Middlebury Institute of International Studies at Monterey. Formerly the Monterey Institute of International Studies.

The tag that aggregates faculty profiles into the "Find an Expert" page.

Jan Knippers Black

First Name
Jan
Last Name
Black
Jan Black 2
Job Title
Professor
Location
117 McCone
Phone
831.647.4180
Language(s)
Español
português

Professor Black’s international experience includes Senior Associate Membership at St. Antony’s College, Oxford University; Fulbright, Mellon and other grants and Fellowships in South America, the Caribbean, and India; on-site or short-term teaching and honorary faculty positions in several Latin American countries, and extensive overseas lecturing and research. She was also a Peace Corps Volunteer in Chile and a faculty member with the University of Pittsburgh’s Semester-at-Sea program.

Expertise

Human rights, international and comparative politics of the Western Hemisphere, international and grassroots development, women´s rights and roles, globalization

Faculty Program Tags
MIIS Tags
Course List

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

DPPG 8650 - SemHumnRgtsProtctn:StrtgPractc      

In this seminar students will undertake investigations, in some cases under the auspices of local, national, or international organizations, on the impact, for good or ill, of particular policies or programs. The resulting evidence of human rights abuse, or of effective human rights protection, will be employed in efforts to prevent abuse, rather than simply to monitor or report it. Students will therefore engage also in strategic planning for campaigns to move the intervention of activists upstream in the project design or policy-making process. Where feasible, the strategies formulated in class will be put into action – through existing organizations, like Amnesty International (for AIUSA, I will be trying to design an alert action system for policy), or through student-launched campaigns or NGOs.

Fall 2015 - MIIS

More Information »

IPSG 8522 - Rethinking Human Rights      

his course approaches human rights issues from a multidisciplinary perspective and with a wide-angle lens that draws in all rights and all peoples. We view rights abuse as neither incomprehensible nor inevitable, but nevertheless pervasive in the twenty-first century. Nor is such abuse, with respect either to perpetrators or victims, confined to distant places and strange peoples. We will undertake here a fundamental re-examination of the basic terms and concepts, theories, controversies, and cleavages associated with human rights. We will also examine the effectiveness of our strategies, treaties, and institutions in assessing accountability, promoting reconciliation, and otherwise protecting the abused and endangered.

Spring 2015 - MIIS

More Information »

IPSG 8530 - Cuba:ChngingCourse,ChngngTimes      

Spring 2014 - MIIS, Spring 2015 - MIIS

More Information »

IPSG 8650 - SemHumnRgtsProtctn:StrtgPractc      

In this seminar students will undertake investigations, in some cases under the auspices of local, national, or international organizations, on the impact, for good or ill, of particular policies or programs. The resulting evidence of human rights abuse, or of effective human rights protection, will be employed in efforts to prevent abuse, rather than simply to monitor or report it. Students will therefore engage also in strategic planning for campaigns to move the intervention of activists upstream in the project design or policy-making process. Where feasible, the strategies formulated in class will be put into action – through existing organizations, like Amnesty International (for AIUSA, I will be trying to design an alert action system for policy), or through student-launched campaigns or NGOs.

Spring 2014 - MIIS

More Information »

IPSG 8672 - Sem:Transitnal Injustice:Chile      

Spring 2014 - MIIS

More Information »

Extra Information

Interview with GlobalNet21

Education

PhD, International Studies, MA Latin American Studies, School of International Service, American University, Washington D.C.; B.A. Art and Spanish, University of Tennessee.

Faculty Type
Regular Faculty
Dynamic Features
Course Catalog

Edward J. Laurance

First Name
Edward
Last Name
Laurance
Ed Laurance
Job Title
Professor and Gordon Paul Smith Chair in International Policy and Development
Location
311 McCone
Phone
831.647.4144

I Believe:

One of the most critical challenges to development and indeed humanity is armed violence, especially in fragile states. This violence leads to death and injury, violations of human rights, lack of justice and the rule of law, lost productivity, lowering of already inadequate health budgets, and psychological costs. In short, development cannot proceed alongside such violence. I believe that this violence can and must be prevented, reduced and eventually eliminated. I have devoted most of my professional life to this end.

Expertise

Armed violence reduction, research methods for development practitioners, global governance, international organizations, proliferation and effects of conventional weapons and small arms, program evaluation and project management

Faculty Program Tags
MIIS Tags
Course List

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

DPPG 8528 - Supervised Stretch Work      

This learning opportunity consists of a student engaging in activities that result in their learning that knowledge and professional skills critical to their career path. Stretchwork is defined as those learning opportunities which a person takes on their own to grow in their career field. Put another way, once you graduate there are no advisors or courses your employer conducts. You have to “stretch” yourself into new knowledge and skills.

There are two basic rationales for learning through stretchwork at MIIS. First, your career path may require skills and knowledge that are not readily available in formal courses at MIIS. Examples may include careers in public health and humanitarian assistance, where jobs are plentiful. Stretchwork might include taking online courses, working with a local organization (e.g., M and E) or taking workshops at the DLC. The second rationale is preparing for life-ling learning by starting it while you are at MIIS.

Fall 2015 - MIIS

More Information »

DPPG 8626 - SemEvalArmedViolencReductnPgms      

Evaluation of violence reduction programs

This seminar presents three bodies of knowledge: Violence, Violence Reduction Programs, Programs , and Evaluation methods and tools used to evaluate these programs, to include program design. Participants will have access via Skype and in person to real programs taking place in local, national and global contexts. The main requirement of the course is an evaluation of a violence –reduction program. There are no prerequisites for this seminar and it counts as the MPA evaluation requirement.

Fall 2015 - MIIS

More Information »

DPPG 8634 - SEM: Security & Development      

In September 2015 the United Nations will formally announce the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs),which will be the international development framework that will replace the current Millennium Development Goals. The seventeen proposed goals and associated targets are planned to run until 2030. Among them, Goal 16 focuses on peaceful and inclusive societies, access to justice, rights-based development and accountable institutions. Examples of targets include significantly reducing all forms of violence; ending abuse, exploitation, trafficking and all forms of violence and torture against children; promoting the rule of law at the national and international levels, and ensure equal access to justice for all; by 2030 significantly reducing illicit financial and arms flows, strengthening recovery and return of stolen assets, and combating all forms of organized crime; and substantially reduce corruption and bribery in all its forms.

This will be the approach of this seminar. The seminar meets 2 hours each week with a voluntary Friday morning session for those who wish to consult on their research. The main learning outcome will be understanding how security and development issues and institutions intersect, and then applying these concepts in a real world situation.

Fall 2015 - MIIS

More Information »

IPMG 8541 - ResrchMethdsForDvlpmntPractice      

The focus of this course is on the methods used in designing, implementing and evaluating development programs, broadly defined. The methods covered are those currently in use in a variety of contexts. Examples of methods covered include data analysis (SPSS and Excel), survey research, interviewing, key informant interviewing, focus groups, direct observation, developing tools for analysis, rapid assessment, stakeholder analysis and conflict analysis. The methods will be taught in modular form, all involving completing a small team project utilizing the method. While much of the work will be done in teams, each student will be evaluated separately. Some projects will be conducted with local government and nonprofit organizations, while others will involve the MIIS community.

Fall 2013 - MIIS

More Information »

IPSG 8501 - Policy Analysis      

This course introduces students to the theory and practice of policy analysis. Students will be introduced to the stages of the public policy process, including agenda setting, formulation, implementation, and evaluation. Students will also develop basic policy analysis skills, including problem structuring, stakeholder identification, summarization of current policy, development of policy options, elaboration of criteria for selection, and recommendation of course of action. These concepts are illustrated by examples policies that fall within students' range of interests. This course also introduces students to scientific methods that are used as a means for structuring policy inquiry. A series of research approaches and techniques are presented in the context of forecasting, monitoring, and evaluation for the analysis of domestic and international policies.

Fall 2014 - MIIS, Spring 2015 - MIIS

More Information »

IPSG 8544 - Intro to HumanSecurity&Dvlpmnt      

The focus of this course is human security, the everyday security of individuals and the communities in which they live rather than the security of nation states. It is the gateway course into the field of human security and development. The key concepts of human security are freedom from fear, freedom from want, and freedom to live in a society of justice under the rule of law. Specific approaches and policies of human security covered in this course include conflict analysis, management and resolution, human rights, peacebuilding, legitimate institutions and good governance, rule of law and justice, and programs and policies designed to lower armed violence.

Spring 2015 - MIIS

More Information »

IPSG 8611 - Sem:ArmedViolence & Developmnt      

Armed violence resulting from internal conflict and criminal activity is posing a serious obstacle to political, social and economic development at the global, regional, national and local level. This seminar focuses on the reality of armed violence and its negative effects. The course addresses the global burden of violence, its impact on development, theories/risk factors/stresses of violence, and preventing armed violence. There are three main seminar research topics. The first is the demobilization and reintegration of ex-combatants, to include women and child soldiers. The second theme is the instruments of armed violence, namely, small arms and light weapons (SALW), to include land mines. Topics include the sources and methods of illegal arms proliferation, diversion from legal to illegal arms possession, misuse or proliferation. A third general theme is the various policies and programs being implemented to reduce urban gang violence, with a special focus on the public health approach to armed violence reduction. The typical student research project is on which develops (or evaluates) a program to reduce or prevent armed violence and enhance development at the local, national or global level. Students must have read the book The Better Angels of Our Nature: Why Violence Has Declined prior to the start of the seminar.

Spring 2014 - MIIS, Spring 2015 - MIIS

More Information »

IPSG 9541 - ResrchMethdsForDvlpmntPractice      

The focus of this course is on the methods used in designing, implementing and evaluating development programs, broadly defined. The methods covered are those currently in use in a variety of contexts. Examples of methods covered include data analysis (SPSS and Excel), survey research, interviewing, key informant interviewing, focus groups, direct observation, developing tools for analysis, rapid assessment, stakeholder analysis and conflict analysis. The methods will be taught in modular form, all involving completing a small team project utilizing the method. While much of the work will be done in teams, each student will be evaluated separately. Some projects will be conducted with local government and nonprofit organizations, while others will involve the MIIS community.

Fall 2013 - MIIS

More Information »

IPSG 9547 - Intl Orgs & Global Governance      

This course studies those global problems which have a multilateral element as part of the effort to manage and provide solutions- nonproliferation, terrorism, humanitarian crises, migration, armed violence, human rights and security, crime , public health and economic, political and social development. The course starts with a full inquiry into global governance (not world government!). [See the Council on Foreign Relations’ Global Governance Monitor at http://www.cfr.org/global-governance/global-governance-monitor/p18985] Who are the actors? What are the norms that govern national behavior? Which governments do/do not comply with these norms and why? Which problems are more “globally governed” than others? The second half of the course focuses on the role of international governmental organizations (IGOs)- their structure, influence, level of autonomy, etc. Are IGOs actors or just an arena where national governments make the decisions? Students have the opportunity to focus on those organizations involved in the management of their global problem of interest.

Spring 2014 - MIIS

More Information »

MPAG 8547 - Intl Orgs & Global Governance      

This course studies those global problems which have a multilateral element as part of the effort to manage and provide solutions- nonproliferation, terrorism, humanitarian crises, migration, armed violence, human rights and security, crime , public health and economic, political and social development. The course starts with a full inquiry into global governance (not world government!). [See the Council on Foreign Relations’ Global Governance Monitor at http://www.cfr.org/global-governance/global-governance-monitor/p18985] Who are the actors? What are the norms that govern national behavior? Which governments do/do not comply with these norms and why? Which problems are more “globally governed” than others? The second half of the course focuses on the role of international governmental organizations (IGOs)- their structure, influence, level of autonomy, etc. Are IGOs actors or just an arena where national governments make the decisions? Students have the opportunity to focus on those organizations involved in the management of their global problem of interest.

Spring 2014 - MIIS

More Information »

MPAG 8635 - Eval Practicum: DPP AOL system      

This course will allow students hands-on experience in developing an “Assessment of Learning (AOL)” system for the Development Practice and Policy program. Students will conduct primary research (interviews, FGDs) and data analysis related to faculty, student, and administration preferences on the system; review of best practices for AOL in other universities in the US; and a review of the academic literature pertaining to high quality AOL systems for Masters-level education. Students will have a chance to get wider, practical experience in action research, mixed methods research, formulating recommendations, and creating a high quality final report. Students in the class will form a single team and grading will be based on peer reviews of contributions to team products and process, participation in class, and quality of overall deliverable. The principal audience for the final deliverable will be the Chairs of the IPS and MPA degree programs.

Fall 2014 - MIIS

More Information »

MPAG 9541 - ResrchMethdsForDvlpmntPractice      

The focus of this course is on the methods used in designing, implementing and evaluating development programs, broadly defined. The methods covered are those currently in use in a variety of contexts. Examples of methods covered include data analysis (SPSS and Excel), survey research, interviewing, key informant interviewing, focus groups, direct observation, developing tools for analysis, rapid assessment, stakeholder analysis and conflict analysis. The methods will be taught in modular form, all involving completing a small team project utilizing the method. While much of the work will be done in teams, each student will be evaluated separately. Some projects will be conducted with local government and nonprofit organizations, while others will involve the MIIS community.

Fall 2013 - MIIS

More Information »

NPTG 9547 - Intl Orgs & Global Governance      

This course studies those global problems which have a multilateral element as part of the effort to manage and provide solutions- nonproliferation, terrorism, humanitarian crises, migration, armed violence, human rights and security, crime , public health and economic, political and social development. The course starts with a full inquiry into global governance (not world government!). [See the Council on Foreign Relations’ Global Governance Monitor at http://www.cfr.org/global-governance/global-governance-monitor/p18985] Who are the actors? What are the norms that govern national behavior? Which governments do/do not comply with these norms and why? Which problems are more “globally governed” than others? The second half of the course focuses on the role of international governmental organizations (IGOs)- their structure, influence, level of autonomy, etc. Are IGOs actors or just an arena where national governments make the decisions? Students have the opportunity to focus on those organizations involved in the management of their global problem of interest.

Spring 2014 - MIIS

More Information »

NPTG 9611 - Sem:ArmedViolence & Developmnt      

Armed violence resulting from intrastate conflict and criminal activity is posing a serious obstacle to political, social and economic development at the global, regional, national and local level. This seminar describes the global reality of armed violence and its negative effects. The focus is on the instruments of armed violence, namely, small arms and light weapons (SALW), to include land mines. Topics include the sources and methods of illegal arms proliferation, diversion from legal to illegal arms possession, misuse or proliferation, gang violence, election violence, the public health approach to armed violence reduction, and the path from conflict to armed conflict. Emphasis is placed on policies and programs at the local, national and global level to reduce armed violence and enable development, to include Disarmament, Demobilization and Reintegration of ex-combatants, weapons exchange for development programs, reducing access to SALW, and the efforts to integrate armed violence and development. The typical student project is a research paper which develops (or evaluates) a program to reduce or prevent armed violence and enhance development at the local, national or global level.

Spring 2014 - MIIS, Spring 2015 - MIIS

More Information »

Extra Information

Recent Activities

In the past several years I have:

  1. Led a team of students in observing the final negotiations of the Arms Trade Treaty at the United Nations in New York.
  2. Created and developed software that allows national government to track their progress towards complying with the UN’s International Small Arms Control Standards (ISACS). http://www.smallarmsstandards.org/isacs-news/
  3. Published two articles in Arms Control Today on the international arms trade.
  4. Served as Coordinator of Veterans Affairs at MIIS
  5. Conducted a major study for the UN Development Program on how security and development are integrated in UNDP programming.
  6. Worked with the Small Arms Survey in Geneva in developing and implementing a program evaluation of a weapons marking project in East Africa.
  7. Placed students in security and development organizations in MIIS Immersive Professional Learning programs.
  8. Since 2009 have served as an expert for the United Nations project ISACS, developing global standards for controlling the proliferation and misuse of small arms and light weapons.
  9. Advised the City of Salinas, California, on gang violence reduction and prevention.

Education

PhD, International Relations, University of Pennsylvania; MA, International Relations and Public Administration, Temple University; BS, United States Military Academy

Careers in Security and Development

Students who concentrate on security and development can do so as a specialization within the MPA program or the Human Security and Development Track in IPD. They normally take courses in conflict and conflict resolution, human security, human rights, and a full range of development courses. They also spend at least six months as a junior professional with an S and D organization while at MIIS. Graduates who entered this field have served as program managers for conflict management in South Sudan, field analysts for international governmental organizations as well as NGOs and think tanks, staff officers developing public security education and training for the UN, survey researchers in areas fraught with insecurity and conflict, and evaluators of programs designed to reduce armed violence and enable development.

For an excellent in-depth look at this field see the World Development Report 2011: Conflict, Security and Development. Washington: The World Bank

Selected Publications

laurance_chapter_final_version_pdf“The Small Arms Problem As Arms Control: A Policy-Driven Research Agenda” in The State of Arms: Consolidation, Innovation and Relevance in Small Arms Research: Essays in honour of Pablo Dreyfus. Eds: Kai Michael Kenkel and Peter Bachelor. London: Routledge, Summer 2013.

 
“1991 Arms Trade Control Efforts and Their Echoes” in Arms Control Today, July-August 2011. 
 

iccrThe UNDP Role in the Comprehensive Approach to Security in Fragile States: An Assessment, Edward J. Laurance Version 5.1 10 June 2010.

laurance-_managing_the_tools_of_war_and_violence "Managing the Tools of War and Violence: Global Governance or State-centric Realpolitik?  In Michael Brzoska and Axel Krohn (eds.) Overcoming Armed Violence in a Complex World: Essays in Honor of Herbert Wulf. Budrich UniPress Ltd. November 2009.

managing_the_global_problems_created_by_the_conventional_arms_trade With Hendrik Wagenmakers and Herbert Wulf. "Managing the Global Problems Created by the Conventional Arms Trade: An Assessment of the United Nations Register of Conventional Arms." Global Governance, Vol. 2, Spring 2005.

With Rachel Stohl. Making Global Public Policy: The Case of Small Arms and Light Weapons. Occasional Paper No. 7. Geneva: Small Arms Survey, December 2002.

<The United Nations Conventional Arms Register (UNCAR): Present Challenges, New Directions.

"Light Weapons and Human Development: The Need for Transparency and Early Warning." In Jeffrey Boutwell and Michael T. Klare, Light Weapons and Civil Conflict: Controlling the Tools of Violence (Boulder: Rowman and Littlefield Publishers, Inc., 1999), pp. 185-196.

"Monitoring the Flow, Availability and Misuse of Light Weapons," in Arms Watching: Integrating Small Arms and Light Weapons Into the Early Warning of Violent Conflict. Edward J. Laurance (Ed.) (London: International Alert, May 1999).

Arms Watching: Integrating Small Arms and Light Weapons Into the Early Warning of Violent Conflict(Ed.)(London: International Alert, May 1999).

Light Weapons and Intra-State Conflict: Early Warning Factors and Preventive Action. (Washington: Carnegie Commission on Preventing Deadly Conflict, July 1998).

"Small Arms, Light Weapons, and Conflict Prevention: The New Post-Cold War Logic of Disarmament" in Barnett R. Rubin Cases and Strategies for Preventive Action (The Century Foundation Press, 1998), pp. 135-168.

"Moratoria on Small Arms and Light Weapons: Conceptualization and Application to Central America" in Sverre Lodgaard and Carsten F. Ronnfeldt, A Moratorium on Light Weapons in West Africa (Oslo: Norwegian Institute of International Affairs, 1998), pp. 69-83.

"A Conceptual Framework for Arms Trade Transparency in South-East Asia." In Bates Gill and J.N. Mak (eds.), Arms Transparency and Security in South-East Asia. SIPRI Research Report No. 13. (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1997), pp. 10-24.

With Sarah E. Meek. The Role of Conventional Arms Buildups in the Outbreak of Conflict: Developing Early Warning and Preventive Measures. Report submitted to the United States Institute for Peace in fulfillment of grant SG-94-113. July 1996.

With Sarah E. Meek. The New Field of Micro-Disarmament: Addressing the Proliferation and Buildup of Small Arms and Light Weapons. Brief 7. (Bonn: Bonn International Center for Conversion, September 1996).

"The Role of Arms Control in Coping With Conflict after the Cold War." in Roger Kanet and Edward Kolodziej (Eds.), Coping With Conflict after the Cold War. (Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 1996), pp. 331-362.

"Addressing the Negative Consequences of Light Weapons Trafficking: Opportunities for Transparency and Restraint." in Jeffrey Boutwell, Michael Klare and Laura Reed, Editors, Lethal Commerce: The Global Trade in Small Arms and Light Weapons. (Cambridge: American Academy of Arts and Sciences, 1995), pp. 140-57.

"The UN Register of Conventional Arms: Rationales and Prospects for Compliance and Effectiveness," The Washington Quarterly , (Spring 1993).

"Reducing the Negative Consequences of Arms Transfers Through Unilateral Arms Control." in Bennett Ramberg (Ed.) Arms Control Without Negotiation: From the Cold War to the New World Order. (Boulder: Lynne Rienner Publishers, 1993), pp. 175-198

With Siemon Wezeman and Herbert Wulf. Arms Watch: SIPRI Report on the First Year of the UN Register of Conventional Arms. (Oxford: Oxford University Press, November 1993).

The International Arms Trade. (New York: Lexington Books, 1992).

"The Political Implications of Illegal Arms Exports From the United States." Political Science Quarterly, 107, 3 (Fall 1992), 501-533.

"Events Data and Policy Analysis: Improving the Potential for Applying Academic Research to Foreign and Defense Policy Problems." Policy Sciences , 23,1(1990).

"The New Gunrunning." Orbis (Spring 1989), 225-237.

Faculty Type
Regular Faculty
Dynamic Features
Course Catalog

Holly Mikkelson

First Name
Holly
Last Name
Mikkelson
Holly Mikkelson
Job Title
Associate Professor
Location
McCone Building 221
Phone
831.647.6432
Language(s)
Español

I am a state and federally certified court interpreter, and I am certified by the American Translators Association. I have served as a consultant to court interpreter regulatory and training entities such as the California Judicial Council and the National Center for State Courts, and I have published extensively on court and community interpreting, including a very popular series of interpreter training manuals (published by Acebo).

Language Tags
Faculty Program Tags
Course List

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

TISP 8511 - Intro Written Trans to English      

Introduces students to the basic theory and practice of translation, both written and sight. Students will learn to apply text analysis, text typology, and contrastive analysis of their working languages to identify, analyze, and resolve translation problems while independently developing an efficient and rational approach to the process of translation. The appropriate application of electronic translation tools will also be introduced. Fundamental translation theory will be emphasized at the beginning of the course and will be conveyed in the form of assigned readings, lectures, class discussions, and independent research. In addition, course assignments will include practice and graded exercises in sight and written translation, utilizing authentic texts drawn from an extensive variety of text categories that include, but are not limited to, current events, general political economy, general legal documents, and scientific and technical topics for general audiences. As the term progresses, student time and effort will increasingly be spent on the preparation and evaluation of written translation assignments. Students will be expected to take at least one midterm exam and one final exam, to be assigned at the discretion of the instructor(s) of record.

Fall 2013 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS, Fall 2015 - MIIS

More Information »

TISP 8521 - Intrm Translation into English      

Builds on the theoretical and practical foundation laid in Introduction to Translation and introduces the translation of specialized subject matter. Depending upon the language program in which they are enrolled, students will be expected to acquire and demonstrate basic proficiency in the sight and written translation of either commercial and economic texts, legal texts, or scientific and technical texts. The amount of emphasis accorded to a particular topic will depend on the specific professional requirements of each language program. Course assignments will include readings, research, presentations, practice and graded exercises in sight translation, and practice and graded written translation assignments, including exercises in speed translation. Students will also be expected to take at least one midterm and one final exam. The frequency, nature, and structure of course assignments and examinations are largely at the discretion of the instructor(s) of record.

Prerequisite: Introduction to Translation or equivalent background.

Spring 2014 - MIIS, Spring 2015 - MIIS

More Information »

TISP 8631 - Adv Translation I into English      

This is the first of two complementary courses designed to bring translation knowledge and skills up to the level that would be required of someone working in a professional translation environment. Students will be expected to apply the knowledge and skills acquired during the first-year translation courses to produce translations that meet high standards for content, form, and presentation. A great deal of attention is given to subject matter knowledge and research, precision in text analysis and writing, and the appropriate application of translation technology. Some programs emphasize scientific and technical topics in this course, but others give considerable attention to commercial, economic, legal, and political texts, many of which have a technical component. The frequency, nature, and structure of course assignments and examinations are at the discretion of the instructor(s) of record. Students will, however, be expected to take at least one midterm exam and one final exam.

Prerequisite: 2nd-year student in good standing or equivalent background.

Fall 2013 - MIIS, Fall 2015 - MIIS

More Information »

TISP 8633 - Intro to Court Interpreting      

Familiarizes students with the techniques and terminology of consecutive and simultaneous interpreting, and the practical considerations particular to judicial and quasi-judicial settings. Attention is given to the registers of speech encountered in typical legal proceedings, including street slang, police jargon, legal terms, and technical testimony. Students learn courtroom protocol, witness control techniques, and review the practical implications of the court interpreter code of ethics. The frequency, nature, and structure of course assignments and examinations are at the discretion of the instructor(s) of record.

Fall 2013 - MIIS

More Information »

TISP 8641 - Advanced Trans II to English      

This course is the counterpart to Advanced Translation I. Students are expected to translate texts of considerable difficulty and complexity and to cope with the types of operational challenges that are likely to be encountered in professional translation settings, such as working in teams or coping with multiple technologies. Emphasis is on particular text categories and subject-matter knowledge that are pertinent to current market demand for the specific language combination and direction in which the course is being taught. The frequency, nature, and structure of course assignments are at the discretion of the instructor(s) of record, but will include projects that simulate, as closely as possible, the professional translation environment, as well as at least one midterm and one final exam.

Prerequisite: Advanced Translation I or similar background.

Spring 2014 - MIIS, Spring 2015 - MIIS

More Information »

TISP 8649 - Consec/Simul Court Proceedings      

Spring 2014 - MIIS

More Information »

TISP 8651 - Community Interpreting      

Spring 2015 - MIIS

More Information »

TISP 8661 - Advancd Community Interpreting      

Summer 2015 - MIIS

More Information »

MIIS Tags
Expertise

Translation and interpretation of Spanish and English, court, community and medical interpreting

Extra Information

Education

MA, Intercultural Communication and Certificate in Translation and Interpretation, Monterey Institute of International Studies; BA, Sociology, Mills College

Recent Accomplishments

I have completed a number of collaborative book projects in the last few years: I co-authored the 2nd edition of Fundamentals of Court Interpretation: Theory, Policy and Practice, published in 2012, and Introduction to Healthcare for Spanish-speaking Interpreters and Translators, published in 2015. In addition, Professor Barry Slaughter Olsen and I translated Jesús Baigorri’s From Paris to Nuremberg: The birth of conference interpreting (2014), and I co-edited The Routledge Handbook of Interpreting with Professor Renee Jourdenais (2015). I am currently working on the second edition of Introduction to Court Interpreting, scheduled to be published in 2016.

Publications

Gonzalez, Roseann D., Vasquez, Victoria F., and Mikkelson, Holly.Fundamentals of Court Interpretation: Theory, Policy and Practice. 2nd ed. Durham, NC: Carolina Academic Press, 2012.

Crezee, Ineke, Mikkelson, Holly and Monzon-Storey, Laura. Introduction to Healthcare for Spanish-speaking Interpreters and Translators. Amsterdam, New York: John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2015.

Mikkelson, Holly and Jourdenais, Renee (Eds.). The Routledge Handbook of Interpreting. Routledge, 2015.

Mikkelson, Holly. Introduction to Court Interpreting. In Translation Practices Explained. Vol. 1. Manchester: St. Jerome Publishing, 2000.

Faculty Type
Regular Faculty
Dynamic Features
Course Catalog

Chuanyun Bao

First Name
Chuanyun
Last Name
Bao
Chuanyun Bao
Job Title
Professor
Location
Casa Fuente Building 300B
Phone
831.647.4172
Language(s)
中文

It has been a long time since the summer of 1990 when I left my job at the United Nations Office in Geneva where I served as a staff interpreter to join the faculty at the Middlebury Institute of International Studies.  Over these years, I have taught sight translation, consecutive and simultaneous interpretation, and briefly, translation. I have continued to work as a freelance interpreter for corporations, institutions, the United Nations and other international organizations.

MIIS Tags
Faculty Program Tags
Expertise

Simultaneous and consecutive interpretation and translation of Chinese and English

Course List

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

TICH 8502 - Intro to Interp into Chinese      

Introduces students to conference interpretation in general and consecutive interpretation in particular. Lays a foundation for the development of professional skills in consecutive interpretation, emphasizing the ability to understand and analyze a message in the source language (SL) and convey it in the target language (TL) in a straightforward and clear manner. Develops students’ ability to identify, analyze, and paraphrase the meaning in the SL and establish logical relations between its components. Emphasis is placed on active listening and concentration skills, memory, the ability to abstract information for subsequent recall, and basic elements of note-taking. At the end of the course, students are able to interpret extemporaneous passages that are on topics familiar to them and are between three and five minutes in length.

In language-specific sessions and joint sessions with other language programs, students are introduced to the skill of consecutive interpreting in both theory and practice. They practice listening to and repeating the content of passages of increasing length and difficulty. Students hone their public-speaking skills by developing and delivering speeches. Content is interpreted on topics from daily life, current events and the media, and general areas of personal interest to students.

Course assignments include readings and research on class topics, presentations, practice, graded exercises, and peer and self-assessment. The frequency, nature, and structure of course assignments and examinations are at the discretion of the instructor(s) of record.

Fall 2014 - MIIS

More Information »

TICH 8513 - Intro Sight Trans to English      

Introduces students to the basic theory and practice of translation, both written and sight. Students will learn to apply text analysis, text typology, and contrastive analysis of their working languages to identify, analyze, and resolve translation problems while independently developing an efficient and rational approach to the process of translation. The appropriate application of electronic translation tools will also be introduced. Fundamental translation theory will be emphasized at the beginning of the course and will be conveyed in the form of assigned readings, lectures, class discussions, and independent research. In addition, course assignments will include practice and graded exercises in sight and written translation, utilizing authentic texts drawn from an extensive variety of text categories that include, but are not limited to, current events, general political economy, general legal documents, and scientific and technical topics for general audiences. As the term progresses, student time and effort will increasingly be spent on the preparation and evaluation of written translation assignments. Students will be expected to take at least one midterm exam and one final exam, to be assigned at the discretion of the instructor(s) of record.

Fall 2013 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS, Fall 2015 - MIIS

More Information »

TICH 8525 - Intrm Intrp-Consc into English      

Intermediate Interpretation – Consecutive and Simultaneous

Builds on the practical and theoretical foundation laid in Introduction to Interpretation. Consists of both language-specific and joint sessions with other language programs.

In consecutive, students learn to identify the implicit structural organization of an extemporaneous speech by presenting and interpreting speeches of this type. Reinforces ability to perceive essential meaning and further develops note-taking techniques. Emphasizes clarity of expression, correct style and grammar, proper diction, and polished presentation. Students also expand their active vocabulary to include the terms and idioms that frequently occur in extemporaneous speeches. At the end of the course, students are able to interpret passages that are delivered extemporaneously, are of moderate difficulty, and are derived from professional settings. These passages vary from one to several paragraphs in length depending upon language combination, direction, and source content.

In simultaneous, students are introduced to basic strategies of interpreting in this mode in the booth. Begins with a general introduction and follows up with a series of preparatory exercises helping students develop the concentration necessary for listening and speaking at the same time, mastering voice management, and acquiring smooth delivery techniques. Students learn to analyze discourse for meaning while rendering a coherent version in the TL with correct grammar, diction and style. At the end of the course, students are able to interpret passages that are between eight and ten minutes in length.

Content on a wide range of topics and current events is interpreted, with some emphasis placed on business and economics. Course assignments include readings and research on class topics, presentations, practice, graded exercises, and peer and self-assessment. The frequency, nature, and structure of course assignments and examinations are at the discretion of the instructor(s) of record.

Course prerequisites: Introduction to Interpretation or the equivalent

Spring 2014 - MIIS, Spring 2015 - MIIS

More Information »

TICH 8635 - Adv Intrp I Consc into English      

This is the first of two complementary courses designed to bring interpretation knowledge and skills up to the professional level. Students are expected to apply the knowledge and skills acquired during the first-year interpretation courses to produce interpretations that would be of acceptable quality in a professional setting. Content on a wide range of topics and current events is interpreted, with emphasis placed on business, economics, science, technology, and other topics congruent with current market demand for interpretation in the language combination in question. Course assignments include readings and research on class topics, presentations, practice, graded exercises, and peer and self-assessment.

In consecutive interpretation, students prepare by researching topics before each session, with emphasis on sequential logic in notetaking and accurate terminology in delivery. Students continue to hone their skills by diagnosing and correcting problems at all stages from listening through delivery, while progressing to increasingly difficult and challenging material. In simultaneous interpretation, the techniques learned in the previous semester are consolidated, which enables students to polish their delivery and language register. Focuses on nuance of meaning, accuracy of interpretation, research and preparation for conferences, and glossary development. Special attention is given to maintaining concentration while under significant psychological stress. Students learn to recognize SL discourse patterns and render them effectively in TL.

At the end of the course, students are able to interpret difficult passages that are derived from professional settings. In consecutive, students are able to interpret passages up to several paragraphs in length. In simultaneous interpretation, students are able to interpret passages that are between fifteen and twenty minutes in length. The frequency, nature, and structure of course assignments and examinations are at the discretion of the instructor(s) of record.

Fall 2013 - MIIS

More Information »

TICH 8637 - Adv Intrp I Simul into English      

This is the first of two complementary courses designed to bring interpretation knowledge and skills up to the professional level. Students are expected to apply the knowledge and skills acquired during the first-year interpretation courses to produce interpretations that would be of acceptable quality in a professional setting. Content on a wide range of topics and current events is interpreted, with emphasis placed on business, economics, science, technology, and other topics congruent with current market demand for interpretation in the language combination in question. Course assignments include readings and research on class topics, presentations, practice, graded exercises, and peer and self-assessment.

In consecutive interpretation, students prepare by researching topics before each session, with emphasis on sequential logic in notetaking and accurate terminology in delivery. Students continue to hone their skills by diagnosing and correcting problems at all stages from listening through delivery, while progressing to increasingly difficult and challenging material. In simultaneous interpretation, the techniques learned in the previous semester are consolidated, which enables students to polish their delivery and language register. Focuses on nuance of meaning, accuracy of interpretation, research and preparation for conferences, and glossary development. Special attention is given to maintaining concentration while under significant psychological stress. Students learn to recognize SL discourse patterns and render them effectively in TL.

At the end of the course, students are able to interpret difficult passages that are derived from professional settings. In consecutive, students are able to interpret passages up to several paragraphs in length. In simultaneous interpretation, students are able to interpret passages that are between fifteen and twenty minutes in length. The frequency, nature, and structure of course assignments and examinations are at the discretion of the instructor(s) of record.

Fall 2013 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS, Fall 2015 - MIIS

More Information »

TICH 8645 - Adv Intrp II-Consc to English      

Advanced Interpretation II – Consecutive and Simultaneous

This course is the counterpart to Advanced Interpretation I. Students are expected to interpret speeches of considerable difficulty and complexity and to cope with the types of challenges that are likely to be encountered in professional settings. Provides final preparation for the Professional Examinations.

In consecutive interpretation, emphasis is placed on both science and technology and political rhetoric, requiring particular attention to nuance and tone. Students learn the vernacular of political speeches and other challenging material while sharpening listening, processing, and notetaking functions.

In simultaneous interpretation, advanced instruction is given for difficult speeches. Emphasizes following the logic of complex scientific and technical discourse, and remaining faithful to the style and tone of persuasive political discourse. Students are also introduced to simultaneous interpretation with text. They learn how to draw upon outlines, transcripts, slides and transparencies, and other written materials to enhance the accuracy and completeness of their interpretation. Emphasis is placed on text preparation strategies and efficient use of textual materials while on the air.

Content on a wide range of topics and current events is interpreted, with emphasis placed on topics congruent with current market demand for interpretation in the relevant language combination(s). Course assignments include readings and research on class topics, presentations, practice, graded exercises, and peer and self-assessment.

At the end of the course, students are expected to interpret difficult speeches in professional settings. In consecutive, students are called upon to interpret passages that are several paragraphs in length. In simultaneous, students are able to interpret passages that are between fifteen and twenty minutes in length. The frequency, nature, and structure of course assignments and examinations are at the discretion of the instructor(s) of record.

Course prerequisites: Advanced Interpretation I or the equivalent

Spring 2015 - MIIS

More Information »

TICH 8647 - Adv Intrp II-Siml into English      

Advanced Interpretation II – Consecutive and Simultaneous

This course is the counterpart to Advanced Interpretation I. Students are expected to interpret speeches of considerable difficulty and complexity and to cope with the types of challenges that are likely to be encountered in professional settings. Provides final preparation for the Professional Examinations.

In consecutive interpretation, emphasis is placed on both science and technology and political rhetoric, requiring particular attention to nuance and tone. Students learn the vernacular of political speeches and other challenging material while sharpening listening, processing, and notetaking functions.

In simultaneous interpretation, advanced instruction is given for difficult speeches. Emphasizes following the logic of complex scientific and technical discourse, and remaining faithful to the style and tone of persuasive political discourse. Students are also introduced to simultaneous interpretation with text. They learn how to draw upon outlines, transcripts, slides and transparencies, and other written materials to enhance the accuracy and completeness of their interpretation. Emphasis is placed on text preparation strategies and efficient use of textual materials while on the air.

Content on a wide range of topics and current events is interpreted, with emphasis placed on topics congruent with current market demand for interpretation in the relevant language combination(s). Course assignments include readings and research on class topics, presentations, practice, graded exercises, and peer and self-assessment.

At the end of the course, students are expected to interpret difficult speeches in professional settings. In consecutive, students are called upon to interpret passages that are several paragraphs in length. In simultaneous, students are able to interpret passages that are between fifteen and twenty minutes in length. The frequency, nature, and structure of course assignments and examinations are at the discretion of the instructor(s) of record.

Course prerequisites: Advanced Interpretation I or the equivalent

Spring 2014 - MIIS

More Information »

Language Tags
Extra Information

Education

Diploma in Translation and Conference Interpretation, United Nations Translators and Interpreters Program (now the Graduate School of Translation and Interpretation), Beijing Foreign Studies University; visiting student in the Department of Foreign Languages and Literature, Nanjing University, China; diploma in English language and literature, Xuzhou Normal University, China

Faculty Type
Regular Faculty
Dynamic Features
Course Catalog

Barry Slaughter Olsen

First Name
Barry
Last Name
Olsen
Barry Olsen Photo
Job Title
Associate Professor
Location
IIRC Building 5
Phone
831.647.4628
Language(s)
Español
Русский
português

Professor Olsen has been working as a conference interpreter and translator since 1993. Before joining our faculty, he was a translator in residence at American University in Washington, D.C. He has taught various courses on simultaneous and consecutive interpreting in the United States, Latin America and Europe. Over the years he has interpreted for the U.S. State Department, the Inter-American Development Bank, the Organization of American States, National Geographic Society, C-SPAN Television, and many other public and private sector clients.

Language Tags
Faculty Program Tags
Course List

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

TIAG 8604 - Practicum in Interpretation      

Facilitates the transition from the classroom to the first professional assignment by offering students a wide range of interpretation experiences. Advanced interpreting students become comfortable with working in settings in which different modes of interpretation are called for and where relay interpretation is the norm. Students provide simultaneous and consecutive interpretation at Monterey Institute public events and taped conferences, for Institute interdisciplinary courses, and as part of community outreach; they also work intensively together in multilingual practice groups during the semester. Reinforces the concept of reflective practice, requiring students to evaluate their own performance as well as that of their peers. Students are expected to complete an interpretation portfolio.

Fall 2013 - MIIS, Spring 2014 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS

More Information »

TIRU 8501 - Intro to Interp into English      

Introduces students to conference interpretation in general and consecutive interpretation in particular. Lays a foundation for the development of professional skills in consecutive interpretation, emphasizing the ability to understand and analyze a message in the source language (SL) and convey it in the target language (TL) in a straightforward and clear manner. Develops students’ ability to identify, analyze, and paraphrase the meaning in the SL and establish logical relations between its components. Emphasis is placed on active listening and concentration skills, memory, the ability to abstract information for subsequent recall, and basic elements of note-taking. At the end of the course, students are able to interpret extemporaneous passages that are on topics familiar to them and are between three and five minutes in length.

In language-specific sessions and joint sessions with other language programs, students are introduced to the skill of consecutive interpreting in both theory and practice. They practice listening to and repeating the content of passages of increasing length and difficulty. Students hone their public-speaking skills by developing and delivering speeches. Content is interpreted on topics from daily life, current events and the media, and general areas of personal interest to students.

Course assignments include readings and research on class topics, presentations, practice, graded exercises, and peer and self-assessment. The frequency, nature, and structure of course assignments and examinations are at the discretion of the instructor(s) of record.

Fall 2013 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS

More Information »

TIRU 8525 - Intrm Intrp-Consc into English      

Intermediate Interpretation – Consecutive and Simultaneous

Builds on the practical and theoretical foundation laid in Introduction to Interpretation. Consists of both language-specific and joint sessions with other language programs.

In consecutive, students learn to identify the implicit structural organization of an extemporaneous speech by presenting and interpreting speeches of this type. Reinforces ability to perceive essential meaning and further develops note-taking techniques. Emphasizes clarity of expression, correct style and grammar, proper diction, and polished presentation. Students also expand their active vocabulary to include the terms and idioms that frequently occur in extemporaneous speeches. At the end of the course, students are able to interpret passages that are delivered extemporaneously, are of moderate difficulty, and are derived from professional settings. These passages vary from one to several paragraphs in length depending upon language combination, direction, and source content.

In simultaneous, students are introduced to basic strategies of interpreting in this mode in the booth. Begins with a general introduction and follows up with a series of preparatory exercises helping students develop the concentration necessary for listening and speaking at the same time, mastering voice management, and acquiring smooth delivery techniques. Students learn to analyze discourse for meaning while rendering a coherent version in the TL with correct grammar, diction and style. At the end of the course, students are able to interpret passages that are between eight and ten minutes in length.

Content on a wide range of topics and current events is interpreted, with some emphasis placed on business and economics. Course assignments include readings and research on class topics, presentations, practice, graded exercises, and peer and self-assessment. The frequency, nature, and structure of course assignments and examinations are at the discretion of the instructor(s) of record.

Course prerequisites: Introduction to Interpretation or the equivalent

Spring 2014 - MIIS, Spring 2015 - MIIS

More Information »

TIRU 8527 - Intrm Intrp-Siml into English      

The course introduces basic skills in simultaneous conference interpretation from Russian into English. Various contemporary texts in Russian by a variety of speakers (mass media, presentations, conference papers) are used to practice simultaneous interpretation skills in class and to illustrate the process of interpretation. Classes include interpretation sessions, theoretical discussions and exercises. Major topics covered by the course are: stages of simultaneous interpretation from Russian into English, Russian language source text analysis, semantic transformations, input-output lag management, output quality control, mental preparedness. Special attention is paid to voice quality and voice training as needed by individual students. Students will have an opportunity to build basic simultaneous interpretation skills and improve their knowledge of Russian realia and their cultural knowledge to prepare themselves for more advanced texts and exercises. Reading assignments are required.

Final semester grade is calculated based on the midterm exam (30%), the semester exam (30%) and classroom performance (40%).

Spring 2014 - MIIS, Spring 2015 - MIIS

More Information »

TIRU 8635 - Adv Intrp I Consc into English      

This is the first of two complementary courses designed to bring interpretation knowledge and skills up to the professional level. Students are expected to apply the knowledge and skills acquired during the first-year interpretation courses to produce interpretations that would be of acceptable quality in a professional setting. Content on a wide range of topics and current events is interpreted, with emphasis placed on business, economics, science, technology, and other topics congruent with current market demand for interpretation in the language combination in question. Course assignments include readings and research on class topics, presentations, practice, graded exercises, and peer and self-assessment.

In consecutive interpretation, students prepare by researching topics before each session, with emphasis on sequential logic in notetaking and accurate terminology in delivery. Students continue to hone their skills by diagnosing and correcting problems at all stages from listening through delivery, while progressing to increasingly difficult and challenging material. In simultaneous interpretation, the techniques learned in the previous semester are consolidated, which enables students to polish their delivery and language register. Focuses on nuance of meaning, accuracy of interpretation, research and preparation for conferences, and glossary development. Special attention is given to maintaining concentration while under significant psychological stress. Students learn to recognize SL discourse patterns and render them effectively in TL.

At the end of the course, students are able to interpret difficult passages that are derived from professional settings. In consecutive, students are able to interpret passages up to several paragraphs in length. In simultaneous interpretation, students are able to interpret passages that are between fifteen and twenty minutes in length. The frequency, nature, and structure of course assignments and examinations are at the discretion of the instructor(s) of record.

Fall 2014 - MIIS

More Information »

TIRU 8645 - Adv Intrp II-Consc to English      

The course is designed to continue building students’ consecutive interpretation skills for the Russian into English combination with the goal of preparing for Professional Exams. Heavy emphasis is placed on learning to interpret high register political texts from Russian into English as may be done in the context of major international organizations. Topics include: current political events, international organizations, diplomatic protocol, nonproliferation of nuclear weapons, resolution of political and economic conflicts. Students are expected to be able to interpret in a variety of simulated professional situations.

Final semester grade is calculated based on the midterm exam (30%), the semester exam (30%) and classroom performance (40%).

Spring 2014 - MIIS

More Information »

TISP 8501 - Intro to Interp into English      

Introduces students to conference interpretation in general and consecutive interpretation in particular. Lays a foundation for the development of professional skills in consecutive interpretation, emphasizing the ability to understand and analyze a message in the source language (SL) and convey it in the target language (TL) in a straightforward and clear manner. Develops students’ ability to identify, analyze, and paraphrase the meaning in the SL and establish logical relations between its components. Emphasis is placed on active listening and concentration skills, memory, the ability to abstract information for subsequent recall, and basic elements of note-taking. At the end of the course, students are able to interpret extemporaneous passages that are on topics familiar to them and are between three and five minutes in length.

In language-specific sessions and joint sessions with other language programs, students are introduced to the skill of consecutive interpreting in both theory and practice. They practice listening to and repeating the content of passages of increasing length and difficulty. Students hone their public-speaking skills by developing and delivering speeches. Content is interpreted on topics from daily life, current events and the media, and general areas of personal interest to students.

Course assignments include readings and research on class topics, presentations, practice, graded exercises, and peer and self-assessment. The frequency, nature, and structure of course assignments and examinations are at the discretion of the instructor(s) of record.

Fall 2013 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS

More Information »

TISP 8525 - Intrm Intrp-Consc into English      

Intermediate Interpretation – Consecutive and Simultaneous

Builds on the practical and theoretical foundation laid in Introduction to Interpretation. Consists of both language-specific and joint sessions with other language programs.

In consecutive, students learn to identify the implicit structural organization of an extemporaneous speech by presenting and interpreting speeches of this type. Reinforces ability to perceive essential meaning and further develops note-taking techniques. Emphasizes clarity of expression, correct style and grammar, proper diction, and polished presentation. Students also expand their active vocabulary to include the terms and idioms that frequently occur in extemporaneous speeches. At the end of the course, students are able to interpret passages that are delivered extemporaneously, are of moderate difficulty, and are derived from professional settings. These passages vary from one to several paragraphs in length depending upon language combination, direction, and source content.

In simultaneous, students are introduced to basic strategies of interpreting in this mode in the booth. Begins with a general introduction and follows up with a series of preparatory exercises helping students develop the concentration necessary for listening and speaking at the same time, mastering voice management, and acquiring smooth delivery techniques. Students learn to analyze discourse for meaning while rendering a coherent version in the TL with correct grammar, diction and style. At the end of the course, students are able to interpret passages that are between eight and ten minutes in length.

Content on a wide range of topics and current events is interpreted, with some emphasis placed on business and economics. Course assignments include readings and research on class topics, presentations, practice, graded exercises, and peer and self-assessment. The frequency, nature, and structure of course assignments and examinations are at the discretion of the instructor(s) of record.

Course prerequisites: Introduction to Interpretation or the equivalent

Spring 2014 - MIIS, Spring 2015 - MIIS

More Information »

TISP 8637 - Adv Intrp I Simul into English      

This is the first of two complementary courses designed to bring interpretation knowledge and skills up to the professional level. Students are expected to apply the knowledge and skills acquired during the first-year interpretation courses to produce interpretations that would be of acceptable quality in a professional setting. Content on a wide range of topics and current events is interpreted, with emphasis placed on business, economics, science, technology, and other topics congruent with current market demand for interpretation in the language combination in question. Course assignments include readings and research on class topics, presentations, practice, graded exercises, and peer and self-assessment.

In consecutive interpretation, students prepare by researching topics before each session, with emphasis on sequential logic in notetaking and accurate terminology in delivery. Students continue to hone their skills by diagnosing and correcting problems at all stages from listening through delivery, while progressing to increasingly difficult and challenging material. In simultaneous interpretation, the techniques learned in the previous semester are consolidated, which enables students to polish their delivery and language register. Focuses on nuance of meaning, accuracy of interpretation, research and preparation for conferences, and glossary development. Special attention is given to maintaining concentration while under significant psychological stress. Students learn to recognize SL discourse patterns and render them effectively in TL.

At the end of the course, students are able to interpret difficult passages that are derived from professional settings. In consecutive, students are able to interpret passages up to several paragraphs in length. In simultaneous interpretation, students are able to interpret passages that are between fifteen and twenty minutes in length. The frequency, nature, and structure of course assignments and examinations are at the discretion of the instructor(s) of record.

Fall 2013 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS

More Information »

TISP 8647 - Adv Intrp II-Siml into English      

Advanced Interpretation II – Consecutive and Simultaneous

This course is the counterpart to Advanced Interpretation I. Students are expected to interpret speeches of considerable difficulty and complexity and to cope with the types of challenges that are likely to be encountered in professional settings. Provides final preparation for the Professional Examinations.

In consecutive interpretation, emphasis is placed on both science and technology and political rhetoric, requiring particular attention to nuance and tone. Students learn the vernacular of political speeches and other challenging material while sharpening listening, processing, and notetaking functions.

In simultaneous interpretation, advanced instruction is given for difficult speeches. Emphasizes following the logic of complex scientific and technical discourse, and remaining faithful to the style and tone of persuasive political discourse. Students are also introduced to simultaneous interpretation with text. They learn how to draw upon outlines, transcripts, slides and transparencies, and other written materials to enhance the accuracy and completeness of their interpretation. Emphasis is placed on text preparation strategies and efficient use of textual materials while on the air.

Content on a wide range of topics and current events is interpreted, with emphasis placed on topics congruent with current market demand for interpretation in the relevant language combination(s). Course assignments include readings and research on class topics, presentations, practice, graded exercises, and peer and self-assessment.

At the end of the course, students are expected to interpret difficult speeches in professional settings. In consecutive, students are called upon to interpret passages that are several paragraphs in length. In simultaneous, students are able to interpret passages that are between fifteen and twenty minutes in length. The frequency, nature, and structure of course assignments and examinations are at the discretion of the instructor(s) of record.

Course prerequisites: Advanced Interpretation I or the equivalent

Spring 2014 - MIIS, Spring 2015 - MIIS

More Information »

MIIS Tags
Expertise

Simultaneous and consecutive interpretation, interpreter training and education, multilingual negotiations, political and diplomatic discourse, and interpreting and technology.

Extra Information

Recent Accomplishments

In 2014, Professor Olsen, together with fellow MIIS Professor Holly Mikkelson, published the English translation of From Paris to Nuremberg: The birth of conference interpreting (John Benjamins, Amsterdam, 2014). Originally written in Spanish by Jesús Baigorri-Jalón, the book is a seminal work on the genesis of conference interpreting and chronicles its development from the 1919 Paris Peace Conference to the end of the Nuremberg Trials after World War II.

Outside of class, he continues to work as a conference interpreter. His most recent assignments include the 2014 Ibero-American Presidential Summit in Veracruz, and the G20 Summit in Cabo San Lucas, Mexico, and the annual International Drug Enforcement Conference (IDEC).

Professor Olsen’s research over the last five years helped to create a patented cloud-based multi-channel audio conferencing system that makes remote simultaneous interpreting for teleconferences possible. The system is now used by organizations around the world to conduct virtual meetings in multiple languages with the help of remote simultaneous interpretation. He continues to research the use of technology to provide interpreting services in new ways.

In 2011, Professor Olsen was instrumental in the negotiation of a memorandum of understanding signed with the Organization of American States for the creation of a postgraduate conference interpreter and translator training experience for qualified Monterey Institute graduates.

Publications

Interpreting in the 21st Century: Bigger, More Diverse, Different, Olsen, Barry Slaughter, GALAxy Q3 Newsletter, September 2014.

Sound Brazilian! App. Intended for speakers of Spanish who would like to learn or are already learning Portuguese, it offers more than 50 tips on the words and phrases that speakers of Spanish who are learning Brazilian Portuguese find the trickiest to use correctly. B. Olsen, E. Brown and G. Silva, April 2014.

One Interpreting Practice Book to Train Them All, Olsen, Barry Slaughter, The ATA Chronicle, September 2013.

Interpreting and the Digital Revolution. Olsen, Barry Slaughter, The ATA Chronicle, January 2012.

Interpreting: Full Speed Ahead, Blazing a Trail Toward National Unity. Bancroft, Marjory, with Olsen, Barry S. and Allen, Katharine, 2011.

Brief of Amici Curiae: Interpreting and Translation Professors in Support of Petitioner, Brief submitted to the Supreme Court of the United States in the case Kouichi Taniguchi v. Kan Pacific Saipan, Ltd., 2011. 

Translations 

From Paris to Nuremberg: The birth of conference interpreting, (Translated from the original Spanish by Holly Mikkelson and Barry Slaughter Olsen). Jesús Baigorri-Jalón, John Benjamins, June 2014

How Do You Do That? (Translated from the original Portuguese by Barry Slaughter Olsen). Magalhaes, Ewandro, The ATA Chronicle, April 2010.

Education

MA, Conference Interpretation (English, Spanish, Russian), Monterey Institute of International Studies, BA, Spanish Translation, Brigham Young University

Faculty Type
Regular Faculty
Dynamic Features
Course Catalog

Anna Vassilieva

First Name
Anna
Last Name
Vassilieva
Anna Vassilieva, Professor, Image
Job Title
Professor
Location
McGowan Building 200A
Phone
831.647.3546
Language(s)
Русский

Professor Vassilieva is a teacher, author, translator and editor. She authored The Russian Émigré Presson Democracy in Russia, 1980-1990s, co-authored a study Influence on Russian Culture on RussianNegotiating Style, co-edited Russia and East Asia: Informal and Gradual Integration, Crossing NationalBorders : Human Migration Issues in Northeast Asia, translated Dead End: the Road to Afghanistan, The Road to Home, Colors of Jazz.

MIIS Tags
Faculty Program Tags
Expertise

Contemporary Russian politics, Russian politics in Central Asia, Russian culture and society, Siberia, Russians in Japan.

Dr. Vassilieva interviewed on PBS's NewHour

Course List

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

RULA 8452 - VladimrPutin:Russia&ItsPrsidnt      

Fall 2013 - MIIS, Fall 2015 - MIIS

More Information »

RULA 8484 - Modern Russia in War & Peace      

Fall 2014 - MIIS

More Information »

RULA 8520 - Individual Research Projects      

Fall 2013 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS

More Information »

RULA 8530 - Individual Research Projcts II      

Spring 2015 - MIIS

More Information »

Language Tags
Extra Information

Education

Ph.D., History, Russian Diplomatic Academy; BA, MA, Irkutsk State Linguistic University

Faculty Type
Regular Faculty
Dynamic Features
Course Catalog

Kathleen M. Bailey

First Name
Kathleen
Last Name
Bailey
Kathleen Bailey, Professor of International Education Management, IEM, Image
Job Title
Professor
Location
McCone Building 208
Phone
831.647.4181

Professor Bailey is currently serving as President and Chair of The International Research Foundation for English Language Education (TIRF). With her work for TIRF, Professor Bailey and the TIRF Board of Trustees are seeking to promote effective practices in the use of English in the emerging global knowledge economy of the 21st century. She has conducted teacher training activities, including leading workshops and teaching courses, in thirty different countries.

Faculty Program Tags
MIIS Tags
Course List

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

EDUC 8505 - Intro to Classroom Observation      

Develops skills in classroom observation and an understanding of observation as a fundamental professional development and research activity.

Spring 2015 - MIIS

More Information »

EDUC 8540 - Language Assessment      

Considers issues in language assessment including reliability, validity, test bias, and authenticity. Examines differences and similarities among placement, proficiency, achievement, aptitude, and performance testing. Explores alternative evaluation procedures. Prepares students to evaluate tests and to develop original language tests. Prerequisites: Language Analysis and Educational Research Methods.

Fall 2013 - MIIS, Spring 2014 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS, Fall 2015 - MIIS

More Information »

EDUC 8660 - Intro to Language Prog Admin      

Presents a practical overview of problems, situations and issues occurring in the management of language programs. Provides participants with an opportunity to shadow a language program administrator and later to complete an administrative internship.

Spring 2014 - MIIS, Spring 2015 - MIIS

More Information »

EDUC 8661 - Language Teacher Supervision      

Provides language teachers with the skills and knowledge necessary to meet the challenges of supervision. Examines current models of, and research on, language teacher supervision. Students practice observing teachers and conducting post-observation conferences, developing their ability to provide professional feedback, differentiate between evaluative and developmental supervision, and examine the variables related to working with teachers in a variety of specific contexts.

Fall 2013 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS, Fall 2015 - MIIS

More Information »

EDUC 8662 - Language Teacher Education      

Investigates issues related to teacher training, education and development. Examines various philosophies and models of pre-service and in-service programs for training language teachers, thus building professional skills for students to be competent and confident teacher educators. Participants examine their own language learning and teaching histories to determine the influence of those histories on their future roles as teacher educators. Each participant also designs an original teacher training program.

Spring 2014 - MIIS, Spring 2015 - MIIS

More Information »

LING 8640 - Applied Linguistics Research      

Requires original research to be conducted by the student on issues such as language attitudes, cultural variables, language learning, or other topics from sociolinguistics and second language acquisition. Introduces a range of research methods, including exposure to various data collection and analysis procedures in both the qualitative and quantitative research traditions.

Fall 2013 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS, Spring 2015 - MIIS, Fall 2015 - MIIS

More Information »

Expertise

Applied linguistics research, assessment, teacher education, language program administration, language teacher supervision

Extra Information

Education

PhD, Applied Linguistics; MA, TESOL, University of California, Los Angeles

Faculty Type
Regular Faculty
Dynamic Features
Course Catalog

Pages