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Mahmoud I. Abdalla

First Name
Mahmoud
Last Name
Abdalla
mahmoud-i-abdalla
Job Title
Associate Professor
Location
IIRC Building 7
City, State, ZIP
Monterey, CA
Phone
831.647.4607
Language(s)
svenska

Mahmoud Abdalla earned his M.A. and Ph.D. in applied linguistics at Essex University and the University of Edinburgh in the United Kingdom. He has taught and lectured extensively on linguistics, Arabic language, and Arab culture and media in several universities and academic institutions in Egypt, Europe, and the United States. He was previously the academic director of the Arabic Language Flagship Program and the coordinator of the Arabic Program in the Department of Linguistics and German, Slavic, Asian, and African Languages at Michigan State University.

Expertise

Arabic language, Arab culture and media, linguistics, second language acquisition, language culture and identity.

MIIS Tags
Faculty Program Tags
Language Tags
Course List

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

ARBC 6698 - Language Practicum      

This is a one unit course which is designed to give graduate students an opportunity to reflect on Arabic pedagogical theories and become familiar with a range of teaching strategies and techniques. The course includes class observation, lesson planning, a micro-teaching component and actual teaching demonstrations of the language skills. Students are required to conduct interviews with professional instructors during which they discuss the best practices as well as problems encountered in teaching the beginning, intermediate and advanced college level Arabic classes. To address the linguistic phenomenon of diglossia, students will practice teaching Arab dialect(s) alongside the formal varieties of the language. The course is offer in the last summer session towards the completion of the Master’s degree.

Summer 2013

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ARLA 8263 - Cultur/ComMedArabcSpkCountries      

Spring 2014 - MIIS

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ARLA 8290 - Topics in Arab Culture      

Fall 2011 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS

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ARLA 8294 - Mediterranean Cultures      

Spring 2015 - MIIS

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ARLA 8315 - Arab & Islamic Culture in Asia      

Spring 2015 - MIIS

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ARLA 8320 - Development of Arab Mass Media      

SThe course will offer an overview of the history of Arab mass media and the role they play in contemporary Arab society. Students will read, watch and analyze authentic materials from various Arab newspapers, magazines, satellite TV stations, online programs, cinema and the like. Students will be exposed to discourse that is presented in Modern Standard Arabic and dialects.

Spring 2011 - MIIS, Spring 2013 - MIIS

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ARLA 8331 - ModernEgypt &Role in ArabWorld      

Students who enroll in this course will study Egypt’s leading role in the region. The curse will focus on the political and social changes that affect this role. This will be done through reading a collection of literary works, historical texts and current editorials and articles. Students will also watch and discuss documentary films that shed light on the problems that Egypt encounters.

Spring 2011 - MIIS

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ARLA 8335 - Events in the Middle East      

Fall 2011 - MIIS

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ARLA 8341 - Economy of the Middle East      

The course focuses on the economic development in the Middle East. It will also focus on the effect of Arab Spring on contemporary Arab society including social justice and economic growth. The commercial, financial and business relations between the Arab World and regional and international organizations will be discussed in this class. Students will practice using the target language in activities and tasks that include interviewing local businessmen, preparation of business proposals and designing blogs or websites that provide useful information about how to do business in the Middle East.

Spring 2012 - MIIS

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ARLA 8343 - Glblizatn/Dvlpmnt InMiddleEast      

Fall 2012 - MIIS

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ARLA 8352 - Arab American Relations      

Fall 2011 - MIIS

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ARLA 8373 - ChangesInContmpraryArabSociety      

Fall 2013 - MIIS

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ARLA 8384 - Events in the Middle East II      

Fall 2014 - MIIS

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ARLA 8385 - Lang/ID:RoleSoclMediaArabWorld      

Spring 2014 - MIIS

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ARLA 8392 - Nat'l ID &Women's Status,M.E.      

Fall 2013 - MIIS

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ARLA 8393 - Politcs&Scurity-MultipolarWrld      

This course will be a part of a larger Monterey Model curriculum arrangement, which will consist of three groups of students specializing in Arabic, Chinese and Russian languages and Area studies. The Monterey Model curriculum will be devised in a way that would allow students from different language groups and areas of expertise to come together several times during the semester in order to exchange their views and acquired knowledge pertinent to selected themes. Students, professors and invited distinguished experts will be discussing differences in public, media and governmental views related to important international events and role of languages in regional politics. An effort will be made to integrate various approaches to better understand domestic politics and foreign relations through cultural, historical and political discourse. Students will watch jointly news broadcasts in Arabic, Chinese and Russian in order to better grasp the role of mass media in China, Russia and Middle East. Students will acquire practical skills of working with interpreters and will prepare their own presentations for some plenary sessions where they will have to rely on assistance of interpreters to generate the discussion of their topics. The joint coordinated curriculum will consist of the following topics:

1. Overview. Ethnic groups and minorities. Concepts of territory, geography, security.

2. Islam in country specific case studies. Political movements rooted in Islam. Religion and State in country specific case studies.

3. Security. Terrorism. Border Issues.

4. Language specific themes, for example: Arab Spring: media coverage, History and Present of Russian-Chinese diplomatic collaboration, Mutual perceptions : case studies of Chinese business and China’s economic presence in Northern Africa, Role of Shanghai Cooperation Organization, Chinese, Russian, Arabic media strategies covering several key political events, Differences and similarities in patterns of civil unrest and political/economic consequences in China, Russia and Arabic speaking countries.

Spring 2012 - MIIS

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ARLA 8394 - TopicsInSecurity&IntlRelations      

Spring 2013 - MIIS

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ARLA 8397 - Arab-African Relations      

Fall 2012 - MIIS

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Faculty Type
Regular Faculty
Dynamic Features
Course Catalog

Philip J. Murphy

First Name
Philip
Last Name
Murphy
Phil Murphy
Job Title
Assistant Professor
Location
224 McCone
Phone
831.647.4600
Language(s)
Македонски јазик

Dr. Murphy earned his PhD in Public and International Affairs from the University of Pittsburgh, where he recently held the position of Senior Policy Fellow at the Matthew B. Ridgway Center for International Security Studies. He has taught distance education courses in a Master of Public Policy and Management program targeted at mid-career public and private sector professionals in Macedonia.

Expertise

Public Policy, Research Methods, Quantitative Methods, Network Analysis, International Development

Faculty Program Tags
MIIS Tags
Course List

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

IPMG 9532 - Peru Practicum      

Spring 2015 - MIIS

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IPSG 8501 / IPOL 8501 - Policy Analysis      

This course introduces students to the theory and practice of policy analysis. Students will be introduced to the stages of the public policy process, including agenda setting, formulation, implementation, and evaluation. Students will also develop basic policy analysis skills, including problem structuring, stakeholder identification, summarization of current policy, development of policy options, elaboration of criteria for selection, and recommendation of course of action. These concepts are illustrated by examples policies that fall within students' range of interests. This course also introduces students to scientific methods that are used as a means for structuring policy inquiry. A series of research approaches and techniques are presented in the context of forecasting, monitoring, and evaluation for the analysis of domestic and international policies.

Fall 2011 - MIIS, Spring 2014 - MIIS

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IPSG 8504 / IPOL 8504 - Data Analysis for Public Polcy      

The course is an introduction to inferential statistics with an emphasis on Policy Analysis applications. Topics to be covered include sampling, estimation, hypothesis testing, analysis of variance, and simple and multiple regression analysis. The course will also include an introduction to the use of the computer as a tool for data analysis using leading statistical packages, as well as Excel statistical functions.

Spring 2011 - MIIS, Spring 2012 - MIIS, Fall 2012 - MIIS, Fall 2013 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS

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IPSG 8532 - Peru Practicum      

Spring 2015 - MIIS

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IPSG 8565 / IPOL 8565 - Intro to Network Analysis      

This course introduces students to the skills and concepts at the core of a dynamic and rapidly developing interdisciplinary field. Network analytic tools focus on the relationships between nodes (e.g., individuals, groups, organizations, countries, etc.). We analyze these relationships to uncover or predict a variety of important factors (e.g., the potential or importance of various actors, organizational vulnerabilities, potential subgroups, the need for redundancy, social and economic ties, growth within a network, …). Although the security field has received the greatest amount of recent attention (covert or terrorist networks), these tools can offer valuable insight into a variety of disciplines. The combination of – often stunning – visual analytic techniques with more quantitative measures accounts for much of the increasing worldwide popularity of this field.

Course Objectives

At the end of the semester, students will be able to:
Explain and apply a number of the concepts that underpin network analysis Apply concepts such as centrality, brokerage, equivalence and diffusion to network data Critically evaluate structures and substructures within a network Perform a variety of approaches to clustering and cohesion to networks Analyze networks using a variety of software packages

Spring 2011 - MIIS, Spring 2012 - MIIS, Fall 2012 - MIIS, Fall 2013 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS

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IPSG 8673 - Advanced Data Analysis      

The advanced data analysis course was designed to provide students with the opportunity to expand upon the skills developed in the introductory course (IPSG 8504), and introduce new skills that address a greater range of analytic needs. This is a project-based, applied course. Class discussions will include both how and why to use these tools, with a strong emphasis on policy applications. Among others, the course covers modules on Factor Analysis, Non-Linear Regression, Spatial Analysis and Time Series Analysis, and its design has a strong emphasis on policy applications. Multiple data sets will be used, but students are encouraged to use their own data and background knowledge.

Spring 2013 - MIIS, Spring 2014 - MIIS, Spring 2015 - MIIS

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IPSG 9507 - QualitativeDataAnalysisMash-Up      

This lively, hands-on course focuses on analysis of qualitative data. By “data”, we mean interview, focus group, written reports and visual records, hundreds of pages of them. Students will have a choice of qualitative data sets – there is no time in this short course to engage in primary data collection -- and our entire focus will be on a) deciding how to interrogate the data (what is it you wish to know, demonstrate, reveal, test?), b) developing code books and coding, c) inter-coder reliability, and d) a wide variety of analytical approaches you can use, once you have qualitative data reduced and organized. The first seven weeks of the course focus on a-c. Then, during a final weekend workshop, students will engage in hands-on analysis, using techniques introduced rapid fire during the workshop: expect to practice no fewer than 20 qualitative analysis techniques over three days. This course emphasizes the importance of studying/reading high quality qualitative research studies as fundamental to learning – we will dissect one study each week to understand how the researchers put it together – while also emphasizing learning-through-doing, making mistakes, and collaborative analysis (qualitative inquiry is almost always improved through collaboration). Your final product will be a 10-page analysis, due two weeks after the final workshop.

Fall 2014 - MIIS

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MPAG 8507 - QualitativeDataAnalysisMash-Up      

This lively, hands-on course focuses on analysis of qualitative data. By “data”, we mean interview, focus group, written reports and visual records, hundreds of pages of them. Students will have a choice of qualitative data sets – there is no time in this short course to engage in primary data collection -- and our entire focus will be on a) deciding how to interrogate the data (what is it you wish to know, demonstrate, reveal, test?), b) developing code books and coding, c) inter-coder reliability, and d) a wide variety of analytical approaches you can use, once you have qualitative data reduced and organized. The first seven weeks of the course focus on a-c. Then, during a final weekend workshop, students will engage in hands-on analysis, using techniques introduced rapid fire during the workshop: expect to practice no fewer than 20 qualitative analysis techniques over three days. This course emphasizes the importance of studying/reading high quality qualitative research studies as fundamental to learning – we will dissect one study each week to understand how the researchers put it together – while also emphasizing learning-through-doing, making mistakes, and collaborative analysis (qualitative inquiry is almost always improved through collaboration). Your final product will be a 10-page analysis, due two weeks after the final workshop.

Fall 2014 - MIIS

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Extra Information

Education

Ph.D University of Pittsburgh; MA East Tennessee State University; BS Appalachian State University

Selected Publications

"Knowledge Hub and Inventory of Opportunities."

"Getting it Done: A Brief Overview of Critical Junctures in the Study of How Policy Translates into Practice."

"Public Administration Education in Macedonia: Accelerating the Process."

"Social Policy and International Interventions in South East Europe."

"Models, Methods, and Stereotypes: Efforts to Maintain, Reify, and Create Macedonia's Ethnopolitical Identities and how Research can Move beyond Them."

"Public Policy Analysis and its Importance to Public Administration Reform."

Faculty Type
Regular Faculty
Dynamic Features
Course Catalog

Sandra M. Dow

First Name
Sandra
Last Name
Dow
Sandra Dow profile
Job Title
Professor of International Finance and Fisher International MBA Program Chair
Location
McCone 211
Phone
831.647.4187
Language(s)
Français

Dr. Sandra M. Dow has taught at the University of Quebec at Montreal (Canada), Concordia University (Canada), Wake Forest University (USA), Saint Mary's University (Canada), and Warsaw School of Economics (Poland).  During her academic career she has taught a range of courses including:  Corporate Finance, International Finance, International Investments, Corporate Governance, and Money and Banking.

MIIS Tags
Short Programs & Research Centers
Expertise

Corporate Governance; International Finance; Environmental, Social, and Governance Risk Management (ESG)

Course List

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

IMGT 8619 - Corp Govrnance & ESG Risk Mgmt      

This workshop focuses on key components of corporate governance. We begin with an examination of the firm’s ownership structure and then zero in on two important internal governance mechanisms: the board of directors and executive compensation policy. An overview of external governance mechanism is provided that includes the market for corporate control and a discussion of gatekeepers (e.g. security analysts, lawyers, accountants, etc.) The course will be conducted using both lecture and cases and active student participation in both is encouraged and required.

Spring 2012 - MIIS

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IMGT 8658 - Corporate Governance      

The recent financial crisis underscores the importance of corporate governance regulation and enforcement. This course will combine various theoretical perspectives on corporate governance with practical applications through lectures, class discussion and case analysis. The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the theoretical foundations of corporate governance and demonstrate the complexity of corporate governance issues. In addition, students will become familiar with the various mechanisms of corporate governance and develop the skills necessary to evaluate the governance of a company.

Spring 2011 - MIIS, Fall 2011 - MIIS, Fall 2012 - MIIS

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IMGT 8668 - Environmental Risk Management      

This workshop examines the business case for addressing climate change issues. Strategic corporate responses to climate change and environmental challenges do not seem to be the primary domain of corporate management. Such decisions are often not seen as profit maximizing in the short run and are generally not consistent with executive incentives. Nevertheless, some climate change responses may indeed be firm value maximizing and so such decisions can be expected to reflect the nature of a firm’s corporate governance.In this workshop we examine the potential impact of climate change on firm value and examine how the quality of the firm’s governance can influence firm response. The course will be conducted using both the lecture and case methods and active student participation is both encouraged and required.

Spring 2011 - MIIS

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IMGT 8682 - Climate Risk & Corp Value      

This workshop examines the business case for addressing climate change issues. Strategic corporate responses to climate change and environmental challenges do not seem to be the primary domain of corporate management. Such decisions are often not seen as profit maximizing in the short run and are generally not consistent with executive incentives. Nevertheless, some climate change responses may indeed be firm value maximizing and so such decisions can be expected to reflect the nature of a firm’s corporate governance. In this workshop we examine the potential impact of climate change on firm value and examine how the quality of the firm’s governance can influence firm response. The workshop will be conducted using both lecture and cases and active student participation is both encouraged and required.

Spring 2012 - MIIS

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IMGT 8697 - Social Risk & Corporate Value      

This workshop provides a framework for analyzing the social risk of the firm and tries to find any links that may exist to corporate value. We will examine various attempts to measure social risk and work with social risk data from a leading data provider (Risk Metrics). The costs of adhering to high environmental and social standards can translate to higher operating costs that in turn may place the firm at a competitive disadvantage and lead to lower profitability. On the other hand strong social policies can confer a competitive advantage on the firm by stimulating technological innovations, improving the efficiency of resource use and thereby cutting costs, strengthening a firm’s reputation and brand, and reducing the firm’s operational risk. The workshop will be conducted using both lecture and cases and active student participation is both encouraged and required.

Spring 2012 - MIIS

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MBAG 8536 - Financial Management      

This core course is designed to help students develop an understanding of the fundamental and practical analytical tools of corporate finance as well as its underlying concepts and principles through an encompassing analytical framework of both risk and return within qualitative and quantitative dimensions. The purpose of this course is to study the management of the firm from a financial point of view by focusing in the financial manager's primary task, which is to plan for the acquisition and use of funds so as to maximize the value of the firm.

Spring 2013 - MIIS, Spring 2014 - MIIS, Spring 2015 - MIIS

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MBAG 8612 - Case Competition Prep Course      

This course prepares students for MBA Case Competition participation. We emphasize “raw cases” as our target competitions: The Economist, Corporate Knights, Hult Prize and Aspen have all adopted this format. In addition to introducing you to the “raw case” approach, you will acquire skills that can give teams a competitive edge in Case competition. Specifically, we provide (in collaboration with participants) possible information sources that you may consult in the course of your analyses, an overview of business methods. Further the differentiating characteristics in elite case competitions may rest not only on your analyses, but also on the crispness of your presentation – both written and oral. Thus the pre-case phase will allow you to improve these skills as well.

Fall 2014 - MIIS

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MBAG 8619 - Corporate Govrnance      

Spring 2014 - MIIS, Spring 2015 - MIIS

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MBAG 8629 / IMGT 8629 - Intl Financial Markets      

The course provides the student with the conceptual framework necessary to appreciate and understand the key financial markets and instruments that facilitate trade and investment activities in a dynamically evolving global financial environment. For this purpose, the course focuses on the global financial environment; the foreign exchange market; the foreign currency options market; the currency futures market; the currency forward market; the currency and interest rate swap markets; the international bond market; the international equity market; international portfolio diversification; and international parity relations.

Fall 2011 - MIIS, Fall 2012 - MIIS, Fall 2013 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS

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MBAG 8638 / IMGT 8638 - Intl Investment Analysis      

This course covers theory and instruments used in developing international investment portfolios. Students gain an understanding of international capital and money markets through the development and management of their own portfolios. The course also covers the use of hedging strategies, asset pricing models and management of exchange risk.

Prerequisite: IMGT 8531 & IMGT 8536.

Spring 2011 - MIIS, Spring 2012 - MIIS, Spring 2013 - MIIS, Fall 2013 - MIIS, Spring 2015 - MIIS

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MBAG 8688 / IMGT 8688 - ESG Risk Assessment      

Successful investing is dependent upon the ability to determine the factors that influence the market's valuation of a company… and then judge the accuracy of that valuation. The goal of this course is to demonstrate how Environmental, Social, and Governance (ESG) factors can be used along with traditional financial metrics to assess risks and opportunities confronting firms. As such, this is a course in socially responsible investing taught from a finance perspective. The importance of “extra-financial” factors in evaluating the risks and opportunities confronting the firm is no longer a fringe area for finance professionals. In 2008 the Chartered Financial Analyst’s association introduced ESG into their curriculum. According to a Thomson Reuters survey released in May 2009, 84% of global buy-side investors said they evaluate ESG criteria to some degree when making investment decisions. Moreover, institutional investors are increasingly vocal in their demands that ESG risks be disclosed to the SEC. There are three themes to the course: Objectives of business (wealth maximization versus long term sustainability?), the pillars of socially responsible investing and the development of SRI funds.

Fall 2011 - MIIS, Fall 2012 - MIIS, Fall 2013 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS

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Faculty Program Tags
Extra Information

Publications

Dow, Sandra and Aggarwal, Raj. (2011) Navigating the C2 Economy: The 21st Century Business Challenge. The European Financial Review, 15 April, 2011.

Dow, Sandra and McGuire, Jean. (2011) Industrial Networks in Japan: Blessing or Curse? The European Financial Review, 17 Feb. 2011.

Faculty Type
Regular Faculty
Dynamic Features
Course Catalog

Sharad Joshi

First Name
Sharad
Last Name
Joshi
Sharad Joshi, Assistant Professor, Image
Job Title
Assistant Professor, Nonproliferation and Terrorism Studies
Location
McGowan 200-F
Phone
831.647.6508
Language(s)
हिन्दी

Dr. Sharad Joshi holds a PhD from the Graduate School of Public and International Affairs at the University of Pittsburgh. He joined the Monterey Institute in September 2006 as a Post-Doctoral Fellow at the James Martin Center for Nonproliferation Studies. At MIIS he has been a research associate at CNS and the Monterey Terrorism Research and Education Program (MonTREP). His current research focuses on various facets of terrorism in South Asia, as well as nonproliferation issues in the region. Dr.

Faculty Program Tags
Short Programs & Research Centers
Course List

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

PSCI 1039 - Security Issues in South Asia      

Security Issues in South Asia
In this course we will examine various security matters in South Asia, including interstate conflict, terrorism, and issues related to weapons of mass destruction. South Asia refers to the region encompassing Pakistan, India, Sri Lanka, Nepal, Bangladesh, Bhutan, and the Maldives. However, given that security matters in Afghanistan are linked closely to Pakistan, this course will include Afghanistan as part of the broader southern Asian region. We will look at topics from the historical, political-economic, and foreign policy perspective. We will discuss various conflicts between countries, including the India-Pakistan dyad, and the reasons behind the wars between them. Cases studies will include Islamist terrorism in the region, and the Tamil Tigers in Sri Lanka. This course will also consider nontraditional security matters such as environmental degradation and refugee movements. (International Relations)/

AAL SOC WTR

Winter 2014

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IPOL 8561 - Counterinsurgency in SouthAsia      

This course examines various insurgent movements that have persisted in South Asia for several decades and the different strategies that have been employed by governments to roll back these insurgencies. Geographically, South Asia includes India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Nepal, Bangladesh, Bhutan, and the Maldives. For the purpose of this course, South Asia will also include Afghanistan, which is closely enmeshed in security dynamics related to other parts of the subcontinent, especially Pakistan. In the course of the semester, several case studies of insurgent movements will be examined, such as the Taliban insurgency in Afghanistan and Pakistan, and the Maoist insurgencies in Nepal and India. Other case studies will include the three-decade long campaign by the Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam (LTTE) in Sri Lanka, and several cases of insurgencies in northeastern India, involving groups such as the United Liberation Front of Assam (ULFA) and the National Socialist Council of Nagaland (NSCN).

Spring 2012 - MIIS

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IPOL 8627 - Sem:Militant Islamic Movements      

This seminar is designed to provide a survey of various militant Islamic organizations – “gradualist” Islamist organizations that do not rely mainly on waging armed jihad, jihadist organizations that rely primarily on violence and terrorism, and other types of fundamentalist or Islamist organizations that do not fall clearly into either category – and is specifically intended for graduate students who have already taken lecture-oriented undergraduate or graduate courses dealing with terrorism. The class will be divided into two separate portions. In the first portion, the lectures and readings will focus on the basic tenets of Islam; an overview of Islamic history; the distinction between Islamic fundamentalism, political Islam, and Islamism; and important examples of the different types of Islamist organizations noted above in particular regions. Given the threat that such Islamist networks and their supporters currently pose to the security of the West, Russia, India, various states in Asia, and moderate Muslims everywhere, it is necessary for every student interested in contemporary subversion and terrorism to become much more knowledgeable about key Islamist and jihadist groups, their agendas, and their tactics. During the second portion of the course, each student will give an oral report in class to present and analyze his or her research findings, which will then be discussed by the entire class. Near the end of this second portion of the class, if not earlier, students must submit their completed research papers.

Spring 2011 - MIIS

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IPOL 8629 - Sem:NucPolcy-NPT OutlierStates      

India, Israel, and Pakistan are the three de facto nuclear weapon states that have been outside the Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) since it came into force in 1970. This seminar examines the relationship of these three countries with the nonproliferation regime broadly, both from the perspective of the states in question as well as from the perspective of the international community.

After a quick review of the nuclear history of these three states—including some discussions of similarities and dissimilarities among them—the seminar focuses on the examination of key themes and questions such as: What is the role of nuclear weapons in national security of the three countries? What are the policies on arms control and disarmament in these three countries? What are the attitudes within these countries regarding the different elements of the global nonproliferation regime, such as the NPT, the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT), and the (proposed) Fissile Material Cutoff Treaty (FMCT)? How did these positions evolve over several decades? How have these three countries responded to some of the more recent nonproliferation initiatives such as the Proliferation Security Initiative (PSI)? The seminar will also address the domestic mechanisms through which these three states deal with nuclear issues. Finally, the seminar also explores the different modalities that have been proposed by various parties to integrate the three countries into the nonproliferation regime.

Spring 2012 - MIIS

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IPSG 8501 / IPOL 8501 - Policy Analysis      

This course introduces students to the theory and practice of policy analysis. Students will be introduced to the stages of the public policy process, including agenda setting, formulation, implementation, and evaluation. Students will also develop basic policy analysis skills, including problem structuring, stakeholder identification, summarization of current policy, development of policy options, elaboration of criteria for selection, and recommendation of course of action. These concepts are illustrated by examples policies that fall within students' range of interests. This course also introduces students to scientific methods that are used as a means for structuring policy inquiry. A series of research approaches and techniques are presented in the context of forecasting, monitoring, and evaluation for the analysis of domestic and international policies.

Fall 2011 - MIIS, Fall 2012 - MIIS, Fall 2013 - MIIS

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NPTG 8584 - Introduction to Terrorism      

This course is designed to provide a critical introduction to the subject of terrorism, an often misunderstood phenomenon that has assumed a particular salience in the wake of 9/11. Its aim is to clarify fundamental definitional and conceptual problems, introduce students to the burgeoning literature on the subject, describe basic terrorist organizational and operational methods, survey a wide range of terrorist groups and ideologies, examine certain high-profile terrorism themes, and tentatively assess the nature of the threat posed by terrorists to global security in the future.

Fall 2014 - MIIS

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NPTG 8624 - Sem:Countrinsurgency in S.Asia      

Insurgency and Terrorism: According to Alex Schmid, an insurgency is: “an armed uprising, revolt, or rebellion by a political group or party against a domestic or foreign ruling in order to subvert it, overthrow it, expel it, and break away from it, or simply to enhance the group’s bargaining position for subsequent political compromise. Acts of terrorism are a frequent occurrence in many insurgencies.” According to Jeffrey Bale, terrorism refers to: “the use or threatened use of violence, usually directed against victims selected for their symbolic or representative value, as a means of instilling anxiety in, transmitting one or more messages to, and thereby manipulating the perceptions and behavior of wider target audiences.”

This course examines various insurgent movements that have persisted in South Asia for several decades and the different strategies that have been employed by governments to roll back these insurgencies. Geographically, South Asia includes India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Nepal, Bangladesh, Bhutan, and the Maldives. For the purpose of this course, South Asia will also include Afghanistan, which is closely enmeshed in security dynamics related to other parts of the subcontinent, especially Pakistan. In the course of the semester, several case studies of insurgent movements will be examined, such as the Taliban insurgency in Afghanistan and Pakistan, and the Maoist insurgencies in Nepal and India. Other case studies will include the three-decade long campaign by the Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam (LTTE) in Sri Lanka, and several cases of insurgencies in northeastern India, involving groups such as the United Liberation Front of Assam (ULFA) and the National Socialist Council of Nagaland (NSCN).

Spring 2014 - MIIS

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NPTG 8668 / IPOL 8668 - Sem:Terrorism in South Asia      

Terrorist violence has persisted in various parts of South Asia for several decades. A variety of interconnected reasons can be assigned to this phenomenon – state sponsorship, separatist tendencies, religious and sectarian divides, and political meddling. Terrorism in South Asia is also a crucial concern because of its broader connections to extra-regional terrorist networks. The two dominant states in South Asia possess nuclear weapons and have a long history of military conflict and have periodically experienced crises situations provoked by terrorist attacks. Additionally, the history of proliferation networks and concerns over Pakistan’s nuclear security further exacerbate the threat perception from terrorist networks.

The object of this course is to understand the causes and dimensions of terrorism in South Asia and to analyze positions adopted by the involved parties, state and non-state. From the policy perspective, this is essential toward formulating responses to terrorism in the region. South Asia is conventionally defined as the region comprising the countries of India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Nepal, Sri Lanka, Bhutan and the Maldives. But for the purposes of this seminar we will also look at developments in Afghanistan (generally considered as South-West Asia), given its crucial links to terrorism issues in South Asia.

Fall 2011 - MIIS, Fall 2012 - MIIS, Fall 2013 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS

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NPTG 8674 / IPOL 8674 - Sem:Terrorism in SouthEastAsia      

Various parts of South-East Asia have been plagued by terrorist violence in recent decades. South-East Asia refers to the region eastward from Burma/Myanmar till the Philippines. This course studies the phenomenon of terrorism in countries of the region such as Thailand, Indonesia, Malaysia and the Philippines. Some of the groups that this course examines include – Jemaah Islamiyah, Abu Sayyaf, Moro Islamic Liberation Front – their objectives, characteristics, composition, ideologies, tactics and fund-raising. Apart from these cases, the course also examines thematic issues such as the prospect of WMD terrorism and proliferation of WMD materials, maritime terrorism and piracy, and U.S. policy on counter-terrorism in South-East Asia. We also discuss connections between groups in South-East Asia and regional and global terrorist groups elsewhere, such as Al Qaeda and the Taliban. In order to have a comprehensive picture of non-state security threats in the region, the course also examines the various insurgent movements in Myanmar. Finally, given the close security dynamics between Australia and South-East Asia, this course also looks at terrorism-related issues in Australia.

Spring 2012 - MIIS, Spring 2013 - MIIS, Spring 2015 - MIIS

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NPTG 8683 / IPOL 8683 - Sem:South Asia & WMD      

In the realm of weapons of mass destruction (WMD), South Asia is one of the key regions of analysis. This course takes a comprehensive look at the role of WMD in the strategic thinking of various actors involved in the South Asian security framework. It is important to note that South Asian nuclear issues cannot be studied in isolation from other regional and global dynamics. States such as the U.S., China, and Russia are crucial players in the South Asian strategic framework. The course examines various reasons behind WMD acquisition by India and Pakistan, concentrating especially on nuclear weapons. These factors include threat perceptions, domestic imperatives and nationalistic attitudes. A key element of nuclear weapons programs is the development of effective delivery systems such as missiles and aircraft. Analysis of such programs provides an indicator of current and future strategy. In this context, both India and Pakistan have made major strides in their cruise and ballistic missile programs to make their nuclear strategy more credible. At the same time, neither side has a clearly enunciated nuclear doctrine, although attempts have been made in this direction. This is crucial in context of a reliable command and control system and for crisis stability. Another major issue covered in this course is the proliferation of WMD materials to non-state actors or aspiring nuclear states by proliferation networks connected to South Asia. Relatedly, policymakers in the region and elsewhere are also concerned with the danger of nuclear terrorism. These are some of the prominent issues concerning weapons of mass destruction in South Asia. The two sides have periodically taken steps to prevent nuclear crises situations. Apart from nuclear weapons, this seminar also examines chemical and biological weapons policy in the two countries.

Spring 2011 - MIIS, Spring 2012 - MIIS, Spring 2014 - MIIS, Spring 2015 - MIIS

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MIIS Tags
Expertise

International Security
South Asia
Terrorism
Nuclear Proliferation
Afghanistan
Southeast Asia

Dr. Joshi interviewed by NATO Review

Extra Information

Education

PhD, Graduate School of Public and International Affairs, University of Pittsburgh, 2006; M.A. (Politics), School of International Studies, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi, 2000; B.A. (Honors-Economics), University of Rajasthan, Jaipur, 1997.

Publications

"Will killing of Taliban Chief Make a Difference in Pakistan?," Chatham House, November 7, 2013

Woolwich Attack and the Changing Nature of Terrorism,” Chatham House, May 24, 2013

The China-Pakistan Nuclear Deal: A Realpolitique Fait Accompli,” Issue Brief, Nuclear Threat Initiative, December 11, 2011.

"Playing Politics:How the Regional Context Impedes Confronting Myanmar's Alleged Nuclear Program," Issue Brief, Nuclear Threat Initiative, February 4, 2011

"AfPak: Negotiate from Strength,” Foreign Policy in Focus, April 15, 2009.

"Deconstructing the Pakistani Response to the Mumbai Attack," International Institute for Counter-Terrorism, Herzliya, Israel, January 7, 2009.

"Cooperative Threat Reduction and Pakistan," (co-authored with Togzhan Kassenova) Issue Brief, Nuclear Threat Initiative, August 4, 2008.

"A Pause in the Indo-U.S. Nuclear Agreement," Issue Brief, Nuclear Threat Initiative, May 2, 2008.

"Is Pakistan Appeasing the Taliban?" Foreign Policy in Focus, June 13, 2008.

"A Ridge Too Far," Foreign Policy in Focus, November 6, 2007.

“Unilateralism and Multilateralism: Analyzing American Nuclear Nonproliferation Policy,” World Affairs (Washington, DC), Spring 2005, Vol. 167, No. 4, pp. 147-161.

“Israel’s Nuclear Policy: A Cost-Benefit Analysis,” Strategic Analysis, March 2000, Vol. XXIII, No. 12, pp. 2089-2110.

Faculty Type
Regular Faculty
Dynamic Features
Course Catalog

Raymond A. Zilinskas

First Name
Raymond
Last Name
Zilinskas
Raymond Zilinkskas, Director Chemical & Biological Nonproliferation, Image
Job Title
Director, Chemical & Biological Weapons Nonproliferation Program
Location
CNS Building, 499 Van Buren
City, State, ZIP
Monterey, CA 93940
Phone
831.647.6545
Language(s)
svenska

What is it that you are most passionate about? 

Preventing the use by nations or terrorists of biological and chemical weapons and should this fail, have done what I can about local, state, federal, and international authorities being well prepared to meet the challenges posed by such events.

Expertise

Clinical microbiology, organic chemistry, international law and mores related to biological and chemical arms control, preparedness and response to biological and chemical emergencies

MIIS Tags
Short Programs & Research Centers
Course List

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

IPOL 8559 - Science & Technology for NPTS      

This course provides students with a solid foundation in scientific and technical fundamentals critical to nonproliferation and terrorism policy analysis. Such policy analyses often require strong foundational knowledge of basic scientific and technical concepts in order to understand, create, and inform policy decisions. The course begins with an introduction to science and the scientific method and then evolves into the three main areas: biological weapons, chemical weapons, nuclear weapons and relevant technologies. Topics covered in the biological component include fundamental concepts related to microorganisms, DNA, RNA, proteins, and processes of infection and disease. Topics covered in the chemistry component include fundamental concepts related to atomic structure and the periodic table, chemical structural representations, functional groups, reactivity, toxicity, as well as modern separation, purification and analytic techniques commonly used for chemical species. Applications of the fundamental concepts in the first two topics are further developed in relation to features of chemical and biological weapons and warfare, including agents, delivery methods and effects. Topics covered in the nuclear component part of the course includes radioactivity, uranium, nuclear weapons, radiation detection instrumentation and applications, environmental plumes, and various instrumentation and analysis techniques. Upon completion of this course students will have a deeper appreciation for the debate on various verification solutions that have been proposed for compliance under the Biological and Toxin Weapons Convention (BWC), Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC) and nuclear treaties.

Spring 2011 - MIIS

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NPTG 8529 - TabletopExerciseDesign&Operatn      

A tabletop exercise (TTX) is a guided discussion of a scenario—a time-compressed sequence of events—that facilitates group problem solving. TTXs are particularly advantageous to governmental and nongovernmental organizations, as well as private businesses because they permit participants to practice response to high-consequence/low-frequency problems. Based on results from a TTX, organizations can develop new plans, or enhance existing plans, for how they will meet the challenges of catastrophic events such as floods and fires, disease outbreaks, sabotage of facilities, and others. Public agencies and private sector entities alike have to ensure business and service continuity, as well as protecting the safety and security of employees, during times of duress, and thus all can benefit from testing their preparedness and response plans using TTXs. Given their utility in illuminating anticipated performance, expectations, and assumptions, TTXs can be also useful in many other situations that would benefit from enhancing teamwork and multi-agency collaboration while assessing the content of plans and policies. Following successful completion of this workshop, students will be able to plan, execute, and evaluate a TTX, as well as make appropriate decisions regarding when and where it is an applicable tool for planning and response purposes.

Spring 2013 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS

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NPTG 8684 / IPOL 8684 - Sem:Bio&ChemWeapons&ArmsCntrl      

During the last 15 years, aggressive governments and terrorists have sought to acquire biological, chemical and toxin weapons for use in international warfare, internal conflicts, or terrorist operations. In a few instances, these weapons were actually deployed, causing casualties and generating mayhem. Most security experts expect that these weapons will see increased use in the foreseeable future. For these reasons, security experts active in the international arena ought to be familiar with these types of weapons systems. Accordingly, this course will address health and environmental effects of biological, chemical and toxin weapons, circumstances which favor their use, the international laws that seek to prevent these weapons from being acquired and used and, when laws fail, methods for determining whether one of these three weapon systems has indeed been used and, if so, the appropriate response.

Fall 2011 - MIIS, Fall 2012 - MIIS, Fall 2013 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS

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Faculty Program Tags
Extra Information

Education

Earned BA (Biology) from California State University at Northridge, Filosofie Kandidat (Organic Chemistry) from University of Stockholm, Sweden, and Ph.D. (International Relations) from University of Southern California.

Recent Accomplishments

  • In August 2014, finished manuscript for the monograph “We Need to Hit Hard”: Saddam’s Use of Chemical Weapons against Revolutionary Iran and Rebellious Iraqi Kurds, which is currently being considered for publication by several presses. Unlike previous publications that focus on Iraq’s acquisition and employment of chemical weapons, the basis for much of the information in this monograph is the cache of captured Iraqi government documents, audio tapes, and video tapes stored at the Conflict Records Research Center in the National Defense University.

  • I worked on (with co-editors Casey Mahoney and James Toppin) an edited monograph on the history of the anti-plague system in the U.S.S.R. and Russia titled Stories of the Soviet Anti-Plague System, which was published in autumn 2013.

  • Completed a book on which I had been working on for 11 years: Milton Leitenberg and Raymond A. Zilinskas, The Soviet Biological Weapons Program: A History, (Cambridge, MA, Harvard University Press, 2012).

  • Wrote a film review for the first time: Raymond A. Zilinskas, “Contagion: A Movie Pandemic Versus the Reality of Public Health,” WMD Junction, September 23, 2011; http://cns.miis.edu/wmdjunction/110923_contagion.htm.

  • Collated 132 entries to create a unique reference source: Rebecca Katz and Raymond A. Zilinskas (eds.), Encyclopedia of Bioterrorism Defense, 2nd Edition, (Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley and Sons, Inc., 2011).

  • Had an article published in Scientific American: Ken Coleman and Raymond A. Zilinskas, “Fake Botox, Real Threat,” Scientific American 302(6):84-89 (June 2010); http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=fake-botox-real-threat.

Faculty Type
Adjunct Faculty
Dynamic Features
Course Catalog

William C. Potter

First Name
William
Last Name
Potter
William Potter, Professor and Director of CNS, Image
Job Title
Professor, Director of the James Martin Center for Nonproliferation Studies
Location
CNS Building, 499 Van Buren St.
City, State, ZIP
Monterey, CA 93940
Phone
831.647.4154
Language(s)
Русский

He has served as a consultant to the Arms Control and Disarmament Agency, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, the RAND Corporation, and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. He has been a member of several committees of the National Academy of Sciences and currently serves on the National Academy of Sciences Nonproliferation Panel. His present research focuses on nuclear terrorism and forecasting proliferation developments.

Faculty Program Tags
MIIS Tags
Course List

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

NPTG 8516 / IPOL 8516 - NPT Simulation      

This course is devoted to a simulation of the 2015 NPT Review Conference (RevCon), which will be held in New York in spring 2015. The RevCon will be the culmination of the five-year review process since the 2010 NPT RevCon, and will involve multilateral negotiations on the implementation of the NPT, with special reference to issues of nuclear disarmament, nonproliferation, and peaceful uses of nuclear energy. Based on the outcomes of the 2010 NPT Review Conference and the 2012, 2013, and 2014 NPT Preparatory Committee (PrepCom) meetings, one would expect major debates at the 2015 RevCon on the subjects of the humanitarian consequences of nuclear weapons, further reductions in all types of nuclear weapons, creation of additional nuclear-weapon-free zones (especially in the Middle East), negative security assurances, nonproliferation compliance, international safeguards, nuclear terrorism, peaceful nuclear uses, and provisions for withdrawal from the Treaty. Depending on the current state of US-Russian relations following the 2014 crisis in Ukraine, there also may be major debates over the value of virtues of nuclear renunciation and the value of negative security assurances and extended deterrence.

Students will assume the roles of delegates to the PrepCom from ten or more states, possibly including Canada, Chile, China, Egypt, France, Indonesia, Iran, Ireland, Japan, Mexico, Peru, Russia, South Africa, and the United States. In most instances, delegations will consist of two students. The precise number of states will depend on the size of the class.

The base point for the simulation is the “real world.” Dr. William Potter will be the principal instructor. He will be assisted in the course by other CNS experts.

(1) The simulation places a premium on interpersonal skills and oral communication.

(2) Emphasis will be placed on developing analytical and political skills relevant to operation in a foreign ministry and other national and international organization bureaucracies. The written component of the course will entail preparation of concise policy papers and drafting of international legal texts.

(3) Students will be required to immerse themselves in the historical record of prior NPT negotiations, especially those related to the 2010 NPT Review Conference and the 2012, 2013, and 2014 NPT PrepComs.

(4) Students will become familiar with the process of multilateral negotiations, which places a premium on coordinating positions across and gaining consensus from a large number of states with diverse national interests and objectives.

(5) Students will be expected to develop an understanding of the multiple expectations of the NPT regime by various states parties and regional groups, as well as to generate constructive ideas to meet the political challenges facing the NPT today.

Fall 2011 - MIIS, Fall 2012 - MIIS, Fall 2013 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS

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Expertise

Nuclear nonproliferation, illicit nuclear trafficking, and nuclear terrorism; Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT); the International Atomic Energy Agency; the Non-Aligned Movement (NAM) and nuclear politics; the sources of nuclear weapons decisions; U.S.-Russian nuclear arms control; Nuclear-Weapons- Free Zones (NWFZs); nuclear safety and security; and nuclear disarmament and  nonproliferation education.

Dr. Potter interviewed on Russia Today
Dr. Potter's contribution to the Carnegie Corporation "virtual roundtable" on U.S.-Russian relations

Extra Information

Education

PhD, MA, Political Science, University of Michigan; BA, Political Science, Southern Illinois University

Publications

Dr. Potter has contributed chapters and articles to over one hundred and twenty scholarly books and journals.

Books:

Principles versus Pragmatism: The Nuclear Politics of the Non-Aligned Movement (2012)

The Four Faces of Nuclear Terrorism (2005); Tactical Nuclear Weapons: Options for Control (2000)

Nuclear Profiles of the Soviet Successor States (1993)

Soviet Decisionmaking for Chernobyl: An Analysis of System Performance and Policy Change (1990)

Nuclear Power and Nonproliferation: An Interdisciplinary Perspective (1982)

Editor:

Principles versus Pragmatism: The Nuclear Politics of the Non-Aligned Movement (2012)

The Four Faces of Nuclear Terrorism (2005); Tactical Nuclear Weapons: Options for Control (2000)

Nuclear Profiles of the Soviet Successor States (1993)

Soviet Decisionmaking for Chernobyl: An Analysis of System Performance and Policy Change (1990)

Nuclear Power and Nonproliferation: An Interdisciplinary Perspective (1982)

Co-Editor:

Forecasting Nuclear Nonproliferation in the 21st Century (2 volumes, 2010)

Engaging China and Russia on Nuclear Disarmament (2009)

The Global Politics of Combating Nuclear Terrorism: A Supply Side Approach (2009)

Dangerous Weapons, Desperate States (1999)

Dismantling the Cold War: U.S. and NIS Perspectives on the Nunn-Lugar Cooperative Threat Reduction Program (1997)

Soviet Decisionmaking for National Security (1984)

The Nuclear Suppliers and Nonproliferation (1985

Continuity and Change in Soviet-East European Relations (1989)

International Missile Bazaar: The New Suppliers’ Network (1994)

Faculty Type
Regular Faculty
Dynamic Features
Course Catalog

Moyara Ruehsen

First Name
Moyara
Last Name
Ruehsen
Moyara Ruehsen
Job Title
Associate Professor
Location
213 McCone
Phone
831.647.4145
Language(s)
العربية
Français

I am passionate about capacity building in the areas of financial regulatory compliance and investigations, and public policies related to illicit markets as well as the macro-economy.  While my research and consulting work can be invigorating, my first love will always be teaching.  I hope to convey my own passion for these subjects to my students and inspire them to go out and explore new career paths they might not have considered when they first began their studies here.

MIIS Tags
Short Programs & Research Centers
Expertise

Money laundering, terrorism financing, corruption, asset recovery,  illegal drug markets, and international macro-economy.

Prof. Ruehsen speaks on euro crisis May 2010

Course List

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

ECPR 8500 - Economics Preparation-Micro      

This intensive course in introductory microeconomics places emphasis on the fundamental principles necessary for success in International Economics I (IPSG 8502), Development Economics (IPSG 8551) and Environmental & Natural Resource Economics (IEPG 8542). This course will examine the allocation of resources in different kinds of economies. Topics include the production possibilities curve, competitive markets, elasticities, monopoly, market failures, and the role of government.

Spring 2011 - MIIS

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ECPR 8501 - Economics Preparation-Macro      

This intensive course in introductory macroeconomics places emphasis on the fundamental principles necessary for success in International Economics II (IPSG 8503), Development Economics (IPSG 8551) and is strongly recommended for Money Laundering & AML Policies (IPSG 8581).

In this course, we examine how the overall level of national economic activity is determined, including output, employment, and inflation. We explore the roles of monetary and fiscal policies in stabilizing the economy and promoting growth, with a focus on contemporary policy debates.

Spring 2011 - MIIS, Summer 2011 - MIIS, Spring 2012 - MIIS, Summer 2012 - MIIS, Spring 2013 - MIIS, Summer 2013 - MIIS, Spring 2014 - MIIS, Summer 2014 - MIIS, Spring 2015 - MIIS

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IMGT 8520 - Topics in Intl Economics      

The first part of this course looks at both the theory and practice of international trade. Topics include an analysis of the gains from free trade and the effects of barriers to trade such as tariffs, quotas, subsidies, and other instruments of commercial policy. The second part of the course focuses on international monetary theory and exchange rate determination, as well as macroeconomic policymaking in an open economy. Topics include balance of payments analysis, emerging market currency crises, exchange rate regimes such as monetary unions, and more. The course will stress concepts and their application rather than theoretical formalism.

Spring 2012 - MIIS

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IPOL 8619 / IPSG 8619 - Sem:Econ Anlysis:Emerging Mkts      

This seminar is designed to provide students with critical skills in the area of economic analysis and writing. It will also be an opportunity to go into more depth on several important economic policy issues such as sovereign debt, foreign direct investment, capital account liberalization, trade liberalization and facilitation, and exchange rate policy. Students will pick one country and write an extensive economic analysis of that country by way of several assignments during the course of the semester.

Spring 2011 - MIIS, Fall 2011 - MIIS, Fall 2013 - MIIS

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IPOL 8696 - SemAdv$Laundering&TerrorFinanc      

This course is designed to give students who have already successfully completed IPOL8555 (Money Laundering and Terrorism Finance) a chance to do graduate-level research on a specific topic of interest. Although there will be a handful of class meetings for specific topics of interest to the entire class, the course is primarily designed as a bi-weekly private tutorial. Students will create their own individualized syllabus specific to their research topic.

Fall 2012 - MIIS

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IPSG 8503 - IntEconIICurrncyCashFlowCrises      

This course focuses on international monetary theory and exchange rate determination, as well as macroeconomic policymaking in an open economy. Topics include balance of payments analysis, currency and debt crises, exchange rate regimes such as monetary unions, and more.

Fall 2013 - MIIS, Spring 2014 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS

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IPSG 8520 / IPOL 8520 - International Economics      

The first part of this course looks at both the theory and practice of international trade. Topics include an analysis of the gains from free trade and the effects of barriers to trade such as tariffs, quotas, subsidies, and other instruments of commercial policy. The second part of the course focuses on international monetary theory and exchange rate determination, as well as macroeconomic policymaking in an open economy. Topics include balance of payments analysis, emerging market currency crises, exchange rate regimes such as monetary unions, and more.

Spring 2011 - MIIS, Fall 2011 - MIIS, Fall 2012 - MIIS, Spring 2013 - MIIS

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IPSG 8581 / IPOL 8555 / IPSG 8582 / IPSG 8555 - MoneyLaundering & AML Policies      

This course provides an introduction to money laundering and serves as a foundation for any of the related follow-up workshops and courses. Topics covered include the three typical stages of money laundering (placement, layering, integration), how to spot “red flag” indicators, trade-based money laundering techniques (false trade invoicing, use of high-value metals, black market peso exchange), misuse of informal value transfer systems, monitoring politically exposed persons, FIU’s and the Egmont Group, and finally global anti-corruption compliance and enforcement. Capital flows and payment methods will also be scrutinized, so an introductory Macroeconomics course is _strongly_ recommended. The goal of this workshop and the three that follow, is to prepare students to take and pass the Certification for Financial Crime Specialists (CFCS).

Spring 2012 - MIIS, Spring 2013 - MIIS, Spring 2014 - MIIS, Spring 2015 - MIIS

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IPSG 8583 - FraudDetctnTaxEvasnAssetRecvry      

This is the third installment of the CFCS preparation series. Topics covered include understanding and recognizing different types of financial fraud, tax evasion vs. tax avoidance, the use of offshore entities, FATCA, different types of asset recovery tools, and how to trace, forfeit and repatriate assets.

Spring 2014 - MIIS, Spring 2015 - MIIS

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IPSG 8584 - FinCrimeInvst,CompliancBstPrct      

This is the fourth and final installment of the CFCS preparation series. Topics covered include laws and investigative techniques for financial crime investigations, how to interpret financial documents, the risk-based approach to compliance, Basel Committee Guidance, Wolfsberg Group recommendations, KYC, KYE, compliance monitoring systems, ethics and best practices.

Spring 2014 - MIIS, Spring 2015 - MIIS

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IPSG 8595 - AdvPublcSpkngForPolicyProfsnls      

Public Speaking for Policy Professionals is an intensive, interactive workshop that will provide you with the basics for making skilled and professional presentations in a variety of venues. Our work together will provide you with the foundation to not only hone your skills, but will offer you practical tools for making expert presentations in other academic and professional venues.

In order to promote your effectiveness as a presenter, you will be called upon to participate in various activities and discussions that require both individual and team considerations. This will include group collaboration on a presentation in our workshop setting, as well as individual attention to your public speaking skills, including use of visual support tools. It is my explicit aim to help you become better presenters by providing you with skills and models to use for your professional development.

By the end of the workshop, you should have a greater understanding of how to present effectively and professionally as an individual and as a team. You should also garner critical tools to develop and hone your language and delivery skills, including non-verbal aspects, effectively organize and create interesting content, and expertly utilize visual support tools.

Fall 2013 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS

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IPSG 8608 - Sem:Topics in Devp: Corruption      

Corruption is a cancer that thwarts both political and economic development throughout the world. With the U.N. Convention on Corruption and now that corruption is a predicate offense for money laundering, it is easier to recover stolen assets that corrupt leaders and their associates have moved overseas. This course will look at the efforts underway to recover and return these stolen assets. For the final project, students will produce a 15-20 minute documentary looking at a case study of their choice. No prior film editing experience is needed (there will be tutorials provided by the DLC), but it helps.

Fall 2014 - MIIS

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IPSG 8613 / IPOL 8613 - Sem: Illicit Drug Markets      

This course is divided into two segments. The first segment of the course covers illegal drug markets along their entire transaction chain from the growing regions of Latin America and Asia to the end-user markets. Emphasis is placed on the international markets for cocaine, heroin, and methamphetamines, and the negative impacts of trafficking and use. The second segment examines the cost-effectiveness and viability of different supply and demand strategies, ranging from crop eradication and border interdiction to treatment and prevention.

Spring 2012 - MIIS, Fall 2012 - MIIS, Spring 2015 - MIIS

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IPSG 8662 - Advanced Terrorism Financing      

This course is a follow-up to the two workshops on Money Laundering and Terrorism Financing. It will go beyond the techniques that terrorists groups use to raise and move funds, and focus on strategies employed to stop them. We will also examine specific case studies, including proliferation financing cases and the use of non-profits.

Spring 2014 - MIIS

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IPSS 8520 - IPSS Professional Training      

The IPSS pre-departure training, consisting of six modules taught by select faculty, intends to help students refresh and/or obtain basic new knowledge and skills essential for successful professional service and future careers. These modules intend to provide a foundation – key skills, points, tools, and guiding resources – which students can use and build on in the future. The modules will use an interactive learning environment covering topics from facilitation, organizational context analysis, and applied research design to Excel essentials and communication and new media skills. A pass/fail grade will be assigned by the IPSS academic coordinator based on students’ attendance and performance in these modules.

Spring 2013 - MIIS

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IPSS 8675 - IPSS Field Deliverables      

During their IPSS internships students complete applied academic deliverables for which they earn six academic credits. The academic credit is not awarded for the internship itself, but for the work that applies students’ academic training to contribute to their host organizations’ mission in area of student’s career interest. The letter grades will be assigned based on the assessment of the following four deliverables:

IPSS Field Project: By the end of their internships students must have completed an ambitious project or other relatively autonomous contribution that presents value for the host organization and builds on students’ strengths and advances his/her skills and knowledge. The field project can take the form of a policy or consultancy report, evaluation, analysis, a website, or other substantive contribution to their host organization that integrates high quality research, analysis, and other skills and subject-matter knowledge. Faculty with relevant expertise and assigned peers will provide every student regular feedback on the major steps of the field project. Student’s regular internship responsibilities ideally should overlap with, but are not limited to the core field assignment. The organizations receiving interns are encouraged to help students identify such assignments prior to their arrival or at the very latest within one month after the start of student’s internship. The organization should provide assistance and guidance in completing this assignment.

Presentation: In the final part of the internship students will present on their field project to their colleagues at their host organizations. The video recording of that presentation will be then reviewed by the MIIS faculty who will invite students for Q&A and also provide additional feedback to students to improve the quality of their final deliverable(s).

Peer feedback: Interns will collaborate with their assigned peers by providing mutual peer feedback on their core field assignments to improve the quality of their work and learn from each other.

Final reflection: Interns will submit a final reflection to IPSS faculty and staff near the end of their internship- summarizing their most important insights and lessons they obtained from the internship experience for their professional and academic development.

Optional: Students are also highly encouraged to blog about their reflections on their internship experiences and comment on each others’ blogs throughout the internship assignment to maximize their learning.

Spring 2015 - MIIS

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NPTG 9555 - Money Laundering&TerrorFinance      

This course will examine the different techniques employed in the three stages of money laundering (placement, layering and integration), the macroeconomic impacts of money laundering, the legal framework, the latest law enforcement strategies, and techniques employed by terrorist groups to move funds and their sources of funds. Examples will be taken from organized criminal groups around the world, and many different terrorist groups (as designated by the U.S. OFAC). Investigation and risk scoring techniques will also be introduced.

Macroeconomics and Data Analysis strongly recommended.

Spring 2013 - MIIS

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NPTG 9581 - MoneyLaundering & AML Policies      

Spring 2015 - MIIS

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NPTG 9582 - TerrorFinanceSanctnsCybercrime      

Spring 2015 - MIIS

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Faculty Program Tags
Extra Information

Education

PhD, International Economics and Middle East Studies, Johns Hopkins University Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS); MA, International Studies, MHS, International Health, BA, Social Science, Johns Hopkins University; CAMS (Certified Anti-Money Laundering Specialist); CFCS (Certified Financial Crime Specialist)

Publications

"Breaking the Ice In Baghdad," Toastmaster Magazine, September 2014.

Freeman, Michael and Moyara Ruehsen, "Terrorism Financing Methods: An Overview,"_Perspecitives on Terrorism_Volume 7, Issue 4, August 2013.

"PKK" in Michael Freeman's_Financing Terrorism:Case Studies_, Ashgate Press, 2012.

"Afghanistan's Drug War - The Farmers Aren't the Enemy." LA Times 2 November 2009.

Arab Government Responses to the Threat of Terrorist Financing,” Chapter in J. Giraldo and H. Trinkunas, Terrorism Financing and State Responses in Comparative Perspective, Stanford University Press, Fall 2007.

“Choosing an Appropriate Palestinian Monetary Regime.” Research in Middle East Economics Volume 6, 2005, pp. 183-199.

Diamonds Are a Terrorist’s Best Friend,” moneylaundering.com, (September 2004).

Little Noticed UN Report Cites Alleged Saudi Terrorist Financing,” Money Laundering Alert, (October 2003).

Dirty Laundering: Financing Latin America’s Drug Trade,” (review essay) in Harvard International Review, (Winter 2003).

The Fallacy of Sanctions,” Middle East Insight (March-April 2002).

Tracing al-Qaeda’s Money,” Middle East Insight (January-February 2002).

Suspected UAE Links to Terrorist Funds Spark Anti-Laundering Efforts,” Money Laundering Alert (December 2001).

Arab Naming Customs Complicate Screening for Suspected Terrorists,” Money Laundering Alert (December 2001).

Faculty Type
Regular Faculty
Dynamic Features
Course Catalog

Pushpa Iyer

First Name
Pushpa
Last Name
Iyer
Pushpa Midd
Job Title
Associate Professor
Location
124 D McCone
Phone
831.647.7104
Language(s)
हिन्दी

Before coming to the United States for her Ph.D. studies, Pushpa Iyer worked to secure the rights of the poor and the marginalised in Gujarat state, India through holistic development programmes. Her commitment to bringing peace between the divided Hindu and Muslim communities in Gujarat laid the foundation for her subsequent work and academic interest in conflict resolution and peace building. She has consulted for different NGOs and institutions including the World Bank.  Such work has taken her to India, Sri Lanka and the Philippines.

Expertise

Identity conflicts, civil wars, peace processes, non-state armed actors, South Asia

Faculty Program Tags
MIIS Tags
Course List

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

ICCO 9511 - Intro to Conflict Resolution      

This course is an introduction to the field of conflict resolution and is intended to provide a solid foundation for further inquiry and application. The course is deliberately very broad and it so designed to facilitate students to pick and choose specific topics they would like to study in-depth in future. This course is both theory and skills based. Theories useful for understanding the root causes, dynamics and the resolution of the conflict (primarily inter-state conflict) will be examined. In the latter half of the course, students will focus on developing skills (primarily negotiation, mediation and facilitation) as third party interveners. Students will be encouraged to find their style of intervention, analyze complex conflict situations, develop intervention strategies and suggest methods and processes for implementing agreements reached.

Fall 2013 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS

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ICCO 9545 - Culture and Conflict      

Spring 2013 - MIIS, Spring 2015 - MIIS

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ICCO 9578 - Women & War      

War is increasingly recognized as a gendered phenomenon. In today’s global context the need to study the impact of war on women as separate from men is very pertinent. This is because the changing nature of warfare has created many new roles and therefore new experiences for women in war. This course primarily focuses on the experiences of women, as combatants, victims and peacebuilders, in situations of violent conflict. Through an inter-disciplinary approach, students will learn to analyse the intersections between women as an identity group, culture, security, nationality and peace in periods before, during and after war. The use of case-studies in this course will provide a context specific analysis of the various dynamics of gendered warfare. Further, the political, social, cultural and legal measures initiated to mitigate the negative impacts of war on women and to promote a more prominent role for women as decision-makers will be examined.

Fall 2013 - MIIS

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IPOL 8588 - Water and Conflict      

Human beings cannot survive without water. Water is a basic need. Scarcity or depletion of water resources, as is the case on our planet today, means there is almost certainly a situation of ‘the haves vs. the have-nots’. Those who exercise their power to control resources use a variety of tools to ensure their access to water and often do so at the cost of depriving others of their basic need and human right. Conflict invariably follows. And while a natural conclusion is that these conflicts will invariably turn violent, the fact is that we have not really had water wars. Why?

In this course, students will explore a variety of social issues that are intertwined in conflicts over water. Through case studies, students will further their understanding of water conflicts and the reason behind how and why potential water wars are transformed through various dispute resolution and conflict management processes.

Spring 2012 - MIIS

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IPOL 8612 - Sem:Chlng Peacebld: Nepal      

Spring 2012 - MIIS

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IPOL 8671 - Sem:ParadigmShft:Sec/Dev/HRgts      

In his seminal book, The Structure of Scientific Revolutions, Thomas Kuhn introduced the concept of looking at the history of science through the psychological and sociological interactions of a community of people who exist in a ‘paradigm’. Extending his ideas from the physical to the social sciences, as many have done, this course will examine the paradigmatic shifts in security, development and human rights over the years. This course will emphasise on various aspects of the shifts in these three ideological concepts in practice. The goal of the course is to use Kuhn’s notions of paradigms and paradigm shifts to understand the need for change in our approach towards global issues and challenges.

Students will learn to question the nature and content of paradigm shifts in security, development and human rights through case studies.

Spring 2011 - MIIS, Spring 2012 - MIIS

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IPSG 8511 / IPOL 8511 - Intro to Conflict Resolution      

This course is an introduction to the field of conflict resolution and is intended to provide a solid foundation for further inquiry and application. The course is deliberately very broad and it so designed to facilitate students to pick and choose specific topics they would like to study in-depth in future. This course is both theory and skills based. Theories useful for understanding the root causes, dynamics and the resolution of the conflict (primarily inter-state conflict) will be examined. In the latter half of the course, students will focus on developing skills (primarily negotiation, mediation and facilitation) as third party interveners. Students will be encouraged to find their style of intervention, analyze complex conflict situations, develop intervention strategies and suggest methods and processes for implementing agreements reached.

Fall 2011 - MIIS, Fall 2012 - MIIS, Fall 2013 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS

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IPSG 8540 - ThePraxisOfConflictTrnsformatn      

The two-credit course aims to provide students with a first hand experience of the poverty, homelessness, and violence in the city of bright lights – Los Angeles, California. A deeper study of these social, economic and political challenges will lead to a better understanding of the factors that lie underneath: racial tensions, extreme wealth, gentrification, gang violence, and other structural imbalances including those in the criminal justice system. Students will learn from different local organizations how they, through their own unique approach, work to transform these inequalities into more just and equal structures and relationships. Students will also have the opportunity to network for internships and jobs with local organizations. Partnering with Chrysalis, a Los Angles based non-profit, the course will be led by Dr. Pushpa Iyer and administered through the Center for Conflict Studies at MIIS.

Spring 2015 - MIIS

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IPSG 8545 / IPOL 8545 - Culture and Conflict      

Cultures are dynamic and evolving, yet at the same time deeply rooted in the past. More than language, food, clothing and customs, culture also encompasses race, ethnicity, gender and nationality shared between different groups within a particular culture. Consequently, culture and conflict are inextricably linked. We use our cultural lenses to understand, define and analyse the conflicts around us. In the field, culture is often described as the vehicle on which conflict rides rather than the source of conflict. This course will help students to become more aware of the cultural lenses one wears in conflict. Students will learn to perform in depth examinations of aspects of culture through interactions and information gathering from individuals and groups who come from cultures dissimilar to their own.

Spring 2011 - MIIS, Spring 2013 - MIIS, Spring 2015 - MIIS

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IPSG 8578 / IPOL 8578 - Women & War      

War is increasingly recognized as a gendered phenomenon. In today’s global context the need to study the impact of war on women as separate from men is very pertinent. This is because the changing nature of warfare has created many new roles and therefore new experiences for women in war. This course primarily focuses on the experiences of women, as combatants, victims and peacebuilders, in situations of violent conflict. Through an inter-disciplinary approach, students will learn to analyse the intersections between women as an identity group, culture, security, nationality and peace in periods before, during and after war. The use of case-studies in this course will provide a context specific analysis of the various dynamics of gendered warfare. Further, the political, social, cultural and legal measures initiated to mitigate the negative impacts of war on women and to promote a more prominent role for women as decision-makers will be examined.

Fall 2011 - MIIS, Fall 2012 - MIIS, Fall 2013 - MIIS

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IPSG 8588 - Water and Conflict      

Human beings cannot survive without water. Water is a basic need. Scarcity or depletion of water resources, as is the case on our planet today, means there is almost certainly a situation of ‘the haves vs. the have-nots’. Those who exercise their power to control resources use a variety of tools to ensure their access to water and often do so at the cost of depriving others of their basic need and human right. Conflict invariably follows. And while a natural conclusion is that these conflicts will invariably turn violent, the fact is that we have not really had water wars. Why?

In this course, students will explore a variety of social issues that are intertwined in conflicts over water. Through case studies, students will further their understanding of water conflicts and the reason behind how and why potential water wars are transformed through various dispute resolution and conflict management processes.

Fall 2014 - MIIS

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IPSG 8610 - Fieldwork and Reporting      

Today, students of almost every social science discipline (conflict studies, development, security studies, and related disciplines), engage in research that involves gathering information from primary sources. Primary data is what transforms research from an abstract state to a more ‘real’ relevant body of knowledge. For the research-cum-practice student seeking to get their hands dirty - to experience first hand the realities that inform theories and concepts - the need to prepare for fieldwork has become a must. How does one conduct oneself when on the ground? How does one represent themselves to people who in effect are sources of data? How does one handle the information gathered and present it to their broader academic and professional community? What role does one’s personality, culture, ethics, values play in data gathering and reporting? What does one do in highly emotional and sensitive contexts? How does one observe, analyze and understand the physical, society and cultural aspects of the context in which data is being collected? And most importantly, how does one maneuver the context to achieve the goals of fieldwork without compromising on core pre-determined personal ethics and values.

This course will engage students in a discussion on responsible data gathering. It will highlight the importance of a self-reflective approach in fieldwork where one is prepared to test hypothesis, challenge oneself in the face of new information including being proved wrong. It will also seek to explore how one reconciles personal values, ethics and emotions with fieldwork goals. Students will work through scenarios and have an opportunity to experiment in data gathering and reporting in simulated settings.

This course may be a pre-requisite for J-Term immersive learning courses led by this instructor.

Fall 2014 - MIIS

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IPSG 8612 - Sem:Chlng Peacebld: Mindanao      

Challenges to Peacebuilding is a structured, academic field course. The course seeks to help participants be able to link the theory of peacebuilding to its practice through field research. The course is especially useful for students in the fields of conflict studies, human rights, development, business and environment. It is designed to supplement and complement conflict resolution theories and concepts learned in the classroom with ‘real-world’ examples on the nature of conflict, its impact on people, peacebuilding initiatives and in understanding the kinds of actors involved in rebuilding and bring peace to a country. Another key objective of this course is get students to learn to deal with the complexities of conducting field research, develop data collection instruments and summarize data for a qualitative analysis. Mindanao (southern Philippines) has witnessed an armed conflict for decades. The Moro struggle for self-determination has recently seen resolution with a peace agreement between the Government and the largest armed group, the Moro Islamic Liberation Front (MILF). With a consensus to set up a semi-autonomous region “Bangsamoro”, peacebuilding efforts in Mindanao will now be renewed. The over decade long peace talks have been interrupted with violence but has also seen the very active efforts made by government and civil society to end the violence and build peace. This historic and contemporary examination of peacebuilding efforts makes Mindanao a very interesting study. Through this course, participants will interact with NGOs, INGOs, religious leaders, government officials, civil society members and members of peace zones in Mindanao. There will be visits to areas in central and northern Mindanao. First hand information gained from these meetings will be analyzed as a group through regular debrief sessions during and after the field trip. Outcomes will be presented through presentations at various forums and publications.

Spring 2015 - MIIS

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IPSG 8632 - SemIntergratdTheory,Rsrch&Prac      

Students ideally only take this course in their fourth semester of the Human Security and Development Track. Students spending their fourth semester doing IPSS, DPMI or the equivalent, can take this course in their third semester.
In this course students will map, review and connect the major theories they have studied. They will explore how the theories emerge and develop from the intersection of research and practice. At the same time, they will learn to understand the mutually reinforcing relationships between theory, research and practice. Through mapping and review of their own research and practice experiences, students will then develop their own theories of practice. By the end of the course, they will be able to present a portfolio of their informed approach to some of the global challenges, which they hope to tackle as they step into the ‘real’ world.

Spring 2013 - MIIS, Spring 2015 - MIIS

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IPSG 8679 / IPOL 8679 - Sem:Cnflct&Peacebldg Dvded Soc      

his seminar is intended to be a follow-up to the ‘Introduction to Conflict Resolution course’. The course will look in-depth into characteristics of deep-rooted conflict; examine the theories and frameworks that underlie different peace-building strategies and through a study of four cases (Tentatively Plan: South Africa, Cyprus, Sri Lanka, Guatemala) understand the complexity and challenges involved in implementing peace-building strategies. For the seminar paper, students will research and present an analysis of the opportunities and challenges to peace building in the context of one conflict torn society (a case selected by the student for study).

Spring 2011 - MIIS, Spring 2012 - MIIS, Spring 2013 - MIIS

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IPSG 8682 / IPOL 8682 - SEM: Non-State Armed Actors      

There is growing acceptance to the argument that alienation of non-state armed groups does not bring an end to violence. A question being increasingly asked by third party interveners, policy makers/ analysts and scholars is: ‘how to effectively engage with such groups?’ ‘Understanding’ groups is the first step when attempting to intervene in the conflict. In order to do, one must examine the leadership of the group. This is central to any political analysis. The leader and the nature of leadership creates and to a large extent influences every other aspect of the group such as ideology, goals, leadership, structure, culture and commitment. Every student will examine the nature of leadership in one non-state armed group and comment on the implications for those choosing to engage with that particular group. Specifically, the students will research on: (1) Profile and Personality of the Leader/s; Origins of Leadership (2) Type of Leadership (3) Source of Power (4) Maintaining Authority and Control/Ensuring Follower Compliance and Commitment (5) Dealing with threats, change and Crisis Management (6) Negotiating with Leadership/Group - Implications for Practitioners, Policy Makers and Scholars.

Fall 2011 - MIIS, Fall 2012 - MIIS, Spring 2015 - MIIS

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NPTG 9682 - SEM: Non-State Armed Actors      

There is growing acceptance to the argument that alienation of non-state armed groups does not bring an end to violence. A question being increasingly asked by third party interveners, policy makers/ analysts and scholars is: ‘how to effectively engage with such groups?’ ‘Understanding’ groups is the first step when attempting to intervene in the conflict. In order to do, one must examine the leadership of the group. This is central to any political analysis. The leader and the nature of leadership creates and to a large extent influences every other aspect of the group such as ideology, goals, leadership, structure, culture and commitment. Every student will examine the nature of leadership in one non-state armed group and comment on the implications for those choosing to engage with that particular group. Specifically, the students will research on: (1) Profile and Personality of the Leader/s; Origins of Leadership (2) Type of Leadership (3) Source of Power (4) Maintaining Authority and Control/Ensuring Follower Compliance and Commitment (5) Dealing with threats, change and Crisis Management (6) Negotiating with Leadership/Group - Implications for Practitioners, Policy Makers and Scholars.

Spring 2015 - MIIS

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Extra Information

Education

Ph.D (Conflict Analysis and Resolution), George Mason University, US MBA (International Management), University of East London, UK Post-Graduate Diplomas in Human Resources Management, Organizational Behaviour, Sacred Heart University, Luxembourg and Academy of Human Resources Development, India Bachelor of Law (Labour Laws), Gujarat University, India Bachelor of Commerce, Gujarat University, India

Publications

Co-authored chapters: “The Nature, Structure and Variety of Peace Zones” and “The Collapse of Peace Zones in Aceh” in Zones of Peace edited by Landon Hancock and Christopher Mitchell. Kumarian Press. Feb 2007.

“Peace Zones in Mindanao”. Case – study for STEPS project of Collaborative for Development Action Inc.  2004.

“Martyrdom in Context: Implications for Conflict Resolution”. In Koinonia Journal, Vol.XVI Princeton Theological Seminary Graduate Forum, 2004.

“Zones of Peace: A Framework for Analysis”. With Dr. Landon Hancock. In Conflict Trends, ACCORD, South Africa, Vol. 1 March 2004.

“Was it a Genocide in Gujarat?” – Religion and Peacemaking bulletin - The United States Institute for Peace. April 2002.

Faculty Type
Regular Faculty
Dynamic Features
Course Catalog

Tsuneo Akaha

First Name
Tsuneo
Last Name
Akaha
Tsuneo Akaha, Picture
Job Title
Professor
Location
Casa Fuente Building 300J
Phone
831.647.3564
Language(s)
日本語
I am passionate about finding local solutions to global human security problems through collaboration with colleagues around the world.
 
I love being a professor at MIIS because we are a community with a common goal: make a difference in the world.
 
MIIS Tags
Expertise

Japanese foreign and security policy, international relations of the Asia Pacific, international political economy, Asian studies, Asia-Pacific development, East Asia security, globalization, human rights, human security, international migration, international relations theory, Northeast Asia and security issues, US-Asia policy

Faculty Program Tags
Course List

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

IPMG 8593 - GP&SColoqiumComrclizeImpctInvs      

GS&P Colloquium: Commercializing Impact Investing

Impact investments are investments made with the intention to generate measurable social and environmental impact alongside a financial return. Impact investing complements public and philanthropic capitals in addressing pressing global problems. Although impact investing has the potential to unlock significant sums of commercial capital, the challenges to commercialization of impact investing are numerous and difficult. The struggle, however, may shed light on how capitalism as we know of today may be transformed. The spring 2015 Global Problem & Solution Colloquium will invite leading thinkers and practitioners in the sector to share with our students and faculty their perspectives and experiences in bridging the gap and explore and envision a better future together.

Spring 2013 - MIIS

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IPOL 8562 - Human Security Issues      

Spring 2012 - MIIS

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IPOL 8630 - Sem: Human Security      

The concept of "human security" was first introduced in the 1994 Human Development Report by the United Nations Development Program. It has since attracted growing attention in the academic and policy communities around the world. The concept has also become part of official policy, particularly in Japan and Canada. In contrast to the traditional concept of "national security" with its focus on the security of the state against military threats, "human security" emphasizes the protection of individual citizens’ security not only from war and other forms of physical violence but also from threats of a political, economic, social, cultural, and environmental nature. At the most fundamental level, “human security” is defined as "freedom from fear" and "freedom from hunger," but beyond that there are competing approaches to it, as well as critical challenges to it both as a concept and as a guide for national or international policy. This seminar critically examines the concept of human security, its real-world applications, and implications for international policy. Through a series of panel discussions, debates, and case studies, students will develop a firm understanding of the conceptual significance, analytical utility, and policy implications of human security. There are no prerequisites for this course.

Spring 2011 - MIIS

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IPOL 8649 - Sem: Regionalism in NE Asia      

"Northeast Asia," including China, Japan, Korea, Mongolia, and Russia, has long been largely a geographic reference, not a political community, nor an economic unit. Historical factors and contemporary obstacles prevent the emergence of a regional identity among the peoples of this region. However, debate is intensifying among academic and policy communities in the region about the feasibility and desirability of building Northeast Asia as a region whose members share a common political, economic, and security agenda, as well as a collective identity. Some argue it is both desirable and possible, while others assert that it is desirable but not possible. Still others propose that Northeast Asian countries should become part of an East Asia community, which would include Southeast Asian nations, or part of an even larger Asia-Pacific community, including the United States and other North and South American countries on the Pacific rim. One of the central questions on which these arguments rest is the role of nationalism and regional cooperation over transnational problems in obstructing or fostering the development of a regional identity. This seminar will examine the critical tension between nationalism and regionalism in Northeast Asia, as well as the future architecture of the region.

Fall 2012 - MIIS

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IPSG 8501 / IPOL 8501 - Policy Analysis      

This course introduces students to the theory and practice of policy analysis. Students will be introduced to the stages of the public policy process, including agenda setting, formulation, implementation, and evaluation. Students will also develop basic policy analysis skills, including problem structuring, stakeholder identification, summarization of current policy, development of policy options, elaboration of criteria for selection, and recommendation of course of action. These concepts are illustrated by examples policies that fall within students' range of interests. This course also introduces students to scientific methods that are used as a means for structuring policy inquiry. A series of research approaches and techniques are presented in the context of forecasting, monitoring, and evaluation for the analysis of domestic and international policies.

Spring 2012 - MIIS, Spring 2013 - MIIS

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IPSG 8512 - Culture&InternationalRelations      

Culture in International Relations

What is “culture”? How do we know culture when we see it? How does it manifest itself? How does it influence the way individuals, communities, and nations interact with each other? What is the relationship between culture and civilization? Does it make sense to talk about cultural and/or civilizational conflict? If it does, what form does it take? Does it necessarily lead to violent conflict? Is there such a thing as an international or global culture? What might be its elements and their sources? What new insights does our explicit focus on culture add to our understanding of international relations? What can we do with those insights in analyzing international policy development and implementation? In order to answer these questions, we will explore culture at three levels: (1) individual and community; (2) nation and state; and (3) the international system. At the individual-community level, we will examine the way culture shapes a person’s identity and role within his/her community. At the national level, we will explore the sources of "national culture" and how it informs the way members of a nation see and behave toward members of other nations, with a particular focus on the (re)production of ethnic identities, national myths, and political ideologies. At the international system level, we will scrutinize the impact of "national cultures" on relations between states, with a particular focus on deepening conflict between nationalism and globalism. How does nationalism sustain itself against the ever-expanding forces of liberal globalism? By mid-term the student will develop a research proposal to analyze the impact of culture (at any of the three levels mentioned above) on the interaction between two or more nations over a policy problem of particular interest to the student. In the second half of the semester the student will carry out the proposed research and at the conclusion of the semester he/she will present his/her findings.

Spring 2015 - MIIS

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IPSG 8531 - East Asia: Politics & Security      

With the dramatically changed balance of power, historical issues continuing to color contemporary international relations, North Korea's nuclear and missile development seemingly unresolvable, and both the United States and Russia "pivoting" toward the region, East Asia today is a region in flux. This course will provide a review of the developments of major power relations and challenges facing political and security policy communities in the region. The course will include a scenario building exercise guided by competing theories of international relations. There are no prerequisites for this course.

Spring 2014 - MIIS

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IPSG 8544 - Intro to HumanSecurity&Dvlpmnt      

The focus of this course is human security, the everyday security of individuals and the communities in which they live rather than the security of nation states. It is the gateway course into the field of human security and development. The key concepts of human security are freedom from fear, freedom from want, and freedom to live in a society of justice under the rule of law. Specific approaches and policies of human security covered in this course include conflict analysis, management and resolution, human rights, peacebuilding, legitimate institutions and good governance, rule of law and justice, and programs and policies designed to lower armed violence.

Spring 2014 - MIIS

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IPSG 8560 / IPOL 8560 - Intro to Intl Migration      

This course will introduce students to migration as an object of policy studies, various aspects of migration as a social phenomenon, and policies designed to encourage, discourage, or otherwise affect the flow of people within and between countries. Among the issues to be addressed are: economic-development aspects of migration; human trafficking and relevant policy; gender and migration; public health issues associated with migration; demography-development link; migration as a factor in international relations; terrorism & border control issues relative to migration; refugee issues and policy; and the integration of migrants at destination. The course will also introduce students to international laws and other norms and frameworks dealing with migration and migrants, as well as to international organizations and non-governmental organizations actively involved with migration issues. Illustrative examples of problems of migration, migrants, and policy responses will be drawn from various countries and regions of the world. Students will begin developing skills in analyzing demographic, social, economic, and political factors in the migration process; dynamics of and policy responses to forced migration, the effectiveness of legal and policy instruments to regulate migration, and national and human security implications of migration.

Fall 2012 - MIIS, Fall 2013 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS

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IPSG 8599 / IPOL 8599 - HumanSecurity:Concept & Policy      

The concept of "human security" was first introduced in the 1994 Human
>Development Report by the United Nations Development Program. It has
>since attracted growing attention in the academic and policy
>communities around the world. The concept has also become part of
>official policy in some countries, including Japan and Canada. In
>contrast to the traditional concept of "national security" with its
>focus on the security of the state against military threats, "human
>security" emphasizes the protection of individual citizens¹ security
>not only from war and other forms of physical violence but also from
>threats of a political, economic, social, cultural, and environmental
>nature. At the most fundamental level, ³human security² is defined as
>"freedom from fear" and "freedom from want," but beyond that there are
>competing approaches to it, as well as critical challenges to it both
>as a concept and as a guide for national or international policy.
>This course will critically examine: (1) "human security" as a concept;
>(2) opportunities and challenges in translating the concept into
>policy"; and (3) case studies of human security problems and policies
>from around the world.

Fall 2012 - MIIS, Fall 2013 - MIIS

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IPSG 8606 - Intl Migration & Development      

International Migration and Development

This course will examine the nexus of international migration and development, that is, how international migration contributes to development around the world and how the positive and negative consequences of development drive international migration. The United Nations High Level Panel convened to discuss post-2015 global development goals submitted its report to the Secretary General, and the report states international migration is a key aspect of development and should be an important part of development strategy. The course will be of particular interest to students who are pursuing a career in the nexus of international migration and development. Each student will select a country of interest, assess the role of international migration (both in-migration and out-migration) in its development strategy (or lack thereof), conduct a research into the two-way influence, both positive and negative, between international migration and development in that country, and develop a policy recommendation for maximizing the positive development impact of international migration.

Spring 2015 - MIIS

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IPSG 8614 - SemFrgnPlcy,Trade&SecPolE.Asia      

(East Asia is a dynamic region of great importance by virtue of its population size, economic dynamism, and political and security challenges. The impact of the region’s international relations is felt not only by the countries geographically located in the region but also by the rest of the world. The region is characterized by diversity in terms of historical, civilizational, and ethno-cultural backgrounds, political systems, levels of economic development, and foreign relations, as well as global impact, making regional relations very complex and sometimes very difficult, for major powers and smaller powers alike. This course will examine a broad range of foreign policy, trade, and security issues that present both opportunities and challenges to the regional countries and the United States. A unique feature of this course is that it includes a field trip to Tokyo and Beijing from March 12 to 22.* The students will learn first-hand the perspectives of local experts on the regional issues the seminar addresses through guest-lectures, interviews, library research, and discussions with local university students.

* Dec 12 - $100 deposit due; Feb 27 - remainder of program fee due.

Spring 2015 - MIIS

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IPSG 8631 - Seminar: Russia & East Asia      

Seminar: Russia and East Asia

This seminar will examine Russia’s relations with and integration into the East Asian region. Russia’s recently declared “pivot” to the east is an indication of the growing importance Moscow attaches to its strategic, political, and economic interests in East Asia, particularly with respect to China, Japan, and South Korea. The seminar will examine the nature of those interests and policies Moscow is following in pursuit of those interests. A special feature of this seminar is that two MIIS and two Middlebury students will be selected on competitive basis to take a fully-paid field research trip to Vladivostok and Khabarovsk from March 21 to 29. Participants will be selected during the November 7-14 period. The trip will include: (1) a series of meetings with instructors, researchers, and students at the Far Eastern Federal University's School of International and Regional Studies in Vladivostok, as well as the Economic Research Institute, Far Eastern Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences in Khabarovsk; (2) interviews with officials of the regional administrations of Khabarovsk and Primorye; (3) a series of meetings with media reporters and nongovernmental organization representatives in Vladivostok and Khabarovsk; and (4) a questionnaire survey of instructors, researchers, and students at the two institutions named above regarding their views on evolving Russia-Japan relations. Upon return the students will write research papers with a particular focus on Russia’s integration with Northeast Asian countries. The other students will write a research paper on a topic approved by the instructor.

Spring 2015 - MIIS

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IPSG 8632 - SemIntergratdTheory,Rsrch&Prac      

Students ideally only take this course in their fourth semester of the Human Security and Development Track. Students spending their fourth semester doing IPSS, DPMI or the equivalent, can take this course in their third semester.
In this course students will map, review and connect the major theories they have studied. They will explore how the theories emerge and develop from the intersection of research and practice. At the same time, they will learn to understand the mutually reinforcing relationships between theory, research and practice. Through mapping and review of their own research and practice experiences, students will then develop their own theories of practice. By the end of the course, they will be able to present a portfolio of their informed approach to some of the global challenges, which they hope to tackle as they step into the ‘real’ world.

Spring 2014 - MIIS

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IPSG 8640 / IPOL 8640 - Sem:Comprativ Migration Anlys      

Migration takes various forms, ranging from unskilled and skilled labor migration, regular and irregular migration, legal and illegal migration, temporary and permanent migration, refugees and asylum-seekers, to trafficking in persons and people smuggling. This seminar is designed for students to develop a comparative framework for analyzing one or more of these types and aspects of migration in two countries in two different regions of the world and to use that framework for research. The aim of such analysis is to: (1) identify the historical, geographical, political, economic, social, and cultural factors shaping the current state of migration in the countries compared, (2) the various factors informing the countries' current policies to deal with the situation, and (3) explain the differences and similarities in their approaches. In addition to the comparative analysis, students will choose one of the countries compared and prepare a "country profile," which offers a succinct summary of (1) and (2) above and a policy recommendation to improve the migration situation. Each student will present his/her country profile as if speaking to a group of journalists who have just been assigned to visit the country you have described and report on its current migration situation.

Spring 2011 - MIIS, Spring 2012 - MIIS, Spring 2013 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS

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JALA 8499 - Special Topic: ICC-Japanese      

This is the Japanese section of the Monterey Model course on human security and as such, will meet in plenary four times with the other language (English, Spanish, and French) sections. Each plenary will include presentations by each language section as well as discussions based on those presentations. The objective of this course is to develop the student’s ability to discuss human security generally, to explore the human security policy of Japan as a concrete example, and to present his/her views on the topic.

Since “human security” was first introduced as a new concept in the UNDP’s Human Development Report (1994), it has attracted much attention in the academic circles and policymakers around the world. This concept has been adopted into the policies of some countries, particularly Japan and Canada. Fundamentally, “human security” is composed of the two elements of “human development” and “human dignity (human rights).” In contrast to the traditional concept of “national security,” which focuses on the protection of the state from military threats, “human security” focuses on the security of individual citizens and includes not only security from war and other forms of physical violence but also security from political, economic, social, cultural, and environmental threats. This course, with a particular focus on Japan’s human security policy, will examine how it is defined, how it is implemented, and what its significance and problems are.

Spring 2012 - MIIS

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Extra Information

Recent Accomplishments

  • Completed a year-long contract with the Open Society Foundations to serve as an International Scholar for Smolny College at St. Petersburg State University, Russia.
  • Gave an invited lecture “Russia’s Pivot to East Asia,” at the Swedish Institute of International Affairs, Stockholm, Sweden, May 27, 2013.
  • Organized the annual conference of Asian Studies on the Pacific Coast at the Monterey Institute, June 7-9, 2013.
  • Submitted a book manuscript, co-edited  with Professor Vassilieva, on "Russia and East Asia: Increasing but Informal Integration" to Routledge, UK, to be published in December 2013.
  • Elected to serve as President of Asian Studies on the Pacific Coast for a one-year term, 2013-14.
  • Published: “Russia’s Mixed Prospects in Regional Integration in East Asia,” in “Expert Opinion,” School of Regional and International Relations, Far Eastern Federal University, Vladivostok, Russia, July 2013. http://ifl.wl.dvfu.ru/8323

Education

PhD, MA, International Relations, University of Southern California; BA, Political Science, Oregon State University; BA, Political Science, Waseda University, Tokyo

Faculty Type
Regular Faculty
Dynamic Features
Course Catalog

Jeff Langholz

First Name
Jeff
Last Name
Langholz
Jeff Langholz, Professor, Image
Job Title
Professor
Location
214 McCone
Phone
831.647.6418
Language(s)
Español

I am passionate about: research and teaching that makes a difference and focuses on the "real world" rather than the "ivory tower"

What excites me about being a professor at MIIS: Our students and faculty are on fire! People here want to build a better world, and have the skills and knowledge to make it happen.

Faculty Program Tags
Short Programs & Research Centers
Course List

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

CLPG 8600 - Conservation Leadershp Pract      

The Monterey Institute Conservation Leadership Practicum's mission is to provide conservation projects world-wide with students and professionals trained in relevant and practical skills for successful environmental project management and leadership. The two weeks are divided into ten key skill areas taught by Monterey Institute professor Jeffrey Langholz and leading local and global conservation practitioners. CLP trainers are qualified professionals in the field from such organizations as Foundations of Success, Pact, Elkhorn Slough Foundation, Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary and Big Sur Land Trust. The first week of the training will cover leadership in project design. The course will cover the Conservation Project Cycle, comprehensive site assessment tools, management plans, and project monitoring and evaluation. The second week of the training will cover how to build project teams, financial management for conservation leaders, leadership ethics, conflict resolution, and effective outreach and media relations. Assignments will include a team conceptual model presentation, team management plan, budgeting exercise, media deliverable, self-assessment, and class participation. Students may elect to complete an additional 2-unit directed study course that expands on a project started during the CLP training under the supervision and guidance of Prof. Langholz.

Spring 2011 - MIIS

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CLPG 8698 - DirStudy:ConsLeadershipApps      

The Conservation Leadership Practicum (CLP) provides professional training that combines readings and hands-on applications, classroom instruction and site visits, and a post-seminar reflection paper. The two-module CLP training occurs over two intensive weeks. An eclectic collection of practitioners teach the modules, bringing a unique mix of insights and experience into the classroom. The practicum concludes with a post-CLP reflection period and the submission of a short written assignment. Participants who successfully complete the practicum will receive a Certificate of Completion from the Monterey Institute. CLP 8698A requires the completion of two 10 page deliverables related to the content and tools provided during CLP. Deliverables are confirmed through a proposal process with the course instructor.

Spring 2011 - MIIS

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IEPG 8503 - Resrch Strategies for Env Pol      

Environmental policy-making requires high quality research at every stage of the process. This course introduces students to the design and implementation of research, with an emphasis on applied research into contemporary environmental policy problems.

Fall 2013 - MIIS

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IEPG 8530 - Biodiversity Policy&Management      

Spring 2014 - MIIS, Spring 2015 - MIIS

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IEPG 8550 - SustainablityLeadrshpPracticum      

Spring 2015 - MIIS

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IEPG 8591 - Applied Conservation Science      

This course is about saving life on earth. It provides the scientific foundation required to formulate sound environmental policies capable of addressing human population growth, habitat destruction, resource overexploitation, and other anthropogenic factors that continue to undermine the earth’s ecological systems. The course focuses on scientific underpinnings of conserving the world’s remaining biological diversity (aka “biodiversity”). It draws from biology, ecology, and other natural sciences to deliver the broad scientific training that future policymakers need. As a short survey course, the goal is not to transform you into a biologist or an ecologist, but rather to equip you with the basic knowledge you need to understand how the natural world works, speak the language with confidence, and use science to develop sound environmental policy.

Spring 2014 - MIIS, Spring 2015 - MIIS

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IEPG 8616 - Environmntal Conflict Mgmt      

Environmental conflicts continue to rise in frequency and intensity across much of the world as populations grow and natural resources dwindle. The growing number of "resource wars" has convinced scholars and government leaders alike that environmental factors are critical to international security. Despite increased attention to the role that natural resources play in conflicts, a crippling information gap persists. Scholars know surprisingly little about the conditions under which fisheries, forests, wildlife, water, and other resources lead to (or exacerbate) conflict, let alone the best ways to prevent or resolve such conflicts. Growing demand exists for professionals who can analyze root causes of these conflicts and apply tools for resolving them. This course helps fill that demand. Using lectures, case studies, role plays, and simulations, it trains students in techniques for analyzing and resolving natural resource disputes worldwide.

Fall 2013 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS

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IEPG 8664 - Conservatn Prjct Design & Eval      

A preponderance of scientific data show that fisheries, forests, freshwater, and other natural resources continue to decline across most of the world, and that conservation projects usually fail to accomplish their goals. This course addresses both of these complex problems. It delivers state of the art techniques for designing conservation projects that have the strongest possible chance of success, and evaluating the extent of that success. Examples include: knowing the conservation project cycle, assessing site conditions, developing management plans, and creating monitoring and evaluation plans. This "learn by doing" course emphasizes practice, especially through learning a conservation project management software program called Miradi. Although the course emphasizes site specific, in situ biodiversity conservation (i.e. protected natural areas), the skills and knowledge can apply to a wide range of environmental projects and programs.

Fall 2013 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS

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IPOL 8503 - Resrch Strategies for Env Pol      

Environmental policy-making requires high quality research at every stage of the process. This course introduces students to the design and implementation of research, with an emphasis on applied research into contemporary environmental policy problems.

Fall 2011 - MIIS, Fall 2012 - MIIS

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IPOL 8591 - Natural Sci Foundtns 4 Env Pol      

This course is about saving life on earth. It provides the scientific foundation required to formulate sound environmental policies capable of addressing human population growth, habitat destruction, resource overexploitation, and other anthropogenic factors that continue to undermine the earth’s ecological systems. The course focuses on scientific underpinnings of conserving the world’s remaining biological diversity (aka “biodiversity”). It draws from biology, ecology, and other natural sciences to deliver the broad scientific training that future policymakers need. As a short survey course, the goal is not to transform you into a biologist or an ecologist, but rather to equip you with the basic knowledge you need to understand how the natural world works, speak the language with confidence, and use science to develop sound environmental policy.

Spring 2011 - MIIS, Fall 2011 - MIIS, Spring 2012 - MIIS

More Information »

IPOL 8616 - Environmntal Conflict Mgmt      

Environmental conflicts continue to rise in frequency and intensity across much of the world as populations grow and natural resources dwindle. The growing number of "resource wars" has convinced scholars and government leaders alike that environmental factors are critical to international security. Despite increased attention to the role that natural resources play in conflicts, a crippling information gap persists. Scholars know surprisingly little about the conditions under which fisheries, forests, wildlife, water, and other resources lead to (or exacerbate) conflict, let alone the best ways to prevent or resolve such conflicts. Growing demand exists for professionals who can analyze root causes of these conflicts and apply tools for resolving them. This course helps fill that demand. Using lectures, case studies, role plays, and simulations, it trains students in techniques for analyzing and resolving natural resource disputes worldwide.

Fall 2011 - MIIS, Fall 2012 - MIIS

More Information »

IPOL 8645 - Protected Areas Policy      

National parks and other protected areas form the cornerstone of global biodiversity policy. Despite tremendous popularity and importance, these bastions of biodiversity face conflicting mandates and escalating threats. This course examines protected area policies in an international context, emphasizing key policy issues that transcend national borders. We will analyze several case studies from Asia, Africa, Latin America, and North America, seeking to isolate factors of apparent success, failure, and institutional learning. Key questions include: How have protected area paradigms changed over time? Can parks be financially self‐sustaining? How can protected areas balance conservation with local economic development? What role can and should local and indigenous communities play in protected areas? What is an appropriate role for the private sector in establishing and operating parks? How can we evaluate the effectiveness of protected areas? To what extent can transboundary protected areas (aka “peace parks”) foster international peace, security, and conservation? The course includes field trips to local protected areas representing different management regimes and challenges. It also includes an overview of career opportunities with a wide variety of international conservation organizations such as The Nature Conservancy, Conservation International, World Wildlife Fund, The World Conservation Union (IUCN), the U.S. Agency for International Development, and The World Bank.

Spring 2011 - MIIS, Fall 2012 - MIIS

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IPOL 8664 - ConservationProjectDesign&Eval      

Spring 2012 - MIIS

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WKSH 8541 - Conservation Mgmt & Leadership      

Spring 2012 - MIIS

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MIIS Tags
Expertise

Biodiversity conservation, environmental conflict management, international environmental policy, protected natural areas, research methods, project design, program evaluation, social entrepreneurship, adaptive management, conservation leadership, sustainable development

Extra Information

Education

PhD, Natural Resource Policy and Management, Cornell University; BA, History, Dana College; MS, Sustainable Development and Conservation Biology University of Maryland

Selected Publications

Langholz, J. (forthcoming in 2014). Private Protected Areas: A Global Movement for Biodiversity Conservation and Sustainable Development. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

Langholz, J. and A. Abeles. 2014. Rethinking postgraduate education for marine conservation. Marine Policy 43(1):372–375.

Langholz, J., Sand, K., Raak, L., Berner, A., Anderson, H., Geels, B., McKeehan, A., and A. Nelsen. 2013. Strategies and tactics for managing environmental conflicts: Insights from Goldman Environmental Prize recipients. Journal of Natural Resources Policy Research, 5(1): 1-17.

Langholz, J. and M. Jay-Russell. 2013. The potential role of wildlife in pathogenic contamination of fresh produce. Human-Wildlife Interactions 7(1):140–157.

Gennet S., Howard J., Langholz J., Andrews K., Reynolds M., and S. Morrison. 2013. Farm practices for food safety: An emerging threat to floodplain and riparian ecosystems. Frontiers in Ecology & Environment; doi:10.1890/120243.

Langholz, J. and F. DePaolis. 2013. Economic Contributions of Santa Cruz County Agriculture. Office of the Agricultural Commissioner, Santa Cruzy County, CA.

Langholz, J. and F. DePaolis. 2013. Economic Contributions of San Luis Obispo County Agriculture. Office of the Agricultural Commissioner, San Luis Obispo County, CA.

Langholz, J. and F. DePaolis. 2012. Economic Contributions of Monterey County Agriculture. Office of the Agricultural Commissioner, Monterey County, CA.

Langholz, J. 2010. Global Trends in Private Protected Areas and Their Implications for the Northern Great Plains. Great Plains Research 20(1): 9-16.

Lowell, K., Langholz, J. and D. Stuart. 2010. Safe and Sustainable: Co-Managing for Food Safety and Ecological Health in California’s Central Coast Region. Georgetown University and The Nature Conservancy. 131 pp.

Langholz, J. 2009. Saving Species, Privately. World Watch Magazine 22(5):7-11.

Langholz, J. and K.Turner. 2008. You Can Prevent Global Warming (and Save Money!): 51 Easy Ways (2nd Edition). Kansas City: Andrews McMeel Publishing.

Sims-Castley, R., G.Kerley, B.Geach, and J.Langholz. 2006.  Socio-economic significance of ecotourism-based private game reserves in South Africa’s Eastern Cape Province. PARKS 15:2, 6-15.

Langholz, J. and Krug, W.  2004.  New Forms of Biodiversity Governance: Non-State Actors and the Private Protected Area Action Plan.  Journal of International Wildlife Law & Policy 7:9-29.

Langholz, J. 2004.  Forest Recreation on Private Lands. In:  Encyclopedia of Life Support Systems.  New York: United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO).

Langholz, J. 2004.  Lessons from Global Climate Change: A Proposed Kyoto Protocol for the World’s Oceans.  Pages 43-58, In:  S. Uno, T. Katsumura, and H. Imaoka (editors), Development of Marine Resources and Ocean Governance: The Environment of Coastal Regions along the Sea of Japan. Hamada, Japan: University of Shimane Press.

Langholz, J. and K.Turner. 2003. You Can Prevent Global Warming (and Save Money!): 51 Easy Ways. Kansas City: Andrews McMeel Publishing.

Langholz, J. 2003.  Privatizing Conservation.  Pages 117-135, In: S. Brechin, P. Wilshusen,  P. West, and C. Fortwangler (editors), Contested Nature: Promoting International Biodiversity with Social Justice in the 21st Century.  New York: State University of New York Press.

Langholz, J. 2002. Privately Owned Parks. Pages 172-188,  In: J. Terborgh, C. van Schaik, L. Davenport, and M. Rao (editors), Making Parks Work: Strategies for Preserving Tropical Forests.  Covelo, CA: Island Press.

Langholz, J.  2002.  External Partnering for the Triple Bottom Line: People, Profits, and the Protection of Biodiversity. Corporate Environmental Strategy 9(1):1-10.

Kramer, R., Langholz, J. and N. Salafsky. 2002. The Role of the Private Sector in Protected Area Establishment and Management: A Conceptual Framework for Analyzing Effectiveness. Pages 335-351, In: J. Terborgh, C. van Schaik, L. Davenport, and M. Rao (editors), Making Parks Work: Strategies for Preserving Tropical Forests. Covelo, CA: Island Press.

Langholz, J., and J. Lassoie. 2002. Combining Conservation and Development on Private Lands: Lessons from Costa Rica. Environment, Development, and Sustainability.

Langholz, J. and K. Brandon. 2001.  Ecotourism and Privately Owned Protected Areas.  Pages 303-314, In: D.Weaver (editor), The Encyclopedia of Ecotourism. Oxon, United Kingdom: CAB International.

Langholz, J., and  J. Lassoie. 2001. Perils and Promise of Privately Owned Protected Areas. BioScience 51(12):1079-1085.

Langholz, J., J.Lassoie, and J. Schelhas. 2000.  Incentives for Biodiversity Conservation: Lessons from Costa Rica’s Private Wildlife Refuge Program. Conservation Biology 14(6): 1735-1743.

Langholz, J., J.Lassoie, D.Lee, and D.Chapman. 2000. Economic Considerations of Privately Owned Parks. Ecological Economics 33(2):173-183.

Langholz, J. 1999. Exploring the Effects of Alternative Income Opportunities on Rainforest Use: Insights from Guatemala’s Maya Biosphere Reserve. Society and Natural Resources 12:139-149.

Uphoff, N., and J. Langholz. 1998. Incentives for Avoiding the Tragedy of the Commons.  Environmental Conservation 25(3): 251-261.

Langholz, J. 1996.  Economics, Objectives, and Success of Private Nature Reserves in Sub-Saharan Africa and Latin America. Conservation Biology 10(1):271-280.

Langholz, J. 1996.  Ecotourism Impact at Independently Owned Nature Reserves in Latin America and Sub-Saharan Africa.  In:  Miller, Joseph and E.Malek-Zadeh (editors), The Ecotourism Equation: Measuring the Impacts.  New Haven, CT: Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies Bulletin Series, No.99

Faculty Type
Regular Faculty
Dynamic Features
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