Middlebury Institute of International Studies at Monterey. Formerly the Monterey Institute of International Studies

ExecEd Program

Robert Shaw

First Name
Robert
Last Name
Shaw
Robert Shaw, Picture
Job Title
Research Associate and Export Control Instructor
Location
CNS Building
City, State, ZIP
Monterey, California
Phone
831-647-6576

Robert Shaw is a Research Associate and Export Control Instructor in the East Asia Nonproliferation Program (EANP) at CNS. His research interests include export controls, WMD-related trafficking and supply chain networks, and Northeast Asian security issues. In 2010, Robert assisted with the curriculum development for the CNS-supported Asia Export Control Fellows Program, and he has written on the response of regional export control systems to illicit North Korean WMD-related procurement networks.

Short Programs & Research Centers
Expertise

Nuclear nonproliferation, export controls, WMD-related trafficking and supply chain networks, and Northeast Asian security issues. In 2010, Robert assisted with the curriculum development for the CNS-supported Asia Export Control Fellows Program, and he has written on the response of regional export control systems to illicit North Korean WMD-related procurement networks.

Faculty Type
Adjunct Faculty

Stephanie Lieggi

First Name
Stephanie
Last Name
Lieggi
lieggi
Job Title
Executive Education Program Instructor
Location
CNS Building 202
City, State, ZIP
Monterey, California
Phone
831-647-6697

Stephanie Lieggi is a Research Associate in the Center for Nonproliferation Studies in the East Asia Nonproliferation Program. Her research interests have included U.S.-China bilateral relations, WMD-related developments in China, Beijing's space program, as well as China's nonproliferation and export control policies. Since 2004, Stephanie has worked on CNS export control-related publications, first as managing editor of the Asian Export Control Observer and later as Associate Editor-in-Chief of the International Export Control Observer.

Expertise

Nuclear nonproliferation, U.S.-China bilateral relations, export control policies, illicit smuggling

Short Programs & Research Centers
Faculty Type
Adjunct Faculty

Amb. Alan Wm. Wolff

First Name
Alan
Last Name
Wolff
Alan Wolff
Job Title
Distinguished Research Professor, Graduate School of International Policy & Management, Director, International Trade & Development Policy Initiative; former Deputy USTR, CEO of the National Foreign Trade Counsel; Senior Counsel, McKenna, Long & Aldrich
Location
Casa Fuente 437F
City, State, ZIP
Monterey, CA 93940
Phone
831.647.3572

Ambassador Alan Wolff has a distinguished career of public service that spans the fields of international trade, legislative and public policy and litigation with a special emphasis on the renewable and clean energy industry. He currently leads Dewey & LeBoeuf's International Trade Practice Group, which has been credited with helping to open international markets for American products including semiconductors, computer parts, telecommunications equipment, soda ash and forest products, consumer photographic film and paper, and insurance and other services. Mr.

Short Programs & Research Centers
Faculty Program Tags
Course List
Expertise

International Trade, Legislative and Public Policy, Finance Law, Renewable and Clean Energy

Extra Information

Education

J.D. Columbia University Law School

B.A. Harvard University

Publications

Books/Articles

  • China’s New Anti-Monopoly Law, A Perspective from the United States, Pacific Rim Law and Policy Review. U of Washington Law School, Co-author with T. Howell, R. Howe, D. Oh, January 2009.
  • Remedy in WTO Dispute Settlement, in The WTO: Governance, Dispute Settlement & Developing Countries, Merit E. Janow, Victoria Donaldson, Alan Yanovich, Editors, Columbia University, January 2008.
  • China’s Drive Toward Innovation, in Issues in Science and Technology, National Academy of Sciences and University of Texas at Austin, (Spring 2007)
  • America's Ability to Achieve its Commercial Objectives and the Operation of the WTO, 91 LAW 8c Law and Policy in International Business 1013 (2000).

Publications

  • The International Trading System and the Environment. Monterey Institute for International Studies, April 17, 2009
  • Chinese Promotional Policies and the Protection of Intellectual Property, U.S. Chamber of Commerce, March 27, 2009
  • Chinese Industrial Policies and their Impact on U.S.Industry, U.S. Economic and Security Review Commission, March 27, 2009
  • Working paper, "U.S. Trade Policies Toward China" (10/15/2008).
  • "Investment Conference: Frameworks to Ensure Open Investment Regimes," U.S. Chamber of Commerce, National Bureau of Research, Washington, DC (09/16/2008).
  • "Standards & IPR in China," U.S. Patent and Trademark Office Conference, Arlington, VA (6/30/08).
  • "Standards & Innovation in China: Public Policy and the Role of Stakeholders," U.S. Chamber of Commerce, National Bureau of Research, Washington, DC (5/8/2008).
  • University of Illinois at Champaign-Urbana, "The Changing Role of Intellectual Property in Asia: National Innovation Policies of India and China" (March 7, 2008).
  • Japan Commerce Association of Washington, DC, "China's Innovation Drive - Implications for Japanese Companies" (February 27, 2008.)
  • U.S. National Academy of Sciences, New Delhi, India, "Innovation Policies in the United States, China and India" (December 2007).
  • The Global Business Dialogue, Inc., Washington, DC, "Responses to the Doha Chairman's Paper on Rules - Remarks on the Valles Rules Negotiation Text, (December 2007).
  • OECD – Ministry of Science and Technology (MOST), Conference on the Review of China's National Innovation System and Policy, "China's National Innovation System: A Foreign Business Perspective", Beijing, China, (August 27, 2007).
  • U.S. National Academy of Sciences and the Government of Belgium, Conference on Regional and National Innovation, "China’s Drive Toward Innovation" (September 21, 2006).
  • Presentation to the Beijing Lawyers Association, "U.S. Trade Remedies" (June 13, 2006).
  • WTO at 10 Conference, "Remedy in WTO Dispute Settlement" (April 7, 2006).
  • The Center for American and International Law, "China’s Compliance with Its WTO Obligations" (June 15, 2005).
Faculty Type
Regular Faculty
Dynamic Features
Course Catalog

Moyara Ruehsen

First Name
Moyara
Last Name
Ruehsen
Moyara Ruehsen
Job Title
Associate Professor
Location
213 McCone
Phone
831.647.4145
Language(s)
العربية
Français

I am passionate about capacity building in the areas of financial regulatory compliance and investigations, and public policies related to illicit markets as well as the macro-economy.  While my research and consulting work can be invigorating, my first love will always be teaching.  I hope to convey my own passion for these subjects to my students and inspire them to go out and explore new career paths they might not have considered when they first began their studies here.

MIIS Tags
Short Programs & Research Centers
Expertise

Money laundering, terrorism financing, corruption, asset recovery,  illegal drug markets, and international macro-economy.

Prof. Ruehsen speaks on euro crisis May 2010

Course List

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

DPPG 8521 - Currncy CapitalFlows&FinCrises      

In this course, students will learn to recognize the predisposing factors of a financial crisis and policy options for optimal financial crisis management by looking at historical case studies. But first, we will look at how the ForEx market works, who are the different players, how are typical transactions structured, different exchange rate regimes (e.g. pegs, crawling bands, free floats, monetary union), factors influencing exchange rate determination, balance of payments, and sovereign debt sustainability. In the second half of the semester, we will parse multiple financial crises from both emerging markets and OECD economies. In addition to readings related to cases, students will also have regular reading assignments of current events. Learning how to discuss and explain monetary topics, and using economic jargon in an appropriate fashion, requires regular practice. It is similar to learning a foreign language, which is why readings should be done in a timely fashion.

Fall 2015 - MIIS

More Information »

ECPR 8501 - Economics Preparation-Macro      

This intensive course in introductory macroeconomics places emphasis on the fundamental principles necessary for success in International Economics II (IPSG 8503), Development Economics (IPSG 8551) and is strongly recommended for Money Laundering & AML Policies (IPSG 8581).

In this course, we examine how the overall level of national economic activity is determined, including output, employment, and inflation. We explore the roles of monetary and fiscal policies in stabilizing the economy and promoting growth, with a focus on contemporary policy debates.

Summer 2013 - MIIS, Spring 2014 - MIIS, Summer 2014 - MIIS, Spring 2015 - MIIS

More Information »

IPSG 8503 - IntEconIICurrncyCashFlowCrises      

This course focuses on international monetary theory and exchange rate determination, as well as macroeconomic policymaking in an open economy. Topics include balance of payments analysis, currency and debt crises, exchange rate regimes such as monetary unions, and more.

Fall 2013 - MIIS, Spring 2014 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS

More Information »

IPSG 8581 / IPSG 8582 - MoneyLaundering & AML Policies      

This course provides an introduction to money laundering and serves as a foundation for any of the related follow-up workshops and courses. Topics covered include the three typical stages of money laundering (placement, layering, integration), how to spot “red flag” indicators, trade-based money laundering techniques (false trade invoicing, use of high-value metals, black market peso exchange), misuse of informal value transfer systems, monitoring politically exposed persons, FIU’s and the Egmont Group, and finally global anti-corruption compliance and enforcement. Capital flows and payment methods will also be scrutinized, so an introductory Macroeconomics course is _strongly_ recommended. The goal of this workshop and the three that follow, is to prepare students to take and pass the Certification for Financial Crime Specialists (CFCS).

Spring 2014 - MIIS, Spring 2015 - MIIS

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IPSG 8583 - FraudDetctnTaxEvasnAssetRecvry      

This is the third installment of the CFCS preparation series. Topics covered include understanding and recognizing different types of financial fraud, tax evasion vs. tax avoidance, the use of offshore entities, FATCA, different types of asset recovery tools, and how to trace, forfeit and repatriate assets.

Spring 2014 - MIIS, Spring 2015 - MIIS

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IPSG 8584 - FinCrimeInvst,CompliancBstPrct      

This is the fourth and final installment of the CFCS preparation series. Topics covered include laws and investigative techniques for financial crime investigations, how to interpret financial documents, the risk-based approach to compliance, Basel Committee Guidance, Wolfsberg Group recommendations, KYC, KYE, compliance monitoring systems, ethics and best practices.

Spring 2014 - MIIS, Spring 2015 - MIIS

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IPSG 8595 - AdvPublcSpkngForPolicyProfsnls      

Public Speaking for Policy Professionals is an intensive, interactive workshop that will provide you with the basics for making skilled and professional presentations in a variety of venues. Our work together will provide you with the foundation to not only hone your skills, but will offer you practical tools for making expert presentations in other academic and professional venues.

In order to promote your effectiveness as a presenter, you will be called upon to participate in various activities and discussions that require both individual and team considerations. This will include group collaboration on a presentation in our workshop setting, as well as individual attention to your public speaking skills, including use of visual support tools. It is my explicit aim to help you become better presenters by providing you with skills and models to use for your professional development.

By the end of the workshop, you should have a greater understanding of how to present effectively and professionally as an individual and as a team. You should also garner critical tools to develop and hone your language and delivery skills, including non-verbal aspects, effectively organize and create interesting content, and expertly utilize visual support tools.

Fall 2013 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS

More Information »

IPSG 8608 - Sem:Topics in Devp: Corruption      

Corruption is a cancer that thwarts both political and economic development throughout the world. With the U.N. Convention on Corruption and now that corruption is a predicate offense for money laundering, it is easier to recover stolen assets that corrupt leaders and their associates have moved overseas. This course will look at the efforts underway to recover and return these stolen assets. For the final project, students will produce a 15-20 minute documentary looking at a case study of their choice. No prior film editing experience is needed (there will be tutorials provided by the DLC), but it helps.

Fall 2014 - MIIS

More Information »

IPSG 8613 - Sem: Illicit Drug Markets      

This course is divided into two segments. The first segment of the course covers illegal drug markets along their entire transaction chain from the growing regions of Latin America and Asia to the end-user markets. Emphasis is placed on the international markets for cocaine, heroin, and methamphetamines, and the negative impacts of trafficking and use. The second segment examines the cost-effectiveness and viability of different supply and demand strategies, ranging from crop eradication and border interdiction to treatment and prevention.

Spring 2015 - MIIS

More Information »

IPSG 8619 - Sem:Econ Anlysis:Emerging Mkts      

This seminar is designed to provide students with critical skills in the area of economic analysis and writing. It will also be an opportunity to go into more depth on several important economic policy issues such as sovereign debt, foreign direct investment, capital account liberalization, trade liberalization and facilitation, and exchange rate policy. Students will pick one country and write an extensive economic analysis of that country by way of several assignments during the course of the semester.

Fall 2013 - MIIS

More Information »

IPSG 8662 - Advanced Terrorism Financing      

This course is a follow-up to the two workshops on Money Laundering and Terrorism Financing. It will go beyond the techniques that terrorists groups use to raise and move funds, and focus on strategies employed to stop them. We will also examine specific case studies, including proliferation financing cases and the use of non-profits.

Spring 2014 - MIIS

More Information »

IPSS 8675 - IPSS Field Deliverables      

During their IPSS internships students complete applied academic deliverables for which they earn six academic credits. The academic credit is not awarded for the internship itself, but for the work that applies students’ academic training to contribute to their host organizations’ mission in area of student’s career interest. The letter grades will be assigned based on the assessment of the following four deliverables:

IPSS Field Project: By the end of their internships students must have completed an ambitious project or other relatively autonomous contribution that presents value for the host organization and builds on students’ strengths and advances his/her skills and knowledge. The field project can take the form of a policy or consultancy report, evaluation, analysis, a website, or other substantive contribution to their host organization that integrates high quality research, analysis, and other skills and subject-matter knowledge. Faculty with relevant expertise and assigned peers will provide every student regular feedback on the major steps of the field project. Student’s regular internship responsibilities ideally should overlap with, but are not limited to the core field assignment. The organizations receiving interns are encouraged to help students identify such assignments prior to their arrival or at the very latest within one month after the start of student’s internship. The organization should provide assistance and guidance in completing this assignment.

Presentation: In the final part of the internship students will present on their field project to their colleagues at their host organizations. The video recording of that presentation will be then reviewed by the MIIS faculty who will invite students for Q&A and also provide additional feedback to students to improve the quality of their final deliverable(s).

Peer feedback: Interns will collaborate with their assigned peers by providing mutual peer feedback on their core field assignments to improve the quality of their work and learn from each other.

Final reflection: Interns will submit a final reflection to IPSS faculty and staff near the end of their internship- summarizing their most important insights and lessons they obtained from the internship experience for their professional and academic development.

Optional: Students are also highly encouraged to blog about their reflections on their internship experiences and comment on each others’ blogs throughout the internship assignment to maximize their learning.

Spring 2015 - MIIS

More Information »

ITDG 8521 - Currncy CapitalFlows&FinCrises      

In this course, students will learn to recognize the predisposing factors of a financial crisis and policy options for optimal financial crisis management by looking at historical case studies. But first, we will look at how the ForEx market works, who are the different players, how are typical transactions structured, different exchange rate regimes (e.g. pegs, crawling bands, free floats, monetary union), factors influencing exchange rate determination, balance of payments, and sovereign debt sustainability. In the second half of the semester, we will parse multiple financial crises from both emerging markets and OECD economies. In addition to readings related to cases, students will also have regular reading assignments of current events. Learning how to discuss and explain monetary topics, and using economic jargon in an appropriate fashion, requires regular practice. It is similar to learning a foreign language, which is why readings should be done in a timely fashion.

Fall 2015 - MIIS

More Information »

MBAG 8561 - Managerial Economics      

This course will cover the fundamental economic principles that can enable managers to make more efficient and economical decisions. Students will be provided with selected tools that can be used to aid and improve the making of economic decisions; that is, decisions involving choice. Economic principles, theories and models will be introduced and discussed in order to develop a basis for consistently considering and evaluating economic policies, practices and activities. Student’s ability to apply the material presented in print and in lecture will be the primary measure of success in this course.

Fall 2015 - MIIS

More Information »

MBAG 8676 - Corruptn,TaxEvasion&AssetRcvry      

Corruption is a cancer that thwarts both political and economic development throughout the world. With the U.N. Convention on Corruption and now that corruption is a predicate offense for money laundering, it is easier to recover stolen assets that corrupt leaders and their associates have moved overseas. Tax evasion also hinders development. FATCA and similar reporting laws around the world now provide a tool to combat this type of crime. This course will look at how corrupt politicians steal with impunity, how offshore secrecy havens work, unilateral and multilateral efforts underway to recover and return stolen assets, legal and political challenges to asset recovery, and policies that can help prevent theft of public monies in the first place.

Fall 2015 - MIIS

More Information »

NPTG 9581 - MoneyLaundering & AML Policies      

Spring 2015 - MIIS

More Information »

NPTG 9582 - TerrorFinanceSanctnsCybercrime      

Spring 2015 - MIIS

More Information »

Faculty Program Tags
Extra Information

Education

PhD, International Economics and Middle East Studies, Johns Hopkins University Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS); MA, International Studies, MHS, International Health, BA, Social Science, Johns Hopkins University; CAMS (Certified Anti-Money Laundering Specialist); CFCS (Certified Financial Crime Specialist)

Publications

"Breaking the Ice In Baghdad," Toastmaster Magazine, September 2014.

Freeman, Michael and Moyara Ruehsen, "Terrorism Financing Methods: An Overview,"_Perspectives on Terrorism_Volume 7, Issue 4, August 2013.

"PKK" in Michael Freeman's_Financing Terrorism:Case Studies_, Ashgate Press, 2012.

"Afghanistan's Drug War - The Farmers Aren't the Enemy." LA Times 2 November 2009.

Arab Government Responses to the Threat of Terrorist Financing,” Chapter in J. Giraldo and H. Trinkunas, Terrorism Financing and State Responses in Comparative Perspective, Stanford University Press, Fall 2007.

“Choosing an Appropriate Palestinian Monetary Regime.” Research in Middle East Economics Volume 6, 2005, pp. 183-199.

Diamonds Are a Terrorist’s Best Friend,” moneylaundering.com, (September 2004).

Little Noticed UN Report Cites Alleged Saudi Terrorist Financing,” Money Laundering Alert, (October 2003).

Dirty Laundering: Financing Latin America’s Drug Trade,” (review essay) in Harvard International Review, (Winter 2003).

The Fallacy of Sanctions,” Middle East Insight (March-April 2002).

Tracing al-Qaeda’s Money,” Middle East Insight (January-February 2002).

Suspected UAE Links to Terrorist Funds Spark Anti-Laundering Efforts,” Money Laundering Alert (December 2001).

Arab Naming Customs Complicate Screening for Suspected Terrorists,” Money Laundering Alert (December 2001).

Faculty Type
Regular Faculty
Dynamic Features
Course Catalog

Wei Liang

First Name
Wei
Last Name
Liang
Wei Liang
Job Title
Associate Professor
Location
McCone Building
Phone
831.647.4142
Language(s)
中文

I am passionate about exploring the relationship between politics and economics and the policy issues derived from the interaction, including trade, development and governance.

I love being a professor at MIIS because our faculty and students share the sense of consciousness and responsibility as citizens of global, national, and local communities. 

Expertise

International Trade Policy and Trade Negotiation, Globalization and Global Economic and Environmental Governance, Trade and Development in Emerging Markets, International Political Economy of East Asia, US-Asia Policy, Chinese Politics and Foreign Policy.

Short Programs & Research Centers
Faculty Program Tags
Course List

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

DPPG 8515 - Intro TradePolcy &Institutions      

This course serves as an introduction to the environments, processes, and main issues that compose the universe of trade policies. Because of the growing complexities of a more interdependent international environment, students need to expand their knowledge, sensitivity and skills in trade policies. Focus on the changing international environment, its trading institutions, key actors and issues; practices of analyzing, formulating and negotiating key trade policy issues.

Fall 2015 - MIIS

More Information »

DPPG 8648 - Sem:Glbl Econ & Env Governance      

Does a global order require global governance regimes and institutions? Can the world be effectively governed? Is justice a legitimate concern of global governance? This course identifies the critical issues of global economic and environmental governance in a highly interdependent world and formulates policy responses to them. Free trade, financial stability, development and climate Change mitigation are the paradigmatic cases for what economists term “externality”, thus raising the need for coordination of governmental actions at the global, or supra-national level. International economic and climate policy coordination is widely seen as fostering economic growth and sustainable development of its member states. Yet the benefits and burdens are often unevenly distributed within states.

This seminar will examine the politics of global economic and environmental governance, focusing on how global norms, rules and formal international institutions facilitate cooperation and mitigate conflict in the world economy. Our broader objective is to attain a sufficient level of historical and contemporary knowledge of global economic and environmental governance to be fully versant in current policy debates and to provide critical analyses of the relevance, legitimacy and effectiveness of these global institutions today.

The course is divided into four sections. The first section introduces to the various concepts, major theories and approaches to global governance. The second section analyzes the core architectural elements of the current system of global economic and environmental governance, including the WTO, IMF, World Bank and UNFCCC. In section III, we will build a nexus between trade, finance, development aid and environment as these issues have fundamental impact on global sustainable development. The concluding section examines the emerging trend of the nexus of economic and environment that will reshape current patterns in global governance.

Fall 2015 - MIIS

More Information »

IPSG 8515 - Intro to Trade Policy      

This course serves as an introduction to the environments, processes, and main issues that compose the universe of trade policies. Because of the growing complexities of a more interdependent international environment, students need to expand their knowledge, sensitivity and skills in trade policies. Focus on the changing international environment, its trading institutions, key actors and issues; practices of analyzing, formulating and negotiating key trade policy issues.

Fall 2014 - MIIS

More Information »

IPSG 8579 - The China Factor      

The rise of China over the last two decades is one of the most significant events that shape global market competition, trade and economic development, and geopolitics. Its implications on worldly issues from global and regional peace and security to the sustainability of the environment are profound. The China factor is an amalgamation of dynamic, complex and interactive forces that appear as problems, puzzles or challenges to different people at different times. This course aims to provide an orientation for students to understand those forces, especially those related to the major stakeholders and their evolving relationships, policies and game rules, and collective behaviors. The orientation is grounded in both Chinese historical and cultural legacies and the contexts of China’s state building, modernization and globalization.

This course provides students with a broad introduction to Contemporary China’s political, economic, and strategic challenges. The discussion begins with the lowest point in Chinese history when the country was rendered as a semi-colony of Western powers and ends with China’s contemporary rise and implications for the world. The questions asked include: In what ways is China rising? How did it happen? How does China’s rise impact the U.S and the global system? The course covers a wide array of topics in primarily three areas: domestic politics, foreign policy challenges and global governance. More specifically, the topics include Chinese imperial legacies and revolution, contemporary political institutions and policy making processes, the opening of China and its reforms and their resulting challenges, China’s role in global peace and development, its relations with U.S., the other Asian powers and the other powers of the world powers, and the mainland-Taiwan relation, China’s trade and investment policy before and during the reform era, the Chinese economic regime and policy making process, China’s industrial policy and national standard strategy, and China’s environmental and energy challenges and sustainable development.

Fall 2014 - MIIS

More Information »

IPSG 8614 - SemFrgnPlcy,Trade&SecPolE.Asia      

(East Asia is a dynamic region of great importance by virtue of its population size, economic dynamism, and political and security challenges. The impact of the region’s international relations is felt not only by the countries geographically located in the region but also by the rest of the world. The region is characterized by diversity in terms of historical, civilizational, and ethno-cultural backgrounds, political systems, levels of economic development, and foreign relations, as well as global impact, making regional relations very complex and sometimes very difficult, for major powers and smaller powers alike. This course will examine a broad range of foreign policy, trade, and security issues that present both opportunities and challenges to the regional countries and the United States. A unique feature of this course is that it includes a field trip to Tokyo and Beijing from March 12 to 22.* The students will learn first-hand the perspectives of local experts on the regional issues the seminar addresses through guest-lectures, interviews, library research, and discussions with local university students.

* Dec 12 - $100 deposit due; Feb 27 - remainder of program fee due.

Spring 2015 - MIIS

More Information »

IPSG 8648 - Sem:Glbl Econ & Env Governance      

Does a global order require global governance regimes and institutions? Can the world be effectively governed? Is justice a legitimate concern of global governance? This course identifies the critical issues of global economic and environmental governance in a highly interdependent world and formulates policy responses to them. Free trade, financial stability, development and climate Change mitigation are the paradigmatic cases for what economists term “externality”, thus raising the need for coordination of governmental actions at the global, or supra-national level. International economic and climate policy coordination is widely seen as fostering economic growth and sustainable development of its member states. Yet the benefits and burdens are often unevenly distributed within states.

This seminar will examine the politics of global economic and environmental governance, focusing on how global norms, rules and formal international institutions facilitate cooperation and mitigate conflict in the world economy. Our broader objective is to attain a sufficient level of historical and contemporary knowledge of global economic and environmental governance to be fully versant in current policy debates and to provide critical analyses of the relevance, legitimacy and effectiveness of these global institutions today.

The course is divided into four sections. The first section introduces to the various concepts, major theories and approaches to global governance. The second section analyzes the core architectural elements of the current system of global economic and environmental governance, including the WTO, IMF, World Bank and UNFCCC. In section III, we will build a nexus between trade, finance, development aid and environment as these issues have fundamental impact on global sustainable development. The concluding section examines the emerging trend of the nexus of economic and environment that will reshape current patterns in global governance.

Fall 2014 - MIIS

More Information »

IPSG 8686 - Sem:Intl Trade Negotiatn Simul      

requent negotiations between governments, international organizations, companies, and other nongovernmental actors are central in specifying what globalization and global governance mean for people. But what happens in these negotiations? What determines their outcomes? Could the negotiators do better? This seminar concentrates on this ubiquitous process of international negotiation over economic and other issues and helps students launch original research on this subject. This course is designed to help improve your skill as a negotiator, while you learn more about bargaining theory in the context of global political economy. It offers a conceptual framework to help you diagnose most bargaining situations. It begins simply and adds complications one at a time. You will develop a feel for the process by dissecting what professionals did in historical episodes--economic, environmental, and military-political--and by watching experienced negotiators and mediators on tape. You will practice applying these ideas by negotiating with other students through in-class simulation.

Spring 2015 - MIIS

More Information »

ITDG 8515 - Intro TradePolcy &Institutions      

This course serves as an introduction to the environments, processes, and main issues that compose the universe of trade policies. Because of the growing complexities of a more interdependent international environment, students need to expand their knowledge, sensitivity and skills in trade policies. Focus on the changing international environment, its trading institutions, key actors and issues; practices of analyzing, formulating and negotiating key trade policy issues.

Fall 2015 - MIIS

More Information »

TICH 9579 - The China Factor      

The rise of China over the last two decades is one of the most significant events that shape global market competition, trade and economic development, and geopolitics. Its implications on worldly issues from global and regional peace and security to the sustainability of the environment are profound. The China factor is an amalgamation of dynamic, complex and interactive forces that appear as problems, puzzles or challenges to different people at different times. This course aims to provide an orientation for students to understand those forces, especially those related to the major stakeholders and their evolving relationships, policies and game rules, and collective behaviors. The orientation is grounded in both Chinese historical and cultural legacies and the contexts of China’s state building, modernization and globalization.

This course provides students with a broad introduction to Contemporary China’s political, economic, and strategic challenges. The discussion begins with the lowest point in Chinese history when the country was rendered as a semi-colony of Western powers and ends with China’s contemporary rise and implications for the world. The questions asked include: In what ways is China rising? How did it happen? How does China’s rise impact the U.S and the global system? The course covers a wide array of topics in primarily three areas: domestic politics, foreign policy challenges and global governance. More specifically, the topics include Chinese imperial legacies and revolution, contemporary political institutions and policy making processes, the opening of China and its reforms and their resulting challenges, China’s role in global peace and development, its relations with U.S., the other Asian powers and the other powers of the world powers, and the mainland-Taiwan relation, China’s trade and investment policy before and during the reform era, the Chinese economic regime and policy making process, China’s industrial policy and national standard strategy, and China’s environmental and energy challenges and sustainable development.

Fall 2014 - MIIS

More Information »

Extra Information

Education

PhD, MA, International Relations and International Political Economy, University of Southern California; BA, International Politics, Peking University, China.

 

 

Faculty Type
Regular Faculty
Dynamic Features
Course Catalog