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Dr. Itamara Lochard

First Name
Itamara
Last Name
Lochard
Itamara Lochard, Director MCySec, Picture
Job Title
Director, MIIS Cyber Security Initiative (MIIS CySec)
City, State, ZIP
Monterey, CA 93940
Phone
831.647.6680 (direct) or 831.647.6505 (main)

Dr. Itamara Lochard is the Director of the MIIS Cyber Security Initiative (MIIS CySec), a certified mediator and Senior Researcher at the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy. She was the founding commander of the the first U.S. civilian cyber Defense Force unit at the rank of Colonel. She is also a subject matter expert for various NATO Centers of Excellence on cyber, counter-terrorism, HUMINT, strategic communication, crisis management, deterrence and non-state armed groups. 

Expertise
  • crisis management
  • cyber policy / ICT - information, communication, technology
  • globaiization / digital-information age dynamics
  • irregular conflcits and wars
  • non-state actors / groups:  criminal organizations, cyber actors, gangs, insurgents, international organizations, militias, multinational corporations, NGOs, terrorists, etc.
  • strategic communications
Faculty Program Tags
Extra Information

Please see Dr. Lochard's full bio here for addiitonal information on publications, presenations, classes offered at MIIS, fellowships and grants.

Dr. Lochard offers a "Non-State Actors in a Digitial Age" class cross-listed as IPMG 9508 A and NPTG 8508 A.

For more information about the MIIS Cyber Security Initiative (MIIS CySec), please click here.

Faculty Type
Regular Faculty

Jeff Dayton-Johnson

First Name
Jeff
Last Name
Dayton-Johnson
jeff-dayton-johnson
Job Title
Associate Professor and Program Chair
Location
McCone 217
City, State, ZIP
Monterey, CA 93940
Phone
831.647.4647
Language(s)
Español
Français
português

I am passionate about mobilizing knowledge in order to have less inequality and exclusion and more collective action and social cohesion around the world.

What excites me about being a professor at MIIS is the extraordinary energy and productive diversity of the students and faculty alike. It's exciting to walk around campus and hear so many languages being spoken, so many causes being championed, so many ideas being debated, so many projects being launched!

Expertise

Economic development, emerging economies, economics and politics of Latin American countries (including Mexico), immigration, poverty, inequality, natural disasters.

Professor Dayton-Johnson interviewed live about a financial crisis in Latin America on CNBC.

MIIS Tags
Faculty Program Tags
Extra Information

Recent Accomplishments

Together with his faculty and staff colleagues, Jeff helped craft the Development Practice & Policy program at MIIS. DPP – now underway – offers two professional masters degrees for aspiring development professionals who seek meaningful careers, whether at the grassroots level or at the headquarters of a global organization, from California’s Central Coast to any of the world’s continents (for more information, click here).

In a similarly collaborative vein, Jeff and fellow professors are perfecting an integrated classroom-plus-fieldwork approach to the teaching and learning of Policy Analysis at MIIS. In January 2014, Jeff took 25 MIIS students to the highlands of Peru to implement a research project the students themselves designed (for more on the Peru experience, click here).

Recent Publications

Latin America’s Emerging Middle Classes: Economic Perspectives (editor). Palgrave/Macmillan, forthcoming 2015.

“Legitimidad fiscal y protestas en la calle: sobre Brasil y América Latina,” Vox.Lacea July 2013, (with Christian Daude and Angel Melguizo).

The Oxford Handbook of Latin American Political Economy (editor, with Javier Santiso). Oxford University Press, 2012.

“Are the Commons a Metaphor for Our Times?” OECD Observer, 2012 (with Jesús Antón).

"Innovation from Emerging Markets: The Case of Latin America," INSEAD Working Paper 2012/76/ST, 2012,  (with L. Casanova, N.Olaya Fonstad and A. Pietikäinen).

 “The Process of Reform in Latin America,” OECD Development Centre Working Paper, 2011 (with Juliana Londoño Vélez and Sebastián Nieto Parra).

Latin American Economic Outlook 2011: How Middle-Class is Latin America? (coordinator and lead author), OECD, 2010.

 

Faculty Type
Regular Faculty

Patricia Szasz

First Name
Patricia
Last Name
Szasz
Patricia Szasz
Job Title
Assistant Dean for Language & Professional Programs, Graduate School of Translation, Interpretation & Language Education
Location
McCone Building 102C
City, State, ZIP
Monterey, CA 93940
Phone
831-647-3501
Language(s)
Français
italiano

Patricia first became interested in the field of language education based on her own language learning experience. She found that learning French as a school requirement was not nearly as motivating as learning Italian in an effort to engage with the Italian people and culture. After working as a software trainer in Silicon Valley, Patricia taught English as foreign language in Milan and Rome, Italy. Her love of teaching eventually led her to pursue her master's degree in TESOL here at the Monterey Institute.

Faculty Program Tags
MIIS Tags
Course List

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

EDUC 8500 - Principls/Practices Lang Tchng      

Provides an overview of language teaching and learning principles from both historic and current perspectives. Illustrates application of teaching principles through practical examples.

Spring 2011 - MIIS, Spring 2013 - MIIS

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EDUC 8505 - Intro to Classroom Observation      

Develops skills in classroom observation and an understanding of observation as a fundamental professional development and research activity.

Spring 2011 - MIIS, Fall 2011 - MIIS

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Expertise

Language teacher training, content-based instruction, curriculum design, language program administration, leadership, technology-enhanced language learning, project-based learning, and intercultural communication.

Extra Information

Education

MA TESOL, Monterey Institute of International Studies

BA English Language & Literature, University of Michigan – Ann Arbor

Faculty Type
Adjunct Faculty
Dynamic Features
Course Catalog

Leonard Spector

First Name
Leonard
Last Name
Spector
Leonard Spector, Adjunct Professor and CNS Deputy Director, Image
Job Title
Adjunct Professor and Deputy Director of CNS, Washington D.C. Office
Location
1400 K Street, NW, Suite 450
City, State, ZIP
Washington, D.C., 20005
Phone
202.842.3100

Leonard S. Spector is Deputy Director of the Monterey Institute of International Studies' James Martin Center for Nonproliferation Studies, and leads the Center's Washington D.C. Office. In addition he serves as editor-in-chief of the Center's publications. Mr. Spector joined CNS from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), where he served as an Assistant Deputy Administrator for Arms Control and Nonproliferation at the National Nuclear Security Administration.

MIIS Tags
Expertise

Arms control and nonproliferation, international treaties, U.S. domestic and multilateral export controls

Mr. Spector interviewed on MSNBC.

Faculty Program Tags
Course List

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

NPTG 8557 / IPOL 8557 - Nonproliferation Law & Policy      

international law of treaties; the role of the United Nations; domestic nonproliferation policymaking structures and processes; the roles of the executive and legislative branches of government; the utility of international nonproliferation sanctions; the legality of the use of force to combat proliferation; legal solutions to the problem of nuclear smuggling; the effectiveness of multilateral safeguards and inspections; and rules governing civilian commerce in nuclear goods. Attention will be given to examining the hierarchy of legal instruments; mandatory versus voluntary measures and the evolution of norms and customary law; the interaction of international agreements and domestic law; and the interplay of programs, mandatory rules, and discretionary policy. In addition, the course will also explore the impact on the effectiveness of law-based nonproliferation measures of gaps in their scope, acceptance, implementation, and enforcement.

The course will be conducted using both the lecture and classroom exercises, and active student participation is both encouraged and required.

Spring 2012 - MIIS, Spring 2013 - MIIS, Spring 2014 - MIIS, Spring 2015 - MIIS

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WKSH 8590 - Nonproliferation Policy & Law      

By carefully exploring the interplay of non-proliferation policy and legal rules in key nonproliferation controversies, the course will:

• Familiarize students with the basic tenets of international law and domestic legal frameworks
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• Deepen students’ knowledge of selected nonproliferation rules – treaties, international agreements, and national laws – and their role in past and on-going nonproliferation crises

• Highlight how policy makers use legal tools to advance nonproliferation goals – and to deflect such efforts by others

• Assess the balance between rules and realpolitik, and the direction of current trends.

Spring 2011 - MIIS

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Extra Information

Education

Mr. Spector holds a J.D. degree from Yale Law School and an undergraduate degree from Williams College

Publications

His many publications include: Tracking Nuclear Proliferation 1995: A Guide in Maps and Charts (with Mark McDonough and Evan Medeiros, Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, 1995); Nuclear Ambitions: The Spread of Nuclear Weapons, 1989-1990 (Westview Press, 1990); The Undeclared Bomb: The Spread of Nuclear Weapons, 1987-1988 (Harper Business 1990).

Faculty Type
Adjunct Faculty
Dynamic Features
Course Catalog

Avner Cohen

First Name
Avner
Last Name
Cohen
Avner Cohen
Job Title
Professor of Nonproliferation Studies and Senior Fellow with the Center for Nonproliferation Studies
Location
McGowan 203
City, State, ZIP
Monterey, CA 93940
Phone
831.647.6437

Dr. Cohen, widely known for his path-breaking history of the Israeli nuclear program, is an internationally recognized author and expert on nonproliferation issues, focusing on the Middle East. A consultant to a range of NGOs and governmental agencies, Dr. Cohen joins CNS after serving as a Public Policy Scholar at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars (2009-10) and following a ten-year affiliation with the Center for International and Security Studies (CISSM) at the University of Maryland.

MIIS Tags
Expertise

Israeli nuclear program; nonproliferation issues in the Middle East; Nuclear age and nonproliferation history; the non-proliferation regime; nuclear weapons and democracy; morality, ethics, and norms in the nuclear age; the movies of the nuclear age; nuclear disarmament; nuclear weapons free zones

Dr. Cohen interviewed on UCBerkeley's Conversations with History

Interview with Dave Gahary

Faculty Program Tags
Course List

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

IPOL 8608 - Sem:NucWeapons,Dem&Governance      

Few decisions are as important, even fateful, than those regarding nuclear weapons (e.g., research, development, production, deployment, doctrine and ultimately use). But these decisions, historically speaking, have tended to bypass the check-and-balance mechanisms of liberal democracy, thus creating a unique challenge to democratic governance. The political theorist Robert Dahl referred once to the incompatibility between the security and secrecy requirements of nuclear weapons and the spirit of liberal democracy as “tragic tension”, while other scholars claimed that nuclear weapons “corrupt” and poison the values of democracy. The purpose of this seminar is to study systematically the challenges that nuclear weapons create for democratic governance. The seminar will explore, philosophically and empirically, this “tragic tension.” We will examine the challenge both as a generic issue of the nuclear age, i.e., its bearing on both the substance and the procedure of democracy, as well as a comparative issue that manifests itself somewhat differently in different nuclear democracies (a case by case approach). The seminar will also elaborate on the philosophical linkage that exists between the democratic critique of nuclear weapons and the ideas of nuclear nonproliferation and nuclear disarmament.
The seminar will be consisted on one weekly lecture as well as on great deal of individual guidance between the instructor and the students.

Fall 2011 - MIIS, Fall 2012 - MIIS

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IPOL 8629 - Sem:NucPolcy-NPT OutlierStates      

India, Israel, and Pakistan are the three de facto nuclear weapon states that have been outside the Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) since it came into force in 1970. This seminar examines the relationship of these three countries with the nonproliferation regime broadly, both from the perspective of the states in question as well as from the perspective of the international community.

After a quick review of the nuclear history of these three states—including some discussions of similarities and dissimilarities among them—the seminar focuses on the examination of key themes and questions such as: What is the role of nuclear weapons in national security of the three countries? What are the policies on arms control and disarmament in these three countries? What are the attitudes within these countries regarding the different elements of the global nonproliferation regime, such as the NPT, the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT), and the (proposed) Fissile Material Cutoff Treaty (FMCT)? How did these positions evolve over several decades? How have these three countries responded to some of the more recent nonproliferation initiatives such as the Proliferation Security Initiative (PSI)? The seminar will also address the domestic mechanisms through which these three states deal with nuclear issues. Finally, the seminar also explores the different modalities that have been proposed by various parties to integrate the three countries into the nonproliferation regime.

Spring 2012 - MIIS

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IPSG 8505 - Global Politics      

The course introduces students to key analytical concepts and normative views such as balance of power, unipolarity, multipolarity, unilateralism, multilateralism, etc., and major theoretical perspectives for analysis of international politics, as well as the major international events of the past century that have shaped the international system. Students will learn ways that international actors, including sovereign states and non-state entities such as multinational corporations, international organizations, and nongovernmental organizations, exercise power to pursue goals and influence international outcomes. Students will also learn how international institutions, norms, and structures of governance affect the exercise of power and other forms of influence and shape international outcomes. Students will also be introduced to some contemporary issues of national, international, and human security, including the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, and terrorism, as well as issues of globalization, food security, the plight of the LDC’s, and human rights.

Fall 2014 - MIIS, Spring 2015 - MIIS

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NPTG 8509 - Historical Research Methods      

Historical Methods and Source Evaluation for Nonproliferation and Terrorism Studies

This course is designed to provide an introduction to historical research methods, in particular the characteristics of various types of primary sources and basic techniques of source evaluation and criticism, with a focus on the areas of nonproliferation and terrorism studies. It is specifically intended for graduate students who have already taken lecture-oriented undergraduate or graduate courses dealing with terrorism or nonproliferation.

The class will be divided into several separate portions. The first portion will provide basic information about historical research, touching upon both philosophical issues (e.g., the nature of reality [ontology], human perceptions of reality [epistemology], etc.) and methodological issues (e.g., the distinction between primary and secondary sources, internal versus external source criticism, etc.). The second portion will provide some illustrative examples of the primary source research carried out by the two instructors, which students will analyze and discuss in class. In the third portion, everyone in the class will read selections from diverse primary source materials concerning both terrorism and nuclear age studies. Given that several states have already developed chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear (CBRN) weapons programs, and that certain violent non-state groups espousing extremist political and religious ideologies have expressed an interest in acquiring and deploying these so-called “weapons of mass destruction” (WMD) against their designated enemies, it is necessary for students interested in nonproliferation and terrorism to learn how to access, analyze, and evaluate the reliability of primary sources dealing with both terrorism and proliferation/nonproliferation cases. During the fourth portion of the course, students will be working independently on the individual research topics they have selected, which must involve the utilization of some primary historical sources. During the fifth and final portion, each student will give an oral report in class to present and analyze his or her own research findings, which will then be discussed by the entire class. By the end of this last portion of the class, if not earlier, students will submit their completed research papers, which must involve the use of primary historical sources. The course requirements are as follows: regular attendance and active participation in class discussions (30% of grade), an oral report to be delivered in class (30% of grade), and a 7-10 page research paper (40% of grade).

Spring 2015 - MIIS

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NPTG 8558 / IPOL 8558 - Israel and the Bomb      

This course is a comprehensive introduction to the study of Israel’s nuclear history and policy within the broader context of understanding the nuclear dimension of Middle East politics. The course focuses on the uniqueness and the exceptionality that constitutes Israel’s nuclear history and policy. By that uniqueness we mean the original policy which Israel devised to acquire and possess nuclear weapons that ultimately made Israel an exceptional case both vis-à-vis the United States non-proliferation policies and vis-a-vis the non-proliferation regime. That policy is known as Israel’s policy of “nuclear opacity” or “nuclear ambiguity,” under which Israel has never officially acknowledged to acquire or possess nuclear weapons, even though since 1970s Israel is universally presumed as a nuclear weapons state. The course ends with reflections about challenge that Israel’s nuclear uniqueness poses both to the United States nonproliferation policy and the non-proliferation regime as a whole.

Fall 2011 - MIIS, Fall 2012 - MIIS, Fall 2013 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS

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NPTG 8642 - SEM: Moral Dilemmas of Nuc Age      

The invention of the atom bomb and subsequent reality of living under threats of mutual assured destruction have created moral dilemmas and paradoxes of a scale that humanity has never before experienced. If waging a nuclear war is viewed as an unprecedented crime against humanity, something that can never be justified morally, how is it that we have created and legitimated a global world-order that relies on the pledge to commit these very crimes? This seminar will explore, from both a historical and an analytical perspective, the dilemmas and paradoxes of the nuclear age. Historically, we will try to examine some of the big decisions of the nuclear age as fundamentally moral decisions. Analytically, we will explore the moral dimensions of nuclear deterrence.

Fall 2013 - MIIS

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NPTG 8654 - Sem:WMDProliferatnInMiddleEast      

This seminar examines the proliferation of nuclear, biological, and chemical weapons in the Middle East, including historical developments, the present context, and alternate potential futures.

Although the focus is on state actors, proliferation risks posed by non-state terrorist organizations will be discussed as well. The course will begin with overview sessions on why states do and do not pursue and acquire nuclear, biological, and chemical weapons and on the internal and intrastate politics of the region. Subsequent sessions will focus on key regional countries. The course will conclude with integrative simulation sessions allowing participants to wrestle with the prospects for proliferation and nonproliferation in the region. Students will prepare weekly short memos, conduct group work for integrative simulation exercises, prepare an independent research project, and have various presentation opportunities.
.

Spring 2013 - MIIS

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NPTG 8695 / IPOL 8695 - Sem:NuclearWeapons&Intellignce      

This seminar aims to explore the rich nexus involving the proliferation of nuclear weapons and intelligence assessments. Due to the nature of the proliferation dynamics—i.e., nuclear weapons programs are conceived and evolved under strategic and operational secrecy, states tend to define their early nuclear commitments tentatively and ambiguously, the dual use nature of nuclear technology, etc.—identifying and tracing proliferation is epistemologically a difficult task for intelligence. The seminar will explore this difficulty on both the macro and micro levels, that is, from the broad/epistemological level to the narrow empirical/historical case by case level.

In addition, the seminar will examine historically the process by which the US intelligence organizations dealt with some historical cases of proliferation from the Manhattan Project era to the present. The seminar will also examine the process by which intelligence assessments are developed and disseminated, including technologies and human resources. Students will examine some case studies where intelligence assessments have played key roles, including cases of intelligence failures.

Spring 2012 - MIIS, Spring 2013 - MIIS

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NPTG 9505 - Global Politics      

The course introduces students to key analytical concepts and normative views such as balance of power, unipolarity, multipolarity, unilateralism, multilateralism, etc., and major theoretical perspectives for analysis of international politics, as well as the major international events of the past century that have shaped the international system. Students will learn ways that international actors, including sovereign states and non-state entities such as multinational corporations, international organizations, and nongovernmental organizations, exercise power to pursue goals and influence international outcomes. Students will also learn how international institutions, norms, and structures of governance affect the exercise of power and other forms of influence and shape international outcomes. Students will also be introduced to some contemporary issues of national, international, and human security, including the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, and terrorism, as well as issues of globalization, food security, the plight of the LDC’s, and human rights.

Fall 2014 - MIIS, Spring 2015 - MIIS

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Extra Information

Education

Dr. Cohen holds a B.A. in Philosophy and History from Tel Aviv University, an M.A. in Philosophy from York University, and a Ph.D. from the Committee on History of Culture of the University of Chicago (1981).

Publications

Dr. Cohen is the co-editor of Nuclear Weapons and the Future of Humanity (1986) and The Institution of Philosophy (1989), and the author of The Nuclear Age as Moral History (In Hebrew, 1989). His most acclaimed book, Israel and the Bomb, was published in 1998 in English and in 2000 in Hebrew. His latest work, The Worst Kept Secret: Israel's Bargain with the Bomb, was published in October 2010 by Columbia University Press. In addition, he published dozens of professional journals, book chapters, as well as op-eds.

His book THE WORST-KEPT SECRET has a Facebook page: http://www.facebook.com/home.php#!/pages/The-Worst-Kept-Secret-Israels-Bargain-with-the-Bomb/163186743694317

 

 
Faculty Type
Regular Faculty
Dynamic Features
Course Catalog

Stephen I. Schwartz

First Name
Stephen
Last Name
Schwartz
Stephen Schwartz, Adjunct Professor, Image
Job Title
Editor, The Nonproliferation Review
Location
1400 K Street, NW, Suite 450
City, State, ZIP
Washington, D.C., 20005
Phone
202.842.3100

 

Expertise

Nuclear Policy, Nuclear Control, Communications and Intelligence (C3I), Nuclear Weapons Budgets, Nuclear Weapons and Terrorism, Strategic Arms Control, National and Theater/Ballistic Missile Defenses

Stephen I. Schwartz Interviewed on Fox Business Regarding Nuclear Crisis in Japan

MIIS Tags
Extra Information

 

The Nonproliferation Review is a refereed journal concerned with the spread of nuclear, chemical, biological, and conventional weapons. Featuring viewpoints, articles and reports on programs, treaties and export controls, terrorism, and the economic and environmental effects of weapons proliferation.

Jeffrey Lewis

First Name
Jeffrey
Last Name
Lewis
Jeffrey Lewis CNS
Job Title
Director of the East Asia Nonproliferation Program
City, State, ZIP
Monterey, CA 93940

Before coming to the Center for Nonproliferation Studies, Dr. Lewis was the Director of the Nuclear Strategy and Nonproliferation Initiative at the New America Foundation.

Expertise

Nuclear nonproliferation, international security, disarmament, arms control

MIIS Tags
Extra Information

Education

Dr. Lewis received his Ph.D. in Policy Studies (International Security and Economic Policy) from the University of Maryland and his B.A. in Philosophy and Political Science from Augustana College in Rock Island, Ill.

Publications

Dr. Lewis is the author of Minimum Means of Reprisal: China's Search for Security in the Nuclear Age (MIT Press, 2007) and publishes ArmsControlWonk.com, the leading blog on disarmament, arms control and nonproliferation.

Brigadier General (Retired) Russell D. Howard

First Name
Russell
Last Name
Howard
Russ Howard, Adjunct Professor, Image
Job Title
Adjunct Professor
Location
McGowan 200F
City, State, ZIP
Monterey, CA 93940
Phone
831.647.6442

Brigadier General (retired) Russell D. Howard is President of Howard's Global Solutions,  and an Adjunct Professor at the Monterey Institute of International Studies. He is also a Senior Fellow at Joint Special Operations University, Senior Mentor for Development Alternatives Incorporated, Senior Advisor for the Singapore Home Team Academy, and on the Board of Advisers for Laser Shot Incorporated.

MIIS Tags
Expertise

Counterterrorism
Special Operations
Terrorist-Trafficking Nexus
Terrorism and Counterterrorism in Africa

Faculty Program Tags
Course List

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

NPTG 8577 - Special Ops & CounterTerrorism      

The role of special operations in combatting the terrorist threat has evolved since 9/11. Indeed, special operations forces (SOF) have been the post-9/11 military instrument of choice, particularly for sensitive, direct action operations of which failure--such as the killing of Osama bin Laden -- is not an option. Indeed, the skills and technologies that these combat forces apply are unmatched and highly effective. However, the fact that SOF forces are in such high demand and are used increasingly for a host of alternative mission assignments raises a contentious issue: are special operations units still “special”?
This workshop will explore several intelligence and SOF related capabilities and challenges related to their roles in countering terrorism. Intelligence and Special Operations Forces play critical roles in combating terrorist threats. To be sure, both intelligence and SOF have been instrumental in addressing all major threats to US national security for the past several decades, but since 9/11 both have increased in importance to U.S. policy makers as they address America's new enemies; transnational, non-state actors with global reach and who are seeking access to weapons of mass destruction.

Spring 2013 - MIIS, Spring 2014 - MIIS

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NPTG 8578 - Intel & Counterterrorism      

This workshop will explore several intelligence related capabilities and challenges related to their roles in countering terrorism. Intelligence has played a critical role in addressing all major threats to US national security for the past several decades. However, since 9/11 intelligence collection, analysis and dissemination have increased in importance to U.S. policy makers as they address America's new enemies; transnational, non-state actors with global reach and who are seeking access to weapons of mass destruction. The Intelligence in Counterterrorism Workshop describes intelligence capabilities and actions in countering terrorist operations and activities. With regards to intelligence the workshop discusses the "intelligence cycle," the full gamut of intelligence gathering disciplines will be discussed. However, signals, technical, and human intelligence gathering will be emphasized, as will the challenges of gathering intelligence in denied areas. The workshop relies heavily on case studies and guest lecturers to reflect the challenges and opportunities facing the intelligence community in America's counterterrorism efforts.

Fall 2013 - MIIS

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NPTG 8610 / IPOL 8610 - Seminar: Counterterrorism      

September 11, 2001 changed the way Americans view their security forever. Terrorism is no longer “someone else’s” problem. Now Americans are traumatically aware of how vulnerable they are to terrorism and terrorists. Given the events of the last decade and the ongoing campaign against global terrorism, it is imperative that citizens and their leaders understand and make sense of the threat, as well as conceptualize how terrorism might best be challenged and terrorists defeated. The “Counter-terrorism Seminar” is designed to address the challenges of terrorism in the current and future global security environment in a participatory format. Specifically, the seminar briefly reviews the threat terrorism poses to liberal democratic states, citizens and policymakers, then explores how liberal democracies can best predict, prevent, preempt and, if necessary, directly combat terrorism and terrorists. Five themes provide the course framework: Challenges to a Free Society, Strategies for Combating Terrorism, Eclectic (new) approaches to Countering Terrorism, Winning the (so called) War on Terrorism, and Counterterrorism in the post-bin Laden Security Environment. Also, controversial topics such as covert action, rendition, targeted killings, enhanced interrogation (torture), are discussed with particular emphasis on the legality of these and other counter-terror measures. The seminar culminates with a look into the future by discussing the challenges of the post-bin Laden terrorist threat and strategizing means to mitigate the threat.

Spring 2012 - MIIS, Fall 2012 - MIIS, Fall 2013 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS

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NPTG 8646 - Terror & CT in Africa      

The Terrorism and Counterterrorism in Africa Seminar will address increased terrorist activity in Africa, and familiarize students with known terrorist organizations throughout the continent such as al Qaeda in the Islamic Maghreb (AQIM), Al Shabaab, the Lords Revolutionary Army (LRA), Boka Haram, the Libyan Armed Fighters Group, and the Movement for the Emancipation of the Niger Delta (MEND) among others. Seminar participants will evaluate U.S. and international counterterrorism policy and operations in Africa. Based on their evaluation, students will be asked to suggest unilateral, multilateral, “alternative” and mutually supporting policies and operations to address terrorist activity in Africa. In an effort to best apply “theory to practice,” seminar participants will learn how to prepare and apply African related terrorist group profiles and terrorist threat matrices as part of a group exercise and culminating presentation.

Spring 2013 - MIIS, Spring 2014 - MIIS, Spring 2015 - MIIS

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NPTG 8657 - Sem: Homeland Security      

The Homeland Security Seminar is taught in three sections.

Section One examines natural and man-made threats, including terrorist threats, to the United States. It is vital that the origins, forms and potential consequences of threats to the nation be understood before effective policies to thwart them can be developed and implemented.

Section Two examines homeland security from the political and coordination perspectives. Homeland security policy, planning and operations require information sharing, communication and coordination at local, state, federal and international levels of governance; difficult undertakings in a democracy. Also, effective homeland security policy must balance the need for public security with the protection of civil liberties. Therefore, the Patriot Act is covered in detail in Section Two.

Section Three suggests policies to counter threats -- particularly terrorist threats -- to the United States. In Section Three the six critical mission components of the National Homeland Security Strategy are analyzed and critiqued in detail with a view to suggesting more effective national policies.

Spring 2015 - MIIS

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WKSH 8540 - The Terrorist-Traffickng Nexus      

The so-called “nexus” between organized criminal and terrorist organizations is a topic of increasing national and international security interest. The four most resilient and debilitating sectors of organized international crime affecting state security are human, weapons, drug and contraband trafficking (HWDC-trafficking). Sometimes interconnected and mutually supporting, HWDC-trafficking is not only pervasive in states where there is a culture of corruption, but also in democratic states where traffickers take advantage of the freedoms enjoyed in liberal democracies. HWDC-trafficking is responsible for channeling multiple billions of dollars in profit to criminal and terrorist organizations worldwide. Many believe HWDC-trafficking, in its most insidious forms, has been increasingly linked to the activities of violent extremist organizations such as al Qaeda and like-minded groups. To what extent the two types of entities cooperate is not clear and a matter of much debate. Some analysts frame the interactions among terrorist and criminal organizations as symbiotic alliances in which the comparative advantages among organizations determine divisions of labor for mutual benefit and profit. Others liken the relationships to short-term “marriages of convenience” that are executed for specific transactions and events.

Fall 2011 - MIIS, Fall 2012 - MIIS

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WKSH 8542 - Wks: Counterterrorism      

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Spring 2011 - MIIS, Spring 2012 - MIIS

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WKSH 8566 - Counterterrorism in Africa      

The “Africa Counterterrorism Workshop” will address increased terrorist activity in Africa, and familiarize students with known terrorist organizations throughout the continent such as Al Qaeda in the Islamic Maghreb (AQIM), Al Shabaab, the Lords Revolutionary Army (LRA), Boka Haram, the Libyan Armed Fighters Group, and the Movement for the Emancipation of the Niger Delta (MEND) among others. Workshop participants will evaluate U.S. and international counterterrorism policy and operations in Africa. Based on their evaluation, students will be asked to suggest “alternative” or mutually supporting policies. In an effort to “theory to practice” workshop participants will learn how to prepare and apply African related terrorist group profiles and terrorist threat matrices as part of a group exercise and culminating presentation.

Spring 2012 - MIIS

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Extra Information

Education

General Howard holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Industrial Management from San Jose State University, a Bachelor of Arts in Asian Studies from the University of Maryland, a Master of Arts degree in International Management from the Monterey Institute of International Studies, and a Masters of Public Administration degree from Harvard University.

Faculty Type
Adjunct Faculty
Dynamic Features
Course Catalog

Jason Scorse

First Name
Jason
Last Name
Scorse
Jason Scorse, Professor, Image
Job Title
Director, Center for the Blue Economy; Program Chair, International Environmental Policy; Associate Professor
Location
K23 Craig
Phone
831.647.3548
Language(s)
Español

I am passionate about: Living sustainably, not just preaching/teaching it.

What excites me about being a professor at MIIS: Seeing the amazing things our students are doing around the world. It is truly inspiring. I am always happy to talk with prospective, current, and former students by phone, skype, or in person. Please email me to set up an appointment.

Faculty Program Tags
Short Programs & Research Centers
Course List

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

ECPR 8500 - Economics Preparation-Micro      

This intensive course in introductory microeconomics places emphasis on the fundamental principles necessary for success in International Economics I (IPSG 8502), Development Economics (IPSG 8551) and Environmental & Natural Resource Economics (IEPG 8542). This course will examine the allocation of resources in different kinds of economies. Topics include the production possibilities curve, competitive markets, elasticities, monopoly, market failures, and the role of government.

Summer 2011 - MIIS, Spring 2012 - MIIS, Summer 2012 - MIIS, Spring 2013 - MIIS, Summer 2013 - MIIS, Spring 2014 - MIIS, Summer 2014 - MIIS, Spring 2015 - MIIS

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IEPG 8542 - Envirn & Natural Resource Econ      

The purpose of this course is to develop competency in economic theory as it relates to environmental issues, and the analytical skills necessary to evaluate, as well as craft, effective, efficient, and just environmental policies. We will highlight policies that influence (both directly and indirectly) the environment and natural resource use, and analyze their implications. The emphasis will be on identifying and assessing the appropriate economic tools for addressing current environmental issues. Students will learn how to “think like an economist,” which may not make for great party conversation, but is essential for conversing intelligently about the world’s major environmental problems and developing solutions.

Fall 2013 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS

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IEPG 8663 - Ocean & Coastal Economics      

he purpose of this course is to develop advanced economic skills applied to development and resource issues in the world’s oceans and coasts. The course will focus heavily on analytical and data-driven techniques that can help illuminate the costs and benefits of various policies in the ocean and coastal zones, using a variety of metrics, and incorporating environmental and social values. The course will be divided into two parts: Market economics and coastal planning with Prof. DePaolis and non-market economics with Prof. Scorse.

Student participation in both of these sections will be high, involving many in-class assignments, lab sessions, and extended discussions. Students will be expected to engage in original data collection, analysis, and research. This is an intensive course geared for people who want to pursue careers in marine-related fields, although the topics are more broadly applicable to a range of conservation and development-related careers.

GIS is recommended.

Spring 2013 - MIIS, Spring 2014 - MIIS, Spring 2015 - MIIS

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IEPG 8666 - OCRM Speaker Series      

The primary purpose of this speaker series is to introduce incoming IEP students who are pursuing the “Ocean and Coastal Resource Management” concentration to a wide range of cutting-edge interdisciplinary topics. (In order to be eligible for the CBE Summer Fellows Program students must enroll in this course—auditing is acceptable—in addition to committing to the 16 units of advanced coursework in their second year.)

The series will include topics from the local to international levels, with a focus on the policy and economic implications. Students are encouraged to use these talks as networking opportunities, catalysts for future research, and most importantly, to help focus their career goals.

The series is open to all IEP and IPM students interested in ocean and coastal issues, as well as members of the MARINE network and the larger Monterey community.

Fall 2013 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS

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IPOL 8542 - Envirn & Natural Resource Econ      

The purpose of this course is to develop competency in economic theory as it relates to environmental issues, and the analytical skills necessary to evaluate, as well as craft, effective, efficient, and just environmental policies. We will highlight policies that influence (both directly and indirectly) the environment and natural resource use, and analyze their implications. The emphasis will be on identifying and assessing the appropriate economic tools for addressing current environmental issues. Students will learn how to “think like an economist,” which may not make for great party conversation, but is essential for conversing intelligently about the world’s major environmental problems and developing solutions.

Spring 2011 - MIIS, Spring 2012 - MIIS, Fall 2012 - MIIS

More Information »

IPOL 8663 - Ocean & Coastal Economics      

The purpose of this course is to develop advanced economic skills applied to development and resource issues in the world’s oceans and coasts. The course will focus heavily on analytical and data-driven techniques that can help illuminate the costs and benefits of various policies in the ocean and coastal zones, using a variety of metrics, and incorporating environmental and social values. The course will be divided into two parts: Market economics and coastal planning with Prof. DePaolis and non-market economics with Prof. Scorse.

Student participation in both of these sections will be high, involving many in-class assignments, lab sessions, and extended discussions. Students will be expected to engage in original data collection, analysis, and research. This is an intensive course geared for people who want to pursue careers in marine-related fields, although the topics are more broadly applicable to a range of conservation and development-related careers.

Spring 2012 - MIIS

More Information »

IPOL 8666 - IntlMarinePolcy Speaker Series      

Fall 2012 - MIIS

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MIIS Tags
Expertise

Environmental & Natural Resource Economics, Ocean and Coastal Resource Management, Behavioral Economics, International Economics & Development

Extra Information

Recent Accomplishments

Professor Scorse’s major accomplishment over the past two years has been launching the new Center for the Blue Economy (CBE). Dr. Scorse is thrilled with the Center’s success so far, and is confident that it will make the International Environmental Policy program at the Monterey Institute the premier destination for aspiring ocean and coastal resource management professionals.
He is currently spending almost all of his time building the new Center, including hiring faculty and staff, developing the Ocean and Coastal Resource Management curriculum, securing research funding, working with our visiting scholars, organizing the International Marine Policy Speaker series, expanding the Summer Fellows program, mapping out a strategic plan for the years ahead, and preparing to launch our new Journal of Ocean and Coastal Economics (JOCE) in 2014.
Professor Scorse is also beginning to get involved in the national campaign to divest fossil fuel holdings from college endowments, believing that this could provide a major breakthrough in advancing climate change policy. He plans to finish a paper on the topic by spring 2014. His other current research includes new surfonomics work, a soon-to-be-released book chapter on “Ecosystem Services and their Economic and Social Value,” an article on the looming fiscal crisis in U.S. coastal states besieged by climate change, and updates to the non-market work done by the National Ocean Economics Program.

Education

Ph.D. UC-Berkeley, M.S. UC-Berkeley; M.S. UC-Santa Cruz; B.A. UC-Santa Cruz

In the News

Scorse, Jason. “Cheap Gas Hurts The Middle Class.” Fortune 6 December 2012.

Scorse, Jason (and Judy Kildow). “End Federal Flood Insurance.” The New York Times 28 November 2012.

Thomas, Gregory. "Surfonomics quantifies the worth of waves." The Washington Post 24 August 2012.

Scorse, Jason. "My Word: Must never take coast's economic value for granted." Oakland Tribune 10 July 2012.

Publications

Scorse, Jason. What Environmentalists Need to Know about Economics. New York: Palgrave-Macmillan, 2010.

Scorse, Jason (2010). Freeing the Market to Address Climate ChangeFreeing the Market to Address Climate ChangeThe Solutions Journal,1(6):29-32.

Harrison, Ann, and Scorse, Jason. (2010). Multinationals and Anti-sweatshop ActivismMultinationals and Anti-sweatshop Activism, American Economic Review, 100(1): 247–273.

Scorse, Jason. (2009) Non-Market Valuation of Ocean Resources in the National Ocean Economics ReportNon-Market Valuation of Ocean Resources in the National Ocean Economics Report (Judy Kildow ed.), National Ocean Economics Program, Moss Landing, CA.

Harrison, Ann & Scorse, Jason. (2009).Do Foreign Firms Pay More? Evidence from the Indonesian Manufacturing Sector 1990-1999Do Foreign Firms Pay More? Evidence from the Indonesian Manufacturing Sector in Labour Markets and Economic Development, (Ravi Kanbur and Jan Svejnar eds.), Routledge Press, New York.

Scorse, Jason. (2009).Making Matters WorseMaking Matters Worse. The International Journal of Climate Change: Impacts and Response, 1(1):1-6 中文中文

Harrison, Ann & Jason Scorse. (2006).Improving the Conditions of Workers? Minimum Wage Legislation and Anti-Sweatshop ActivismImproving the Conditions of Workers? Minimum Wage Legislation and Anti-Sweatshop Activism. California Management Review, 2 (48):144-160. (Also issued as a Harvard Business School case study) Harrison, Ann & Scorse, Jason. 2004.

Harrison, Ann & Jason Scorse. (2004). Improving the Conditions of Workers? Minimum Wage Legislation and Anti-Sweatshop ActivismThe Impact of Globalization on Compliance with Labor Standards: A Plant- Level Study in Brookings Trade Forum 2003 (Susan Collins and Dani Rodrik eds.), Brookings Institution Press, Washington D.C.

Scorse, Jason. (2001). Reflections on the Free Trade Debate. Economia Rural, 1 (12):8-11.

Working Papers

Does Being a "Top 10" Worst Polluter Affect Facility Environmental Releases? Evidence from the U.S. Toxic Release Inventory (coauthored with Wolfram Schlenker), 2012.

Environmental Policy and the Social Contract, 2012.

 The WTO's Environmental Mandate, 2011.

 The Capitalist Conundrum, 2010.

Moving Beyond the Stale "Environment vs. Economy" Debate, 2010

Book%20review%20of%20Economic%20Thought%20and%20U.S.%20Climate%20Change%20PolicyBook review of Economic Thought and U.S. Climate Change Policy. Edited by David M. Driesen. Cambridge, MA. MIT Press, 2010.

Strong-Cvetich, Nikolas and Scorse, Jason. (2008). Ecotourism in Post-Conflict Peace-Building: A New Tool for Reconciliation? Ecoclub: International Ecotourism Magazine, 8 (96):10-17.

 Why Environmentalists Should Embrace Economics, 2006.

 Do Foreign Firms Pay More? Evidence from the Indonesian Manufacturing Sector 1990-1999. International Labor Organization, Working Paper No. 98, 2005 (coauthored with Ann Harrison and submitted).

Is There Acquiescence in Yes-No Questions? (coauthored with Michael Hanemann & Jon Krosnick), 2005.

Harrison, Ann & Jason Scorse. 2004. Moving Up or Moving Out? Anti-Sweatshop Activists and Labor Market Outcomes, National Bureau of Economic Research, Working Paper No. w10492.

Faculty Type
Regular Faculty
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Course Catalog

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