and computer-assisted learning via podcast and radio. It aims to incorporate language, cultural and conceptual content in Chinese and English to promote Chinese learning and teaching. The class participant will work as a team to compile a semester long podcast and broadcast via MIIS Chinese Radio.

Spring 2015 - MIIS

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CHLA 8450 - Beijing Immersive Module      

Spring 2012 - MIIS

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CHLA 8460 - ArtOfSunzi:ApplPol&BusStudies      

This course contains three stages: first 7.5 weeks of coverage on 36 stratagems and Art of Sunzi (Dai), 4-week of individualization research sign-up and language review (2-hour per week by Cai), and followed by the final 4-week of review, final reports and final deliverables at the Mini-Monterey Model in Irvine Auditorium (Dai). CHLA 8460A is a 12-week intensive course that contains 6-hour instruction per week. In addition to the 12-week intensive course, students are also keeping their reading logs with the teaching associate from mid-October to mid November, during this period of time, students are reviewing materials covered during the first 8 weeks and start to develop their research interests, to further their research reading in Chinese. Final deliverables for the course are a wrap-up research analysis paper of 12 to 15 page (or its equivalence of the content in the format of digital media integration), and a final presentation will be delivered in Irvine Auditorium.

A key research topic is concluded and developed after the first 8 weeks, and further develop an individualization research project related to your major using insights from Art of Sunzi. The Individualization Research Project curriculum will be devised in a way that would allow students to develop their own interest and areas of expertise to conduct 5-minute mini-oral reports 2 times during mid-October and mid-November. You can exchange the views and acquired knowledge pertinent to selected topics and gain feedbacks from fellow classmates.

The Art of Sunzi curriculum will consist of the following topics:

1. Overview: Key concepts and background information of Art of Sunzi

2. History: Historical relevance of Military tactics in Chinese History

3. Business strategies: Business, management and its relation to Art of Sunzi

4. Leadership and Philosophy: Insights of Art of Sunzi on leadership and philosophy

5. Individualization Research Analysis Projects using insights from Art of Sunzi

Fall 2013 - MIIS

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CHLA 8472 - Internet, Media & Conflict      

Able to conduct research in Chinese, discuss and debate. Completion of CS368 or higher.

Fall 2011 - MIIS

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CHLA 8481 - Current Events & Dao De Jing      

Fall 2014 - MIIS

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CHLA 8488 - Cross-Strait Immersive Module      

Spring 2013 - MIIS

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CHLA 8490 - Chinese Grammar Pedagogy      

Chinese Grammar Pedagogy is an introduction to Chinese grammar pedagogy that focuses on structured grammar input, pedagogical methods in instructing Chinese grammar, discourse-based approach, types of grammar elicitation designs, and interaction among grammar, context, and pragmatics. It is designed to integrate theories into hands-on practice. The primary goals of this course include gaining insights from readings of books, Chinese pedagogical grammar articles, discussing grammar teachability issues from elementary to advanced levels, writing reaction journals and reflection, training grammar elicitation techniques, and compiling Chinese grammar from authentic content-based materials. The course will also integrate technology, be it Moodle, AdobeConnect, blogging, etc., into the classroom and invite K-16 Chinese linguists and pedagogues in this field through virtual Elluminate web-conferencing tool and recorded presentation, e.g. Professor Jianhua Bai 白建華, Professor Paul Jia, etc. The course will embrace the Monterey Way, be conducted using content-based instruction, be taught in Chinese and use reading materials in English and Chinese. All the assignments except grammar explanation should be written in Chinese. Students have to choose textbooks or authentic materials for their semester project, and are expected to write reaction journals (one article of your choice from the week’s reading), reflection entries (based on what you have learned with your teacher, peers, and online lecturers, etc.), and conduct a 15-20 min rehearsal and real-class teaching demos. The class is a 3+1 combo, which means three-hour classroom time plus one-hour online portion. Meetings during every Thursday evenings 6-8:50 p.m. and make-up classes on some Friday evenings 5:00-7:50 p.m. before Week 8, and you start to choose or develop your own approach to design your lesson plan during week 8 to week 10. We will meet online again in week 11, and resume our classes during week 13. Our teaching demos in week 13, final presentation is in week 15, and your semester project is due on December 10th, 2:00 p.m. (Submit both Paper and e-copy).

Fall 2013 - MIIS

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CHLA 8493 - Politcs&Scurity-MultipolarWrld      

This course will be a part of a larger Monterey Model curriculum arrangement, which will consist of three groups of students specializing in Arabic, Chinese and Russian languages and Area studies. The Monterey Model curriculum will be devised in a way that would allow students from different language groups and areas of expertise to come together several times during the semester in order to exchange their views and acquired knowledge pertinent to selected themes. Students, professors and invited distinguished experts will be discussing differences in public, media and governmental views related to important international events and role of languages in regional politics. An effort will be made to integrate various approaches to better understand domestic politics and foreign relations through cultural, historical and political discourse. Students will watch jointly news broadcasts in Arabic, Chinese and Russian in order to better grasp the role of mass media in China, Russia and Middle East. Students will acquire practical skills of working with interpreters and will prepare their own presentations for some plenary sessions where they will have to rely on assistance of interpreters to generate the discussion of their topics. The joint coordinated curriculum will consist of the following topics:

1. Overview. Ethnic groups and minorities. Concepts of territory, geography, security.

2. Islam in country specific case studies. Political movements rooted in Islam. Religion and State in country specific case studies.

3. Security. Terrorism. Border Issues.

4. Language specific themes, for example: Arab Spring: media coverage, History and Present of Russian-Chinese diplomatic collaboration, Mutual perceptions : case studies of Chinese business and China’s economic presence in Northern Africa, Role of Shanghai Cooperation Organization, Chinese, Russian, Arabic media strategies covering several key political events, Differences and similarities in patterns of civil unrest and political/economic consequences in China, Russia and Arabic speaking countries.

Spring 2012 - MIIS

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CHLA 8510 - CognitionInChineseLang&Culture      

In addition to three hour class meeting, synchronous and asynchronous online learning are required for this class.

Fall 2011 - MIIS, Spring 2013 - MIIS, Spring 2015 - MIIS

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CHLA 8520 - Individualization projects      

Individualization projects involve a research model that develops students’ interests and enhance literacy habits in their fields. The class is open to both native and non-native advanced speakers of Chinese in order to create an ecological environment for language acquisition. This model comprises of three stages: meaningful inputs correlating to learners’ interests, intake components to utilize synthesis skills in writing in Chinese, and a 5-min delivery of progressive report of one’s individualization project to the class every week, and finally an motivated output that showcases learners’ final report in Irvine Auditorium.  Learners are encouraged to compile their own vocabulary lists and grammar items, synthesis reports in each class to promote learners’ autonomy.

 

Spring 2015 - MIIS

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ICCO 9510 - CognitionInChineseLang&Culture      

Spring 2013 - MIIS

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MIIS Tags
Expertise

Cognitive linguistics, Chinese cognitive linguistics, Chinese as a heritage language, Chinese and Taiwanese popular culture, linguistic anthropology, and interactive blogging

Extra Information

Education

PhD, Cognitive Linguistics, Louisiana State University at Baton Rouge; MA, Linguistics, Louisiana State University at Baton Rouge; MA Program, Chinese Pedagogy at Middlebury College; BA, English Literature, Fu Jen Catholic University

Faculty Type
Regular Faculty
Dynamic Features
Course Catalog

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