Dr. Itamara Lochard

First Name
Itamara
Last Name
Lochard
itamara-lochard-profile
Job Title
Director, Cyber Security Initiative (MCySec)
City, State, ZIP
Monterey, CA 93940
Phone
831.647.6680 (direct) or 831.647.6505 (main)

Dr. Itamara Lochard is the Director of the Monterey Institute Cyber Security Initiative (MCySec), a certified mediator and Senior Researcher at the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy. She was the founding commander of the the first U.S. civilian cyber Defense Force unit at the rank of Colonel. She is also a subject matter expert for various NATO Centers of Excellence on cyber, counter-terrorism, HUMINT, strategic communication, crisis management, deterrence and non-state armed groups. 

Expertise
  • crisis management
  • cyber issues / ICT - information, communication, technology
  • globaiization / digital-information age dynamics
  • irregular conflcits and wars
  • non-state actors / groups:  criminal organizations, cyber actors, gangs, insurgents, international organizations, militias, multinational corporations, NGOs, terrorists, etc.
  • strategic communications
Faculty Program Tags
Extra Information

Please see Dr. Lochard's full bio here for addiitonal information on publications, presenations, classes offered at MIIS, fellowships and grants.

Dr. Lochard offers a "Non-State Actors in a Digitial Age" class cross-listed as IPMG 9508 A and NPTG 8508 A.

For more information about the Monterey Institute Cyber Security Initiative (MCySec), please click here.

Faculty Type
Adjunct Faculty

Jon Brook Wolfsthal

First Name
Jon Brook
Last Name
Wolfsthal
jon-b-wolfsthal
Job Title
Deputy Director of the James Martin Center for Nonproliferation Studies
Location
CNS
City, State, ZIP
Washington, D.C.

From 2009-2012, Jon Wolfsthal served as the Special Advisor to Vice President Joseph R. Biden for nuclear security and nonproliferation and as a director for nonproliferation on the National Security Council. He supported the Administration's negotiation and ratification of the New START arms reduction agreement with the Russian Federation, and helped support the development of nuclear policy including through the 2010 Nuclear Posture Review and other elements of the Obama Administration's security policies.

Faculty Program Tags
Extra Information

Education

B.A. in political science from Emory University, Atlanta Georgia

Publications

Co-Author, Deadly Arsenals; Nuclear, Chemical and Biological Threats (2nd edition), Carnegie Endowment for International Peace (forthcoming 2005)

Co-Author, Deadly Arsenals; Tracking Weapons of Mass Destruction, Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, 2001

Reports

Co-author and coordinator The U.S.-Russia Civil Nuclear Agreement: A Framework for Cooperation, CSIS, 2009

Co-author, Universal Compliance: A Strategy for Nuclear Security, Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, 2005.

Verifying North Korean Nuclear Disarmament: A Technical Analysis, Carnegie Endowment for International Peace and Nautilus Institute for Sciences and Sustainability, 2003.

Editor, Nuclear Status Report: Nuclear Status Report: Nuclear Weapons, Fissile Material & Export Controls in the FSU, Carnegie Endowment for International Peace and the Monterey Institute, 2001.

Editor, Alexander Tikhonov, Russia's Nuclear and Missile Complex: The Human Factor in Proliferation, Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, 2001.

Co-author, An Agenda for Renewal: US-Russian Relations, Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, 2000.

Faculty Type
Adjunct Faculty

George Moore, Ph. D.

First Name
George
Last Name
Moore
Dr.%20George%20M.%20Moore
Job Title
Scientist in Residence at the James Martin Center for Nonproliferation Studies
Location
CNS Building, 499 Van Buren St.
City, State, ZIP
Monterey, CA 93940
Phone
831.647.4613
Language(s)
Français
Deutsch
日本語

From 2007-2012, Dr. Moore was a Senior Analyst in the Office of Nuclear Security at the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in Vienna, Austria. At IAEA, he worked with the Illicit Trafficking Database (ITDB) and served as Scientific Secretary for the Director General's Advisory Group on Nuclear Security (AdSec). He also served as Scientific Secretary for the development of the Agency's Fundamentals of Nuclear Security document, the top-level document in the Agency's Nuclear Security Series that will be published in fall 2012.

Course List

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

IPOL 8552 - Nuclear Trafficking      

This course is designed to provide the student with a basic knowledge of the issues relating to nuclear trafficking, from both a technical and historic perspective. The nuclear and other radioactive materials useful for either an improvised nuclear device, a dispersal device, or a simple exposure device will be considered, along with the technologies used to prevent and detect trafficking in these materials. The history of trafficking in these materials, design concepts, and hoaxes and scams relating to these issues will be covered along with the major efforts and initiatives that have been developed by the international community to deal with them.

Fall 2012 - MIIS

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NPTG 8506 - Nuc/RadioactvMaterials&Weapons      

This workshop is intended to take the student to the next steps beyond what is covered in the Introduction to Science and Technology course. It will provide an intensive exposure (no pun intended) in the fundamentals of nuclear material and other radioactive material, to the hazards of dealing with these materials, and to the effects of the various types of radiation associated with these materials. The student will gain knowledge in the effects of nuclear weapons and radiological weapons (such as radioactive dispersal devices) and the measurements used to discuss and quantify these hazards, such as yield, dose, and the International Atomic Energy Agency’s method for categorizing the hazards of radioactive materials.

After completion of the workshop the student should have a basic understanding of fundamental concepts and vocabulary such as half-life, decay modes, decay calculations, and other basic concepts that would assist them in acquiring scientific literacy to prepare them to work in areas that deal with these concepts. The workshop will cover basic calculations to enable the student to perform basic “back of the envelope” assessments of risks and hazards in various simple scenarios of interest and will provide the student with basic documentation that will be useful in performing these assessments.

Fall 2013 - MIIS

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NPTG 8507 - CybrscurityAspctsOfNucSecurity      

This course is designed to provide the student with a basic knowledge of the issues relating to cyber security, from both a technical and historic perspective. The basic concepts of cyber security that will allow the student to understand the current concerns, vocabulary, and basic principles involved in cyber security will be considered, along with the technologies used to prevent and detect cyber-attacks. The history of cyber-attacks, basic concepts and considerations of cyber warfare, hacking, and basic concepts such as authentication and encryption will be covered along with the major efforts and initiatives that have been developed by the international community to deal with them. A particular focus of the course will be on cyber security as it relates to the field of nuclear security.

Fall 2013 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS

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NPTG 8605 - CTBT:Policy & Technical Issues      

The Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT): Policy and Technical Issues

This workshop will review the history of weapons testing and agreements leading up to the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT). The CTBT and its organization (CTBTO) will be examined from both policy and technical perspectives, along with an analysis of subcritical testing and other CTBT-related issues of nonproliferation importance that may remain even if the CTBT comes into force.

Spring 2014 - MIIS

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NPTG 8620 - SEM: Drones & Surveillance      

We live in an era of satellite surveillance, video monitoring, and electronic surveillance and now the hot button topic of drones performing these tasks in addition to armed drones carrying out assassinations. This 4 unit seminar course will deal with the technical, policy, and legal issues involved in these subjects Privacy rights are often in conflict with the technical capabilities in these and other areas. Civil liberties are balanced against security interest, with or without the knowledge of the population. The course will provide the student with a working understanding of the issues involved in the current use of drones and overhead surveillance and will provide a look at the future uses and limitations, examining how civil liberties are and can be balanced against security interests.

Fall 2014 - MIIS

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NPTG 8653 - Sem: Nuclear Trafficking      

This course is designed to provide the student with a basic knowledge of the issues relating to nuclear trafficking, from both a technical and historic perspective. The nuclear and other radioactive materials useful for either an improvised nuclear device, a dispersal device, or a simple exposure device will be considered, along with the technologies used to prevent and detect trafficking in these materials. The history of trafficking in these materials, design concepts, and hoaxes and scams relating to these issues will be covered along with the major efforts and initiatives that have been developed by the international community to deal with them.

Fall 2013 - MIIS

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NPTG 8656 - Sem: Nuclear Forensics      

Nuclear forensics deals with the science related to the determination of the origins of nuclear materials such as uranium and plutonium and to the policy considerations, such as attribution, which result from determinations that can be made. In addition to science and policy considerations the course will cover the current international efforts in nuclear forensics and survey the performance of conventional forensics in the presence of radioactive material and related issues such as radioactive crime scene management and expert testimony on nuclear forensics issues.

Spring 2013 - MIIS, Spring 2014 - MIIS

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Expertise

Nuclear weapons, Illicit trafficking, Nuclear Security, Binding and Non-Binding Legal Instruments for Nuclear Security, Aviation Security Issues

Faculty Program Tags
Extra Information

B.A. United States Naval Academy

M.S., Ph.D. Nuclear Engineering, University of California, Berkeley

J.D. University of California, Boalt Hall (Berkeley) School of Law

Faculty Type
Adjunct Faculty
Dynamic Features
Course Catalog

Jeffrey Knopf

First Name
Jeffrey
Last Name
Knopf
jeff_knopf_photo
Job Title
Professor and Program Chair, Nonproliferation and Terrorism Studies
Location
McGowan 200 C
City, State, ZIP
Monterey, CA 93940
Phone
831.647.7174

I am passionate about: Making whatever small contribution I can to reducing the dangers posed by nuclear weapons.

What excites me about being a professor at MIIS: Teaching at MIIS offers an opportunity to work with professional Master’s students who will go on to apply what they learn in real-world settings. I also appreciate getting to work in such a beautiful location. 

Course List

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

IPSG 9505 - US Natl Security Policy Making      

This course introduces students to the formulation of U.S. national security policy. It summarizes the roles played by different governmental actors, including the President, Congress, and relevant bureaucratic departments and agencies, and describes the interagency process. It then covers the influence of domestic politics on national security policy, including the impact of interest groups, the media, and public opinion.

Fall 2013 - MIIS

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NPTG 8501 - Intl Security Rsrch & Analysis      

This class will provide students with a basic foundation in how to understand and conduct policy-relevant academic research and analyze policy options for dealing with potential threats to international security. Topics covered will include designing research, evaluating sources, and communicating research findings effectively.

Fall 2014 - MIIS

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NPTG 8505 - US Natl Security Policy Making      

This course introduces students to the formulation of U.S. national security policy. It summarizes the roles played by different governmental actors, including the President, Congress, and relevant bureaucratic departments and agencies, and describes the interagency process. It then covers the influence of domestic politics on national security policy, including the impact of interest groups, the media, and public opinion.

Fall 2013 - MIIS

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NPTG 8574 / IPOL 8574 - Intro to WMD Nonproliferation      

This course surveys the issues surrounding the proliferation of nuclear, chemical, and biological weapons and ballistic missiles. It also provides an introduction to nuclear and radiological terrorism, and an overview of the international nonproliferation regime.

The course is divided into three main parts: Part 1 provides an overview of the trends and technologies of WMD proliferation. Part 2 considers the nonproliferation regime in detail, concentrating on the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT), the conventions banning chemical and biological weapons, supplier regimes and export controls, and verification and compliance issues. Part 3 returns to challenges to the nonproliferation regime, including states of proliferation concern known or believed to be developing WMD outside or in defiance of the NPT, CWC, and BWC and tensions within the nonproliferation regime, and discusses the range of international, multilateral, and unilateral responses to these challenges

Fall 2012 - MIIS, Spring 2013 - MIIS, Fall 2013 - MIIS

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NPTG 8639 - Sem:Deter&InfluencTerrorsm&WMD      

This seminar examines deterrence and other strategies for responding to security threats, with a focus on how those strategies might be adapted to deal with the dangers posed by terrorism and WMD proliferation. The course will survey existing research on deterrence and various alternative policy tools such as coercive diplomacy, assurance, positive incentives, and soft power. It will introduce some of the latest thinking about whether these tools are useful for influencing actors away from support for terrorism or WMD acquisition or use.

Spring 2013 - MIIS, Spring 2014 - MIIS

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Expertise

Nuclear Arms Control and Nonproliferation
Utility of Deterrence, Assurance, and other Strategies for Dealing with WMD and Terrorism
International Cooperation
Public Opinion and Foreign Policy

Faculty Program Tags
Extra Information

Recent Accomplishments

  • Received a grant from the U.S. Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA) to lead a collaborative research project, initiated in early 2012, to examine “Multilateral Cooperation on Nonproliferation: Lessons Learned.”
  • Was a member of a team commissioned in 2011 by the U.S. Defense Department Strategic Multilayer Assessment program to examine “Influencing Violent Extremist Organizations.”
  • Received the Bernard Brodie Prize for the best article in 2010 in the journal Contemporary Security Policy for “The Fourth Wave in Deterrence Research,” published in the April 2010 issue.

Previous Work

I have published research on U.S.-Soviet nuclear arms control, the consequences of nuclear proliferation, the denuclearization process in Argentina and Brazil, and strategies for countering WMD proliferation such as deterrence and assurance. I have also done work on strategies for combating terrorism. In addition to my academic experience, I have worked at several NGOs concerned with U.S. defense and nuclear weapons policies. This includes a previous stint at MIIS at the Center for Nonproliferation Studies, during which time I served as Editor of The Nonproliferation Review.

Education

I received an M.A. and Ph.D. in Political Science from Stanford University. At Stanford, I worked with the late Alexander L. George and Scott Sagan, two internationally renowned experts in international security and nuclear weapons issues. I have a B.A. in Social Studies from Harvard University.

Bibliography

“Nuclear Disarmament and Nonproliferation: Are They Linked?” International Security (forthcoming, winter 2012). PDF/link not available yet.

Editor, Security Assurances and Nuclear Nonproliferation (Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 2012).

NGOs, Social Movements, and Arms Control,” in Arms Control: History, Theory, and Policy, ed. Robert E. Williams, Jr. and Paul R. Viotti (ABC-CLIO/Praeger, 2012). 

The Concept of Nuclear Learning,” Nonproliferation Review 19, no. 1 (March 2012): 79-93.  

Faculty Type
Regular Faculty
Dynamic Features
Course Catalog

Jessica Varnum

First Name
Jessica
Last Name
Varnum
varnum_jessica
Job Title
Adjunct Professor NTI Project Manager and Research Associate at CNS
Location
CNS Building, 499 Van Buren St.
City, State, ZIP
Monterey, CA 93940
Phone
831.647.4610
Language(s)
Français

Jessica C. Varnum is the NTI Project Manager and a Research Associate at the James Martin Center for Nonproliferation Studies (CNS). Varnum manages all of CNS's work for the Nuclear Threat Initiative website, including extensive research databases on nuclear, chemical and biological weapons and their delivery systems, educational resources, country profiles, and issue briefs.

Course List

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

IPOL 8651 - Sem:ScienceTech&NucPolicyMakng      

As future nonproliferation analysts or policymakers, graduates of the MANPTS program will regularly encounter nuclear policy challenges with both political and technical dimensions, from nuclear forensics to missile defense or arms control verification. Yet policymakers are in many cases ignorant of the technical aspects of nuclear policy, and scientists are often equally guilty of coming up with technical solutions to nuclear policy challenges that cannot be implemented because they ignore political realities. The course will explore a series of current and historical nuclear policy case studies to understand the technical and policy dimensions of key nuclear policy challenges, including: nuclear terrorism; nuclear forensics and attribution; the use of science in nuclear intelligence estimates; U.S. nuclear weapons targeting policies; stockpile stewardship and the nuclear weapons labs; the U.S. Reliable Replacement Warhead; detection of nuclear tests and the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty; historical debates over the development of thermonuclear weapons; and ongoing debates about the possibility for “nuclear winter” following either limited or extensive use of nuclear weapons. The current and historical role of scientists and science advisors in the nuclear policy process will also be explored alongside the cases, especially in the United States, but with some comparative consideration of “science and the state” in China, India, and Russia. In addition to seminar-based discussion, the course includes a role-playing simulation exercise, guest lectures by high-level practitioners with hands-on experience of the issues; and the opportunity for students to pursue a research project related to the course that aligns with their academic and professional interests. The course is suitable for MANPTS students of any background, though students will find it helpful to either concurrently or previously have taken “IPOL 8559 Science & Technology for NPTS.”

Fall 2011 - MIIS, Fall 2012 - MIIS

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NPTG 8675 / IPOL 8675 - Sem:Nuc Renaissance& Nonprolif      

This seminar focuses on the nonproliferation, nuclear security, and safeguards challenges associated with the global spread of nuclear energy and other “peaceful” dual-use nuclear technologies, placing these issues in the larger context of the technical, diplomatic, legal, economic, infrastructure, and energy security dimensions of the so-called nuclear renaissance. We will examine key reactor and fuel cycle technologies, and look at the merits/shortcomings of attempts to “fix” proliferation, security, and safeguards challenges with technical innovations. In particular, we will look at Generation IV technologies, designs using the thorium fuel cycle, and safeguards technologies. We will discuss the economic, power infrastructure, regulatory, and capacity-building challenges faced by new nuclear build, especially among nuclear newcomers in the Middle East and Asia. Following discussion of the international organizations charged with assisting and overseeing the responsible implementation of nuclear power programs (and especially the IAEA), we will look at policy proposals to increase international control, such as the creation of multilateral fuel cycle facilities. We will also look at key players—who are the nuclear suppliers, and how do their policies agree/differ concerning export of sensitive nuclear technologies? The seminar is highly participatory, and will involve hands-on activities, such as a nuclear security satellite imagery analysis exercise, and an in-class simulation game.

Spring 2011 - MIIS, Spring 2012 - MIIS, Spring 2013 - MIIS, Fall 2013 - MIIS

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Expertise

Nuclear nonproliferation; Turkey (including Turkish national security and nuclear policies, Turkish foreign policies, and Turkish domestic politics); NATO and extended deterrence; peaceful nuclear trade and cooperation; the responsible expansion of nuclear power; and the science and technology of nuclear policymaking (including the role of science advisors in the policy process and the scientific and technical underpinnings of nuclear policy challenges).

Faculty Program Tags
Extra Information

Education

Varnum earned an M.A. in international policy studies with a certificate in nonproliferation studies from the Monterey Institute of International Studies and graduated summa cum laude from Colby College with a B.A. in government and international studies. She is proficient in French.

Faculty Type
Adjunct Faculty
Dynamic Features
Course Catalog

Leonard Spector

First Name
Leonard
Last Name
Spector
Sandy Spector
Job Title
Adjunct Professor and Deputy Director of CNS, Washington D.C. Office
Location
1400 K Street, NW, Suite 450
City, State, ZIP
Washington, D.C., 20005
Phone
202.842.3100

Leonard S. Spector is Deputy Director of the Monterey Institute of International Studies' James Martin Center for Nonproliferation Studies, and leads the Center's Washington D.C. Office. In addition he serves as editor-in-chief of the Center's publications. Mr. Spector joined CNS from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), where he served as an Assistant Deputy Administrator for Arms Control and Nonproliferation at the National Nuclear Security Administration.

MIIS Tags
Expertise

Arms control and nonproliferation, international treaties, U.S. domestic and multilateral export controls

Mr. Spector interviewed on MSNBC.

Faculty Program Tags
Course List

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

NPTG 8557 / IPOL 8557 - Nonproliferation Law & Policy      

international law of treaties; the role of the United Nations; domestic nonproliferation policymaking structures and processes; the roles of the executive and legislative branches of government; the utility of international nonproliferation sanctions; the legality of the use of force to combat proliferation; legal solutions to the problem of nuclear smuggling; the effectiveness of multilateral safeguards and inspections; and rules governing civilian commerce in nuclear goods. Attention will be given to examining the hierarchy of legal instruments; mandatory versus voluntary measures and the evolution of norms and customary law; the interaction of international agreements and domestic law; and the interplay of programs, mandatory rules, and discretionary policy. In addition, the course will also explore the impact on the effectiveness of law-based nonproliferation measures of gaps in their scope, acceptance, implementation, and enforcement.

The course will be conducted using both the lecture and classroom exercises, and active student participation is both encouraged and required.

Spring 2012 - MIIS, Spring 2013 - MIIS, Spring 2014 - MIIS

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WKSH 8590 - Nonproliferation Policy & Law      

By carefully exploring the interplay of non-proliferation policy and legal rules in key nonproliferation controversies, the course will:

• Familiarize students with the basic tenets of international law and domestic legal frameworks
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• Deepen students’ knowledge of selected nonproliferation rules – treaties, international agreements, and national laws – and their role in past and on-going nonproliferation crises

• Highlight how policy makers use legal tools to advance nonproliferation goals – and to deflect such efforts by others

• Assess the balance between rules and realpolitik, and the direction of current trends.

Spring 2011 - MIIS

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Extra Information

Education

Mr. Spector holds a J.D. degree from Yale Law School and an undergraduate degree from Williams College

Publications

His many publications include: Tracking Nuclear Proliferation 1995: A Guide in Maps and Charts (with Mark McDonough and Evan Medeiros, Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, 1995); Nuclear Ambitions: The Spread of Nuclear Weapons, 1989-1990 (Westview Press, 1990); The Undeclared Bomb: The Spread of Nuclear Weapons, 1987-1988 (Harper Business 1990).

Faculty Type
Adjunct Faculty
Dynamic Features
Course Catalog

Nikolai Sokov

First Name
Nikolai
Last Name
Sokov
sokov_nikolai
Job Title
Adjunct Professor and Senior Research Associate at CNS
Location
CNS Vienna Office
City, State, ZIP
Vienna, Austria
Phone
011.431236948208
Language(s)
Русский

He graduated from Moscow State University in 1981 and subsequently worked at the Institute of US and Canadian Studies and the Institute of World Economy and International Relations in Moscow. From 1987-92 he worked at the Ministry for Foreign Affairs of the Soviet Union and later Russia, and participated in START I and START II negotiations as well as in a number of summit and ministerial meetings.

Course List

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

IPOL 8536 - Comparative NatlSecurityPolicy      

The course will review several key theories of policy making that tackle different levels of analysis and different analytical frameworks. It will examine the impact of a range of factors – including the international system, historical context, political system, domestic politics, bureaucratic politics and individual personalities – in determining national security policies of different countries. Differences between authoritarian and democratic states, large and small states, and presidential and parliamentary democracies, will also be discussed. The material from the discussion of theories will then be applied to more detailed study of practical policy making in four leading international actors: the United States, Russia, China, and the European Union as well as their interaction on a range of international security issues.

Spring 2011 - MIIS

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Expertise

Russian and US Missile systems, Nuclear Command, Control, Communications & Intelligence (C3I), Nuclear Arms Control, Strategic Arms Control, Kosovo Crisis, Emerging Reorientation of Russia's Foreign Policy, Russia's Perception of NATO, Newly Independent States, Arms Control Agreements:Devolution, Major Treaties and International Regimes: Chances for Demise, NATO, Verification/Compliance

Faculty Program Tags
Extra Information

Education

Nikolai has a Ph.D. from the University of Michigan (1996) and (the Soviet equivalent of a Ph.D.) Candidate of Historical Sciences degree from the Institute of World Economy and International Relations (1986).

Publications

He has published extensively on international security and arms control. Nikolai is the author of Russian Strategic Modernization: Past and Future (Rowman and Littlefield, 2000), co-author and co-editor of the first Russian-language college-level textbook on nuclear nonproliferation (Yadernoe Nerasprostranenie, Vol.I-II, PIR Center, 1st edition 2000, 2nd edition 2002), and several monographs.

Faculty Type
Adjunct Faculty
Dynamic Features
Course Catalog

Gaukhar Mukhatzhanova

First Name
Gaukhar
Last Name
Mukhatzhanova
mukhatzhanova_gaukhar
Job Title
Adjunct Professor, Research Associate and NPT Project Manager at CNS
Location
CNS --1400 K Street NW Suite 1225
City, State, ZIP
Washington, D.C. 20005
Phone
(202) 842-3100 x307

Gaukhar's research interests include international nonproliferation organizations and regimes, Iran's nuclear program, politics of the Non-Aligned Movement, and proliferation theory. She has published in the International Security, Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, International Herald Tribune, and has written issue briefs and research stories for NTI and CNS. She teaches a course on Nuclear Proliferation Trends and Trigger Events at the Monterey Institute of International Studies.

Course List

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

IPOL 8631 - Sem:NonprolifTrnds/TriggrEvnts      

How optimistic or pessimistic should we be about the future spread of nuclear weapons, and to what levers do policymakers have access to reduce the likelihood of proliferation? Concerns about accelerating proliferation are rising again, as they have periodically during the sixty-plus years of the nuclear age. This time, Iran’s apparent pursuit of at least a nuclear weapons option is widely expected to catalyze regional proliferation, and there is also concern about further proliferation in response to North Korea’s acquisition of at least rudimentary nuclear weapons. Both theoretical and empirical scholarship can shed light on the conditions under which states are more or less likely to proliferate and the levers policymakers can use to make proliferation less likely. Students will gain knowledge of the development and current state of proliferation theory, survey past works on forecasting nuclear proliferation, analyze prior nuclear proliferation decisions and trigger events, and will be expected to combine theory with comparative studies in conducting their original research.

Spring 2011 - MIIS

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NPTG 8522 - Iran's Nuclear Program      

This workshop serves as an overview to Iran's nuclear program since its development during the Shah period in the 1970's to the Islamic Republic in the present. Topics that will be covered include the geopolitics of Iran, the proliferation of nuclear weapons in the Middle East, and Iranian threat perceptions. Also, Iranian national security in a regional and global context and the role of domestic Iranian politics in the state's nuclear policy will be examined. Finally, the workshop covers the concerns and objectives of U.S. policy towards Iran's nuclear program efforts and nonproliferation and arms control initiatives of international institutions vis-a-vis Iran.

Spring 2013 - MIIS, Spring 2014 - MIIS

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WKSH 8522 - Iran's Nuclear Program      

This workshop serves as an overview to Iran's nuclear program since its development during the Shah period in the 1970's to the Islamic Republic in the present. Topics that will be covered include the geopolitics of Iran, the proliferation of nuclear weapons in the Middle East, and Iranian threat perceptions. Also, Iranian national security in a regional and global context and the role of domestic Iranian politics in the state's nuclear policy will be examined. Finally, the workshop covers the concerns and objectives of U.S. policy towards Iran's nuclear program efforts and nonproliferation and arms control initiatives of international institutions vis-a-vis Iran.

Fall 2010 - MIIS, Spring 2012 - MIIS

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Faculty Program Tags
Faculty Type
Adjunct Faculty
Dynamic Features
Course Catalog

Dr. Jeffrey Lewis

First Name
Jeffrey
Last Name
Lewis
lewis_jeffrey
Job Title
Adjunct Professor and Director of East Asia Non-Proliferation Program at CNS
Location
CNS Building, 499 Van Buren St.
City, State, ZIP
Monterey, CA 93940
Phone
202.842.3100

Before coming to CNS, he was the Director of the Nuclear Strategy and Nonproliferation Initiative at the New America Foundation.

Expertise

Nuclear nonproliferation, international security, disarmament, arms control

Faculty Program Tags
Course List

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

NPTG 8510 / IPOL 8510 - Security&ArmsCntrl-N East Asia      

This course will examine contemporary issues relating to nuclear arms control, disarmament, and nonproliferation in Northeast Asia. Topics to be examined include China's strategic modernization, North Korea's nuclear and ballistic missile programs, and US extended deterrence commitments to Japan, South Korea and Taiwan.

Spring 2012 - MIIS, Spring 2013 - MIIS, Spring 2014 - MIIS

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NPTG 8563 / IPOL 8563 - Evolutn ofChineseNuclearPolicy      

This course, on the evolution of Chinese nuclear policy, is divided into three parts. The first part outlines early Chinese attitudes to nuclear weapons, proliferation and disarmament, prior to and immediately following China’s nuclear test in 1964. The second part examines enduring concepts in Chinese nuclear policy, such as No First Use, and introduces students to important debates in China since the 1980s on nuclear deterrence. The third part focuses on contemporary issues and challenges that shape Chinese nuclear policy, from ballistic missile defense, to the South Asian nuclear tests in 1999, and the North Korean nuclear crisis. The nature of the US-China nuclear relationship will also be explored. The principal objective of the course is to give students a better understanding of China’s nuclear policy, both past and present. A secondary objective is to introduce to students key literature and sources, both in English and Chinese, on this issue.

Fall 2012 - MIIS, Fall 2013 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS

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WKSH 8569 - N Korea's BallisticMissilePgms      

This course will examine the development of North Korea's ballistic
missile programs. Students will examine competing hypotheses about the
sources of North Korea's ballistic missile technologies. The course
will also consider the factors behind North Korea's export of
ballistic missiles, components and technologies. The instructor will
place special emphasis on assessing efforts by the United States and
Israel in the 1990s to curb North Korea's development and
proliferation of ballistic missiles.

Fall 2011 - MIIS

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WKSH 8571 - Wks: China's Nuclear Policies      

This course will review the historical development of China's nuclear weapons policies, forces and posture, with an emphasis on considering competing theoretical explanations for observed behavior. The course will also examine alternative future scenarios for China's nuclear weapons in a policy context.

Fall 2010 - MIIS

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WKSH 8594 - North Korea's Nuclear Program      

Spring 2011 - MIIS

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WKSH 8596 - Japan & Extended Deterrence      

Spring 2011 - MIIS

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Extra Information

Education

Dr. Lewis received his Ph.D. in Policy Studies (International Security and Economic Policy) from the University of Maryland and his B.A. in Philosophy and Political Science from Augustana College in Rock Island, Ill.

Publications

Dr. Lewis is the author of Minimum Means of Reprisal: China's Search for Security in the Nuclear Age (MIT Press, 2007) and publishes ArmsControlWonk.com, the leading blog on disarmament, arms control and nonproliferation.

Faculty Type
Adjunct Faculty
Dynamic Features
Course Catalog

Dr. Ferenc Dalnoki-Veress

First Name
Ferenc
Last Name
Dalnoki-Veress
dalnoki-veress_ferenc
Job Title
Scientist in Residence and Adjunct Professor
Location
CNS Building, 499 Van Buren St.
City, State, ZIP
Monterey, CA 93940
Phone
831.647.4638

Dr. Ferenc Dalnoki-Veress is Scientist-in-Residence at CNS and holds an MSc and PhD in high energy physics from Carleton University, Canada. He specializes in ultra-low radioactivity background detectors and has professional experience in the field of astroparticle physics, primarily neutrino physics.

Course List

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

IPOL 8675 - Sem:Nuc Renaissance& Nonprolif      

This seminar introduces students to the nonproliferation and terrorism issues associated with the anticipated global spread of nuclear energy. It begins with an overview of the nuclear technologies currently being promoted under the rubric of the "nuclear renaissance," and the implications for the demand for sensitive fuel cycle services. Various policy proposals to control the proliferation and terrorism risks posed by the front end (enrichment) and back end (reprocessing) of the nuclear fuel cycle will then be examined, including the possible internationalization of fuel cycle services. The course will then turn to an examination of new technologies, such as new reprocessing techniques, new reactor types, and new fuels such as thorium, that have been proposed as ways to limit proliferation risks. Particular focus will be paid to the implications of new proposals for IAEA safeguards.

Spring 2011 - MIIS

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IPOL 8678 - Sem:VerifyingNuclearDisarmamnt      

This course is a directed study, interactive seminar course for the advanced student. Students will be required to complete several short assignments and to write a research paper on an allocated, practical aspect of the verification of nuclear arms control and to participate in a class simulation to design a verification regime for specified scenarios. The lecture component of the course will start by discussing verification approaches in general and how these have been historically applied. We will then have a series of technical lectures focusing on the technology that will allow the verification of nuclear weapons stocks, confirmation of nuclear weapons elimination, and the prohibition of weapon remanufacture and assembly. The course will finish with the presentation of students research papers to the class.

Fall 2010 - MIIS, Spring 2012 - MIIS

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NPTG 8559 / IPOL 8559 - Science & Technology for NPTS      

This course provides students with a solid foundation in scientific and technical fundamentals critical to nonproliferation and terrorism policy analysis. Such policy analyses often require strong foundational knowledge of basic scientific and technical concepts in order to understand, create, and inform policy decisions. The course begins with an introduction to science and the scientific method and then evolves into the three main areas: biological weapons, chemical weapons, nuclear weapons and relevant technologies. Topics covered in the biological component include fundamental concepts related to microorganisms, DNA, RNA, proteins, and processes of infection and disease. Topics covered in the chemistry component include fundamental concepts related to atomic structure and the periodic table, chemical structural representations, functional groups, reactivity, toxicity, as well as modern separation, purification and analytic techniques commonly used for chemical species. Applications of the fundamental concepts in the first two topics are further developed in relation to features of chemical and biological weapons and warfare, including agents, delivery methods and effects. Topics covered in the nuclear component part of the course includes radioactivity, uranium, nuclear weapons, radiation detection instrumentation and applications, environmental plumes, and various instrumentation and analysis techniques. Upon completion of this course students will have a deeper appreciation for the debate on various verification solutions that have been proposed for compliance under the Biological and Toxin Weapons Convention (BWC), Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC) and nuclear treaties.

Spring 2011 - MIIS, Fall 2011 - MIIS, Spring 2012 - MIIS, Fall 2012 - MIIS, Spring 2013 - MIIS, Fall 2013 - MIIS, Spring 2014 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS

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NPTG 8612 - NucTreatyVerficatn/VirtualWrld      

Spring 2014 - MIIS

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WKSH 8532 - Wks:Nuclear Weapons Technology      

This course addresses the technologies associated with the development of nuclear weapons. The course provides a basic background in the physics of nuclear weapons technology, including the fission and fusion processes, nuclear reactors, the criticality condition and the materials needed for nuclear weapons. The paths that can be taken in developing nuclear weapons are considered. The differences between radiological devices ("dirty" bombs) and critical devices are addressed. Additional topics of the workshop include radiation detection, uranium enrichment, nuclear fuel reprocessing, nuclear weapons types and weapons effects.

Fall 2010 - MIIS

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WKSH 8584 - NucSafety&SecurtyPostFukushima      

Spring 2012 - MIIS

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Faculty Program Tags
Extra Information

Current Courses

Dr. Dalnoki-Veress recognizes that knowledge of science is crucial for understanding weapons of mass destruction and the security threats they pose. In this sense, he has focused on courses where science and policy meet. He coordinates the course Science for NPTS (NPTG 8559) which is a required course and is taught every semester.  He also teaches a novel course titled Nuclear Treaty Verification in a Virtual World (NPTG 8612) which uses avatar based virtual reality to simulate the protocol for the verification of nuclear weapons.

Selected Publications

  • Ferenc Dalnoki-Veress, “Primarily Positive Perceptions: A Survey of Research Reactor Operators on the Benefits and Pitfalls of Converting From HEU to LEU” (paper presented at the European Research Reactor Conference, Ljubljana, Slovenia, April 1, 2014).

 

  • Dalnoki-Veress, Ferenc; Miles Pomper,. "Dealing with South Korea's Spent Fuel Challenges without Pyroprocessing." Arms Control Today. Arms Control Association. July/August 2013.

 

  • Direct Measurement of the Be-7 Solar Neutrino Flux with 192 Days of Borexino Data, C. Arpesella et al. (Borexino Collaboration). 2008. 6pp. Phys.Rev.Lett.,101:091302,2008.

 

  • A Germanium Spectrometer for Routine Characterization of Samples with the Sensitivity of Double Beta Decay Spectrometers, G. Rugel et al. Nuclear Physics B – Neutrino 2004 Proceedings Supplements, Volume 143, June 2005, Page 564, 2005.

 

  • Direct Evidence for Neutrino Flavor Transformation from Neutral-Current Interactions in the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory, Q.R. Ahmad et al. (The SNO Collaboration), Phys.Rev.Lett., 89, 011301, 2002.

 

  • Measurement of Day and Night Neutrino Energy Spectra at SNO and Constraints on Neutrino Mixing Parameters, Q.R. Ahmad et al. (The SNO Collaboration), Phys.Rev.Lett., 89, 011302, 2002.

 

  • Measurement of the Rate of νe + d → p + p + e − Interactions Produced by 8 B Solar Neutrinos at the Sudbury Neutrino Observator, Q.R. Ahmad et al. (The SNO Collaboration) Phys.Rev.Lett., 87, 071301, 2001.

                                                                                                                                                                         

                                                               

Faculty Type
Adjunct Faculty
Dynamic Features
Course Catalog

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