Middlebury Institute of International Studies at Monterey. Formerly the Monterey Institute of International Studies.

Enrique Alonso García

First Name
Enrique
Last Name
García
Enrique Alonso Garcia, Adjunct Professor, International Environmental Policy, IEP, Image
Job Title
Permanent Councilor of State of the Spanish Government, Adjunct Professor
City, State, ZIP
Monterey, CA 93940

For over 20 years, Enrique Alonso Garcia has been active in marine issues around the world, engaging in environmental activities both as an academic and as a professional.  He has made a number of important contributions to initiatives protecting the marine environment.

At this time, he is the president of the Division of Environmental, Rural and Marine Affairs & Science at the Council of State in Spain.

Short Programs & Research Centers
Expertise

Law of the Sea, International Environmental Law, Marine Policy, Access to Marine Genetic Resources, Offshore Marine Protected Areas, Fisheries and Marine Resources Management, Energy and the Marine Environment, Shipping,  Marine Data Bases Interoperability, Seascapes, Marine Bioacoustics, North American Free Trade Agreement and Agreement on Environmental Cooperation, Vessels Interception, Oil Spills Prevention and Management, Multilateral Marine-related Conventions Negotiations, Cetaceans, Marine Animals Welfare, European Union Law and Policy, Food safety, Algae Collections Management.

Extra Information

Education

S.J.D. Law, Complutense University (Spain) 1982; L.L.M. University of Virginia 1981; J.D. Complutense University, 1976; Certified Environmental Manager, Bentley University, Waltham, MA,  1997.

Publications

Enrique Alonso García has published, among other areas, on marine issues in several languages (English, Spanish, German and Japanese). Some of his publications, limited to the marine policy, science and law, are the following:

Enrique Alonso García, "El Conocimiento y la Aplicación del Derecho Ambiental, un Ejemplo Práctico: las Areas Protegidas Marinas, en Especial, las Areas Protegidas en Mar Abierto", en Desarrollo Sostenible y Protección del Medio Ambiente, Luis Piñar Mañas (Director), ed. Civitas. 2002.

Case study.- "Farming in the Elkhorn Slough Watershed, Environmental Justice & the Hispanic Community", by Jason Benford (supervised by Enrique Alonso García & Ana Recarte Vicente-Arche). April 2004

Enrique Alonso García, “The Establishment and Management of Offshore Marine Protected Areas”, in Development of Marine Resources and Ocean Governance, Shigeaki Uno, Tetsuya Katsumura & Hideki Imaoka editors, Kokusai Shoin Pub., 2004 in Japanese.

Case study.- "The Meaning of Salmon in the Northwest: A Historical, Scientific and Sociological Study", by Luisa Molinero (supervised by Enrique Alonso García) April 2005.

Case study.- "The Boston Harbor Project", by Enrique Alonso García & Ana Recarte Vicente-Arche. January 2005.

Case study.- "Oil spill Prevention and Response: the U.S. Institutional System in the Coast of California", by Ana Tejedor & Larry Spinosa (supervised by Enrique Alonso García). May 2006

With Ree Brennin et al,  "1st International Workshop on Beluga Whale Research, Husbandry, and Management in Wild and Captive Environments. 2007.”, Workshop Position Information Document.

Case study.- "Cape Cod Off-Shore Wind Park: The Multivariate Nature of Energy Policy Issues", by Enrique Alonso & Ana Recarte Vicente-Arche,. May 2007.

With Fernando González Botija, Miguel A. Recuerda, Pedro Díaz Peralta, Anselmo Martínez Cañellas, Lucía Roda Ghisleri, Alejandro Lago Candeira,, Maria Rosa Martínez-Larrañaga, and  Arturo Anadón, "Legal Regulation of Risk Analysis and Genetically Modified Foods", en European Food and Feed Law núm.4. 2009

With Lucía Roda Ghisleri, Arturo Anadón, Miguel A. Recuerda, Pedro Díaz Peralta, Fernando González Botija, Anselmo Martínez Cañellas, Alejandro Lago Candeira, andy Maria Rosa Martínez-Larrañaga, "Risk Analysis and GM Foods: Scientific Risk Assessment", en European Food and Feel Law núm.4, 2009

Enrique Alonso García, "Introduction to International Environmental Law: Handbook with Cases and Materials for American Lawyers", Friends of Thoreau Program Series, núm.1, Ed. URJC-Friends of Thoreau, 2a. ed, 2009, ISBN: 84 95541 05 X

Enrique Alonso García y Ana Recarte Vicente-Arche, "La Técnica Normativa En EEUU, en Particular la Elaboración de las Leyes, en La Técnica Normativa: una Necesidad para la Realización de la Justicia, Pablo García Mexía y Jaime Rodríguez Arana (directores), CEU Ediciones, 2010

Enrique Alonso García, "La Reciente e Inminente Legislación Sobre Conservación y Uso Sostenible de la Biodiversidad del Medio Marino, ¿Celebración o Reto?", en Ambienta, núm.94, marzo 2011

Courses

Courses offered at MIIS in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

IPOL8652A-Spri12 Sem: International Marine Law

Faculty Type
Adjunct Faculty

Fernando DePaolis

First Name
Fernando
Last Name
DePaolis
fernando-depaolis
Job Title
Associate Professor
Location
McCone Building 113
Phone
831.647.3568
Language(s)
Español
português
italiano

I am passionate about finding alternative points of view that could solve the world’s biggest problems. In my case, this is done by combining critical thinking with the most sophisticated computer analysis and visualization techniques.

I love being a professor at MIIS because our students challenge me to be connected to the real world of practice and to maintain the highest professional standards. In the end this helps all of us, as we form a dynamic learning community that aims at producing highly effective professionals.

Faculty Program Tags
Expertise

Economic Development. Regional Economics. Econometrics. Spatial Statistics.

Short Programs & Research Centers
Course List

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

DPPG 8500 - Intro to Policy & DataAnalysis      

This course is a guided introduction to conceptualizing problems and making sense of quantitative information in the policy sphere. The course begins by introducing the theory and practice of policy analysis. The stages of the public policy process and methods for structuring policy inquiry are introduced to provide a means for deconstructing policy problems and asking relevant and practical questions in a policy context.

Next the class is introduced to how such questions are addressed using quantitative tools. Topics to be covered include sampling, estimation, hypothesis testing, analysis of variance, and regression techniques. This will basically be a primer on applying inferential statistics to policy problems. The course will also include introductory training in the use of innovative statistical software, as well as Excel statistical functions.

Fall 2015 - MIIS

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DPPG 8673 - Advanced Data Analysis      

Fall 2015 - MIIS

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IEPG 8663 - Ocean & Coastal Economics      

he purpose of this course is to develop advanced economic skills applied to development and resource issues in the world’s oceans and coasts. The course will focus heavily on analytical and data-driven techniques that can help illuminate the costs and benefits of various policies in the ocean and coastal zones, using a variety of metrics, and incorporating environmental and social values. The course will be divided into two parts: Market economics and coastal planning with Prof. DePaolis and non-market economics with Prof. Scorse.

Student participation in both of these sections will be high, involving many in-class assignments, lab sessions, and extended discussions. Students will be expected to engage in original data collection, analysis, and research. This is an intensive course geared for people who want to pursue careers in marine-related fields, although the topics are more broadly applicable to a range of conservation and development-related careers.

GIS is recommended.

Spring 2014 - MIIS, Spring 2015 - MIIS

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IPSG 8504 - Data Analysis for Public Polcy      

The course is an introduction to inferential statistics with an emphasis on Policy Analysis applications. Topics to be covered include sampling, estimation, hypothesis testing, analysis of variance, and simple and multiple regression analysis. The course will also include an introduction to the use of the computer as a tool for data analysis using leading statistical packages, as well as Excel statistical functions.

Spring 2014 - MIIS, Spring 2015 - MIIS

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IPSG 8551 - Development Economics      

The question of why poverty is so persistent and why some countries remain poor, seemingly against all odds, has intrigued economists and other social scientists, and is the central concern of modern development economics. Since the mid-twentieth century, when many former colonies gained independence and started out on their own, experimenting with new economic policies, the questions of development economics have come to acquire an urgency that was not there earlier. And the last twenty years or so have seen an enormous resurgence of research interest in development economics. With so many international organizations and so many governments trying to craft effective policy for development, the rise of interest in development economics is not surprising. But apart from this practical importance, the foundational questions of development economics are also intellectually exciting. This course will give a fairly comprehensive account of modern development economics. We will cover the basics of development theory and policy. Fundamental to this are issues of definition and measurement, testing of theories, familiarity with problems of both short and long run, application of both micro and macroeconomics, interdisciplinary analysis, use of social benefit-cost analysis, and sources and uses of data for use as a country-desk officer of a bank or international agency.

Fall 2013 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS

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IPSG 8673 - Advanced Data Analysis      

The advanced data analysis course was designed to provide students with the opportunity to expand upon the skills developed in the introductory course (IPSG 8504), and introduce new skills that address a greater range of analytic needs. This is a project-based, applied course. Class discussions will include both how and why to use these tools, with a strong emphasis on policy applications. Among others, the course covers modules on Factor Analysis, Non-Linear Regression, Spatial Analysis and Time Series Analysis, and its design has a strong emphasis on policy applications. Multiple data sets will be used, but students are encouraged to use their own data and background knowledge.

Fall 2013 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS

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IPSG 8675 - Adv Topics in Policy Analysis      

WHY?

The course is designed to complete a full-cycle experience of research applied to policy processes, from conceptualization and design to effective deliverables. The sequence starts with the foundations offered in the Fall class, and continues with the field work in J-term. The Spring class delves deeper into the same relevant policy issues from the Fall and J-term, seeking to close the cycle with a report to stakeholders. While this report is not expected to be the final word on a complex policy issue, it should be more relevant and useful than could have been accomplished without the field research component.

WHAT?

• The main themes of the Spring class are additional theoretical/conceptual topics in design and policy analysis, as well as specific tools. Please keep in mind that not all tools will be applicable to all, or even perhaps any, of the specific projects chosen, but may be vital to future policy-relevant research and writing in your academic and professional careers.

• Hands-on analysis of the specific projects conducted in J-term, including further refining hypotheses to be tested, bolstering understanding of background materials and context, strengthening argumentation, analyzing data (from surveys, interviews, and/or other sources), and interjecting research findings effectively into the policymaking process.

HOW?

The hallmark of this class is the intersection of theoretical discussions (covering aspects of policy analysis and research methods, economic development and its measurement, data analysis and effective data presentation, etc.) and the practical imperative of the specific projects, carried over from the first two classes. Student’s ownership of their topics supports a creative environment, assisted by the full faculty team, in which students can produce high-level reports worthy of inclusion in their professional portfolios. Teams will continue their analysis of concrete policy issues in El Salvador, Monterey, and Peru, although the range of research and policy analysis skills and techniques taught will not be limited to those directly applicable to all of these projects. Final deliverables must satisfy your “client,” who may not be one of the course instructors.

Spring 2014 - MIIS, Spring 2015 - MIIS

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Extra Information

Education

PhD, Urban Planning/Regional Economics (University of California-Los Angeles),

MA, Urban Planning/International Development (University of Kansas);

Advanced Diploma Architecture (National University of San Juan, Argentina).

Publications

“The Washington Consensus: A Post Mortem” (with Robert McCleery), in Seiji Naya’s festschrift Forthcoming University of Hawaii Press.

“NAFTA and the Broader Impacts of Trade Agreements on Industrial Development: When ‘Second-Order  Effects’ Dominate (with Robert McCleery), in Plummer, M. (editor) Empirical Methods in International Trade: Essays in Honor of Mordechai (Max) Keinin. 2005. Edward Elgar Publisher.

"Bangladesh: Searching for a Workable Development Path," with Seiji Naya and Robert McCleery, Journal of East Asian Studies, No 3, December 2004:1-20.

“A New Frontier in 21st Century America.” A book review of Terra Incognita by Bowman, A. and Pagano, M. Public Organization Review 4 December 2004.

"Trade and the Location of Industries in the OECD and the European Union." Journal of Economic Geography 2, 2002 (with Michael Storper and Yun-Chung Chen).

Faculty Type
Regular Faculty
Dynamic Features
Course Catalog

Jeff Langholz

First Name
Jeff
Last Name
Langholz
Jeff Langholz, Professor, Image
Job Title
Professor
Location
214 McCone
Phone
831.647.6418
Language(s)
Español

I am passionate about: research and teaching that makes a difference and focuses on the "real world" rather than the "ivory tower"

What excites me about being a professor at MIIS: Our students and faculty are on fire! People here want to build a better world, and have the skills and knowledge to make it happen.

Faculty Program Tags
Short Programs & Research Centers
Course List

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

IEPG 8503 - Resrch Strategies for Env Pol      

Environmental policy-making requires high quality research at every stage of the process. This course introduces students to the design and implementation of research, with an emphasis on applied research into contemporary environmental policy problems.

Fall 2013 - MIIS, Fall 2015 - MIIS

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IEPG 8506 - Public Policy & the Environmnt      

This two-unit course provides a foundation in the paradigms, principles, and tools that shape public policy in the service of environmental protection and sustainable development. We will first explore the sources and dynamics of public policymaking and the fundamental principles of environmental policy, including sustainability, precaution and cost internalization. We will then examine three policy paradigms: 1) regulatory (command and control); 2) collaborative (stakeholder based); and 3) market-based. For each paradigm, we will consider case studies of global and national policy options for particular environmental problems, including forest degradation and carbon emissions. Examples of policy options include substantive and process standards; taxes; eco-system service payments; public investment; etc. Students will work in a team to produce a policy analysis of a major environmental problem.

Fall 2015 - MIIS

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IEPG 8530 - Biodiversity Policy&Management      

Course Description.

Protecting the world's living natural resources can be a confusing, complex endeavor. With so many threats to the natural world, where do you start? Fortunately, policy makers from 193 countries recently agreed on five major strategic goals to guide their efforts through the year 2020. They also agreed on twenty specific targets to accomplish by 2020. These priority goals and targets drive global nature conservation efforts and frame this course. From ranching, aquaculture, forestry, and sustainable agriculture to cutting edge technologies, the course examines the best and worst of both policy and management. Students who master these topics will maximize not just their career opportunities through 2020, but also their personal contribution to protecting important natural resources.

Learning Objectives

. By the end of the course, you should be able to describe best policy and management practices for the following five topics, which represent the global biodiversity priorities through the year 2020: 1) addressing the underlying causes of biodiversity loss by mainstreaming biodiversity across government and society (Strategic Goal A); 2) reducing the direct pressures on biodiversity and promoting sustainable use (Strategic Goal B); 3) improving the status of biodiversity by safeguarding ecosystems, species and genetic diversity (Strategic Goal C); 4) enhancing the benefits to all from biodiversity and ecosystem services (Strategic Goal D); and 5) enhancing implementation through participatory planning, knowledge management and capacity building (Strategic Goal E).

Spring 2014 - MIIS

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IEPG 8550 - SustainablityLeadrshpPracticum      

Course Description.

The world's natural resources continue to decline at an alarming rate despite decades of concerted conservation efforts. Reversing this trend will require going beyond traditional approaches. The Sustainability Leadership Practicum (SLP) helps meet this need by equipping future leaders with proven tools for disrupting the status quo. The curriculum focuses on skills that leading conservation practitioners identified as being most critical to their success in promoting more sustainable use of natural resources. Priority skills combine innovation, collaboration, and communication to create change on a sweeping scale, in a short time frame, and with limited financial resources.

Learning Goal & Objectives.

The course has a single overarching goal: to equip participants with the most critical skills needed to lead disruptive change for sustainable use of natural resources. Fourteen learning objectives support this goal, representing the broad areas of innovation, collaboration, and communication.

Spring 2015 - MIIS

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IEPG 8591 - Applied Conservation Science      

This course is about saving life on earth. It provides the scientific foundation required to formulate sound environmental policies capable of addressing human population growth, habitat destruction, resource overexploitation, and other anthropogenic factors that continue to undermine the earth’s ecological systems. The course focuses on scientific underpinnings of conserving the world’s remaining biological diversity (aka “biodiversity”). It draws from biology, ecology, and other natural sciences to deliver the broad scientific training that future policymakers need. As a short survey course, the goal is not to transform you into a biologist or an ecologist, but rather to equip you with the basic knowledge you need to understand how the natural world works, speak the language with confidence, and use science to develop sound environmental policy.

Spring 2014 - MIIS, Spring 2015 - MIIS

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IEPG 8616 - Environmntal Conflict Mgmt      

Environmental conflicts continue to rise in frequency and intensity across much of the world as populations grow and natural resources dwindle. The growing number of "resource wars" has convinced scholars and government leaders alike that environmental factors are critical to international security. Despite increased attention to the role that natural resources play in conflicts, a crippling information gap persists. Scholars know surprisingly little about the conditions under which fisheries, forests, wildlife, water, and other resources lead to (or exacerbate) conflict, let alone the best ways to prevent or resolve such conflicts. Growing demand exists for professionals who can analyze root causes of these conflicts and apply tools for resolving them. This course helps fill that demand. Using lectures, case studies, role plays, and simulations, it trains students in techniques for analyzing and resolving natural resource disputes worldwide.

Fall 2013 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS, Fall 2015 - MIIS

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IEPG 8664 - Conservatn Prjct Design & Eval      

A preponderance of scientific data show that fisheries, forests, freshwater, and other natural resources continue to decline across most of the world, and that conservation projects usually fail to accomplish their goals. This course addresses both of these complex problems. It delivers state of the art techniques for designing conservation projects that have the strongest possible chance of success, and evaluating the extent of that success. Examples include: knowing the conservation project cycle, assessing site conditions, developing management plans, and creating monitoring and evaluation plans. This "learn by doing" course emphasizes practice, especially through learning a conservation project management software program called Miradi. Although the course emphasizes site specific, in situ biodiversity conservation (i.e. protected natural areas), the skills and knowledge can apply to a wide range of environmental projects and programs.

Fall 2013 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS, Fall 2015 - MIIS

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MIIS Tags
Expertise

Biodiversity conservation, environmental conflict management, international environmental policy, protected natural areas, research methods, project design, program evaluation, social entrepreneurship, adaptive management, conservation leadership, sustainable development

Extra Information

Education

PhD, Natural Resource Policy and Management, Cornell University; BA, History, Dana College; MS, Sustainable Development and Conservation Biology University of Maryland

Selected Publications

Langholz, J. (forthcoming in 2014). Private Protected Areas: A Global Movement for Biodiversity Conservation and Sustainable Development. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

Langholz, J. and A. Abeles. 2014. Rethinking postgraduate education for marine conservation. Marine Policy 43(1):372–375.

Langholz, J., Sand, K., Raak, L., Berner, A., Anderson, H., Geels, B., McKeehan, A., and A. Nelsen. 2013. Strategies and tactics for managing environmental conflicts: Insights from Goldman Environmental Prize recipients. Journal of Natural Resources Policy Research, 5(1): 1-17.

Langholz, J. and M. Jay-Russell. 2013. The potential role of wildlife in pathogenic contamination of fresh produce. Human-Wildlife Interactions 7(1):140–157.

Gennet S., Howard J., Langholz J., Andrews K., Reynolds M., and S. Morrison. 2013. Farm practices for food safety: An emerging threat to floodplain and riparian ecosystems. Frontiers in Ecology & Environment; doi:10.1890/120243.

Langholz, J. and F. DePaolis. 2013. Economic Contributions of Santa Cruz County Agriculture. Office of the Agricultural Commissioner, Santa Cruzy County, CA.

Langholz, J. and F. DePaolis. 2013. Economic Contributions of San Luis Obispo County Agriculture. Office of the Agricultural Commissioner, San Luis Obispo County, CA.

Langholz, J. and F. DePaolis. 2012. Economic Contributions of Monterey County Agriculture. Office of the Agricultural Commissioner, Monterey County, CA.

Langholz, J. 2010. Global Trends in Private Protected Areas and Their Implications for the Northern Great Plains. Great Plains Research 20(1): 9-16.

Lowell, K., Langholz, J. and D. Stuart. 2010. Safe and Sustainable: Co-Managing for Food Safety and Ecological Health in California’s Central Coast Region. Georgetown University and The Nature Conservancy. 131 pp.

Langholz, J. 2009. Saving Species, Privately. World Watch Magazine 22(5):7-11.

Langholz, J. and K. Turner. 2008. You Can Prevent Global Warming (and Save Money!): 51 Easy Ways (2nd Edition). Kansas City: Andrews McMeel Publishing.

Sims-Castley, R., G. Kerley, B. Geach, and J. Langholz. 2006. Socio-economic significance of ecotourism-based private game reserves in South Africa’s Eastern Cape Province. PARKS 15:2, 6-15.

Langholz, J. and Krug, W.  2004. New Forms of Biodiversity Governance: Non-State Actors and the Private Protected Area Action Plan.  Journal of International Wildlife Law & Policy 7:9-29.

Langholz, J. 2004. Forest Recreation on Private Lands. In: Encyclopedia of Life Support Systems. New York: United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO).

Langholz, J. 2004. Lessons from Global Climate Change: A Proposed Kyoto Protocol for the World’s Oceans. Pages 43-58, In:  S. Uno, T. Katsumura, and H. Imaoka (editors), Development of Marine Resources and Ocean Governance: The Environment of Coastal Regions along the Sea of Japan. Hamada, Japan: University of Shimane Press.

Langholz, J. and K. Turner. 2003. You Can Prevent Global Warming (and Save Money!): 51 Easy Ways. Kansas City: Andrews McMeel Publishing.

Langholz, J. 2003. Privatizing Conservation. Pages 117-135, In: S. Brechin, P. Wilshusen, P. West, and C. Fortwangler (editors), Contested Nature: Promoting International Biodiversity with Social Justice in the 21st Century. New York: State University of New York Press.

Langholz, J. 2002. Privately Owned Parks. Pages 172-188, In: J. Terborgh, C. van Schaik, L. Davenport, and M. Rao (editors), Making Parks Work: Strategies for Preserving Tropical Forests. Covelo, CA: Island Press.

Langholz, J.  2002. External Partnering for the Triple Bottom Line: People, Profits, and the Protection of Biodiversity. Corporate Environmental Strategy 9(1):1-10.

Kramer, R., Langholz, J. and N. Salafsky. 2002. The Role of the Private Sector in Protected Area Establishment and Management: A Conceptual Framework for Analyzing Effectiveness. Pages 335-351, In: J. Terborgh, C. van Schaik, L. Davenport, and M. Rao (editors), Making Parks Work: Strategies for Preserving Tropical Forests. Covelo, CA: Island Press.

Langholz, J., and J. Lassoie. 2002. Combining Conservation and Development on Private Lands: Lessons from Costa Rica. Environment, Development, and Sustainability.

Langholz, J. and K. Brandon. 2001.  Ecotourism and Privately Owned Protected Areas. Pages 303-314, In: D. Weaver (editor), The Encyclopedia of Ecotourism. Oxon, United Kingdom: CAB International.

Langholz, J., and  J. Lassoie. 2001. Perils and Promise of Privately Owned Protected Areas. BioScience 51(12):1079-1085.

Langholz, J., J. Lassoie, and J. Schelhas. 2000. Incentives for Biodiversity Conservation: Lessons from Costa Rica’s Private Wildlife Refuge Program. Conservation Biology 14(6): 1735-1743.

Langholz, J., J. Lassoie, D. Lee, and D. Chapman. 2000. Economic Considerations of Privately Owned Parks. Ecological Economics 33(2):173-183.

Langholz, J. 1999. Exploring the Effects of Alternative Income Opportunities on Rainforest Use: Insights from Guatemala’s Maya Biosphere Reserve. Society and Natural Resources 12:139-149.

Uphoff, N., and J. Langholz. 1998. Incentives for Avoiding the Tragedy of the Commons.  Environmental Conservation 25(3): 251-261.

Langholz, J. 1996. Economics, Objectives, and Success of Private Nature Reserves in Sub-Saharan Africa and Latin America. Conservation Biology 10(1):271-280.

Langholz, J. 1996. Ecotourism Impact at Independently Owned Nature Reserves in Latin America and Sub-Saharan Africa.  In:  Miller, Joseph and E.Malek-Zadeh (editors), The Ecotourism Equation: Measuring the Impacts. New Haven, CT: Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies Bulletin Series, No.99

Faculty Type
Regular Faculty
Dynamic Features
Course Catalog

Lyuba Zarsky

First Name
Lyuba
Last Name
Zarsky
Lyuba Zarsky, Professor, Image
Job Title
Associate Professor
Location
McGowan 320B
Phone
831.647.6436
Language(s)
Español

Professor Zarsky has a PhD in Economics and has a distinguished record of professional experience and publication in the fields of sustainable development and business and sustainability.

Faculty Program Tags
Short Programs & Research Centers
Course List

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

IEPG 8507 - Governing the Global Commons      

For most of human history, global commons have been utilized as open access resources. In the past fifty years, rapid economic development, globalization, and population growth have severely degraded the commons and the eco-system services they provide. To sustainably govern the global commons—to move from open access to common pool resource—requires global collective action. Nation-states have traditionally been understood as taking the lead by negotiating and implementing multilateral international environmental treaties. More recently, however, non-state actors and governments at regional and sub-national level are becoming engaged in multilateral governance and/or taking incremental actions to govern the global commons.

This course examines the emerging multi-level governance of three global commons: 1) the atmosphere; 2) the ocean; and 3) the global economy.

Part One focuses on the governance of the atmospheric commons. It first explores the theoretical underpinnings of commons governance and the policy options they imply. We start with Hardin’s “tragedy” framework which points to state regulation and/or private markets, and then probe Elinor Ostrom’s framework which highlights the possibility of robust institutions of collective self-governance. Given the lack of an overarching global government, governing the global commons is inherently a process of collective self-governance.

After a brief examination of climate science, we probe the emerging multi-level climate regime, the overarching goal of which is to de-carbonise the global economy. We focus first on the history, architecture, North-South dynamics and challenges of international climate negotiations under the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). We then turn to multi-level approaches to setting a carbon price, including via global carbon markets; regional, national and sub-national cap and trade systems; and business and financial market risk assessment and disclosure. We will explore how responses to climate change are challenging our existing paradigms of international, national and statewide authority and jurisdiction, as well as traditional concepts of environmental risk and liability. Part Two concludes with an in-class debate about how to overcome North-South differences over emission reduction responsibility in the design of a global treaty in the lead-up to the December, 2015 climate conference in Paris.

Part Two focuses on the governance of the global oceans commons, with a focus on the role of international cooperation to reduce marine pollution. We first examine the process of negotiating and implementing international environmental agreements. We then examine the key treaties governing marine pollution. After a brief introduction to the Law of the Sea and MARPOL, we take an in-depth look at the structure, dynamics and implementation of the London Convention. The London Convention is characterized not only by the active participation of nation-states but also by a high degree of stakeholder engagement, including shipping companies and port authorities. We conclude with a look at emerging issues in the governance of marine pollution, including land-based sources and the regional governance of the Arctic.

Part Three focuses on the global economic commons. We first consider the linkages between globalization and sustainable development and then explore existing and evolving approaches to trade and investment rules which hinder or promote de-carbonisation, or more broadly, externalize or internalize environmental costs and risks.

Fall 2013 - MIIS, Spring 2015 - MIIS

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IEPG 8598 - Business,Sustainablity&Society      

This course provides a foundation in the core concepts and strategic management tools in the dynamic field of global business sustainability. The central aim of the course is to prepare students to design and lead sustainability innovations in or in partnership with global business organizations. Students will work in teams to produce a sustainability strategy for a global corporation.

The course covers six key topics:

• Global sustainability challenges and the role of business in responding to them;

• New social expectations of business and the promise and limitations of corporate social responsibility;

• Sustainability as global business strategy and opportunity;

• Business opportunity and challenges in promoting development in poor markets;

• Managing sustainability, including performance metrics, partnerships, and financing

• Public policy innovations that support business sustainability.

Fall 2013 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS

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IEPG 8611 - Sustainable Coastal Management      

The coast is the most dynamic landscape on earth. It changes every time a wave breaks, a tide changes, or streams flow. About seventy percent of the world’s population lives within 100 km of the coast. This course provides a foundation in the core scientific principles, governance frameworks, and economic challenges and opportunities related to the quest for sustainable coastal management and adaptation. A central theme of the course is the need to assess and respond to coastal climate vulnerability, including via adaptive policy and planning at diverse scales of coastal governance. The case studies in the course encompass both developed and less developed countries, and an emphasis on management of large coastal cities, coastal ecosystems, and other coastal land-uses.

Fall 2014 - MIIS, Fall 2015 - MIIS

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IEPG 8620 - Sustainablility Reporting      

Fall 2015 - MIIS

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IEPG 8623 - Sem:Bus Models for Sustain Dev      

This seminar explores the growing role of the private sector in promoting sustainable development goals in low and middle income countries through core business activities. The overarching aim of such business models is to reduce poverty and promote sustainability by: 1) stimulating access to global markets and supply chains; 2) delivering affordable and sustainable goods and services; 3) responding to the demands of climate change mitigation and adaptation; and/or 4) promoting local capacities for sustainable production. The seminar will examine case studies of five business models, ranging from small-scale, for-profit and non-profit enterprises to partnerships between multinational corporations and NGOs and/or development agencies. Students will work in teams to undertake their own case studies. Together, we will seek to draw lessons for scalability.

Spring 2015 - MIIS

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IEPG 9530 - Business and Global Issues      

Whether in business, government, or NGOs, leadership requires honing the ability to make strategic decisions in a complex, dynamic and high-risk global context -- and often in high-pressure, short-deadline work environments. This Workshop will provide students a rich and realistic opportunity to work in just such an environment.

The Workshop will provide participants with a wealth of complicated material in a variety of formats related to our case: Goldcorp’s highly conflicted Marlin gold mine in Guatemala. Students will be familiar with the case materials prior to the first meeting of the Workshop; the initial class will, through a series of group exercises, provide a platform for addressing issues of economic development, environmental risk, human rights, government policy, global business norms, chronic violence, and international trade and investment rules. How those dimensions are prioritized, conceptualized and understood will largely be student-driven, with the instructors playing a supportive role. Students will then be encouraged to explore, adapt and apply “solution” methodologies, which could include cost-benefit, risk assessment, and risk-performance analyses, scenario creation, deliberative stakeholder engagement, and supply chain reconfiguration.

Students will work in groups to combine issue knowledge and problem-solving methods to define and evaluate strategic options for different players—the company, the government, and the local communities and their NGO allies. This group work will largely be carried out in the lapse between the two class meetings; students will draw upon the expertise of GSIPM faculty (and possibly others) as needed. The second class meeting will end with a series of group presentations of their proposed solutions to the case problem, and a comparative assessment of the proposals by students and faculty.

The Workshop pilots an innovative “raw” case-study pedagogical approach to understand urgent global issues and build competencies to frame and address them. Our hope is to incorporate the lessons of this workshop to scale this approach up to a regular 2-credit course in the Fall, 2014 semester.

Spring 2014 - MIIS

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IPMG 8530 - Business and Global Issues      

Whether in business, government, or NGOs, leadership requires honing the ability to make strategic decisions in a complex, dynamic and high-risk global context -- and often in high-pressure, short-deadline work environments. This Workshop will provide students a rich and realistic opportunity to work in just such an environment.

The Workshop will provide participants with a wealth of complicated material in a variety of formats related to our case: Goldcorp’s highly conflicted Marlin gold mine in Guatemala. Students will be familiar with the case materials prior to the first meeting of the Workshop; the initial class will, through a series of group exercises, provide a platform for addressing issues of economic development, environmental risk, human rights, government policy, global business norms, chronic violence, and international trade and investment rules. How those dimensions are prioritized, conceptualized and understood will largely be student-driven, with the instructors playing a supportive role. Students will then be encouraged to explore, adapt and apply “solution” methodologies, which could include cost-benefit, risk assessment, and risk-performance analyses, scenario creation, deliberative stakeholder engagement, and supply chain reconfiguration.

Students will work in groups to combine issue knowledge and problem-solving methods to define and evaluate strategic options for different players—the company, the government, and the local communities and their NGO allies. This group work will largely be carried out in the lapse between the two class meetings; students will draw upon the expertise of GSIPM faculty (and possibly others) as needed. The second class meeting will end with a series of group presentations of their proposed solutions to the case problem, and a comparative assessment of the proposals by students and faculty.

The Workshop pilots an innovative “raw” case-study pedagogical approach to understand urgent global issues and build competencies to frame and address them. Our hope is to incorporate the lessons of this workshop to scale this approach up to a regular 2-credit course in the Fall, 2014 semester.

Spring 2014 - MIIS

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IPSG 9530 - Business and Global Issues      

Whether in business, government, or NGOs, leadership requires honing the ability to make strategic decisions in a complex, dynamic and high-risk global context -- and often in high-pressure, short-deadline work environments. This Workshop will provide students a rich and realistic opportunity to work in just such an environment.

The Workshop will provide participants with a wealth of complicated material in a variety of formats related to our case: Goldcorp’s highly conflicted Marlin gold mine in Guatemala. Students will be familiar with the case materials prior to the first meeting of the Workshop; the initial class will, through a series of group exercises, provide a platform for addressing issues of economic development, environmental risk, human rights, government policy, global business norms, chronic violence, and international trade and investment rules. How those dimensions are prioritized, conceptualized and understood will largely be student-driven, with the instructors playing a supportive role. Students will then be encouraged to explore, adapt and apply “solution” methodologies, which could include cost-benefit, risk assessment, and risk-performance analyses, scenario creation, deliberative stakeholder engagement, and supply chain reconfiguration.

Students will work in groups to combine issue knowledge and problem-solving methods to define and evaluate strategic options for different players—the company, the government, and the local communities and their NGO allies. This group work will largely be carried out in the lapse between the two class meetings; students will draw upon the expertise of GSIPM faculty (and possibly others) as needed. The second class meeting will end with a series of group presentations of their proposed solutions to the case problem, and a comparative assessment of the proposals by students and faculty.

The Workshop pilots an innovative “raw” case-study pedagogical approach to understand urgent global issues and build competencies to frame and address them. Our hope is to incorporate the lessons of this workshop to scale this approach up to a regular 2-credit course in the Fall, 2014 semester.

Spring 2014 - MIIS

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MBAG 9530 - Business and Global Issues      

Whether in business, government, or NGOs, leadership requires honing the ability to make strategic decisions in a complex, dynamic and high-risk global context -- and often in high-pressure, short-deadline work environments. This Workshop will provide students a rich and realistic opportunity to work in just such an environment.

The Workshop will provide participants with a wealth of complicated material in a variety of formats related to our case: Goldcorp’s highly conflicted Marlin gold mine in Guatemala. Students will be familiar with the case materials prior to the first meeting of the Workshop; the initial class will, through a series of group exercises, provide a platform for addressing issues of economic development, environmental risk, human rights, government policy, global business norms, chronic violence, and international trade and investment rules. How those dimensions are prioritized, conceptualized and understood will largely be student-driven, with the instructors playing a supportive role. Students will then be encouraged to explore, adapt and apply “solution” methodologies, which could include cost-benefit, risk assessment, and risk-performance analyses, scenario creation, deliberative stakeholder engagement, and supply chain reconfiguration.

Students will work in groups to combine issue knowledge and problem-solving methods to define and evaluate strategic options for different players—the company, the government, and the local communities and their NGO allies. This group work will largely be carried out in the lapse between the two class meetings; students will draw upon the expertise of GSIPM faculty (and possibly others) as needed. The second class meeting will end with a series of group presentations of their proposed solutions to the case problem, and a comparative assessment of the proposals by students and faculty.

The Workshop pilots an innovative “raw” case-study pedagogical approach to understand urgent global issues and build competencies to frame and address them. Our hope is to incorporate the lessons of this workshop to scale this approach up to a regular 2-credit course in the Fall, 2014 semester.

Spring 2014 - MIIS

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MBAG 9614 - Business,Sustainablity&Society      

This course provides a foundation in the core concepts and strategic management tools in the dynamic field of global business sustainability. The central aim of the course is to prepare students to design and lead sustainability innovations in or in partnership with global business organizations. Students will work in teams to produce a sustainability strategy for a global corporation.

The course covers six key topics:

• Global sustainability challenges and the role of business in responding to them;

• New social expectations of business and the promise and limitations of corporate social responsibility;

• Sustainability as global business strategy and opportunity;

• Business opportunity and challenges in promoting development in poor markets;

• Managing sustainability, including performance metrics, partnerships, and financing

• Public policy innovations that support business sustainability.

Fall 2013 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS

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MBAG 9620 - Sustainablility Reporting      

Fall 2015 - MIIS

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MBAG 9623 - Sem:Bus Models for Sustain Dev      

This seminar explores the growing role of the private sector in promoting sustainable development goals in low and middle income countries through core business activities. The overarching aim of such business models is to reduce poverty and promote sustainability by: 1) stimulating access to global markets and supply chains; 2) delivering affordable and sustainable goods and services; 3) responding to the demands of climate change mitigation and adaptation; and/or 4) promoting local capacities for sustainable production. The seminar will examine case studies of five business models, ranging from small-scale, for-profit and non-profit enterprises to partnerships between multinational corporations and NGOs and/or development agencies. Students will work in teams to undertake their own case studies. Together, we will seek to draw lessons for scalability.

Spring 2015 - MIIS

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MIIS Tags
Expertise

Sustainable development, business and sustainability, foreign direct investment and the environment, collaborative governance, development economics, global environmental governance. 

Video interview of Dr. Zarsky

Extra Information

Education

Ph.D. Department of Economics, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, 2006; M.A. Economics, Department of Economics and Political Economy, New School for Social Research, New York 1986.

Publications

Can extractive industries promote sustainable development? A net benefits framework and a case study of the Marlin Mine in Guatemala, (co-author), Journal of Environment and Development, 20(2), 131-154, April, 2013.

Extractive industries and local communities: the elusive search for sustainable development, World Policy Review, July, 2013, available at http://www.worldpoliticsreview.com.

Searching for Gold in the Highlands of Guatemala: Economic Benefits and Environmental Risks of the Marlin Mine, (co-author), Global Development and Environment Institute, September, 2011.

"Climate Resilient Industrial Development: Design Principles and Alternative Models", in S.R. Khan and J. Christiansen, ed., Towards New Developmentalism: Market as Means Rather than Master, Routledge Economics, 2010.

Enclave Economy: Foreign Investment and Sustainable Development in Mexico’s Silicon Valley (co-author), Boston: MIT Press, 2007.

“No Miracle Drug: Foreign Direct Investment and Sustainable Development” (co-author), in L. Zarsky (ed.), International Investment for Sustainable Development: Balancing Rights and Rewards, London: Earthscan Press, 2005.

International Investment for Sustainable Development: Balancing Rights and Rewards (contributing editor), London: Earthscan Press, 2005.

“Stuck in the Mud? Nation-States, Globalisation and the Environment," in OECD, Globalisation and the Environment, Paris: OECD, 1997. Reprinted in K. Gallagher and J. Werksman (eds.), Earthscan Reader on International Trade and Sustainable Development, London:  Earthscan Press, 2002, pp. 19-44; and in  K. Conca and G. Dabelko, Green Planet Blues, Environmental Politics from Stockholm to Johannesberg, Westview Press, 2004.

Human Rights and the Environment: Conflicts and Norms in a Globalizing World (contributing editor) London: Earthscan Press, 2002.

Beyond Good Deeds: Case Studies and A New Policy Agenda for Corporate Accountability (co-author), Berkeley: Natural Heritage Institute, July 2002.

“APEC and the ‘Sustainable Development’ Agenda,’ in R. Steinberg (ed.), The Greening of Trade Law, Rowman and Littlefield, 2002.

“Global Reach: Human Rights and Environment in the Framework of Corporate Accountability,” in L. Zarsky (ed.), Human Rights and Environment: Conflicts and Norms in a Globalizing World, London: Earthscan Press, 2002, pp. 31-56.

“Civil Society and the Future of Environmental Governance in Asia,” (co-author), in D. Angel and M. Rock, (eds.), Asia's Clean Revolution: Industry, Growth and the Environment, Greenleaf Publishing, 2001, pp.128-154.

“From Bystanders to Collaborators, New Roles for Civil Society in Urban-Industrial Environmental Governance,” in Asian Development Bank, Asian Environment Outlook, Manila:  ADB, 2001.

“Environmental Norms in the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation Forum,” in D. Shelton (ed.), Commitment and Compliance, The Role of Non-Binding Norms in the International Legal System, New York: Oxford University Press, 2000, pp. 303-329.

“Havens, Halos, and Spaghetti: Untangling the Evidence About FDI and the Environment,” in OECD, Foreign Direct Investment and the Environment, Paris: OECD,  1999, pp. 47-74.

"Energy and the Environment in Asia-Pacific,” in P. Chasek, (ed.), The Global Environment in the 21st Century, Tokyo: United Nations University Press, 1999.

"Lessons of Liberalization in Asia: From Structural Adjustment to Sustainable Development," in Financing for Environmentally Sustainable Development,  Asian Development Bank: Manila, 1994.

“Towards an International Eco-Labeling Framework,” in OECD, Life Cycle Management and Trade, Paris: OECD, 1994, pp. 194-204.

“Sustainable Development: Challenges for Australia,” in Our Common Future, Australian Edition, Melbourne: Oxford University Press, 1990. Also published as a monograph by the Commission for the Future, Melbourne, February, 1990.

Faculty Type
Regular Faculty
Dynamic Features
Course Catalog