Lyuba Zarsky

First Name
Lyuba
Last Name
Zarsky
Lyuba Zarsky, Professor, Image
Job Title
Associate Professor
Location
McGowan 320B
Phone
831.647.6436
Language(s)
Español

Professor Zarsky has a PhD in Economics and has a distinguished record of professional experience and publication in the fields of sustainable development and business and sustainability.

Faculty Program Tags
Short Programs & Research Centers
Course List

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

IEPG 8507 - Governing the Global Commons      

Earth’s life-supporting eco-systems are in crisis due to unsustainable human practices, especially economic production and consumption. At the same time, deep global economic inequities leave more than half of the world’s people living in poverty. The overarching aim of international environmental cooperation is to point human societies towards patterns of ecologically sustainable and equitable development.

This course provides an introduction to the political dynamics, legal structure, and institutions of international cooperation aimed at sustainable governance of the earth’s eco-systems. The course is in three parts.

Part One first examines global environmental problems and politics. After a brief look at the current state of global eco-system services, we examine the logic of global collective action via classical and cosmopolitan concepts of “the commons”. We then explore North-South conflicts based on perceived trade-offs between “environment” and “development” and evaluate current paradigms of economic and population growth.

Part Two examines the key principles, institutions, and treaties of international environmental law. We first examine the foundations of international environmental law, including legal principles, customary norms, and the treaty making process. We then explore treaties covering the atmosphere, viz, the Montreal Protocol and the climate regime, as well as the ocean and bio-diversity. We also consider the role of climate-geo-engineering in mitigating climate change and evaluate the technological, governance and ethical dilemmas it poses. Part Two concludes by examining the effectiveness of international environmental law to date in increasing the resilience of global eco-systems.

Part Three examines global collective action from the perspective of “global environmental governance” (GEG). We explore the role of non-state actors, especially business, scientists, and NGOs, and the efficacy of “soft law” and voluntary standards in changing global business practice. We examine the theory of network analysis and consider how networked governance is evident in multi-level approaches to GEG, including city actions on climate change and regional approaches to trans-boundary resource management.

Spring 2013 - MIIS, Fall 2013 - MIIS, Spring 2015 - MIIS

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IEPG 8598 - Business,Sustainablity&Society      

This course provides a foundation in the core concepts and strategic management tools in the dynamic field of global business sustainability. The central aim of the course is to prepare students to design and lead sustainability innovations in or in partnership with global business organizations. Students will work in teams to produce a sustainability strategy for a global corporation.

The course covers six key topics:

• Global sustainability challenges and the role of business in responding to them;

• New social expectations of business and the promise and limitations of corporate social responsibility;

• Sustainability as global business strategy and opportunity;

• Business opportunity and challenges in promoting development in poor markets;

• Managing sustainability, including performance metrics, partnerships, and financing

• Public policy innovations that support business sustainability.

Fall 2013 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS

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IEPG 8611 - Sustainable Coastal Management      

The coast is the most dynamic landscape on earth. It changes every time a wave breaks, a tide changes, or streams flow. About seventy percent of the world’s population lives within 100 km of the coast. This course provides a foundation in the core scientific principles, governance frameworks, and economic challenges and opportunities related to the quest for sustainable coastal management and adaptation. A central theme of the course is the need to assess and respond to coastal climate vulnerability, including via adaptive policy and planning at diverse scales of coastal governance. The case studies in the course encompass both developed and less developed countries, and an emphasis on management of large coastal cities, coastal ecosystems, and other coastal land-uses.

Spring 2013 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS

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IEPG 8623 - Sem:Bus Models for Sustain Dev      

This seminar explores the growing role of the private sector in promoting sustainable development goals in low and middle income countries through core business activities. The overarching aim of such business models is to reduce poverty and promote sustainability by: 1) stimulating access to global markets and supply chains; 2) delivering affordable and sustainable goods and services; 3) responding to the demands of climate change mitigation and adaptation; and/or 4) promoting local capacities for sustainable production. The seminar will examine case studies of five business models, ranging from small-scale, for-profit and non-profit enterprises to partnerships between multinational corporations and NGOs and/or development agencies. Students will work in teams to undertake their own case studies. Together, we will seek to draw lessons for scalability.

Spring 2013 - MIIS, Spring 2015 - MIIS

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IEPG 9530 - Business and Global Issues      

Whether in business, government, or NGOs, leadership requires honing the ability to make strategic decisions in a complex, dynamic and high-risk global context -- and often in high-pressure, short-deadline work environments. This Workshop will provide students a rich and realistic opportunity to work in just such an environment.

The Workshop will provide participants with a wealth of complicated material in a variety of formats related to our case: Goldcorp’s highly conflicted Marlin gold mine in Guatemala. Students will be familiar with the case materials prior to the first meeting of the Workshop; the initial class will, through a series of group exercises, provide a platform for addressing issues of economic development, environmental risk, human rights, government policy, global business norms, chronic violence, and international trade and investment rules. How those dimensions are prioritized, conceptualized and understood will largely be student-driven, with the instructors playing a supportive role. Students will then be encouraged to explore, adapt and apply “solution” methodologies, which could include cost-benefit, risk assessment, and risk-performance analyses, scenario creation, deliberative stakeholder engagement, and supply chain reconfiguration.

Students will work in groups to combine issue knowledge and problem-solving methods to define and evaluate strategic options for different players—the company, the government, and the local communities and their NGO allies. This group work will largely be carried out in the lapse between the two class meetings; students will draw upon the expertise of GSIPM faculty (and possibly others) as needed. The second class meeting will end with a series of group presentations of their proposed solutions to the case problem, and a comparative assessment of the proposals by students and faculty.

The Workshop pilots an innovative “raw” case-study pedagogical approach to understand urgent global issues and build competencies to frame and address them. Our hope is to incorporate the lessons of this workshop to scale this approach up to a regular 2-credit course in the Fall, 2014 semester.

Spring 2014 - MIIS

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IMGT 8614 - Business,Sustainablity&Society      

Fall 2012 - MIIS

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IPMG 8530 - Business and Global Issues      

Whether in business, government, or NGOs, leadership requires honing the ability to make strategic decisions in a complex, dynamic and high-risk global context -- and often in high-pressure, short-deadline work environments. This Workshop will provide students a rich and realistic opportunity to work in just such an environment.

The Workshop will provide participants with a wealth of complicated material in a variety of formats related to our case: Goldcorp’s highly conflicted Marlin gold mine in Guatemala. Students will be familiar with the case materials prior to the first meeting of the Workshop; the initial class will, through a series of group exercises, provide a platform for addressing issues of economic development, environmental risk, human rights, government policy, global business norms, chronic violence, and international trade and investment rules. How those dimensions are prioritized, conceptualized and understood will largely be student-driven, with the instructors playing a supportive role. Students will then be encouraged to explore, adapt and apply “solution” methodologies, which could include cost-benefit, risk assessment, and risk-performance analyses, scenario creation, deliberative stakeholder engagement, and supply chain reconfiguration.

Students will work in groups to combine issue knowledge and problem-solving methods to define and evaluate strategic options for different players—the company, the government, and the local communities and their NGO allies. This group work will largely be carried out in the lapse between the two class meetings; students will draw upon the expertise of GSIPM faculty (and possibly others) as needed. The second class meeting will end with a series of group presentations of their proposed solutions to the case problem, and a comparative assessment of the proposals by students and faculty.

The Workshop pilots an innovative “raw” case-study pedagogical approach to understand urgent global issues and build competencies to frame and address them. Our hope is to incorporate the lessons of this workshop to scale this approach up to a regular 2-credit course in the Fall, 2014 semester.

Spring 2014 - MIIS

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IPOL 8506 - Public Policy & the Environmnt      

This two-unit course provides a foundation in the paradigms, principles, and tools that shape public policy in the service of environmental protection and sustainable development. We will first explore the sources and dynamics of public policymaking and the fundamental principles of environmental policy, including sustainability, precaution and cost internalization. We will then examine three policy paradigms: 1) regulatory (command and control); 2) collaborative (stakeholder based); and 3) market-based. For each paradigm, we will consider case studies of global and national policy options for particular environmental problems, including forest degradation and carbon emissions. Examples of policy options include substantive and process standards; taxes; eco-system service payments; public investment; etc. Students will work in a team to produce a policy analysis of a major environmental problem.

Fall 2010 - MIIS, Fall 2011 - MIIS, Fall 2012 - MIIS

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IPOL 8507 - Intl Environmental Law&Politcs      

This course provides a foundation in the core concepts, actors, drivers and institutions of global environmental politics and governance. The first half of the class focuses on global environmental politics and the second on international environmental law and more broadly, global environmental governance (GEG). The first half of the class is divided into two parts. Part One explores the state of the global environment, the nature of global environmental problems and the key actors in global environmental politics. Part Two examines seven underlying drivers of global environmental degradation: 1) technology, especially energy; 2) consumption; 3) values/cultural norms; 4) globalization; 5) capitalism and the growth imperative; 6) poverty and inequality; and 7 population growth. For each driver, we will explore a core conceptual framework and then consider and critically evaluate how it relates to global environmental problems, especially climate change. The second half of the class will examine international environmental regimes, including legal treaties and “soft law”. It will evaluate the overall effectiveness of global environmental governance (GEG) in addressing the underlying drivers of global environmental degradation and solving global environmental problems, especially climate change and biodiversity loss. The course will analyze and debate proposals to improve GEG, including the creation of a World Environment Organization, an increased role for regional governance, and a “multi-level” approach centered on a greater role for cities.

Fall 2010 - MIIS, Spring 2011 - MIIS, Fall 2011 - MIIS, Spring 2012 - MIIS

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IPOL 8598 - Business,Sustainablity&Society      

Fall 2012 - MIIS

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IPOL 8617 - Sem:Partner w/Bus.for Sust.Dev      

Business is increasingly partnering with governments and NGOs to deliver a wide variety of global sustainable development goals, including poverty reduction, carbon mitigation, clean energy, access to clean water, and eco-resilience and climate adaptation. While there have some high-profile success stories, business partnerships have also suffered from "culture clashes", lack of clarity about goals, poor performance measurement, and lack of accountability mechanisms.

This course examines and critically evaluates four types of emerging global business partnerships: 1) business-government “private-public” partnerships in the provision of public infrastructure, especially water; 2) multi-stakeholder “collaborative governance” of global markets (e.g. forests, sea food, bio-fuels); 3) capacity-building business-NGO partnerships involving business philanthropy; and 4) “investment” partnerships aimed at increasing finance for sustainable development.

We will first explore the context for the emergence of business partnerships, examine the meaning and measurement of "sustainable development", and consider obstacles in both business and NGO culture to effective partnering. We will then examine case studies of the four types of partnerships in developing countries and conclude by considering what innovations in business, NGO and government practice would make partnerships more effective, scale-able and accountable. Students will work in teams to produce and orally present a collaborative case study.

Spring 2012 - MIIS

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IPOL 8623 - Sem:Bus Models for Sustain Dev      

This seminar explores the growing role of the private sector in promoting sustainable development goals in low and middle income countries through core business activities. The overarching aim of such business models is to reduce poverty and promote sustainability by: 1) stimulating access to global markets and supply chains; 2) delivering affordable and sustainable goods and services; 3) responding to the demands of climate change mitigation and adaptation; and/or 4) promoting local capacities for sustainable production. The seminar will examine case studies of five business models, ranging from small-scale, for-profit and non-profit enterprises to partnerships between multinational corporations and NGOs and/or development agencies. Students will work in teams to undertake their own case studies. Together, we will seek to draw lessons for scalability.

Fall 2010 - MIIS, Fall 2011 - MIIS

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IPOL 8665 - Sem: Climate & Development      

This seminar explores emerging thinking and practice about climate resilient, low carbon development paths. The course is in three parts. After examining the economic challenges posed by climate change, Part I defines “climate resilient development” and probes design principles and alternative models. Part II examines the challenge of financing transitions to climate resilient, low-carbon development and considers public, private, and public-private initiatives at multiple scales (from global adaptation funds to micro-asset investors). Part III explores methodologies for selecting climate resilience among alternative investment options and examines case studies of climate resilient development at the project, city, sector, and national levels. The case studies highlight the roles of public policy and multi-stakeholder collaborative governance. The course consists of one third professor lecture, one third guest speakers, and one third student-led discussions and exercises. Students will produce a case study of climate resilient development and participate in a class debate.

Spring 2011 - MIIS

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IPSG 9530 - Business and Global Issues      

Whether in business, government, or NGOs, leadership requires honing the ability to make strategic decisions in a complex, dynamic and high-risk global context -- and often in high-pressure, short-deadline work environments. This Workshop will provide students a rich and realistic opportunity to work in just such an environment.

The Workshop will provide participants with a wealth of complicated material in a variety of formats related to our case: Goldcorp’s highly conflicted Marlin gold mine in Guatemala. Students will be familiar with the case materials prior to the first meeting of the Workshop; the initial class will, through a series of group exercises, provide a platform for addressing issues of economic development, environmental risk, human rights, government policy, global business norms, chronic violence, and international trade and investment rules. How those dimensions are prioritized, conceptualized and understood will largely be student-driven, with the instructors playing a supportive role. Students will then be encouraged to explore, adapt and apply “solution” methodologies, which could include cost-benefit, risk assessment, and risk-performance analyses, scenario creation, deliberative stakeholder engagement, and supply chain reconfiguration.

Students will work in groups to combine issue knowledge and problem-solving methods to define and evaluate strategic options for different players—the company, the government, and the local communities and their NGO allies. This group work will largely be carried out in the lapse between the two class meetings; students will draw upon the expertise of GSIPM faculty (and possibly others) as needed. The second class meeting will end with a series of group presentations of their proposed solutions to the case problem, and a comparative assessment of the proposals by students and faculty.

The Workshop pilots an innovative “raw” case-study pedagogical approach to understand urgent global issues and build competencies to frame and address them. Our hope is to incorporate the lessons of this workshop to scale this approach up to a regular 2-credit course in the Fall, 2014 semester.

Spring 2014 - MIIS

More Information »

MBAG 9530 - Business and Global Issues      

Whether in business, government, or NGOs, leadership requires honing the ability to make strategic decisions in a complex, dynamic and high-risk global context -- and often in high-pressure, short-deadline work environments. This Workshop will provide students a rich and realistic opportunity to work in just such an environment.

The Workshop will provide participants with a wealth of complicated material in a variety of formats related to our case: Goldcorp’s highly conflicted Marlin gold mine in Guatemala. Students will be familiar with the case materials prior to the first meeting of the Workshop; the initial class will, through a series of group exercises, provide a platform for addressing issues of economic development, environmental risk, human rights, government policy, global business norms, chronic violence, and international trade and investment rules. How those dimensions are prioritized, conceptualized and understood will largely be student-driven, with the instructors playing a supportive role. Students will then be encouraged to explore, adapt and apply “solution” methodologies, which could include cost-benefit, risk assessment, and risk-performance analyses, scenario creation, deliberative stakeholder engagement, and supply chain reconfiguration.

Students will work in groups to combine issue knowledge and problem-solving methods to define and evaluate strategic options for different players—the company, the government, and the local communities and their NGO allies. This group work will largely be carried out in the lapse between the two class meetings; students will draw upon the expertise of GSIPM faculty (and possibly others) as needed. The second class meeting will end with a series of group presentations of their proposed solutions to the case problem, and a comparative assessment of the proposals by students and faculty.

The Workshop pilots an innovative “raw” case-study pedagogical approach to understand urgent global issues and build competencies to frame and address them. Our hope is to incorporate the lessons of this workshop to scale this approach up to a regular 2-credit course in the Fall, 2014 semester.

Spring 2014 - MIIS

More Information »

MBAG 9614 - Business,Sustainablity&Society      

This course provides a foundation in the core concepts and strategic management tools in the dynamic field of global business sustainability. The central aim of the course is to prepare students to design and lead sustainability innovations in or in partnership with global business organizations. Students will work in teams to produce a sustainability strategy for a global corporation.

The course covers six key topics:

• Global sustainability challenges and the role of business in responding to them;

• New social expectations of business and the promise and limitations of corporate social responsibility;

• Sustainability as global business strategy and opportunity;

• Business opportunity and challenges in promoting development in poor markets;

• Managing sustainability, including performance metrics, partnerships, and financing

• Public policy innovations that support business sustainability.

Fall 2013 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS

More Information »

MBAG 9623 - Sem:Bus Models for Sustain Dev      

This seminar explores the growing role of the private sector in promoting sustainable development goals in low and middle income countries through core business activities. The overarching aim of such business models is to reduce poverty and promote sustainability by: 1) stimulating access to global markets and supply chains; 2) delivering affordable and sustainable goods and services; 3) responding to the demands of climate change mitigation and adaptation; and/or 4) promoting local capacities for sustainable production. The seminar will examine case studies of five business models, ranging from small-scale, for-profit and non-profit enterprises to partnerships between multinational corporations and NGOs and/or development agencies. Students will work in teams to undertake their own case studies. Together, we will seek to draw lessons for scalability.

Spring 2013 - MIIS, Spring 2015 - MIIS

More Information »

MIIS Tags
Expertise

Sustainable development, business and sustainability, foreign direct investment and the environment, collaborative governance, development economics, global environmental governance. 

Video interview of Dr. Zarsky

Extra Information

Education

Ph.D. Department of Economics, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, 2006; M.A. Economics, Department of Economics and Political Economy, New School for Social Research, New York 1986.

Publications

Can extractive industries promote sustainable development? A net benefits framework and a case study of the Marlin Mine in Guatemala, (co-author), Journal of Environment and Development, 20(2), 131-154, April, 2013.

Extractive industries and local communities: the elusive search for sustainable development, World Policy Review, July, 2013, available at http://www.worldpoliticsreview.com.

Searching for Gold in the Highlands of Guatemala: Economic Benefits and Environmental Risks of the Marlin Mine, (co-author), Global Development and Environment Institute, September, 2011.

"Climate Resilient Industrial Development: Design Principles and Alternative Models", in S.R. Khan and J. Christiansen, ed., Towards New Developmentalism: Market as Means Rather than Master, Routledge Economics, 2010.

Enclave Economy: Foreign Investment and Sustainable Development in Mexico’s Silicon Valley (co-author), Boston: MIT Press, 2007.

“No Miracle Drug: Foreign Direct Investment and Sustainable Development” (co-author), in L. Zarsky (ed.), International Investment for Sustainable Development: Balancing Rights and Rewards, London: Earthscan Press, 2005.

International Investment for Sustainable Development: Balancing Rights and Rewards (contributing editor), London: Earthscan Press, 2005.

“Stuck in the Mud? Nation-States, Globalisation and the Environment," in OECD, Globalisation and the Environment, Paris: OECD, 1997. Reprinted in K. Gallagher and J. Werksman (eds.), Earthscan Reader on International Trade and Sustainable Development, London:  Earthscan Press, 2002, pp. 19-44; and in  K. Conca and G. Dabelko, Green Planet Blues, Environmental Politics from Stockholm to Johannesberg, Westview Press, 2004.

Human Rights and the Environment: Conflicts and Norms in a Globalizing World (contributing editor) London: Earthscan Press, 2002.

Beyond Good Deeds: Case Studies and A New Policy Agenda for Corporate Accountability (co-author), Berkeley: Natural Heritage Institute, July 2002.

“APEC and the ‘Sustainable Development’ Agenda,’ in R. Steinberg (ed.), The Greening of Trade Law, Rowman and Littlefield, 2002.

“Global Reach: Human Rights and Environment in the Framework of Corporate Accountability,” in L. Zarsky (ed.), Human Rights and Environment: Conflicts and Norms in a Globalizing World, London: Earthscan Press, 2002, pp. 31-56.

“Civil Society and the Future of Environmental Governance in Asia,” (co-author), in D. Angel and M. Rock, (eds.), Asia's Clean Revolution: Industry, Growth and the Environment, Greenleaf Publishing, 2001, pp.128-154.

“From Bystanders to Collaborators, New Roles for Civil Society in Urban-Industrial Environmental Governance,” in Asian Development Bank, Asian Environment Outlook, Manila:  ADB, 2001.

“Environmental Norms in the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation Forum,” in D. Shelton (ed.), Commitment and Compliance, The Role of Non-Binding Norms in the International Legal System, New York: Oxford University Press, 2000, pp. 303-329.

“Havens, Halos, and Spaghetti: Untangling the Evidence About FDI and the Environment,” in OECD, Foreign Direct Investment and the Environment, Paris: OECD,  1999, pp. 47-74.

"Energy and the Environment in Asia-Pacific,” in P. Chasek, (ed.), The Global Environment in the 21st Century, Tokyo: United Nations University Press, 1999.

"Lessons of Liberalization in Asia: From Structural Adjustment to Sustainable Development," in Financing for Environmentally Sustainable Development,  Asian Development Bank: Manila, 1994.

“Towards an International Eco-Labeling Framework,” in OECD, Life Cycle Management and Trade, Paris: OECD, 1994, pp. 194-204.

“Sustainable Development: Challenges for Australia,” in Our Common Future, Australian Edition, Melbourne: Oxford University Press, 1990. Also published as a monograph by the Commission for the Future, Melbourne, February, 1990.

Faculty Type
Regular Faculty
Dynamic Features
Course Catalog

Jan Knippers Black

First Name
Jan
Last Name
Black
Jan Black 2
Job Title
Professor
Location
117 McCone
Phone
831.647.4180
Language(s)
Español
português

Professor Black’s international experience includes Senior Associate Membership at St. Antony’s College, Oxford University; Fulbright, Mellon and other grants and Fellowships in South America, the Caribbean, and India; on-site or short-term teaching and honorary faculty positions in several Latin American countries, and extensive overseas lecturing and research. She was also a Peace Corps Volunteer in Chile and a faculty member with the University of Pittsburgh’s Semester-at-Sea program.

Expertise

Human rights, international and comparative politics of the Western Hemisphere, international and grassroots development, women´s rights and roles, globalization

Faculty Program Tags
MIIS Tags
Course List

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

IPOL 8636 - SemMedia InIntl Public Affairs      

This course raises three basic questions about the media: How should its messages be read and understood, or "de-coded?" What is its role, or impact, as a social institution? And how might we use it effectively to promote policy or program objectives? We will deal with the impact of contemporary global trends on the profession of journalism and on the media industry and the influence of media coverage on policy approaches to urgent problems. And we will examine media self-assessment - that is, media coverage of media coverage of some particularly shocking events or controversial issues. Students will engage in some role-playing and will prepare Op-ed and article-length (8-10 pages) pieces for newspapers or magazines.

Spring 2011 - MIIS

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IPOL 8650 - Sem:HumanRgts ImpactAssessment      

Students will have an opportunity in this course to delve deeply into a human rights issue of their choosing. Working with national, international, or local organizations, and employing a range of instruments and assessment tools, they will identify abuses or protections and their systemic roots; assess directions, degrees, and modes of change in manifestations of impacts; and fashion strategies for meeting policy or programmatic objectives. Impact assessment papers prepared for the course may draw upon internship experience or fieldwork already completed or may serve as preparation for IPSS or other professional field experience.

Spring 2011 - MIIS, Spring 2012 - MIIS

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IPOL 8688 - Sem:W.Hemi:Politics&PolMaking      

This course will deal with the changing nature of issues, policy challenges, and alliances among Western Hemisphere states, including the United States and Canada, and between those states and the global community. Using teamwork and role-playing, students will consider the policy implications of such issues as national and indigenous resource rights versus multinational corporate claims; social activism, nationalism and secessionism; regional and cross-border environmental issues; anti-drug and anti-terrorist operations; economic integration, trade, aid, immigration, and human rights. Grades will be based on classroom participation and the preparation of policy-option briefs on three topics.

Fall 2010 - MIIS, Spring 2012 - MIIS

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IPSG 8522 / IPOL 8522 - Rethinking Human Rights      

his course approaches human rights issues from a multidisciplinary perspective and with a wide-angle lens that draws in all rights and all peoples. We view rights abuse as neither incomprehensible nor inevitable, but nevertheless pervasive in the twenty-first century. Nor is such abuse, with respect either to perpetrators or victims, confined to distant places and strange peoples. We will undertake here a fundamental re-examination of the basic terms and concepts, theories, controversies, and cleavages associated with human rights. We will also examine the effectiveness of our strategies, treaties, and institutions in assessing accountability, promoting reconciliation, and otherwise protecting the abused and endangered.

Fall 2010 - MIIS, Spring 2013 - MIIS

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IPSG 8530 - Cuba:ChngingCourse,ChngngTimes      

Spring 2013 - MIIS, Spring 2014 - MIIS, Spring 2015 - MIIS

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IPSG 8627 - HIstory,Culture&SocietyIn Iran      

History, Culture and Society in Iran

For most of the last half century, Iran has been an enigma, even to otherwise well-traveled Westerners. Politicians and pundits, especially from the United States, have generally painted a grim and monocromatic image of a country actually endowed with a multi-millenial history and a rich tapistry of tradition and culture. An ancient civilization, Iran offers its visitors a sense of time travel – in both directions – from the grandeur of Isfahan and UNESCO – protected Persepolis to the modern conveniences and cutting-edge scientific advancements show-cased inTehran.

GSIPM is offering this 2 or 4- credit hour onsite course in Iran, taught by Professor Jan Black, for the first time in 2015. We will cover many topics, as they relate to the history and trajectory of Iran. In addition to sites of great beauty and historic significance, we will visit governmental, non-governmental, and public sector institutions dealing with international affairs, education, theology, environmental preservation, and commerce, as well as museums displaying splenderous artistic creations of the past and cravings for peace in the future.

Full participation in scheduled events will be expected. Students will be challenged to integrate and analyze what they observe about the country’s history and culture and the thicket of traditional and modern institutions and organizations of civil society. It is our hope and expectation that we will be able to revisit and examine the troubled years of US – Iranian relations from an Iranian perspective. Students will be encouraged then to envision diplomatic strategies conducive to sustainable peace and normal productive relations.

In addition to time spent onsite over spring break, there will be at least 7 or 8 pre- and post-travel meetings on campus, including a final presentation of findings for the campus and local communities. We hope also to bring in several speakers to share their research on and their observations of contemporary Iran. The course will be open in principle to all MIIS programs, as well as to students from Middlebury College. There are no prerequisites, but priority will be given to students from the DPP (IPS & MPA) program. Beyond that, priority will be based on the student’s prior education and experience and his or her intended topic or focus for the course.

Course “deliverables” will be due shortly after the presentations to take place toward the end of spring term. Deliverables may take any of several forms (to be discussed with the professor), but they must represent a serious undertaking with respect to research and analysis. It is presumed that students will pursue their particular interests, but each project should be underpinned by an understanding of the country’s modern history, particularly diplomatic history, and its social and cultural foundations.

Spring 2015 - MIIS

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IPSG 8650 - SemHumnRgtsProtctn:StrtgPractc      

In this seminar students will undertake investigations, in some cases under the auspices of local, national, or international organizations, on the impact, for good or ill, of particular policies or programs. The resulting evidence of human rights abuse, or of effective human rights protection, will be employed in efforts to prevent abuse, rather than simply to monitor or report it. Students will therefore engage also in strategic planning for campaigns to move the intervention of activists upstream in the project design or policy-making process. Where feasible, the strategies formulated in class will be put into action – through existing organizations, like Amnesty International (for AIUSA, I will be trying to design an alert action system for policy), or through student-launched campaigns or NGOs.

Spring 2014 - MIIS

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IPSG 8672 / IPOL 8672 - Sem:Transitnal Injustice:Chile      

Spring 2012 - MIIS, Spring 2013 - MIIS, Spring 2014 - MIIS

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Extra Information

Interview with GlobalNet21

Education

PhD, International Studies, MA Latin American Studies, School of International Service, American University, Washington D.C.; B.A. Art and Spanish, University of Tennessee.

Faculty Type
Regular Faculty
Dynamic Features
Course Catalog

Edward J. Laurance

First Name
Edward
Last Name
Laurance
Ed Laurance
Job Title
Professor and Gordon Paul Smith Chair in International Policy and Development
Location
311 McCone
Phone
831.647.4144

I Believe:

One of the most critical challenges to development and indeed humanity is armed violence, especially in fragile states. This violence leads to death and injury, violations of human rights, lack of justice and the rule of law, lost productivity, lowering of already inadequate health budgets, and psychological costs. In short, development cannot proceed alongside such violence. I believe that this violence can and must be prevented, reduced and eventually eliminated. I have devoted most of my professional life to this end.

Expertise

Armed violence reduction, research methods for development practitioners, global governance, international organizations, proliferation and effects of conventional weapons and small arms, program evaluation and project management

Faculty Program Tags
MIIS Tags
Course List

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

IPMG 8526 - Implementing Humanitarianism      

This two-day workshop will provide participants with the knowledge and skills needed to adequately respond to disasters and post-conflict humanitarian emergencies. It focuses on implementing the core global standards described in the Sphere Handbook, which collects evidence-based universal minimum standards in four life-saving sectors: water supply, sanitation and hygiene promotion; food security and nutrition; shelter, settlement and non-food items; and health action. Based on moral and legal principles spelled out in the Humanitarian Charter, it also defines Protection Principles and Core Standards which inform any humanitarian response in a spirit of quality and accountability to the affected populations.

In preparing for the workshop, participants learn the basics of needs assessment and apply them to selected humanitarian emergences to include conflict, post-conflict and disaster situations. The first day of the workshop will cover the Sphere standards and how they are implemented, especially in the humanitarian emergencies studied prior to the course. The workshop will pay special attention to the protection of vulnerable populations during a disaster or conflict. Activities include practical team-based exercises, as well as interacting with real-world humanitarian emergency professionals, including Skype sessions with professionals in the field. The day concludes with assigning a team exercise on implementing Sphere standards to be presented and evaluated on the second day of the workshop. The final portion of the workshop is a personal reflection and assessment.

The workshop is designed for those participants who desire to work in humanitarian emergencies and disaster response. Sphere training is considered an essential qualification for such work. Given the continuing occurrence of conflicts, armed violence and natural disasters, opportunities for work in this field abound. The workshop provides critical skills for this work.

The lead instructor, Molly Lineberger, worked in Haiti for two and a half years with Catholic Relief Services, before, during and after the earthquake of January 2010. She has extensive experience in the application of the Sphere standards, to include training humanitarian staff in these standards. Professor Ed Laurance has extensive knowledge and experience working on armed violence and its humanitarian effects.

Spring 2013 - MIIS

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IPMG 8541 - ResrchMethdsForDvlpmntPractice      

The focus of this course is on the methods used in designing, implementing and evaluating development programs, broadly defined. The methods covered are those currently in use in a variety of contexts. Examples of methods covered include data analysis (SPSS and Excel), survey research, interviewing, key informant interviewing, focus groups, direct observation, developing tools for analysis, rapid assessment, stakeholder analysis and conflict analysis. The methods will be taught in modular form, all involving completing a small team project utilizing the method. While much of the work will be done in teams, each student will be evaluated separately. Some projects will be conducted with local government and nonprofit organizations, while others will involve the MIIS community.

Fall 2013 - MIIS

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IPOL 8541 - ResrchMethdsForDvlpmntPractice      

The focus of this course is on the methods used in designing, implementing and evaluating development programs, broadly defined. The methods covered are those currently in use in a variety of contexts. Examples of methods covered include data analysis (SPSS and Excel), survey research, interviewing, key informant interviewing, focus groups, direct observation, developing tools for analysis, rapid assessment, stakeholder analysis and conflict analysis. The methods will be taught in modular form, all involving completing a small team project utilizing the method. While much of the work will be done in teams, each student will be evaluated separately. Some projects will be conducted with local government and nonprofit organizations, while others will involve the MIIS community.

Fall 2012 - MIIS

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IPOL 8582 - Evaluation Methods      

The course is designed for all students in all GSIPM curricula seeking to add the critical skill of program evaluation to their portfolio. For MPA students it counts as one of the three Program Evaluation courses that satisfy that MPA core requirement. The course is organized in three parts. In the first quarter of the course we look at program evaluation --- “a robust arena of activity directed at collecting, analyzing, interpreting, and communicating information about the effectiveness of social programs undertaken for the purpose of improving social conditions”-- - in its practical application: purposes and types of evaluations, participants and stakeholders, identifying issues and formulating questions, needs assessment, assessing program theory, program monitoring and strategies for impact assessment. In the second quarter of the course we systematically explore the various data-generation methods used in program evaluation. Methods to be examined may include but are not limited to statistical analysis, survey research, key informant interviews, field research and observation, focus groups, and ethnographic techniques. In the last half of the course students will conduct an evaluation of actual programs conducted in the larger Monterey area, using the concepts and data-generation techniques learned in the first half of the course.

Spring 2011 - MIIS

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IPOL 8585 - International Organizations      

The upsurge in truly global problems since the end of the Cold War has resulted in the rise of International Governmental Organizations (IGOs) as vital actors in the global governance, or management, of these issues. This course will study and analyze IGOs acting on a wide range of global issues, allowing students in a variety of programs and specializations to gain a better understanding of how such issues are managed - nonproliferation, terrorism, development, environment, trade, et al. This course is also appropriate for MPA students wishing to understand the behavior of IGOs. Topics include IGOs as bureaucracies, IGOs as independent actors or controlled by national governments, (authority and autonomy), power of IGOs, pathologies of IGOs and organizational change.

Fall 2010 - MIIS, Fall 2011 - MIIS

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IPOL 8634 - Sem:SecurityJustice&Developmnt      

The main focus of this course is addressing the challenge to the achievement of the Millennium Development Goals. A growing level of insecurity and armed violence is preventing desperately needed economic, social and political development (good governance), especially in fragile states emerging from conflict. As governments, NGOs and IGOs collaborate to solve this problem, several specific challenges or obstacles to development have emerged that fall under the umbrella concept of "Security, Justice and Development." They include: 1) the presence of anti-personnel landmines that deny the use of land and exact a humanitarian toll; 2) the negative effects of excessive proliferation, accumulation availability and misuse of small arms and light weapons; 3) the presence of corrupt and poorly trained and equipped security forces which requires security sector reform and governance; 4) the lack of human security - freedom from fear, injustice and want; 5) the disarmament, demobilization and reintegration (DDR) of former combatants, 6) the need for conflict prevention and resolution, and most recently 7) the need for the state to operate under the rule of law. All of these problems are major components of post-conflict reconstruction. Students will select one or more of these as the focus of a major research paper, in either a single country or a comparative context.

Fall 2010 - MIIS, Spring 2011 - MIIS, Fall 2011 - MIIS, Fall 2012 - MIIS

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IPSG 8501 - Policy Analysis      

This course introduces students to the theory and practice of policy analysis. Students will be introduced to the stages of the public policy process, including agenda setting, formulation, implementation, and evaluation. Students will also develop basic policy analysis skills, including problem structuring, stakeholder identification, summarization of current policy, development of policy options, elaboration of criteria for selection, and recommendation of course of action. These concepts are illustrated by examples policies that fall within students' range of interests. This course also introduces students to scientific methods that are used as a means for structuring policy inquiry. A series of research approaches and techniques are presented in the context of forecasting, monitoring, and evaluation for the analysis of domestic and international policies.

Fall 2014 - MIIS, Spring 2015 - MIIS

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IPSG 8544 / IPOL 8544 - Intro to HumanSecurity&Dvlpmnt      

The focus of this course is human security, the everyday security of individuals and the communities in which they live rather than the security of nation states. It is the gateway course into the field of human security and development. The key concepts of human security are freedom from fear, freedom from want, and freedom to live in a society of justice under the rule of law. Specific approaches and policies of human security covered in this course include conflict analysis, management and resolution, human rights, peacebuilding, legitimate institutions and good governance, rule of law and justice, and programs and policies designed to lower armed violence.

Spring 2012 - MIIS, Spring 2013 - MIIS, Spring 2015 - MIIS

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IPSG 8611 / IPOL 8611 - Sem:ArmedViolence & Developmnt      

Armed violence resulting from internal conflict and criminal activity is posing a serious obstacle to political, social and economic development at the global, regional, national and local level. This seminar focuses on the reality of armed violence and its negative effects. The course addresses the global burden of violence, its impact on development, theories/risk factors/stresses of violence, and preventing armed violence. There are three main seminar research topics. The first is the demobilization and reintegration of ex-combatants, to include women and child soldiers. The second theme is the instruments of armed violence, namely, small arms and light weapons (SALW), to include land mines. Topics include the sources and methods of illegal arms proliferation, diversion from legal to illegal arms possession, misuse or proliferation. A third general theme is the various policies and programs being implemented to reduce urban gang violence, with a special focus on the public health approach to armed violence reduction. The typical student research project is on which develops (or evaluates) a program to reduce or prevent armed violence and enhance development at the local, national or global level. Students must have read the book The Better Angels of Our Nature: Why Violence Has Declined prior to the start of the seminar.

Spring 2012 - MIIS, Spring 2013 - MIIS, Spring 2014 - MIIS, Spring 2015 - MIIS

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IPSG 9541 - ResrchMethdsForDvlpmntPractice      

The focus of this course is on the methods used in designing, implementing and evaluating development programs, broadly defined. The methods covered are those currently in use in a variety of contexts. Examples of methods covered include data analysis (SPSS and Excel), survey research, interviewing, key informant interviewing, focus groups, direct observation, developing tools for analysis, rapid assessment, stakeholder analysis and conflict analysis. The methods will be taught in modular form, all involving completing a small team project utilizing the method. While much of the work will be done in teams, each student will be evaluated separately. Some projects will be conducted with local government and nonprofit organizations, while others will involve the MIIS community.

Fall 2013 - MIIS

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IPSG 9547 - Intl Orgs & Global Governance      

This course studies those global problems which have a multilateral element as part of the effort to manage and provide solutions- nonproliferation, terrorism, humanitarian crises, migration, armed violence, human rights and security, crime , public health and economic, political and social development. The course starts with a full inquiry into global governance (not world government!). [See the Council on Foreign Relations’ Global Governance Monitor at http://www.cfr.org/global-governance/global-governance-monitor/p18985] Who are the actors? What are the norms that govern national behavior? Which governments do/do not comply with these norms and why? Which problems are more “globally governed” than others? The second half of the course focuses on the role of international governmental organizations (IGOs)- their structure, influence, level of autonomy, etc. Are IGOs actors or just an arena where national governments make the decisions? Students have the opportunity to focus on those organizations involved in the management of their global problem of interest.

Spring 2014 - MIIS

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MPAG 8547 - Intl Orgs & Global Governance      

This course studies those global problems which have a multilateral element as part of the effort to manage and provide solutions- nonproliferation, terrorism, humanitarian crises, migration, armed violence, human rights and security, crime , public health and economic, political and social development. The course starts with a full inquiry into global governance (not world government!). [See the Council on Foreign Relations’ Global Governance Monitor at http://www.cfr.org/global-governance/global-governance-monitor/p18985] Who are the actors? What are the norms that govern national behavior? Which governments do/do not comply with these norms and why? Which problems are more “globally governed” than others? The second half of the course focuses on the role of international governmental organizations (IGOs)- their structure, influence, level of autonomy, etc. Are IGOs actors or just an arena where national governments make the decisions? Students have the opportunity to focus on those organizations involved in the management of their global problem of interest.

Spring 2014 - MIIS

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MPAG 8605 - Capstone:Rsch&Writing Proj-PA      

Overview

The capstone requirement has two objectives. First, it enables you to acquire, demonstrate, integrate, reflect on, apply, and deepen competencies central to the MPA degree and to your future. Second, a capstone project prepares you for a position you hope to get upon graduation. Your capstone project is a public demonstration of your learning process here at MIIS: through it, you show your peers and faculty how far you have progressed. A public sharing of your work is required. How you do that is open for negotiation.

The capstone seminar helps you produce a deliverable which you are proud to submit to employers, working professionals in the field you wish to enter, and/or journals. Choice of capstone projects is limitless and students who perform best are those that creatively identify a project and product that is meaningful to them.

Approach

My role as seminar faculty is threefold. I am process guide; I am learning/support group facilitator; I am quality standard upholder. I am not content help. I am not responsible for reminding you of everything you have or should have learned in your classes here at MIIS. Capstone is your chance to interrogate yourself, to look deep to see what you have and have not learned, to revisit previous class contents and tools. You should expect no new content, as a result, apart from – perhaps – public speaking and presentation/argumentation competencies.

While we have a formal weekly meeting time, we will not use it every week. Our schedule of meetings will be established month-by-month.

Spring 2013 - MIIS

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MPAG 8635 - Eval Practicum: DPP AOL system      

This course will allow students hands-on experience in developing an “Assessment of Learning (AOL)” system for the Development Practice and Policy program. Students will conduct primary research (interviews, FGDs) and data analysis related to faculty, student, and administration preferences on the system; review of best practices for AOL in other universities in the US; and a review of the academic literature pertaining to high quality AOL systems for Masters-level education. Students will have a chance to get wider, practical experience in action research, mixed methods research, formulating recommendations, and creating a high quality final report. Students in the class will form a single team and grading will be based on peer reviews of contributions to team products and process, participation in class, and quality of overall deliverable. The principal audience for the final deliverable will be the Chairs of the IPS and MPA degree programs.

Fall 2014 - MIIS

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MPAG 9541 - ResrchMethdsForDvlpmntPractice      

The focus of this course is on the methods used in designing, implementing and evaluating development programs, broadly defined. The methods covered are those currently in use in a variety of contexts. Examples of methods covered include data analysis (SPSS and Excel), survey research, interviewing, key informant interviewing, focus groups, direct observation, developing tools for analysis, rapid assessment, stakeholder analysis and conflict analysis. The methods will be taught in modular form, all involving completing a small team project utilizing the method. While much of the work will be done in teams, each student will be evaluated separately. Some projects will be conducted with local government and nonprofit organizations, while others will involve the MIIS community.

Fall 2013 - MIIS

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NPTG 9547 - Intl Orgs & Global Governance      

This course studies those global problems which have a multilateral element as part of the effort to manage and provide solutions- nonproliferation, terrorism, humanitarian crises, migration, armed violence, human rights and security, crime , public health and economic, political and social development. The course starts with a full inquiry into global governance (not world government!). [See the Council on Foreign Relations’ Global Governance Monitor at http://www.cfr.org/global-governance/global-governance-monitor/p18985] Who are the actors? What are the norms that govern national behavior? Which governments do/do not comply with these norms and why? Which problems are more “globally governed” than others? The second half of the course focuses on the role of international governmental organizations (IGOs)- their structure, influence, level of autonomy, etc. Are IGOs actors or just an arena where national governments make the decisions? Students have the opportunity to focus on those organizations involved in the management of their global problem of interest.

Spring 2014 - MIIS

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NPTG 9611 - Sem:ArmedViolence & Developmnt      

Armed violence resulting from intrastate conflict and criminal activity is posing a serious obstacle to political, social and economic development at the global, regional, national and local level. This seminar describes the global reality of armed violence and its negative effects. The focus is on the instruments of armed violence, namely, small arms and light weapons (SALW), to include land mines. Topics include the sources and methods of illegal arms proliferation, diversion from legal to illegal arms possession, misuse or proliferation, gang violence, election violence, the public health approach to armed violence reduction, and the path from conflict to armed conflict. Emphasis is placed on policies and programs at the local, national and global level to reduce armed violence and enable development, to include Disarmament, Demobilization and Reintegration of ex-combatants, weapons exchange for development programs, reducing access to SALW, and the efforts to integrate armed violence and development. The typical student project is a research paper which develops (or evaluates) a program to reduce or prevent armed violence and enhance development at the local, national or global level.

Spring 2014 - MIIS, Spring 2015 - MIIS

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Extra Information

Recent Activities

In the past several years I have:

  1. Led a team of students in observing the final negotiations of the Arms Trade Treaty at the United Nations in New York.
  2. Created and developed software that allows national government to track their progress towards complying with the UN’s International Small Arms Control Standards (ISACS). http://www.smallarmsstandards.org/isacs-news/
  3. Published two articles in Arms Control Today on the international arms trade.
  4. Served as Coordinator of Veterans Affairs at MIIS
  5. Conducted a major study for the UN Development Program on how security and development are integrated in UNDP programming.
  6. Worked with the Small Arms Survey in Geneva in developing and implementing a program evaluation of a weapons marking project in East Africa.
  7. Placed students in security and development organizations in MIIS Immersive Professional Learning programs.
  8. Since 2009 have served as an expert for the United Nations project ISACS, developing global standards for controlling the proliferation and misuse of small arms and light weapons.
  9. Advised the City of Salinas, California, on gang violence reduction and prevention.

Education

PhD, International Relations, University of Pennsylvania; MA, International Relations and Public Administration, Temple University; BS, United States Military Academy

Careers in Security and Development

Students who concentrate on security and development can do so as a specialization within the MPA program or the Human Security and Development Track in IPS. They normally take courses in conflict and conflict resolution, human security, human rights, and a full range of development courses. They also spend at least six months as a junior professional with an S and D organization while at MIIS. Graduates who entered this field have served as program managers for conflict management in South Sudan, field analysts for international governmental organizations as well as NGOs and think tanks, staff officers developing public security education and training for the UN, survey researchers in areas fraught with insecurity and conflict, and evaluators of programs designed to reduce armed violence and enable development.

For an excellent in-depth look at this field see the World Development Report 2011: Conflict, Security and Development. Washington: The World Bank

http://siteresources.worldbank.org/INTWDRS/Resources/WDR2011_Full_Text.pdf

Selected Publications

laurance_chapter_final_version_pdf“The Small Arms Problem As Arms Control: A Policy-Driven Research Agenda” in The State of Arms: Consolidation, Innovation and Relevance in Small Arms Research: Essays in honour of Pablo Dreyfus. Eds: Kai Michael Kenkel and Peter Batchelor. London: Routledge, Summer 2013.

 
“1991 Arms Trade Control Efforts and Their Echoes” in Arms Control Today, July-August 2011. 
 

iccrThe UNDP Role in the Comprehensive Approach to Security in Fragile States: An Assessment, Edward J. Laurance Version 5.1 10 June 2010.

laurance-_managing_the_tools_of_war_and_violence "Managing the Tools of War and Violence: Global Governance or State-centric Realpolitik?  In Michael Brzoska and Axel Krohn (eds.) Overcoming Armed Violence in a Complex World: Essays in Honor of Herbert Wulf. Budrich UniPress Ltd. November 2009.

managing_the_global_problems_created_by_the_conventional_arms_trade With Hendrik Wagenmakers and Herbert Wulf. "Managing the Global Problems Created by the Conventional Arms Trade: An Assessment of the United Nations Register of Conventional Arms." Global Governance, Vol. 2, Spring 2005.

With Rachel Stohl. Making Global Public Policy: The Case of Small Arms and Light Weapons. Occasional Paper No. 7. Geneva: Small Arms Survey, December 2002.

<The United Nations Conventional Arms Register (UNCAR): Present Challenges, New Directions.

"Light Weapons and Human Development: The Need for Transparency and Early Warning." In Jeffrey Boutwell and Michael T. Klare, Light Weapons and Civil Conflict: Controlling the Tools of Violence (Boulder: Rowman and Littlefield Publishers, Inc., 1999), pp. 185-196.

"Monitoring the Flow, Availability and Misuse of Light Weapons," in Arms Watching: Integrating Small Arms and Light Weapons Into the Early Warning of Violent Conflict. Edward J. Laurance (Ed.) (London: International Alert, May 1999).

Arms Watching: Integrating Small Arms and Light Weapons Into the Early Warning of Violent Conflict(Ed.)(London: International Alert, May 1999).

Light Weapons and Intra-State Conflict: Early Warning Factors and Preventive Action. (Washington: Carnegie Commission on Preventing Deadly Conflict, July 1998).

"Small Arms, Light Weapons, and Conflict Prevention: The New Post-Cold War Logic of Disarmament" in Barnett R. Rubin Cases and Strategies for Preventive Action (The Century Foundation Press, 1998), pp. 135-168.

"Moratoria on Small Arms and Light Weapons: Conceptualization and Application to Central America" in Sverre Lodgaard and Carsten F. Ronnfeldt, A Moratorium on Light Weapons in West Africa (Oslo: Norwegian Institute of International Affairs, 1998), pp. 69-83.

"A Conceptual Framework for Arms Trade Transparency in South-East Asia." In Bates Gill and J.N. Mak (eds.), Arms Transparency and Security in South-East Asia. SIPRI Research Report No. 13. (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1997), pp. 10-24.

With Sarah E. Meek. The Role of Conventional Arms Buildups in the Outbreak of Conflict: Developing Early Warning and Preventive Measures. Report submitted to the United States Institute for Peace in fulfillment of grant SG-94-113. July 1996.

With Sarah E. Meek. The New Field of Micro-Disarmament: Addressing the Proliferation and Buildup of Small Arms and Light Weapons. Brief 7. (Bonn: Bonn International Center for Conversion, September 1996).

"The Role of Arms Control in Coping With Conflict after the Cold War." in Roger Kanet and Edward Kolodziej (Eds.), Coping With Conflict after the Cold War. (Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 1996), pp. 331-362.

"Addressing the Negative Consequences of Light Weapons Trafficking: Opportunities for Transparency and Restraint." in Jeffrey Boutwell, Michael Klare and Laura Reed, Editors, Lethal Commerce: The Global Trade in Small Arms and Light Weapons. (Cambridge: American Academy of Arts and Sciences, 1995), pp. 140-57.

"The UN Register of Conventional Arms: Rationales and Prospects for Compliance and Effectiveness," The Washington Quarterly , (Spring 1993).

"Reducing the Negative Consequences of Arms Transfers Through Unilateral Arms Control." in Bennett Ramberg (Ed.) Arms Control Without Negotiation: From the Cold War to the New World Order. (Boulder: Lynne Rienner Publishers, 1993), pp. 175-198

With Siemon Wezeman and Herbert Wulf. Arms Watch: SIPRI Report on the First Year of the UN Register of Conventional Arms. (Oxford: Oxford University Press, November 1993).

The International Arms Trade. (New York: Lexington Books, 1992).

"The Political Implications of Illegal Arms Exports From the United States." Political Science Quarterly, 107, 3 (Fall 1992), 501-533.

"Events Data and Policy Analysis: Improving the Potential for Applying Academic Research to Foreign and Defense Policy Problems." Policy Sciences , 23,1(1990).

"The New Gunrunning." Orbis (Spring 1989), 225-237.

Faculty Type
Regular Faculty
Dynamic Features
Course Catalog

Holly Mikkelson

First Name
Holly
Last Name
Mikkelson
Holly Mikkelson
Job Title
Associate Professor
Location
McCone Building 221
Phone
831.647.6432
Language(s)
Español

Professor Mikkelson is a state and federally certified court interpreter, and is accredited by the American Translators Association. She has been a consultant to court interpreter regulatory and training entities such as the California Judicial Council and the National Center for State Courts, and has published extensively on court and community interpreting. She is a member of the American Translators Association, the National Association of Judiciary Translators and Interpreters, and the Conference of Interpreter Trainers.

Language Tags
Faculty Program Tags
Course List

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

TIAG 8604 - Practicum in Interpretation      

Facilitates the transition from the classroom to the first professional assignment by offering students a wide range of interpretation experiences. Advanced interpreting students become comfortable with working in settings in which different modes of interpretation are called for and where relay interpretation is the norm. Students provide simultaneous and consecutive interpretation at Monterey Institute public events and taped conferences, for Institute interdisciplinary courses, and as part of community outreach; they also work intensively together in multilingual practice groups during the semester. Reinforces the concept of reflective practice, requiring students to evaluate their own performance as well as that of their peers. Students are expected to complete an interpretation portfolio.

Fall 2012 - MIIS

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TISP 8511 - Intro Written Trans to English      

Introduces students to the basic theory and practice of translation, both written and sight. Students will learn to apply text analysis, text typology, and contrastive analysis of their working languages to identify, analyze, and resolve translation problems while independently developing an efficient and rational approach to the process of translation. The appropriate application of electronic translation tools will also be introduced. Fundamental translation theory will be emphasized at the beginning of the course and will be conveyed in the form of assigned readings, lectures, class discussions, and independent research. In addition, course assignments will include practice and graded exercises in sight and written translation, utilizing authentic texts drawn from an extensive variety of text categories that include, but are not limited to, current events, general political economy, general legal documents, and scientific and technical topics for general audiences. As the term progresses, student time and effort will increasingly be spent on the preparation and evaluation of written translation assignments. Students will be expected to take at least one midterm exam and one final exam, to be assigned at the discretion of the instructor(s) of record.

Fall 2013 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS

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TISP 8521 - Intrm Translation into English      

Builds on the theoretical and practical foundation laid in Introduction to Translation and introduces the translation of specialized subject matter. Depending upon the language program in which they are enrolled, students will be expected to acquire and demonstrate basic proficiency in the sight and written translation of either commercial and economic texts, legal texts, or scientific and technical texts. The amount of emphasis accorded to a particular topic will depend on the specific professional requirements of each language program. Course assignments will include readings, research, presentations, practice and graded exercises in sight translation, and practice and graded written translation assignments, including exercises in speed translation. Students will also be expected to take at least one midterm and one final exam. The frequency, nature, and structure of course assignments and examinations are largely at the discretion of the instructor(s) of record.

Prerequisite: Introduction to Translation or equivalent background.

Spring 2013 - MIIS, Spring 2014 - MIIS, Spring 2015 - MIIS

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TISP 8631 - Adv Translation I into English      

This is the first of two complementary courses designed to bring translation knowledge and skills up to the level that would be required of someone working in a professional translation environment. Students will be expected to apply the knowledge and skills acquired during the first-year translation courses to produce translations that meet high standards for content, form, and presentation. A great deal of attention is given to subject matter knowledge and research, precision in text analysis and writing, and the appropriate application of translation technology. Some programs emphasize scientific and technical topics in this course, but others give considerable attention to commercial, economic, legal, and political texts, many of which have a technical component. The frequency, nature, and structure of course assignments and examinations are at the discretion of the instructor(s) of record. Students will, however, be expected to take at least one midterm exam and one final exam.

Prerequisite: 2nd-year student in good standing or equivalent background.

Fall 2011 - MIIS, Fall 2012 - MIIS, Fall 2013 - MIIS

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TISP 8633 - Intro to Court Interpreting      

Familiarizes students with the techniques and terminology of consecutive and simultaneous interpreting, and the practical considerations particular to judicial and quasi-judicial settings. Attention is given to the registers of speech encountered in typical legal proceedings, including street slang, police jargon, legal terms, and technical testimony. Students learn courtroom protocol, witness control techniques, and review the practical implications of the court interpreter code of ethics. The frequency, nature, and structure of course assignments and examinations are at the discretion of the instructor(s) of record.

Fall 2010 - MIIS, Fall 2011 - MIIS, Fall 2012 - MIIS, Fall 2013 - MIIS

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TISP 8641 - Advanced Trans II to English      

This course is the counterpart to Advanced Translation I. Students are expected to translate texts of considerable difficulty and complexity and to cope with the types of operational challenges that are likely to be encountered in professional translation settings, such as working in teams or coping with multiple technologies. Emphasis is on particular text categories and subject-matter knowledge that are pertinent to current market demand for the specific language combination and direction in which the course is being taught. The frequency, nature, and structure of course assignments are at the discretion of the instructor(s) of record, but will include projects that simulate, as closely as possible, the professional translation environment, as well as at least one midterm and one final exam.

Prerequisite: Advanced Translation I or similar background.

Spring 2012 - MIIS, Spring 2014 - MIIS, Spring 2015 - MIIS

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TISP 8643 - Court Interpreting Consec      

This course builds on the knowledge acquired in TISP 8633, Introduction to Court Interpreting. Students will practice interpreting interviews and witness testimony in both informal settings and formal court proceedings, using role-play scenarios and scripts. They will learn to apply the Code of Ethics that was introduced in TISP 8633 in the real world, and will become more familiar with courtroom protocol. They will also acquire the ability to control turn-taking, learn how to intervene in different situations, and hone their note-taking skills. Each week a new topic will be introduced to help the students learn the specialized terminology of criminal and civil court proceedings. Regional differences in Spanish usage will also be emphasized throughout the exercises. By the end of the semester, students will be able to accurately interpret statements up to 60 words in length and will be ready to take oral certification exams for court interpreters.

Spring 2011 - MIIS, Spring 2012 - MIIS, Spring 2013 - MIIS

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TISP 8649 - Consec/Simul Court Proceedings      

Spring 2014 - MIIS

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TISP 8651 - Community Interpreting      

Spring 2015 - MIIS

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MIIS Tags
Expertise

Translation and interpretation of Spanish and English, court and medical interpreting

Extra Information

Education

MA, Intercultural Communication and Certificate in Translation and Interpretation, Monterey Institute of International Studies; BA, Sociology, Mills College

Recent Accomplishments

In 2011,  Mikkelson received the Alexander Gode Medal, the American Translators Association's top honor for contributions to the profession. She also co-authored the 2nd edition of the book Fundamentals of Court Interpretation: Theory, Policy and Practice, published in 2012.

Publications

Gonzalez, Roseann D., Vasquez, Victoria F., and Mikkelson, Holly. Fundamentals of Court Interpretation: Theory, Policy and Practice. 2nd ed. Durham, NC: Carolina Academic Press, 2012.

Mikkelson, Holly. Introduction to Court Interpreting. In Translation Practices Explained. Vol. 1. Manchester: St. Jerome Publishing, 2000.

Faculty Type
Regular Faculty
Dynamic Features
Course Catalog

Chuanyun Bao

First Name
Chuanyun
Last Name
Bao
Chuanyun Bao
Job Title
Professor
Location
Casa Fuente Building 300B
Phone
831.647.4172
Language(s)
中文

It has been a long time since the summer of 1990 when I left my job at the United Nations Office in Geneva where I served as a staff interpreter to join the faculty at the Monterey Institute of International Studies.  Over these years, I have taught sight translation, consecutive and simultaneous interpretation, and briefly, translation. I have continued to work as a freelance interpreter for corporations, institutions, the United Nations and other international organizations.

MIIS Tags
Faculty Program Tags
Expertise

Simultaneous and consecutive interpretation and translation of Chinese and English

Course List

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

TICH 8502 - Intro to Interp into Chinese      

Introduces students to conference interpretation in general and consecutive interpretation in particular. Lays a foundation for the development of professional skills in consecutive interpretation, emphasizing the ability to understand and analyze a message in the source language (SL) and convey it in the target language (TL) in a straightforward and clear manner. Develops students’ ability to identify, analyze, and paraphrase the meaning in the SL and establish logical relations between its components. Emphasis is placed on active listening and concentration skills, memory, the ability to abstract information for subsequent recall, and basic elements of note-taking. At the end of the course, students are able to interpret extemporaneous passages that are on topics familiar to them and are between three and five minutes in length.

In language-specific sessions and joint sessions with other language programs, students are introduced to the skill of consecutive interpreting in both theory and practice. They practice listening to and repeating the content of passages of increasing length and difficulty. Students hone their public-speaking skills by developing and delivering speeches. Content is interpreted on topics from daily life, current events and the media, and general areas of personal interest to students.

Course assignments include readings and research on class topics, presentations, practice, graded exercises, and peer and self-assessment. The frequency, nature, and structure of course assignments and examinations are at the discretion of the instructor(s) of record.

Fall 2014 - MIIS

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TICH 8513 - Intro Sight Trans to English      

Introduces students to the basic theory and practice of translation, both written and sight. Students will learn to apply text analysis, text typology, and contrastive analysis of their working languages to identify, analyze, and resolve translation problems while independently developing an efficient and rational approach to the process of translation. The appropriate application of electronic translation tools will also be introduced. Fundamental translation theory will be emphasized at the beginning of the course and will be conveyed in the form of assigned readings, lectures, class discussions, and independent research. In addition, course assignments will include practice and graded exercises in sight and written translation, utilizing authentic texts drawn from an extensive variety of text categories that include, but are not limited to, current events, general political economy, general legal documents, and scientific and technical topics for general audiences. As the term progresses, student time and effort will increasingly be spent on the preparation and evaluation of written translation assignments. Students will be expected to take at least one midterm exam and one final exam, to be assigned at the discretion of the instructor(s) of record.

Fall 2013 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS

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TICH 8514 - Intro Sight Trans to Chinese      

Introduces students to the basic theory and practice of translation, both written and sight. Students will learn to apply text analysis, text typology, and contrastive analysis of their working languages to identify, analyze, and resolve translation problems while independently developing an efficient and rational approach to the process of translation. The appropriate application of electronic translation tools will also be introduced. Fundamental translation theory will be emphasized at the beginning of the course and will be conveyed in the form of assigned readings, lectures, class discussions, and independent research. In addition, course assignments will include practice and graded exercises in sight and written translation, utilizing authentic texts drawn from an extensive variety of text categories that include, but are not limited to, current events, general political economy, general legal documents, and scientific and technical topics for general audiences. As the term progresses, student time and effort will increasingly be spent on the preparation and evaluation of written translation assignments. Students will be expected to take at least one midterm exam and one final exam, to be assigned at the discretion of the instructor(s) of record.

Fall 2010 - MIIS

More Information »

TICH 8525 - Intrm Intrp-Consc into English      

Intermediate Interpretation – Consecutive and Simultaneous

Builds on the practical and theoretical foundation laid in Introduction to Interpretation. Consists of both language-specific and joint sessions with other language programs.

In consecutive, students learn to identify the implicit structural organization of an extemporaneous speech by presenting and interpreting speeches of this type. Reinforces ability to perceive essential meaning and further develops note-taking techniques. Emphasizes clarity of expression, correct style and grammar, proper diction, and polished presentation. Students also expand their active vocabulary to include the terms and idioms that frequently occur in extemporaneous speeches. At the end of the course, students are able to interpret passages that are delivered extemporaneously, are of moderate difficulty, and are derived from professional settings. These passages vary from one to several paragraphs in length depending upon language combination, direction, and source content.

In simultaneous, students are introduced to basic strategies of interpreting in this mode in the booth. Begins with a general introduction and follows up with a series of preparatory exercises helping students develop the concentration necessary for listening and speaking at the same time, mastering voice management, and acquiring smooth delivery techniques. Students learn to analyze discourse for meaning while rendering a coherent version in the TL with correct grammar, diction and style. At the end of the course, students are able to interpret passages that are between eight and ten minutes in length.

Content on a wide range of topics and current events is interpreted, with some emphasis placed on business and economics. Course assignments include readings and research on class topics, presentations, practice, graded exercises, and peer and self-assessment. The frequency, nature, and structure of course assignments and examinations are at the discretion of the instructor(s) of record.

Course prerequisites: Introduction to Interpretation or the equivalent

Spring 2011 - MIIS, Spring 2012 - MIIS, Spring 2013 - MIIS, Spring 2014 - MIIS, Spring 2015 - MIIS

More Information »

TICH 8635 - Adv Intrp I Consc into English      

This is the first of two complementary courses designed to bring interpretation knowledge and skills up to the professional level. Students are expected to apply the knowledge and skills acquired during the first-year interpretation courses to produce interpretations that would be of acceptable quality in a professional setting. Content on a wide range of topics and current events is interpreted, with emphasis placed on business, economics, science, technology, and other topics congruent with current market demand for interpretation in the language combination in question. Course assignments include readings and research on class topics, presentations, practice, graded exercises, and peer and self-assessment.

In consecutive interpretation, students prepare by researching topics before each session, with emphasis on sequential logic in notetaking and accurate terminology in delivery. Students continue to hone their skills by diagnosing and correcting problems at all stages from listening through delivery, while progressing to increasingly difficult and challenging material. In simultaneous interpretation, the techniques learned in the previous semester are consolidated, which enables students to polish their delivery and language register. Focuses on nuance of meaning, accuracy of interpretation, research and preparation for conferences, and glossary development. Special attention is given to maintaining concentration while under significant psychological stress. Students learn to recognize SL discourse patterns and render them effectively in TL.

At the end of the course, students are able to interpret difficult passages that are derived from professional settings. In consecutive, students are able to interpret passages up to several paragraphs in length. In simultaneous interpretation, students are able to interpret passages that are between fifteen and twenty minutes in length. The frequency, nature, and structure of course assignments and examinations are at the discretion of the instructor(s) of record.

Fall 2012 - MIIS, Fall 2013 - MIIS

More Information »

TICH 8637 - Adv Intrp I Simul into English      

This is the first of two complementary courses designed to bring interpretation knowledge and skills up to the professional level. Students are expected to apply the knowledge and skills acquired during the first-year interpretation courses to produce interpretations that would be of acceptable quality in a professional setting. Content on a wide range of topics and current events is interpreted, with emphasis placed on business, economics, science, technology, and other topics congruent with current market demand for interpretation in the language combination in question. Course assignments include readings and research on class topics, presentations, practice, graded exercises, and peer and self-assessment.

In consecutive interpretation, students prepare by researching topics before each session, with emphasis on sequential logic in notetaking and accurate terminology in delivery. Students continue to hone their skills by diagnosing and correcting problems at all stages from listening through delivery, while progressing to increasingly difficult and challenging material. In simultaneous interpretation, the techniques learned in the previous semester are consolidated, which enables students to polish their delivery and language register. Focuses on nuance of meaning, accuracy of interpretation, research and preparation for conferences, and glossary development. Special attention is given to maintaining concentration while under significant psychological stress. Students learn to recognize SL discourse patterns and render them effectively in TL.

At the end of the course, students are able to interpret difficult passages that are derived from professional settings. In consecutive, students are able to interpret passages up to several paragraphs in length. In simultaneous interpretation, students are able to interpret passages that are between fifteen and twenty minutes in length. The frequency, nature, and structure of course assignments and examinations are at the discretion of the instructor(s) of record.

Fall 2010 - MIIS, Fall 2013 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS

More Information »

TICH 8645 - Adv Intrp II-Consc to English      

Advanced Interpretation II – Consecutive and Simultaneous

This course is the counterpart to Advanced Interpretation I. Students are expected to interpret speeches of considerable difficulty and complexity and to cope with the types of challenges that are likely to be encountered in professional settings. Provides final preparation for the Professional Examinations.

In consecutive interpretation, emphasis is placed on both science and technology and political rhetoric, requiring particular attention to nuance and tone. Students learn the vernacular of political speeches and other challenging material while sharpening listening, processing, and notetaking functions.

In simultaneous interpretation, advanced instruction is given for difficult speeches. Emphasizes following the logic of complex scientific and technical discourse, and remaining faithful to the style and tone of persuasive political discourse. Students are also introduced to simultaneous interpretation with text. They learn how to draw upon outlines, transcripts, slides and transparencies, and other written materials to enhance the accuracy and completeness of their interpretation. Emphasis is placed on text preparation strategies and efficient use of textual materials while on the air.

Content on a wide range of topics and current events is interpreted, with emphasis placed on topics congruent with current market demand for interpretation in the relevant language combination(s). Course assignments include readings and research on class topics, presentations, practice, graded exercises, and peer and self-assessment.

At the end of the course, students are expected to interpret difficult speeches in professional settings. In consecutive, students are called upon to interpret passages that are several paragraphs in length. In simultaneous, students are able to interpret passages that are between fifteen and twenty minutes in length. The frequency, nature, and structure of course assignments and examinations are at the discretion of the instructor(s) of record.

Course prerequisites: Advanced Interpretation I or the equivalent

Spring 2013 - MIIS, Spring 2015 - MIIS

More Information »

TICH 8647 - Adv Intrp II-Siml into English      

Advanced Interpretation II – Consecutive and Simultaneous

This course is the counterpart to Advanced Interpretation I. Students are expected to interpret speeches of considerable difficulty and complexity and to cope with the types of challenges that are likely to be encountered in professional settings. Provides final preparation for the Professional Examinations.

In consecutive interpretation, emphasis is placed on both science and technology and political rhetoric, requiring particular attention to nuance and tone. Students learn the vernacular of political speeches and other challenging material while sharpening listening, processing, and notetaking functions.

In simultaneous interpretation, advanced instruction is given for difficult speeches. Emphasizes following the logic of complex scientific and technical discourse, and remaining faithful to the style and tone of persuasive political discourse. Students are also introduced to simultaneous interpretation with text. They learn how to draw upon outlines, transcripts, slides and transparencies, and other written materials to enhance the accuracy and completeness of their interpretation. Emphasis is placed on text preparation strategies and efficient use of textual materials while on the air.

Content on a wide range of topics and current events is interpreted, with emphasis placed on topics congruent with current market demand for interpretation in the relevant language combination(s). Course assignments include readings and research on class topics, presentations, practice, graded exercises, and peer and self-assessment.

At the end of the course, students are expected to interpret difficult speeches in professional settings. In consecutive, students are called upon to interpret passages that are several paragraphs in length. In simultaneous, students are able to interpret passages that are between fifteen and twenty minutes in length. The frequency, nature, and structure of course assignments and examinations are at the discretion of the instructor(s) of record.

Course prerequisites: Advanced Interpretation I or the equivalent

Spring 2011 - MIIS, Spring 2012 - MIIS, Spring 2013 - MIIS, Spring 2014 - MIIS

More Information »

Language Tags
Extra Information

Education

Diploma in Translation and Conference Interpretation, United Nations Translators and Interpreters Program (now the Graduate School of Translation and Interpretation), Beijing Foreign Studies University; visiting student in the Department of Foreign Languages and Literature, Nanjing University, China; diploma in English language and literature, Xuzhou Normal University, China

Faculty Type
Regular Faculty
Dynamic Features
Course Catalog

Barry Slaughter Olsen

First Name
Barry
Last Name
Olsen
Barry Olsen Photo
Job Title
Associate Professor
Location
IIRC Building 5
Phone
831.647.4628
Language(s)
Español
Русский
português

Professor Olsen has been working as a conference interpreter and translator since 1993. Before joining our faculty, he was a translator in residence at American University in Washington, D.C. He has taught various courses on simultaneous and consecutive interpreting in the United States, Latin America and Europe. Over the years he has interpreted for the U.S. State Department, the Inter-American Development Bank, the Organization of American States, National Geographic Society, C-SPAN Television, and many other public and private sector clients.

Language Tags
Faculty Program Tags
Course List

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

TIAG 8604 - Practicum in Interpretation      

Facilitates the transition from the classroom to the first professional assignment by offering students a wide range of interpretation experiences. Advanced interpreting students become comfortable with working in settings in which different modes of interpretation are called for and where relay interpretation is the norm. Students provide simultaneous and consecutive interpretation at Monterey Institute public events and taped conferences, for Institute interdisciplinary courses, and as part of community outreach; they also work intensively together in multilingual practice groups during the semester. Reinforces the concept of reflective practice, requiring students to evaluate their own performance as well as that of their peers. Students are expected to complete an interpretation portfolio.

Fall 2013 - MIIS, Spring 2014 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS

More Information »

TIRU 8501 - Intro to Interp into English      

Introduces students to conference interpretation in general and consecutive interpretation in particular. Lays a foundation for the development of professional skills in consecutive interpretation, emphasizing the ability to understand and analyze a message in the source language (SL) and convey it in the target language (TL) in a straightforward and clear manner. Develops students’ ability to identify, analyze, and paraphrase the meaning in the SL and establish logical relations between its components. Emphasis is placed on active listening and concentration skills, memory, the ability to abstract information for subsequent recall, and basic elements of note-taking. At the end of the course, students are able to interpret extemporaneous passages that are on topics familiar to them and are between three and five minutes in length.

In language-specific sessions and joint sessions with other language programs, students are introduced to the skill of consecutive interpreting in both theory and practice. They practice listening to and repeating the content of passages of increasing length and difficulty. Students hone their public-speaking skills by developing and delivering speeches. Content is interpreted on topics from daily life, current events and the media, and general areas of personal interest to students.

Course assignments include readings and research on class topics, presentations, practice, graded exercises, and peer and self-assessment. The frequency, nature, and structure of course assignments and examinations are at the discretion of the instructor(s) of record.

Fall 2010 - MIIS, Fall 2011 - MIIS, Fall 2012 - MIIS, Fall 2013 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS

More Information »

TIRU 8525 - Intrm Intrp-Consc into English      

Intermediate Interpretation – Consecutive and Simultaneous

Builds on the practical and theoretical foundation laid in Introduction to Interpretation. Consists of both language-specific and joint sessions with other language programs.

In consecutive, students learn to identify the implicit structural organization of an extemporaneous speech by presenting and interpreting speeches of this type. Reinforces ability to perceive essential meaning and further develops note-taking techniques. Emphasizes clarity of expression, correct style and grammar, proper diction, and polished presentation. Students also expand their active vocabulary to include the terms and idioms that frequently occur in extemporaneous speeches. At the end of the course, students are able to interpret passages that are delivered extemporaneously, are of moderate difficulty, and are derived from professional settings. These passages vary from one to several paragraphs in length depending upon language combination, direction, and source content.

In simultaneous, students are introduced to basic strategies of interpreting in this mode in the booth. Begins with a general introduction and follows up with a series of preparatory exercises helping students develop the concentration necessary for listening and speaking at the same time, mastering voice management, and acquiring smooth delivery techniques. Students learn to analyze discourse for meaning while rendering a coherent version in the TL with correct grammar, diction and style. At the end of the course, students are able to interpret passages that are between eight and ten minutes in length.

Content on a wide range of topics and current events is interpreted, with some emphasis placed on business and economics. Course assignments include readings and research on class topics, presentations, practice, graded exercises, and peer and self-assessment. The frequency, nature, and structure of course assignments and examinations are at the discretion of the instructor(s) of record.

Course prerequisites: Introduction to Interpretation or the equivalent

Spring 2011 - MIIS, Spring 2012 - MIIS, Spring 2013 - MIIS, Spring 2014 - MIIS, Spring 2015 - MIIS

More Information »

TIRU 8527 - Intrm Intrp-Siml into English      

The course introduces basic skills in simultaneous conference interpretation from Russian into English. Various contemporary texts in Russian by a variety of speakers (mass media, presentations, conference papers) are used to practice simultaneous interpretation skills in class and to illustrate the process of interpretation. Classes include interpretation sessions, theoretical discussions and exercises. Major topics covered by the course are: stages of simultaneous interpretation from Russian into English, Russian language source text analysis, semantic transformations, input-output lag management, output quality control, mental preparedness. Special attention is paid to voice quality and voice training as needed by individual students. Students will have an opportunity to build basic simultaneous interpretation skills and improve their knowledge of Russian realia and their cultural knowledge to prepare themselves for more advanced texts and exercises. Reading assignments are required.

Final semester grade is calculated based on the midterm exam (30%), the semester exam (30%) and classroom performance (40%).

Spring 2013 - MIIS, Spring 2014 - MIIS, Spring 2015 - MIIS

More Information »

TIRU 8635 - Adv Intrp I Consc into English      

This is the first of two complementary courses designed to bring interpretation knowledge and skills up to the professional level. Students are expected to apply the knowledge and skills acquired during the first-year interpretation courses to produce interpretations that would be of acceptable quality in a professional setting. Content on a wide range of topics and current events is interpreted, with emphasis placed on business, economics, science, technology, and other topics congruent with current market demand for interpretation in the language combination in question. Course assignments include readings and research on class topics, presentations, practice, graded exercises, and peer and self-assessment.

In consecutive interpretation, students prepare by researching topics before each session, with emphasis on sequential logic in notetaking and accurate terminology in delivery. Students continue to hone their skills by diagnosing and correcting problems at all stages from listening through delivery, while progressing to increasingly difficult and challenging material. In simultaneous interpretation, the techniques learned in the previous semester are consolidated, which enables students to polish their delivery and language register. Focuses on nuance of meaning, accuracy of interpretation, research and preparation for conferences, and glossary development. Special attention is given to maintaining concentration while under significant psychological stress. Students learn to recognize SL discourse patterns and render them effectively in TL.

At the end of the course, students are able to interpret difficult passages that are derived from professional settings. In consecutive, students are able to interpret passages up to several paragraphs in length. In simultaneous interpretation, students are able to interpret passages that are between fifteen and twenty minutes in length. The frequency, nature, and structure of course assignments and examinations are at the discretion of the instructor(s) of record.

Fall 2010 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS

More Information »

TIRU 8645 - Adv Intrp II-Consc to English      

The course is designed to continue building students’ consecutive interpretation skills for the Russian into English combination with the goal of preparing for Professional Exams. Heavy emphasis is placed on learning to interpret high register political texts from Russian into English as may be done in the context of major international organizations. Topics include: current political events, international organizations, diplomatic protocol, nonproliferation of nuclear weapons, resolution of political and economic conflicts. Students are expected to be able to interpret in a variety of simulated professional situations.

Final semester grade is calculated based on the midterm exam (30%), the semester exam (30%) and classroom performance (40%).

Spring 2011 - MIIS, Spring 2014 - MIIS

More Information »

TISP 8501 - Intro to Interp into English      

Introduces students to conference interpretation in general and consecutive interpretation in particular. Lays a foundation for the development of professional skills in consecutive interpretation, emphasizing the ability to understand and analyze a message in the source language (SL) and convey it in the target language (TL) in a straightforward and clear manner. Develops students’ ability to identify, analyze, and paraphrase the meaning in the SL and establish logical relations between its components. Emphasis is placed on active listening and concentration skills, memory, the ability to abstract information for subsequent recall, and basic elements of note-taking. At the end of the course, students are able to interpret extemporaneous passages that are on topics familiar to them and are between three and five minutes in length.

In language-specific sessions and joint sessions with other language programs, students are introduced to the skill of consecutive interpreting in both theory and practice. They practice listening to and repeating the content of passages of increasing length and difficulty. Students hone their public-speaking skills by developing and delivering speeches. Content is interpreted on topics from daily life, current events and the media, and general areas of personal interest to students.

Course assignments include readings and research on class topics, presentations, practice, graded exercises, and peer and self-assessment. The frequency, nature, and structure of course assignments and examinations are at the discretion of the instructor(s) of record.

Fall 2011 - MIIS, Fall 2012 - MIIS, Fall 2013 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS

More Information »

TISP 8525 - Intrm Intrp-Consc into English      

Intermediate Interpretation – Consecutive and Simultaneous

Builds on the practical and theoretical foundation laid in Introduction to Interpretation. Consists of both language-specific and joint sessions with other language programs.

In consecutive, students learn to identify the implicit structural organization of an extemporaneous speech by presenting and interpreting speeches of this type. Reinforces ability to perceive essential meaning and further develops note-taking techniques. Emphasizes clarity of expression, correct style and grammar, proper diction, and polished presentation. Students also expand their active vocabulary to include the terms and idioms that frequently occur in extemporaneous speeches. At the end of the course, students are able to interpret passages that are delivered extemporaneously, are of moderate difficulty, and are derived from professional settings. These passages vary from one to several paragraphs in length depending upon language combination, direction, and source content.

In simultaneous, students are introduced to basic strategies of interpreting in this mode in the booth. Begins with a general introduction and follows up with a series of preparatory exercises helping students develop the concentration necessary for listening and speaking at the same time, mastering voice management, and acquiring smooth delivery techniques. Students learn to analyze discourse for meaning while rendering a coherent version in the TL with correct grammar, diction and style. At the end of the course, students are able to interpret passages that are between eight and ten minutes in length.

Content on a wide range of topics and current events is interpreted, with some emphasis placed on business and economics. Course assignments include readings and research on class topics, presentations, practice, graded exercises, and peer and self-assessment. The frequency, nature, and structure of course assignments and examinations are at the discretion of the instructor(s) of record.

Course prerequisites: Introduction to Interpretation or the equivalent

Spring 2012 - MIIS, Spring 2013 - MIIS, Spring 2014 - MIIS, Spring 2015 - MIIS

More Information »

TISP 8637 - Adv Intrp I Simul into English      

This is the first of two complementary courses designed to bring interpretation knowledge and skills up to the professional level. Students are expected to apply the knowledge and skills acquired during the first-year interpretation courses to produce interpretations that would be of acceptable quality in a professional setting. Content on a wide range of topics and current events is interpreted, with emphasis placed on business, economics, science, technology, and other topics congruent with current market demand for interpretation in the language combination in question. Course assignments include readings and research on class topics, presentations, practice, graded exercises, and peer and self-assessment.

In consecutive interpretation, students prepare by researching topics before each session, with emphasis on sequential logic in notetaking and accurate terminology in delivery. Students continue to hone their skills by diagnosing and correcting problems at all stages from listening through delivery, while progressing to increasingly difficult and challenging material. In simultaneous interpretation, the techniques learned in the previous semester are consolidated, which enables students to polish their delivery and language register. Focuses on nuance of meaning, accuracy of interpretation, research and preparation for conferences, and glossary development. Special attention is given to maintaining concentration while under significant psychological stress. Students learn to recognize SL discourse patterns and render them effectively in TL.

At the end of the course, students are able to interpret difficult passages that are derived from professional settings. In consecutive, students are able to interpret passages up to several paragraphs in length. In simultaneous interpretation, students are able to interpret passages that are between fifteen and twenty minutes in length. The frequency, nature, and structure of course assignments and examinations are at the discretion of the instructor(s) of record.

Fall 2010 - MIIS, Fall 2011 - MIIS, Fall 2012 - MIIS, Fall 2013 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS

More Information »

TISP 8647 - Adv Intrp II-Siml into English      

Advanced Interpretation II – Consecutive and Simultaneous

This course is the counterpart to Advanced Interpretation I. Students are expected to interpret speeches of considerable difficulty and complexity and to cope with the types of challenges that are likely to be encountered in professional settings. Provides final preparation for the Professional Examinations.

In consecutive interpretation, emphasis is placed on both science and technology and political rhetoric, requiring particular attention to nuance and tone. Students learn the vernacular of political speeches and other challenging material while sharpening listening, processing, and notetaking functions.

In simultaneous interpretation, advanced instruction is given for difficult speeches. Emphasizes following the logic of complex scientific and technical discourse, and remaining faithful to the style and tone of persuasive political discourse. Students are also introduced to simultaneous interpretation with text. They learn how to draw upon outlines, transcripts, slides and transparencies, and other written materials to enhance the accuracy and completeness of their interpretation. Emphasis is placed on text preparation strategies and efficient use of textual materials while on the air.

Content on a wide range of topics and current events is interpreted, with emphasis placed on topics congruent with current market demand for interpretation in the relevant language combination(s). Course assignments include readings and research on class topics, presentations, practice, graded exercises, and peer and self-assessment.

At the end of the course, students are expected to interpret difficult speeches in professional settings. In consecutive, students are called upon to interpret passages that are several paragraphs in length. In simultaneous, students are able to interpret passages that are between fifteen and twenty minutes in length. The frequency, nature, and structure of course assignments and examinations are at the discretion of the instructor(s) of record.

Course prerequisites: Advanced Interpretation I or the equivalent

Spring 2011 - MIIS, Spring 2012 - MIIS, Spring 2013 - MIIS, Spring 2014 - MIIS, Spring 2015 - MIIS

More Information »

MIIS Tags
Expertise

Simultaneous and consecutive interpretation, interpreter training and education, multilingual negotiations, political and diplomatic discourse, and interpreting and technology.

Extra Information

Recent Accomplishments

  • In 2011, Professor Olsen was instrumental in the negotiation of a memorandum of understanding signed with the Organization of American States for the creation of a postgraduate conference interpreter and translator training experience for qualified Monterey Institute graduates.
  • Outside of class, he continues to work as a conference interpreter. His most recent assignments include the G20 Presidential Summit in Cabo San Lucas, Mexico, and the annual International Drug Enforcement Conference (IDEC).
  • Professor Olsen’s current research is focused on the creation of a cloud-based multi-channel audio conferencing system that makes remote simultaneous interpreting for teleconferences possible.

Publications

Interpreting and the Digital Revolution. Olsen, Barry Slaughter, The ATA Chronicle, January 2012.

Interpreting: Full Speed Ahead, Blazing a Trail Toward National Unity. Bancroft, Marjory, with Olsen, Barry S. and Allen, Katharine, 2011.

Brief of Amici Curiae: Interpreting and Translation Professors in Support of Petitioner, Brief submitted to the Supreme Court of the United States in the case Kouichi Taniguchi v. Kan Pacific Saipan, Ltd., 2011.

How Do You Do That? (Translated from the original Portuguese by Barry Slaughter Olsen). Magalhaes, Ewandro, The ATA Chronicle, April 2010.

Education

MA, Conference Interpretation (English, Spanish, Russian), Monterey Institute of International Studies, BA, Spanish Translation, Brigham Young University

Faculty Type
Regular Faculty
Dynamic Features
Course Catalog

Anna Vassilieva

First Name
Anna
Last Name
Vassilieva
Anna Vassilieva, Professor, Image
Job Title
Professor
Location
McGowan Building 200A
Phone
831.647.3546
Language(s)
Русский

Professor Vassilieva is a teacher, author, translator and editor. She authored The Russian Émigré Presson Democracy in Russia, 1980-1990s, co-authored a study Influence on Russian Culture on RussianNegotiating Style, co-edited Russia and East Asia: Informal and Gradual Integration, Crossing NationalBorders : Human Migration Issues in Northeast Asia, translated Dead End: the Road to Afghanistan, The Road to Home, Colors of Jazz.

MIIS Tags
Faculty Program Tags
Expertise

Contemporary Russian politics, Russian politics in Central Asia, Russian culture and society, Siberia, Russians in Japan.

Dr. Vassilieva interviewed on PBS's NewHour

Course List

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

RULA 8321 - Current Social&Politicl Issues      

Students will be working with authentic Russian language materials from electronic sources in Russia and CIS. The course work has two distinct goals: (1) to expand the vocabulary related to politics, sociology, and security, as well as the ability to read, translate, and analyze primary information sources; and (2) to introduce the variety of interpretations of current political, social, and security trends in the Russian media and government discourse on contemporary subjects. Students will engage in vocabulary-expanding exercises, review of advanced grammar rules, individual and group presentations, writing and speaking assignments related to the most acute issues facing Russian society today.

Fall 2012 - MIIS

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RULA 8332 - SociologicalOvrviewModrnRussia      

Fall 2011 - MIIS

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RULA 8342 - Politics&SocietyInModernRussia      

The goal of this course is to develop students’ familiarity with vocabulary and discourse specific to the area of public, political and sociological situation in contemporary Russia. The events of the end of 2011 and the beginning of 2012 are of particular interest to Russia watchers because of the broad civic discontent displayed in Russian public life during the period after the parliamentary elections and before the presidential elections. Students will read, translate and discuss sociological studies and journalistic accounts reporting Russian domestic politics, presidential candidates’ platforms, electoral forecasts and results. Students will make presentations reflecting political platforms of different presidential candidates, watch TV programs and follow media discourse related to the pre-electoral and post-electoral developments in Russia.

Spring 2012 - MIIS

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RULA 8399 - Traditnl/HumanSecurityInRussia      

Spring 2013 - MIIS

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RULA 8440 - Comprhnding Terrorist Websites      

The goal of this course is to examine historical, political and religious context of Jihad in Russian Federation’s republics of Chechnya, Dagestan and Ingushetia. Students will read documents and texts explaining the goals of Jihad in Russia and penetrate its semantic and cultural rhetoric. Students will watch and analyze documentaries dedicated to Russian jihad and numerous terrorist attacks on Russian soil in recent history. Students will learn about the networks, tactics and general appeal of electronic media among the young Muslim population in the region as well as role of women in Russian jihad.

Spring 2011 - MIIS

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RULA 8442 - NonproliferatnIssues in Russia      

The goal of this course is to develop students’ familiarity with vocabulary and discourse specific to the area of nonproliferation of weapons of mass destruction in Russian academic, political and journalistic discourse. Students will read, translate texts explaining Russia’s politics of nonproliferation, its relations with the United States, and its history of cooperation with Iran among other issues. Students will have an opportunity to listen to distinguished guest speakers from Russia and the New East European countries and practice discussing nonproliferation issues in Russian with the experts.

Spring 2011 - MIIS

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RULA 8452 - VladimrPutin:Russia&ItsPrsidnt      

Fall 2013 - MIIS

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RULA 8455 - PutinsRussia:ResurctnOrDemise?      

Spring 2015 - MIIS

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RULA 8484 - Modern Russia in War & Peace      

Fall 2014 - MIIS

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RULA 8491 - Pol/Soc in Post-Comunist Wrld      

The goals of this course is to study the Russian language electronic media discourse on the most acute issues of politics and society in the post-Communist states. Students will read and translated journalistic, analytical, and sociological overviews of such issues as ethnic conflicts, state-society relations and perceptions, US-Russia relations, NATO-Russia relations, national identity, corruption, and evolution of post-Soviet societies. Students will hone their presentation skills, expand their vocabulary, and analytical writing skills. An effort will be made to improve students’ understanding of cultural and historical factors driving political changes in modern Eurasia.

Fall 2010 - MIIS

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RULA 8492 - Russian Pol/Society XXICentury      

Spring 2013 - MIIS

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RULA 8493 - Politcs&Scurity-MultipolarWrld      

This course will be a part of a larger Monterey Model curriculum arrangement, which will consist of three groups of students specializing in Arabic, Chinese and Russian languages and Area studies. The Monterey Model curriculum will be devised in a way that would allow students from different language groups and areas of expertise to come together several times during the semester in order to exchange their views and acquired knowledge pertinent to selected themes. Students, professors and invited distinguished experts will be discussing differences in public, media and governmental views related to important international events and role of languages in regional politics. An effort will be made to integrate various approaches to better understand domestic politics and foreign relations through cultural, historical and political discourse. Students will watch jointly news broadcasts in Arabic, Chinese and Russian in order to better grasp the role of mass media in China, Russia and Middle East. Students will acquire practical skills of working with interpreters and will prepare their own presentations for some plenary sessions where they will have to rely on assistance of interpreters to generate the discussion of their topics. The joint coordinated curriculum will consist of the following topics:

1. Overview. Ethnic groups and minorities. Concepts of territory, geography, security.

2. Islam in country specific case studies. Political movements rooted in Islam. Religion and State in country specific case studies.

3. Security. Terrorism. Border Issues.

4. Language specific themes, for example: Arab Spring: media coverage, History and Present of Russian-Chinese diplomatic collaboration, Mutual perceptions : case studies of Chinese business and China’s economic presence in Northern Africa, Role of Shanghai Cooperation Organization, Chinese, Russian, Arabic media strategies covering several key political events, Differences and similarities in patterns of civil unrest and political/economic consequences in China, Russia and Arabic speaking countries.

Spring 2012 - MIIS

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RULA 8497 - Intelctual/PolDiscoursMdrnRus      

Fall 2011 - MIIS, Fall 2012 - MIIS

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RULA 8520 - Individual Research Projects      

Fall 2011 - MIIS, Fall 2012 - MIIS, Fall 2013 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS

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RULA 8530 - Individual Research Projcts II      

Spring 2013 - MIIS, Spring 2015 - MIIS

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Language Tags
Extra Information

Education

Ph.D., History, Russian Diplomatic Academy; BA, MA, Irkutsk State Linguistic University

Faculty Type
Regular Faculty
Dynamic Features
Course Catalog

Kathleen M. Bailey

First Name
Kathleen
Last Name
Bailey
Kathleen Bailey, Professor of International Education Management, IEM, Image
Job Title
Professor
Location
McCone Building 208
Phone
831.647.4181

Professor Bailey is currently serving as President and Chair of The International Research Foundation for English Language Education (TIRF). With her work for TIRF, Professor Bailey and the TIRF Board of Trustees are seeking to promote effective practices in the use of English in the emerging global knowledge economy of the 21st century. She has conducted teacher training activities, including leading workshops and teaching courses, in thirty different countries.

Faculty Program Tags
MIIS Tags
Course List

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

EDUC 8505 - Intro to Classroom Observation      

Develops skills in classroom observation and an understanding of observation as a fundamental professional development and research activity.

Spring 2012 - MIIS, Spring 2015 - MIIS

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EDUC 8540 - Language Assessment      

Considers issues in language assessment including reliability, validity, test bias, and authenticity. Examines differences and similarities among placement, proficiency, achievement, aptitude, and performance testing. Explores alternative evaluation procedures. Prepares students to evaluate tests and to develop original language tests. Prerequisites: Language Analysis and Educational Research Methods.

Fall 2010 - MIIS, Spring 2011 - MIIS, Fall 2011 - MIIS, Spring 2012 - MIIS, Fall 2012 - MIIS, Fall 2013 - MIIS, Spring 2014 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS

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EDUC 8559 - Teaching of Speaking      

Fall 2011 - MIIS

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EDUC 8651 - Portfolio Continuation      

Summer 2011 - MIIS

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EDUC 8660 - Intro to Language Prog Admin      

Presents a practical overview of problems, situations and issues occurring in the management of language programs. Provides participants with an opportunity to shadow a language program administrator and later to complete an administrative internship.

Spring 2011 - MIIS, Spring 2012 - MIIS, Spring 2013 - MIIS, Spring 2014 - MIIS, Spring 2015 - MIIS

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EDUC 8661 - Language Teacher Supervision      

Provides language teachers with the skills and knowledge necessary to meet the challenges of supervision. Examines current models of, and research on, language teacher supervision. Students practice observing teachers and conducting post-observation conferences, developing their ability to provide professional feedback, differentiate between evaluative and developmental supervision, and examine the variables related to working with teachers in a variety of specific contexts.

Fall 2010 - MIIS, Fall 2011 - MIIS, Fall 2012 - MIIS, Fall 2013 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS

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EDUC 8662 - Language Teacher Education      

Investigates issues related to teacher training, education and development. Examines various philosophies and models of pre-service and in-service programs for training language teachers, thus building professional skills for students to be competent and confident teacher educators. Participants examine their own language learning and teaching histories to determine the influence of those histories on their future roles as teacher educators. Each participant also designs an original teacher training program.

Spring 2011 - MIIS, Spring 2012 - MIIS, Spring 2013 - MIIS, Spring 2014 - MIIS, Spring 2015 - MIIS

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LING 8640 - Applied Linguistics Research      

Requires original research to be conducted by the student on issues such as language attitudes, cultural variables, language learning, or other topics from sociolinguistics and second language acquisition. Introduces a range of research methods, including exposure to various data collection and analysis procedures in both the qualitative and quantitative research traditions.

Fall 2010 - MIIS, Spring 2011 - MIIS, Fall 2012 - MIIS, Fall 2013 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS, Spring 2015 - MIIS

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Expertise

Applied linguistics research, assessment, teacher education, language program administration, language teacher supervision

Extra Information

Education

PhD, Applied Linguistics; MA, TESOL, University of California, Los Angeles

Faculty Type
Regular Faculty
Dynamic Features
Course Catalog

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