Rufus H. Yerxa

First Name
Rufus H.
Last Name
Yerxa
yerxa
Job Title
Visiting Professor
Location
400 Pacific Street, Rm D205,
City, State, ZIP
Monterey, CA 93940
Phone
(831) 647-4693

Rufus Yerxa joined MIIS as a visiting professor in October 2013, having recently completed more than a decade of service as Deputy Director General of the World Trade Organization in Geneva. As the organization’s second ranking official, he helped to broaden the WTO’s membership and strengthen its role as the principal rules-based institution governing world trade.

Faculty Program Tags
Expertise

International trade law, U.S. trade policy and WTO affairs

Faculty Type
Visiting Faculty

Robert Rogowsky

First Name
Robert
Last Name
Rogowsky
Rogowsky, Picture
Job Title
Professor in International Policy and Development
Location
Casa Fuente
City, State, ZIP
Monterey, CA 93940

The future truly isn’t what it used to be. One prediction is that 40 percent of the jobs today’s students will hold in 20 years don’t exist yet. Our role as educators is to prepare our graduates to thrive and lead in an incredibly challenging and dynamic world.

I am passionate about being a professor at MIIS. Innovative administrators, remarkable faculty, and invigorated students, all working as a team makes MIIS boil with inquisitive and creative energy.  It is a vibrant academic community that blends learning with meaningful application. I am thrilled to be part of it.

Faculty Program Tags
Faculty Type
Regular Faculty

Jeff Dayton-Johnson

First Name
Jeff
Last Name
Dayton-Johnson
jeff-dayton-johnson
Job Title
Associate Professor and Program Chair
Location
McCone 217
City, State, ZIP
Monterey, CA 93940
Phone
831.647.4647
Language(s)
Español
Français
português

I am passionate about mobilizing knowledge in order to have less inequality and exclusion and more collective action and social cohesion around the world.

What excites me about being a professor at MIIS is the extraordinary energy and productive diversity of the students and faculty alike. It's exciting to walk around campus and hear so many languages being spoken, so many causes being championed, so many ideas being debated, so many projects being launched!

Expertise

Economic development, emerging economies, economics and politics of Latin American countries (including Mexico), immigration, poverty, inequality, natural disasters.

Professor Dayton-Johnson interviewed live about a financial crisis in Latin America on CNBC.

MIIS Tags
Faculty Program Tags
Extra Information

Recent Accomplishments

Together with his faculty and staff colleagues, Jeff helped craft the Development Practice & Policy program at MIIS. DPP – now underway – offers two professional masters degrees for aspiring development professionals who seek meaningful careers, whether at the grassroots level or at the headquarters of a global organization, from California’s Central Coast to any of the world’s continents (for more information, click here).

In a similarly collaborative vein, Jeff and fellow professors are perfecting an integrated classroom-plus-fieldwork approach to the teaching and learning of Policy Analysis at MIIS. In January 2014, Jeff took 25 MIIS students to the highlands of Peru to implement a research project the students themselves designed (for more on the Peru experience, click here).

Recent Publications

Latin America’s Emerging Middle Classes: Economic Perspectives (editor). Palgrave/Macmillan, forthcoming 2015.

“Legitimidad fiscal y protestas en la calle: sobre Brasil y América Latina,” Vox.Lacea July 2013, (with Christian Daude and Angel Melguizo).

The Oxford Handbook of Latin American Political Economy (editor, with Javier Santiso). Oxford University Press, 2012.

“Are the Commons a Metaphor for Our Times?” OECD Observer, 2012 (with Jesús Antón).

"Innovation from Emerging Markets: The Case of Latin America," INSEAD Working Paper 2012/76/ST, 2012,  (with L. Casanova, N.Olaya Fonstad and A. Pietikäinen).

 “The Process of Reform in Latin America,” OECD Development Centre Working Paper, 2011 (with Juliana Londoño Vélez and Sebastián Nieto Parra).

Latin American Economic Outlook 2011: How Middle-Class is Latin America? (coordinator and lead author), OECD, 2010.

 

Faculty Type
Regular Faculty

Li Juan Zhang

First Name
Li Juan
Last Name
Zhang
lijuan
Job Title
Adjunct Professor
Language(s)
中文

Professor Zhang is a Fulbright Scholar at the Monterey Institute from 1997-1999 and serves as a research fellow at the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University from 2006-2007. She is a full professor in the School of Economics at Shandong University in China. She has authored and co-authored five books and published about twenty academic papers in a number of professional journals.

Faculty Program Tags
Expertise

International Economics; International Trade Policy; Commercial Diplomacy; Trade Negotiations; US-China Trade Relations

Course List

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

IPMG 8602 / IMGT 8602 - FinanclIssChina-GlobalContext      

China’s rise has put China’s financial issues at the center of global economic and financial stability. This course provides an up-to-date evaluation on China’s currency policy, foreign exchange regime, banking structure and other financial issues in the global context. The course begins with an overview of China’s financial system, followed by discussions on how variation in China’s financial reforms can account for differences in patterns of global business and world economic development. Then the course turns to a case analysis of China’s RMB exchange rate and its effects on the global financial order and world/American economy. During simulations, students will take on various roles in contemporary debates/issues, including RMB appreciation, SME financing, capital controls, foreign debts, and the future global financial regime.

Spring 2012 - MIIS, Spring 2013 - MIIS

More Information »

IPMG 9574 - Shanghai Free Trade Zone      

China (Shanghai) Pilot Free Trade Zone (Shanghai FTZ) was launched in September 2013, which is thought to be one of the largest regulatory reforms of China since the 1980s. Shanghai FTZ is expected to spark wider economic reform and trigger a new wave of trade and financial liberalization in China. The eleven-square-mile area also promises financial deregulation, convertibility of China’s currency and freer flow of capital. This course offers a practical as well as economic approach exploring related issues surrounding the Shanghai FTZ in an effort to prepare MIIS students deal with real-world business issues.

This is an immersive learning courses aiming to create unique, high-impact learning experiences that result in real-world solutions. Students are expected to think up a practical problem in the real world. Faculty advisors will help students to turn knowledge into judgment and judgment into action through project research papers. To experience the real world issues, impacts and policy implications of Shanghai FTZ, students are encouraged to travel to Shanghai during the March Spring Break. In Shanghai, students will meet local policymakers and industry professionals, talk to those with an interest in your question, and discuss related issues. Students will also have the opportunity to meet with faculty and students from the School of Management at Shanghai University of Finance and Economics (SHUFE). A roundtable discussion and professional seminar will also be hosted at SHUFE campus.

The course will be divided into THREE sections:

1. Classroom lecture on MIIS campus: this section include lectures and background building on the topic.

2. Shanghai FTZ visiting and onsite research at Shanghai: this section will include a trip to Shanghai, interview policymakers and researchers in various industries, and conduct survey in Shanghai.

3. In-depth research and case analysis at MIIS: after returning from Shanghai, students will continue working on a team project. Each team is required to present its team project, revise based upon comments received and finalize by the end of the class. Research paper proceedings will be published if possible.

Spring 2014 - MIIS

More Information »

IPSG 8573 / IPOL 8573 - US-China Trade Relations      

This course offers an economic approach for addressing the US-China trade related issues in an effort to prepare MIIS students for the complex realities of US-China trade and commercial diplomacy. Given the fact that China may overtake the U.S. to become the world’s largest economy in the near future, the practical aim of this course is to prepare MIIS students for navigating the future US-China political and economic environment. This is critical as tensions within their roles as future government and business leaders are sure to be present. As a consequence, students will develop a better understanding of how US-China trade and economic diplomacy has been built based on increasing interdependence of the two large economies, growing bilateral trade, engaging American strategy, the rising power of China and their collective impacts on overall US-China relations.

Fall 2011 - MIIS, Fall 2012 - MIIS, Fall 2013 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS

More Information »

IPSG 8574 - Shanghai Free Trade Zone      

China (Shanghai) Pilot Free Trade Zone (Shanghai FTZ) was launched in September 2013, which is thought to be one of the largest regulatory reforms of China since the 1980s. Shanghai FTZ is expected to spark wider economic reform and trigger a new wave of trade and financial liberalization in China. The eleven-square-mile area also promises financial deregulation, convertibility of China’s currency and freer flow of capital. This course offers a practical as well as economic approach exploring related issues surrounding the Shanghai FTZ in an effort to prepare MIIS students deal with real-world business issues.

This is an immersive learning courses aiming to create unique, high-impact learning experiences that result in real-world solutions. Students are expected to think up a practical problem in the real world. Faculty advisors will help students to turn knowledge into judgment and judgment into action through project research papers. To experience the real world issues, impacts and policy implications of Shanghai FTZ, students are encouraged to travel to Shanghai during the March Spring Break. In Shanghai, students will meet local policymakers and industry professionals, talk to those with an interest in your question, and discuss related issues. Students will also have the opportunity to meet with faculty and students from the School of Management at Shanghai University of Finance and Economics (SHUFE). A roundtable discussion and professional seminar will also be hosted at SHUFE campus.

The course will be divided into THREE sections:

1. Classroom lecture on MIIS campus: this section include lectures and background building on the topic.

2. Shanghai FTZ visiting and onsite research at Shanghai: this section will include a trip to Shanghai, interview policymakers and researchers in various industries, and conduct survey in Shanghai.

3. In-depth research and case analysis at MIIS: after returning from Shanghai, students will continue working on a team project. Each team is required to present its team project, revise based upon comments received and finalize by the end of the class. Research paper proceedings will be published if possible.

Spring 2014 - MIIS

More Information »

WKSH 8552 - FinanclIssChina-GlobalContext      

China’s rise has put China’s financial issues at the center of global economic and financial stability. This course provides an up-to-date evaluation on China’s currency policy, foreign exchange regime, banking structure and other financial issues in the global context. The course begins with an overview of China’s financial system, followed by discussions on how variation in China’s financial reforms can account for differences in patterns of global business and world economic development. Then the course turns to a case analysis of China’s RMB exchange rate and its effects on the global financial order and world/American economy. During simulations, students will take on various roles in contemporary debates/issues, including RMB appreciation, SME financing, capital controls, foreign debts, and the future global financial regime.

Spring 2012 - MIIS

More Information »

Extra Information

Education

Ph.D., Economics, Shandong University; MA, Commercial Diplomacy, Monterey Institute of International Studies; BA Economics, Shandong University

Faculty Type
Adjunct Faculty
Dynamic Features
Course Catalog

Amb. Alan Wm. Wolff

First Name
Alan
Last Name
Wolff
Alan Wolff
Job Title
Distinguished Research Professor, Graduate School of International Policy and Management, Director, International Trade and Development Policy Initiative
Location
Casa Fuente 437F
City, State, ZIP
Monterey, CA 93940
Phone
831.647.3572

Ambassador Alan Wolff has a distinguished career of public service that spans the fields of international trade, legislative and public policy and litigation with a special emphasis on the renewable and clean energy industry. He currently leads Dewey & LeBoeuf's International Trade Practice Group, which has been credited with helping to open international markets for American products including semiconductors, computer parts, telecommunications equipment, soda ash and forest products, consumer photographic film and paper, and insurance and other services. Mr.

Short Programs & Research Centers
Faculty Program Tags
Course List

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

WKSH 8564 - American Trade PolicyFormation      

The workshop will examine the workings of the U.S. trade policy formulation
process. The focus will be on the interaction of USTR with other Executive Branch agencies, with the Congress, and with interested private parties, public opinion and the media in the context of international trade relations and the rules of the World Trade Organization. A simulation will be conducted in which key trade policy decisions will be debated by workshop participants on behalf of the roles chosen or assigned.

Spring 2011 - MIIS

More Information »

Expertise

International Trade, Legislative and Public Policy, Finance Law, Renewable and Clean Energy

Extra Information

Education

J.D. Columbia University Law School

B.A. Harvard University

Publications

Books/Articles

  • China’s New Anti-Monopoly Law, A Perspective from the United States, Pacific Rim Law and Policy Review. U of Washington Law School, Co-author with T. Howell, R. Howe, D. Oh, January 2009.
  • Remedy in WTO Dispute Settlement, in The WTO: Governance, Dispute Settlement & Developing Countries, Merit E. Janow, Victoria Donaldson, Alan Yanovich, Editors, Columbia University, January 2008.
  • China’s Drive Toward Innovation, in Issues in Science and Technology, National Academy of Sciences and University of Texas at Austin, (Spring 2007)
  • America's Ability to Achieve its Commercial Objectives and the Operation of the WTO, 91 LAW 8c Law and Policy in International Business 1013 (2000).

Publications

  • The International Trading System and the Environment. Monterey Institute for International Studies, April 17, 2009
  • Chinese Promotional Policies and the Protection of Intellectual Property, U.S. Chamber of Commerce, March 27, 2009
  • Chinese Industrial Policies and their Impact on U.S.Industry, U.S. Economic and Security Review Commission, March 27, 2009
  • Working paper, "U.S. Trade Policies Toward China" (10/15/2008).
  • "Investment Conference: Frameworks to Ensure Open Investment Regimes," U.S. Chamber of Commerce, National Bureau of Research, Washington, DC (09/16/2008).
  • "Standards & IPR in China," U.S. Patent and Trademark Office Conference, Arlington, VA (6/30/08).
  • "Standards & Innovation in China: Public Policy and the Role of Stakeholders," U.S. Chamber of Commerce, National Bureau of Research, Washington, DC (5/8/2008).
  • University of Illinois at Champaign-Urbana, "The Changing Role of Intellectual Property in Asia: National Innovation Policies of India and China" (March 7, 2008).
  • Japan Commerce Association of Washington, DC, "China's Innovation Drive - Implications for Japanese Companies" (February 27, 2008.)
  • U.S. National Academy of Sciences, New Delhi, India, "Innovation Policies in the United States, China and India" (December 2007).
  • The Global Business Dialogue, Inc., Washington, DC, "Responses to the Doha Chairman's Paper on Rules - Remarks on the Valles Rules Negotiation Text, (December 2007).
  • OECD – Ministry of Science and Technology (MOST), Conference on the Review of China's National Innovation System and Policy, "China's National Innovation System: A Foreign Business Perspective", Beijing, China, (August 27, 2007).
  • U.S. National Academy of Sciences and the Government of Belgium, Conference on Regional and National Innovation, "China’s Drive Toward Innovation" (September 21, 2006).
  • Presentation to the Beijing Lawyers Association, "U.S. Trade Remedies" (June 13, 2006).
  • WTO at 10 Conference, "Remedy in WTO Dispute Settlement" (April 7, 2006).
  • The Center for American and International Law, "China’s Compliance with Its WTO Obligations" (June 15, 2005).
Faculty Type
Regular Faculty
Dynamic Features
Course Catalog

Philip J. Murphy

First Name
Philip
Last Name
Murphy
Phil Murphy
Job Title
Assistant Professor
Location
224 McCone
Phone
831.647.4600
Language(s)
Македонски јазик

Dr. Murphy earned his PhD in Public and International Affairs from the University of Pittsburgh, where he recently held the position of Senior Policy Fellow at the Matthew B. Ridgway Center for International Security Studies. He has taught distance education courses in a Master of Public Policy and Management program targeted at mid-career public and private sector professionals in Macedonia.

Expertise

Public Policy, Research Methods, Quantitative Methods, Network Analysis, International Development

Faculty Program Tags
MIIS Tags
Course List

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

IPMG 9532 - Peru Practicum      

Spring 2015 - MIIS

More Information »

IPSG 8501 / IPOL 8501 - Policy Analysis      

This course introduces students to the theory and practice of policy analysis. Students will be introduced to the stages of the public policy process, including agenda setting, formulation, implementation, and evaluation. Students will also develop basic policy analysis skills, including problem structuring, stakeholder identification, summarization of current policy, development of policy options, elaboration of criteria for selection, and recommendation of course of action. These concepts are illustrated by examples policies that fall within students' range of interests. This course also introduces students to scientific methods that are used as a means for structuring policy inquiry. A series of research approaches and techniques are presented in the context of forecasting, monitoring, and evaluation for the analysis of domestic and international policies.

Fall 2011 - MIIS, Spring 2014 - MIIS

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IPSG 8504 / IPOL 8504 - Data Analysis for Public Polcy      

The course is an introduction to inferential statistics with an emphasis on Policy Analysis applications. Topics to be covered include sampling, estimation, hypothesis testing, analysis of variance, and simple and multiple regression analysis. The course will also include an introduction to the use of the computer as a tool for data analysis using leading statistical packages, as well as Excel statistical functions.

Spring 2011 - MIIS, Spring 2012 - MIIS, Fall 2012 - MIIS, Fall 2013 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS

More Information »

IPSG 8532 - Peru Practicum      

Spring 2015 - MIIS

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IPSG 8565 / IPOL 8565 - Intro to Network Analysis      

This course introduces students to the skills and concepts at the core of a dynamic and rapidly developing interdisciplinary field. Network analytic tools focus on the relationships between nodes (e.g., individuals, groups, organizations, countries, etc.). We analyze these relationships to uncover or predict a variety of important factors (e.g., the potential or importance of various actors, organizational vulnerabilities, potential subgroups, the need for redundancy, social and economic ties, growth within a network, …). Although the security field has received the greatest amount of recent attention (covert or terrorist networks), these tools can offer valuable insight into a variety of disciplines. The combination of – often stunning – visual analytic techniques with more quantitative measures accounts for much of the increasing worldwide popularity of this field.

Course Objectives

At the end of the semester, students will be able to:
Explain and apply a number of the concepts that underpin network analysis Apply concepts such as centrality, brokerage, equivalence and diffusion to network data Critically evaluate structures and substructures within a network Perform a variety of approaches to clustering and cohesion to networks Analyze networks using a variety of software packages

Spring 2011 - MIIS, Spring 2012 - MIIS, Fall 2012 - MIIS, Fall 2013 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS

More Information »

IPSG 8673 - Advanced Data Analysis      

The advanced data analysis course was designed to provide students with the opportunity to expand upon the skills developed in the introductory course (IPSG 8504), and introduce new skills that address a greater range of analytic needs. This is a project-based, applied course. Class discussions will include both how and why to use these tools, with a strong emphasis on policy applications. Among others, the course covers modules on Factor Analysis, Non-Linear Regression, Spatial Analysis and Time Series Analysis, and its design has a strong emphasis on policy applications. Multiple data sets will be used, but students are encouraged to use their own data and background knowledge.

Spring 2013 - MIIS, Spring 2014 - MIIS, Spring 2015 - MIIS

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IPSG 9507 - QualitativeDataAnalysisMash-Up      

This lively, hands-on course focuses on analysis of qualitative data. By “data”, we mean interview, focus group, written reports and visual records, hundreds of pages of them. Students will have a choice of qualitative data sets – there is no time in this short course to engage in primary data collection -- and our entire focus will be on a) deciding how to interrogate the data (what is it you wish to know, demonstrate, reveal, test?), b) developing code books and coding, c) inter-coder reliability, and d) a wide variety of analytical approaches you can use, once you have qualitative data reduced and organized. The first seven weeks of the course focus on a-c. Then, during a final weekend workshop, students will engage in hands-on analysis, using techniques introduced rapid fire during the workshop: expect to practice no fewer than 20 qualitative analysis techniques over three days. This course emphasizes the importance of studying/reading high quality qualitative research studies as fundamental to learning – we will dissect one study each week to understand how the researchers put it together – while also emphasizing learning-through-doing, making mistakes, and collaborative analysis (qualitative inquiry is almost always improved through collaboration). Your final product will be a 10-page analysis, due two weeks after the final workshop.

Fall 2014 - MIIS

More Information »

MPAG 8507 - QualitativeDataAnalysisMash-Up      

This lively, hands-on course focuses on analysis of qualitative data. By “data”, we mean interview, focus group, written reports and visual records, hundreds of pages of them. Students will have a choice of qualitative data sets – there is no time in this short course to engage in primary data collection -- and our entire focus will be on a) deciding how to interrogate the data (what is it you wish to know, demonstrate, reveal, test?), b) developing code books and coding, c) inter-coder reliability, and d) a wide variety of analytical approaches you can use, once you have qualitative data reduced and organized. The first seven weeks of the course focus on a-c. Then, during a final weekend workshop, students will engage in hands-on analysis, using techniques introduced rapid fire during the workshop: expect to practice no fewer than 20 qualitative analysis techniques over three days. This course emphasizes the importance of studying/reading high quality qualitative research studies as fundamental to learning – we will dissect one study each week to understand how the researchers put it together – while also emphasizing learning-through-doing, making mistakes, and collaborative analysis (qualitative inquiry is almost always improved through collaboration). Your final product will be a 10-page analysis, due two weeks after the final workshop.

Fall 2014 - MIIS

More Information »

Extra Information

Education

Ph.D University of Pittsburgh; MA East Tennessee State University; BS Appalachian State University

Selected Publications

"Knowledge Hub and Inventory of Opportunities."

"Getting it Done: A Brief Overview of Critical Junctures in the Study of How Policy Translates into Practice."

"Public Administration Education in Macedonia: Accelerating the Process."

"Social Policy and International Interventions in South East Europe."

"Models, Methods, and Stereotypes: Efforts to Maintain, Reify, and Create Macedonia's Ethnopolitical Identities and how Research can Move beyond Them."

"Public Policy Analysis and its Importance to Public Administration Reform."

Faculty Type
Regular Faculty
Dynamic Features
Course Catalog

Moyara Ruehsen

First Name
Moyara
Last Name
Ruehsen
Moyara Ruehsen
Job Title
Associate Professor
Location
213 McCone
Phone
831.647.4145
Language(s)
العربية
Français

I am passionate about capacity building in the areas of financial regulatory compliance and investigations, and public policies related to illicit markets as well as the macro-economy.  While my research and consulting work can be invigorating, my first love will always be teaching.  I hope to convey my own passion for these subjects to my students and inspire them to go out and explore new career paths they might not have considered when they first began their studies here.

MIIS Tags
Short Programs & Research Centers
Expertise

Money laundering, terrorism financing, corruption, asset recovery,  illegal drug markets, and international macro-economy.

Prof. Ruehsen speaks on euro crisis May 2010

Course List

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

ECPR 8500 - Economics Preparation-Micro      

This intensive course in introductory microeconomics places emphasis on the fundamental principles necessary for success in International Economics I (IPSG 8502), Development Economics (IPSG 8551) and Environmental & Natural Resource Economics (IEPG 8542). This course will examine the allocation of resources in different kinds of economies. Topics include the production possibilities curve, competitive markets, elasticities, monopoly, market failures, and the role of government.

Spring 2011 - MIIS

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ECPR 8501 - Economics Preparation-Macro      

This intensive course in introductory macroeconomics places emphasis on the fundamental principles necessary for success in International Economics II (IPSG 8503), Development Economics (IPSG 8551) and is strongly recommended for Money Laundering & AML Policies (IPSG 8581).

In this course, we examine how the overall level of national economic activity is determined, including output, employment, and inflation. We explore the roles of monetary and fiscal policies in stabilizing the economy and promoting growth, with a focus on contemporary policy debates.

Spring 2011 - MIIS, Summer 2011 - MIIS, Spring 2012 - MIIS, Summer 2012 - MIIS, Spring 2013 - MIIS, Summer 2013 - MIIS, Spring 2014 - MIIS, Summer 2014 - MIIS, Spring 2015 - MIIS

More Information »

IMGT 8520 - Topics in Intl Economics      

The first part of this course looks at both the theory and practice of international trade. Topics include an analysis of the gains from free trade and the effects of barriers to trade such as tariffs, quotas, subsidies, and other instruments of commercial policy. The second part of the course focuses on international monetary theory and exchange rate determination, as well as macroeconomic policymaking in an open economy. Topics include balance of payments analysis, emerging market currency crises, exchange rate regimes such as monetary unions, and more. The course will stress concepts and their application rather than theoretical formalism.

Spring 2012 - MIIS

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IPOL 8619 / IPSG 8619 - Sem:Econ Anlysis:Emerging Mkts      

This seminar is designed to provide students with critical skills in the area of economic analysis and writing. It will also be an opportunity to go into more depth on several important economic policy issues such as sovereign debt, foreign direct investment, capital account liberalization, trade liberalization and facilitation, and exchange rate policy. Students will pick one country and write an extensive economic analysis of that country by way of several assignments during the course of the semester.

Spring 2011 - MIIS, Fall 2011 - MIIS, Fall 2013 - MIIS

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IPOL 8696 - SemAdv$Laundering&TerrorFinanc      

This course is designed to give students who have already successfully completed IPOL8555 (Money Laundering and Terrorism Finance) a chance to do graduate-level research on a specific topic of interest. Although there will be a handful of class meetings for specific topics of interest to the entire class, the course is primarily designed as a bi-weekly private tutorial. Students will create their own individualized syllabus specific to their research topic.

Fall 2012 - MIIS

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IPSG 8503 - IntEconIICurrncyCashFlowCrises      

This course focuses on international monetary theory and exchange rate determination, as well as macroeconomic policymaking in an open economy. Topics include balance of payments analysis, currency and debt crises, exchange rate regimes such as monetary unions, and more.

Fall 2013 - MIIS, Spring 2014 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS

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IPSG 8520 / IPOL 8520 - International Economics      

The first part of this course looks at both the theory and practice of international trade. Topics include an analysis of the gains from free trade and the effects of barriers to trade such as tariffs, quotas, subsidies, and other instruments of commercial policy. The second part of the course focuses on international monetary theory and exchange rate determination, as well as macroeconomic policymaking in an open economy. Topics include balance of payments analysis, emerging market currency crises, exchange rate regimes such as monetary unions, and more.

Spring 2011 - MIIS, Fall 2011 - MIIS, Fall 2012 - MIIS, Spring 2013 - MIIS

More Information »

IPSG 8581 / IPOL 8555 / IPSG 8582 / IPSG 8555 - MoneyLaundering & AML Policies      

This course provides an introduction to money laundering and serves as a foundation for any of the related follow-up workshops and courses. Topics covered include the three typical stages of money laundering (placement, layering, integration), how to spot “red flag” indicators, trade-based money laundering techniques (false trade invoicing, use of high-value metals, black market peso exchange), misuse of informal value transfer systems, monitoring politically exposed persons, FIU’s and the Egmont Group, and finally global anti-corruption compliance and enforcement. Capital flows and payment methods will also be scrutinized, so an introductory Macroeconomics course is _strongly_ recommended. The goal of this workshop and the three that follow, is to prepare students to take and pass the Certification for Financial Crime Specialists (CFCS).

Spring 2012 - MIIS, Spring 2013 - MIIS, Spring 2014 - MIIS, Spring 2015 - MIIS

More Information »

IPSG 8583 - FraudDetctnTaxEvasnAssetRecvry      

This is the third installment of the CFCS preparation series. Topics covered include understanding and recognizing different types of financial fraud, tax evasion vs. tax avoidance, the use of offshore entities, FATCA, different types of asset recovery tools, and how to trace, forfeit and repatriate assets.

Spring 2014 - MIIS, Spring 2015 - MIIS

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IPSG 8584 - FinCrimeInvst,CompliancBstPrct      

This is the fourth and final installment of the CFCS preparation series. Topics covered include laws and investigative techniques for financial crime investigations, how to interpret financial documents, the risk-based approach to compliance, Basel Committee Guidance, Wolfsberg Group recommendations, KYC, KYE, compliance monitoring systems, ethics and best practices.

Spring 2014 - MIIS, Spring 2015 - MIIS

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IPSG 8595 - AdvPublcSpkngForPolicyProfsnls      

Public Speaking for Policy Professionals is an intensive, interactive workshop that will provide you with the basics for making skilled and professional presentations in a variety of venues. Our work together will provide you with the foundation to not only hone your skills, but will offer you practical tools for making expert presentations in other academic and professional venues.

In order to promote your effectiveness as a presenter, you will be called upon to participate in various activities and discussions that require both individual and team considerations. This will include group collaboration on a presentation in our workshop setting, as well as individual attention to your public speaking skills, including use of visual support tools. It is my explicit aim to help you become better presenters by providing you with skills and models to use for your professional development.

By the end of the workshop, you should have a greater understanding of how to present effectively and professionally as an individual and as a team. You should also garner critical tools to develop and hone your language and delivery skills, including non-verbal aspects, effectively organize and create interesting content, and expertly utilize visual support tools.

Fall 2013 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS

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IPSG 8608 - Sem:Topics in Devp: Corruption      

Corruption is a cancer that thwarts both political and economic development throughout the world. With the U.N. Convention on Corruption and now that corruption is a predicate offense for money laundering, it is easier to recover stolen assets that corrupt leaders and their associates have moved overseas. This course will look at the efforts underway to recover and return these stolen assets. For the final project, students will produce a 15-20 minute documentary looking at a case study of their choice. No prior film editing experience is needed (there will be tutorials provided by the DLC), but it helps.

Fall 2014 - MIIS

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IPSG 8613 / IPOL 8613 - Sem: Illicit Drug Markets      

This course is divided into two segments. The first segment of the course covers illegal drug markets along their entire transaction chain from the growing regions of Latin America and Asia to the end-user markets. Emphasis is placed on the international markets for cocaine, heroin, and methamphetamines, and the negative impacts of trafficking and use. The second segment examines the cost-effectiveness and viability of different supply and demand strategies, ranging from crop eradication and border interdiction to treatment and prevention.

Spring 2012 - MIIS, Fall 2012 - MIIS, Spring 2015 - MIIS

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IPSG 8662 - Advanced Terrorism Financing      

This course is a follow-up to the two workshops on Money Laundering and Terrorism Financing. It will go beyond the techniques that terrorists groups use to raise and move funds, and focus on strategies employed to stop them. We will also examine specific case studies, including proliferation financing cases and the use of non-profits.

Spring 2014 - MIIS

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IPSS 8520 - IPSS Professional Training      

The IPSS pre-departure training, consisting of six modules taught by select faculty, intends to help students refresh and/or obtain basic new knowledge and skills essential for successful professional service and future careers. These modules intend to provide a foundation – key skills, points, tools, and guiding resources – which students can use and build on in the future. The modules will use an interactive learning environment covering topics from facilitation, organizational context analysis, and applied research design to Excel essentials and communication and new media skills. A pass/fail grade will be assigned by the IPSS academic coordinator based on students’ attendance and performance in these modules.

Spring 2013 - MIIS

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IPSS 8675 - IPSS Field Deliverables      

During their IPSS internships students complete applied academic deliverables for which they earn six academic credits. The academic credit is not awarded for the internship itself, but for the work that applies students’ academic training to contribute to their host organizations’ mission in area of student’s career interest. The letter grades will be assigned based on the assessment of the following four deliverables:

IPSS Field Project: By the end of their internships students must have completed an ambitious project or other relatively autonomous contribution that presents value for the host organization and builds on students’ strengths and advances his/her skills and knowledge. The field project can take the form of a policy or consultancy report, evaluation, analysis, a website, or other substantive contribution to their host organization that integrates high quality research, analysis, and other skills and subject-matter knowledge. Faculty with relevant expertise and assigned peers will provide every student regular feedback on the major steps of the field project. Student’s regular internship responsibilities ideally should overlap with, but are not limited to the core field assignment. The organizations receiving interns are encouraged to help students identify such assignments prior to their arrival or at the very latest within one month after the start of student’s internship. The organization should provide assistance and guidance in completing this assignment.

Presentation: In the final part of the internship students will present on their field project to their colleagues at their host organizations. The video recording of that presentation will be then reviewed by the MIIS faculty who will invite students for Q&A and also provide additional feedback to students to improve the quality of their final deliverable(s).

Peer feedback: Interns will collaborate with their assigned peers by providing mutual peer feedback on their core field assignments to improve the quality of their work and learn from each other.

Final reflection: Interns will submit a final reflection to IPSS faculty and staff near the end of their internship- summarizing their most important insights and lessons they obtained from the internship experience for their professional and academic development.

Optional: Students are also highly encouraged to blog about their reflections on their internship experiences and comment on each others’ blogs throughout the internship assignment to maximize their learning.

Spring 2015 - MIIS

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NPTG 9555 - Money Laundering&TerrorFinance      

This course will examine the different techniques employed in the three stages of money laundering (placement, layering and integration), the macroeconomic impacts of money laundering, the legal framework, the latest law enforcement strategies, and techniques employed by terrorist groups to move funds and their sources of funds. Examples will be taken from organized criminal groups around the world, and many different terrorist groups (as designated by the U.S. OFAC). Investigation and risk scoring techniques will also be introduced.

Macroeconomics and Data Analysis strongly recommended.

Spring 2013 - MIIS

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NPTG 9581 - MoneyLaundering & AML Policies      

Spring 2015 - MIIS

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NPTG 9582 - TerrorFinanceSanctnsCybercrime      

Spring 2015 - MIIS

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Faculty Program Tags
Extra Information

Education

PhD, International Economics and Middle East Studies, Johns Hopkins University Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS); MA, International Studies, MHS, International Health, BA, Social Science, Johns Hopkins University; CAMS (Certified Anti-Money Laundering Specialist); CFCS (Certified Financial Crime Specialist)

Publications

"Breaking the Ice In Baghdad," Toastmaster Magazine, September 2014.

Freeman, Michael and Moyara Ruehsen, "Terrorism Financing Methods: An Overview,"_Perspecitives on Terrorism_Volume 7, Issue 4, August 2013.

"PKK" in Michael Freeman's_Financing Terrorism:Case Studies_, Ashgate Press, 2012.

"Afghanistan's Drug War - The Farmers Aren't the Enemy." LA Times 2 November 2009.

Arab Government Responses to the Threat of Terrorist Financing,” Chapter in J. Giraldo and H. Trinkunas, Terrorism Financing and State Responses in Comparative Perspective, Stanford University Press, Fall 2007.

“Choosing an Appropriate Palestinian Monetary Regime.” Research in Middle East Economics Volume 6, 2005, pp. 183-199.

Diamonds Are a Terrorist’s Best Friend,” moneylaundering.com, (September 2004).

Little Noticed UN Report Cites Alleged Saudi Terrorist Financing,” Money Laundering Alert, (October 2003).

Dirty Laundering: Financing Latin America’s Drug Trade,” (review essay) in Harvard International Review, (Winter 2003).

The Fallacy of Sanctions,” Middle East Insight (March-April 2002).

Tracing al-Qaeda’s Money,” Middle East Insight (January-February 2002).

Suspected UAE Links to Terrorist Funds Spark Anti-Laundering Efforts,” Money Laundering Alert (December 2001).

Arab Naming Customs Complicate Screening for Suspected Terrorists,” Money Laundering Alert (December 2001).

Faculty Type
Regular Faculty
Dynamic Features
Course Catalog

Wei Liang

First Name
Wei
Last Name
Liang
Wei Liang
Job Title
Associate Professor
Location
McCone Building
Phone
831.647.4142
Language(s)
中文

I am passionate about exploring the relationship between politics and economics and the policy issues derived from the interaction, including trade, development and governance.

I love being a professor at MIIS because our faculty and students share the sense of consciousness and responsibility as citizens of global, national, and local communities. 

Expertise

International Trade Policy and Trade Negotiation, Globalization and Global Economic and Environmental Governance, Trade and Development in Emerging Markets, International Political Economy of East Asia, US-Asia Policy, Chinese Politics and Foreign Policy.

Short Programs & Research Centers
Faculty Program Tags
Course List

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

IMGT 8579 - The China Factor      

This course covers a wide array of topics in three areas: the international relations, the investment and trade, and market competition. A more detailed list of the topics in the international relations area includes the Chinese imperial legacies and revolution, the contemporary political institutions and policy making processes, the opening of China and reforms and their resulting challenges, China’s role in global peace and development, China’s relations with U.S., the other Asian powers and the other world powers, and the mainland-Taiwan relation. The major topics in the trade and investment area include the evolution of China’s trade and investment policy before and during the reform era, the Chinese economic regime and policy making process, China’s accession into the WTO and integration into global economy, the regional economic cooperation between China and East and Southeast Asia, China’s industrial policy and national standard strategy, Sino-US economic relations and China’s environmental and energy challenges and sustainable development. In the market competition area, the major topics are the rise of private businesses and reform of state-owned enterprises, the Chinese-style enterprise management, the changing consumer behavior, sourcing in China, and dynamic competition among Chinese firms and multinationals in China and in global marketplaces. In each of these areas, the learning focuses on the important institutional and individual players, processes, policies and strategies at the different levels of social, economic and political activities in China and beyond.

Fall 2011 - MIIS, Fall 2012 - MIIS

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IPOL 8593 - GP&S Colloquium:EmergngMarkets      

In the past two decades, emerging economies—including, but not limited to, the celebrated “BRICS” (Brazil, Russia, India, China, and South Africa). This course will take on, and contribute to, debates surrounding these emerging markets. How have they become the darlings of international capital markets, regional economic and political leaders, and the brightest lights in a gloomy global economic landscape? Along with this rapid economic growth, these same countries are also experiencing dramatic social changes, environmental problems, political transitions and foreign policy frictions. How can these growing pains be effectively managed?

Today’s global challenges often require global solutions and a small number of developed countries ( such as G8) can no longer effectively coordinate policy solution to address global crises, including economic recession, financial crisis, and climate change negotiations. As such, the G20, including a number of the emerging economies in its membership, has risen to prominence as a new forum for global governance. The experiences of these countries also offer an opportunity to think about larger questions of global order and national development. What constitutes power in the global political economy and how is it/should it be/is it beginning to be (re)distributed? How can state and market work together to generate equitable and participatory growth? How should the BRICS and other emerging economies be factored into the 21st century’s policy challenges, such as climate change or reworking international financial institutions after the recent economic crisis? What do the experiences of the emerging markets mean for the many people who still lack access to the fruits of such growth--- including over a billion citizens of these countries themselves?

Spring 2012 - MIIS

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IPOL 8638 - Sem:US&E Asia Trade&Invest Pol      

This course examines US economic relations with East Asia, defined for our purposes as including Japan, China, South and North Korea, Taiwan and the member states of ASEAN. The Asia-Pacific is a region of extraordinary importance across virtually all aspects of global politics and economics. It is also a region filled with apparent contradictions and unresolved questions. It is thus vitally important for students and practitioners of International relations to develop a reasonable grasp of the region and the policy implications for the United States. The United States, China, and Japan comprise the world’s three largest economies by purchasing power, but China is also a developing economy with a non-convertible currency. East Asian states are involved in an ambitious attempt to create regional institutions to support their growing economic integration, and yet suspicions between the two natural leaders of East Asia – China and Japan – have been conspicuous in numerous ways. The Asia-Pacific is being pushed together and pulled apart on an ongoing basis by military and economic trends arising both locally and globally. The key questions are whether the region is headed toward greater cooperation or conflict and how the U.S. may be able to affect the direction. The first half of the semester will focus on the trade and investment policies of the countries in the region and bilateral economic relations with the U.S. In the second half we will turn our attention to the regional economic integration and its implications for the U.S.

Spring 2011 - MIIS, Spring 2012 - MIIS

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IPOL 8648 - Sem:Glbl Econ & Env Governance      

Does a global order require global governance regimes and institutions? Can the world be effectively governed? Is justice a legitimate concern of global governance? This course identifies the critical issues of global economic and environmental governance in a highly interdependent world and formulates policy responses to them. The course is divided into four sections. The first section introduces to the various concepts, major theories and approaches to global governance. The second section analyzes the core architectural elements of the current system of global economic and environmental governance, including the WTO, IMF, World Bank and UNFCCC. In section III, we will build a nexus between trade and environment as both issues have a fundamental impact on global sustainable development. The concluding section examines the emerging trend of the nexus of trade and environment that will reshape current patterns in global governance.

Fall 2011 - MIIS, Fall 2012 - MIIS

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IPSG 8515 / IPOL 8515 - Intro to Trade Policy      

This course serves as an introduction to the environments, processes, and main issues that compose the universe of trade policies. Because of the growing complexities of a more interdependent international environment, students need to expand their knowledge, sensitivity and skills in trade policies. Focus on the changing international environment, its trading institutions, key actors and issues; practices of analyzing, formulating and negotiating key trade policy issues.

Fall 2011 - MIIS, Fall 2012 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS

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IPSG 8554 - US TradePolicy&USAsiaTrdRelatn      

This workshop is an, intensive exploration of the scope and nature of US trade policy. Trade policy is considered in the context of a 200-year history of economic development of the United States and its expanding geo-political role in the world. Geo-economic policy is viewed as part of U.S strategic foreign policy. In particular we shall examine the role of the American quest for a liberal (in the 18th century sense), rules-based system to build a modern, capitalist-friendly international order. It finishes with a detailed look at the newest and most dynamic and geopolitically impactful trade relationship: US Pivot to Asia and US-China relations.

Spring 2015 - MIIS

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IPSG 8579 / IPOL 8579 - The China Factor      

The rise of China over the last two decades is one of the most significant events that shape global market competition, trade and economic development, and geopolitics. Its implications on worldly issues from global and regional peace and security to the sustainability of the environment are profound. The China factor is an amalgamation of dynamic, complex and interactive forces that appear as problems, puzzles or challenges to different people at different times. This course aims to provide an orientation for students to understand those forces, especially those related to the major stakeholders and their evolving relationships, policies and game rules, and collective behaviors. The orientation is grounded in both Chinese historical and cultural legacies and the contexts of China’s state building, modernization and globalization.

This course provides students with a broad introduction to Contemporary China’s political, economic, and strategic challenges. The discussion begins with the lowest point in Chinese history when the country was rendered as a semi-colony of Western powers and ends with China’s contemporary rise and implications for the world. The questions asked include: In what ways is China rising? How did it happen? How does China’s rise impact the U.S and the global system? The course covers a wide array of topics in primarily three areas: domestic politics, foreign policy challenges and global governance. More specifically, the topics include Chinese imperial legacies and revolution, contemporary political institutions and policy making processes, the opening of China and its reforms and their resulting challenges, China’s role in global peace and development, its relations with U.S., the other Asian powers and the other powers of the world powers, and the mainland-Taiwan relation, China’s trade and investment policy before and during the reform era, the Chinese economic regime and policy making process, China’s industrial policy and national standard strategy, and China’s environmental and energy challenges and sustainable development.

Fall 2011 - MIIS, Fall 2012 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS

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IPSG 8614 - SemFrgnPlcy,Trade&SecPolE.Asia      

(East Asia is a dynamic region of great importance by virtue of its population size, economic dynamism, and political and security challenges. The impact of the region’s international relations is felt not only by the countries geographically located in the region but also by the rest of the world. The region is characterized by diversity in terms of historical, civilizational, and ethno-cultural backgrounds, political systems, levels of economic development, and foreign relations, as well as global impact, making regional relations very complex and sometimes very difficult, for major powers and smaller powers alike. This course will examine a broad range of foreign policy, trade, and security issues that present both opportunities and challenges to the regional countries and the United States. A unique feature of this course is that it includes a field trip to Tokyo and Beijing from March 12 to 22.* The students will learn first-hand the perspectives of local experts on the regional issues the seminar addresses through guest-lectures, interviews, library research, and discussions with local university students.

* Dec 12 - $100 deposit due; Feb 27 - remainder of program fee due.

Spring 2015 - MIIS

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IPSG 8625 - SEM: Cross-Strait Relations      

This course seeks to examine the political economy that has shaped the cross-strait relations between mainland China and Taiwan since 1949, with particular emphasis on the last two decades, and the evolution and the future prospects of Cross-Strait relations. The course focuses on two core themes (1) an analysis of PRC and Taiwan’s domestic institutions, politics and policy related to cross-strait relations and (2) analysis of Cross-Strait relations. The session on PRC and Taiwan’s domestic politics and policy will address a variety of issues, including China’s domestic decision-making process, its foreign policy toward Taiwan, China’s defense policy toward Taiwan, nationalism, Taiwan democratic transition, Taiwan’s party and electoral politics, the quality of its democracy, competing national identities in Taiwan’s politics, the role of new social movements and the formulation of public policy under democracy. The sessions on Cross-Strait relations will examine topics such as the nature and sources of political conflict across the Strait, the security dilemma facing the two sides, the increasing economic integration across the Strait and its impact on security, the role of the U.S. in the dyadic relationship, and prospects for political reconciliation between the PRC and Taiwan.

This course will feature a week-long field research and language immersion in Shanghai and Taipei (March 16-March 24, 2013). Students will take this opportunity to conduct interviews and collect primary source data for their respective research project related to Cross-Strait relations. Students will acquire the cultural, social, and business skills necessary to communicate on a daily basis with the public and professional community through an intensive one-week immersion in Taipei and Shanghai. The program offers not only seminars and roundtable discussions in collaboration with the most prestigious educational institutions such as Fudan University and National Chengchi University, but also extensive interactions with international companies and government offices in the two cities. Discussion and seminar topics will cover the history, politics, security, economics, and business aspects of cross-strait relations.

Spring 2013 - MIIS

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IPSG 8648 - Sem:Glbl Econ & Env Governance      

Does a global order require global governance regimes and institutions? Can the world be effectively governed? Is justice a legitimate concern of global governance? This course identifies the critical issues of global economic and environmental governance in a highly interdependent world and formulates policy responses to them. Free trade, financial stability, development and climate Change mitigation are the paradigmatic cases for what economists term “externality”, thus raising the need for coordination of governmental actions at the global, or supra-national level. International economic and climate policy coordination is widely seen as fostering economic growth and sustainable development of its member states. Yet the benefits and burdens are often unevenly distributed within states.

This seminar will examine the politics of global economic and environmental governance, focusing on how global norms, rules and formal international institutions facilitate cooperation and mitigate conflict in the world economy. Our broader objective is to attain a sufficient level of historical and contemporary knowledge of global economic and environmental governance to be fully versant in current policy debates and to provide critical analyses of the relevance, legitimacy and effectiveness of these global institutions today.

The course is divided into four sections. The first section introduces to the various concepts, major theories and approaches to global governance. The second section analyzes the core architectural elements of the current system of global economic and environmental governance, including the WTO, IMF, World Bank and UNFCCC. In section III, we will build a nexus between trade, finance, development aid and environment as these issues have fundamental impact on global sustainable development. The concluding section examines the emerging trend of the nexus of economic and environment that will reshape current patterns in global governance.

Fall 2014 - MIIS

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IPSG 8686 / IPOL 8686 - Sem:Intl Trade Negotiatn Simul      

requent negotiations between governments, international organizations, companies, and other nongovernmental actors are central in specifying what globalization and global governance mean for people. But what happens in these negotiations? What determines their outcomes? Could the negotiators do better? This seminar concentrates on this ubiquitous process of international negotiation over economic and other issues and helps students launch original research on this subject. This course is designed to help improve your skill as a negotiator, while you learn more about bargaining theory in the context of global political economy. It offers a conceptual framework to help you diagnose most bargaining situations. It begins simply and adds complications one at a time. You will develop a feel for the process by dissecting what professionals did in historical episodes--economic, environmental, and military-political--and by watching experienced negotiators and mediators on tape. You will practice applying these ideas by negotiating with other students through in-class simulation.

Spring 2011 - MIIS, Spring 2012 - MIIS, Spring 2013 - MIIS, Spring 2015 - MIIS

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TICH 9579 - The China Factor      

The rise of China over the last two decades is one of the most significant events that shape global market competition, trade and economic development, and geopolitics. Its implications on worldly issues from global and regional peace and security to the sustainability of the environment are profound. The China factor is an amalgamation of dynamic, complex and interactive forces that appear as problems, puzzles or challenges to different people at different times. This course aims to provide an orientation for students to understand those forces, especially those related to the major stakeholders and their evolving relationships, policies and game rules, and collective behaviors. The orientation is grounded in both Chinese historical and cultural legacies and the contexts of China’s state building, modernization and globalization.

This course provides students with a broad introduction to Contemporary China’s political, economic, and strategic challenges. The discussion begins with the lowest point in Chinese history when the country was rendered as a semi-colony of Western powers and ends with China’s contemporary rise and implications for the world. The questions asked include: In what ways is China rising? How did it happen? How does China’s rise impact the U.S and the global system? The course covers a wide array of topics in primarily three areas: domestic politics, foreign policy challenges and global governance. More specifically, the topics include Chinese imperial legacies and revolution, contemporary political institutions and policy making processes, the opening of China and its reforms and their resulting challenges, China’s role in global peace and development, its relations with U.S., the other Asian powers and the other powers of the world powers, and the mainland-Taiwan relation, China’s trade and investment policy before and during the reform era, the Chinese economic regime and policy making process, China’s industrial policy and national standard strategy, and China’s environmental and energy challenges and sustainable development.

Fall 2011 - MIIS, Fall 2012 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS

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Extra Information

Education

PhD, MA, International Relations and International Political Economy, University of Southern California; BA, International Politics, Peking University, China.

 

 

Faculty Type
Regular Faculty
Dynamic Features
Course Catalog

Robert McCleery

First Name
Robert
Last Name
McCleery
Robert McCleery
Job Title
Associate Professor, International Policy and Development
Location
McCone Building
Phone
831.647.4146
Language(s)
Español
日本語

I am passionate about the effort to reduce global poverty and inequality.  My research, consulting and teaching all point towards that goal.  It is the unifying theme of my work on trade, investment, infrastructure, migration and productivity, as well as the focus of my classes in development and trade.

Faculty Program Tags
Expertise

International economics, migration, trade and trade agreements, Asian and Latin American trade and development, foreign direct investment, international finance

Course List

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

IMGT 8600 - Intl Trade&Investment Simlatn      

This course will present students with the opportunity to explore a number of issues and concerns relating to international business, from economics and finance to human resources and operations management. Using an expanded version of the International Trade Game developed by the instructor for use in IM520, students will:
1. Select a country in which to locate a new production facility, based on a matrix of countries and variables, which will involve researching 18 issues, from labor laws to expected inflation;
2. Negotiate with the prospective host country governments for investment incentives;
3. Finance their investment (in home, host, or third country capital markets);
4. Manage their subsidiary to maximize profits, within the confines of local laws and international codes of conduct;
5. Present their business strategies to an annual stockholder’s meeting and in an annual report; and
6. Evaluate your classmates by allocating your investments to the best run companies. Grades will be based on your subsidiary’s performance, how much investment you attract from your classmates, and how well your own investment portfolio performs.

Spring 2011 - MIIS

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IPOL 8593 - GP&S Colloquium:EmergngMarkets      

In the past two decades, emerging economies—including, but not limited to, the celebrated “BRICS” (Brazil, Russia, India, China, and South Africa). This course will take on, and contribute to, debates surrounding these emerging markets. How have they become the darlings of international capital markets, regional economic and political leaders, and the brightest lights in a gloomy global economic landscape? Along with this rapid economic growth, these same countries are also experiencing dramatic social changes, environmental problems, political transitions and foreign policy frictions. How can these growing pains be effectively managed?

Today’s global challenges often require global solutions and a small number of developed countries ( such as G8) can no longer effectively coordinate policy solution to address global crises, including economic recession, financial crisis, and climate change negotiations. As such, the G20, including a number of the emerging economies in its membership, has risen to prominence as a new forum for global governance. The experiences of these countries also offer an opportunity to think about larger questions of global order and national development. What constitutes power in the global political economy and how is it/should it be/is it beginning to be (re)distributed? How can state and market work together to generate equitable and participatory growth? How should the BRICS and other emerging economies be factored into the 21st century’s policy challenges, such as climate change or reworking international financial institutions after the recent economic crisis? What do the experiences of the emerging markets mean for the many people who still lack access to the fruits of such growth--- including over a billion citizens of these countries themselves?

Spring 2012 - MIIS

More Information »

IPOL 8607 - Sem:IntlTrade&InvestmntSimlatn      

Spring 2011 - MIIS

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IPOL 8656 - Sem:Adv Economic Development      

In this class, students will integrate and expand on the theories and methodological tools introduced in Development Economics and Data Analysis (or Business Statistics) to do original, empirical research on a development policy issue of their choosing. In the first half of the course, tools such as cost-benefit analysis, input-output analysis, and multivariate regression analysis will be introduce and refined through readings and experimentation. Students will see how to select, clean and use data sets from national and international sources. Students and faculty, as a team, will address “macro” development questions such as the relationship between aid, governance, and development.
The second half of the course encourages students to evaluate the potential expansion of “micro” development policies. Each student will analyze a “successful” development policy in a specific country, confirm or refute its success, and prepare a plan for either expanding that policy to a different country and cultural context (if it is deemed successful) or rethinking and reconfiguring that policy in its current context to make it successful.

Spring 2011 - MIIS, Spring 2012 - MIIS

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IPOL 8661 - Sem:Trade and Development      

Goals of the seminar: to illuminate two large questions: (a) How, exactly, are trade and development interdependent? and (b) What policies, national or international, should follow from the understanding we gain of (a)? We shall pursue these goals, both individually and collectively, through readings, structured discussions, external research, reporting of findings and writing.

Fall 2011 - MIIS

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IPOL 8687 - Adv Quant Analysis for Trade      

Trade policy professionals who negotiate, as well as those interested in how trade policies affect development through economic, social and environmental conditions within countries and industries, need to understand the underlying stakes and motivations of the parties involved, and how trade policies ripple throughout different sectors of the economy. To develop this understanding requires a firm grasp of micro and macroeconomics of trade and trade policy as well as knowledge of laws and institutions. This course strengthens students' ability to conduct and interpret basic economic analysis at the national, industry, and firm level. The course is a mixture of practical analytical skills and a survey of the most innovative research on the effects of trade policy on employment, incomes and select industrial and agricultural sectors.

Fall 2011 - MIIS

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IPSG 8502 - Intl Economics I: Trade      

This course looks at both the theory and practice of international trade. Topics include an analysis of the gains from free trade and the effects of barriers to trade such as tariffs, quotas, subsidies, and other instruments of commercial policy. Institutional frameworks for international trade – including regional trade agreements and the World Trade Organization – are also addressed.

Fall 2013 - MIIS, Spring 2014 - MIIS

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IPSG 8515 - Intro to Trade Policy      

This course serves as an introduction to the environments, processes, and main issues that compose the universe of trade policies. Because of the growing complexities of a more interdependent international environment, students need to expand their knowledge, sensitivity and skills in trade policies. Focus on the changing international environment, its trading institutions, key actors and issues; practices of analyzing, formulating and negotiating key trade policy issues.

Fall 2013 - MIIS

More Information »

IPSG 8551 / IPOL 8551 - Development Economics      

The question of why poverty is so persistent and why some countries remain poor, seemingly against all odds, has intrigued economists and other social scientists, and is the central concern of modern development economics. Since the mid-twentieth century, when many former colonies gained independence and started out on their own, experimenting with new economic policies, the questions of development economics have come to acquire an urgency that was not there earlier. And the last twenty years or so have seen an enormous resurgence of research interest in development economics. With so many international organizations and so many governments trying to craft effective policy for development, the rise of interest in development economics is not surprising. But apart from this practical importance, the foundational questions of development economics are also intellectually exciting. This course will give a fairly comprehensive account of modern development economics. We will cover the basics of development theory and policy. Fundamental to this are issues of definition and measurement, testing of theories, familiarity with problems of both short and long run, application of both micro and macroeconomics, interdisciplinary analysis, use of social benefit-cost analysis, and sources and uses of data for use as a country-desk officer of a bank or international agency.

Spring 2011 - MIIS, Spring 2012 - MIIS, Spring 2015 - MIIS

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IPSG 8603 - Sem:Asia's Dvlopmnt Challenges      

Rapid economic growth in Asia lead to a wide discussion and sometimes emulation of the "Asian Miracle." Asia's growth was noteworthy not just for its pace, but for the accompanying improvements in social indicators (education, life expectancy, etc.). Yet challenges to its sustainability have been brought by economists, environmentalists, and other social scientists. New problems, from the 1997-98 financial crisis to the 2001 trade recession, are emerging in both the "miracle" countries and those who were left behind by the recent wave of growth. In this course, we will address questions such as: How can development policies in Asia be adjusted to make growth more sustainable? How should different Asian countries, at different levels of development, respond to challenges such as poverty alleviation, governance, financial development, the IT revolution, and regional cooperation? What lessons can be learned from high-growth Asian countries, and can and should they be applied to developing countries in Asia and other regions?

Fall 2014 - MIIS

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IPSG 8607 - Sem:IntlTrade&InvestmntSimlatn      

The story:

In this course, you will role-play the project leader/team of a new production venture outside the US. It is 2004, and your jeans manufacturing company (Levi’s or similar company) finds that US production is no longer competitive with overseas production, as trade barriers and transportation costs fall. You will compete for the position of “Overseas production coordinator,” then research, negotiate, finance, and manage the firm’s overseas production center. This will, of course, require detailed knowledge and analysis of national laws, culture, macroeconomic and trade policies, regulatory environment, and other factors of importance in both business and policy analysis.

For MBA students, the class provides an opportunity to put into practice your previous classroom exposure to accounting, economics, finance, and operations principles. The course counts as a seminar for TID students, but rather than reading and discussing scholarly articles, it requires hands-on research, management, negotiations, and collaboration. Dual degree students (MBA and TID in particular) are especially welcome, there will be numerous opportunities to integrate materials from their different programs.

Fall 2014 - MIIS

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IPSG 8661 - Sem: Trade & Development      

The link between trade (and other aspects of globalization) and development is crucial to understanding the positions of developing countries towards trade liberalization and globalization in general and the Doha Round of WTO negotiations in particular. We will take a broad view of both trade and development, beginning with consensus definitions, then reviewing and critiquing expert analysis of these important interactions. You will be exposed to different viewpoints and different country cases, then encouraged to choose your own path in a very contentious field for your own case study. An overarching theme of the class is how to capture potential gains from trade, labor, and capital movements without a loss of sovereignty, social institutions, and cultural heritage.

Spring 2014 - MIIS

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IPSG 8675 - Adv Topics in Policy Analysis      

WHY?

The course is designed to complete a full-cycle experience of research applied to policy processes, from conceptualization and design to effective deliverables. The sequence starts with the foundations offered in the Fall class, and continues with the field work in J-term. The Spring class delves deeper into the same relevant policy issues from the Fall and J-term, seeking to close the cycle with a report to stakeholders. While this report is not expected to be the final word on a complex policy issue, it should be more relevant and useful than could have been accomplished without the field research component.

WHAT?

• The main themes of the Spring class are additional theoretical/conceptual topics in design and policy analysis, as well as specific tools. Please keep in mind that not all tools will be applicable to all, or even perhaps any, of the specific projects chosen, but may be vital to future policy-relevant research and writing in your academic and professional careers.

• Hands-on analysis of the specific projects conducted in J-term, including further refining hypotheses to be tested, bolstering understanding of background materials and context, strengthening argumentation, analyzing data (from surveys, interviews, and/or other sources), and interjecting research findings effectively into the policymaking process.

HOW?

The hallmark of this class is the intersection of theoretical discussions (covering aspects of policy analysis and research methods, economic development and its measurement, data analysis and effective data presentation, etc.) and the practical imperative of the specific projects, carried over from the first two classes. Student’s ownership of their topics supports a creative environment, assisted by the full faculty team, in which students can produce high-level reports worthy of inclusion in their professional portfolios. Teams will continue their analysis of concrete policy issues in El Salvador, Monterey, and Peru, although the range of research and policy analysis skills and techniques taught will not be limited to those directly applicable to all of these projects. Final deliverables must satisfy your “client,” who may not be one of the course instructors.

Spring 2014 - MIIS, Spring 2015 - MIIS

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IPSG 8681 / IPOL 8681 - Sem: Quant Methods for Trade      

Trade policy professionals who formulate, negotiate, advise, or lobby for trade policies need to understand the underlying stakes and motivations of the parties involved. To develop this understanding requires a firm grasp of micro and macroeconomics of trade and trade policy and an ability to do “back of the envelop calculations” of gains and losses to different parties, in addition to negotiation skills, basic knowledge of international laws and institutions, etc. This course strengthens students’ ability to conduct and interpret basic and intermediate economic and commercial analysis. These include the ability to estimate the impact of trade policies on: (1) production, price, and trade flows, using short-run and long-run elasticities of supply and demand, (2) consumer and producer surplus, (3) tariff equivalents of quotas, subsidies, and other non-tariff barriers, (4) deadweight social loss triangles, (5) changes in profits due to changes in quantity and/or price of traded goods or services, (6) employment impacts of trade flows, and (7) how the impacts of specific policies have "spillover effects" on other sectors and at the macroeconomic level. Students also learn some simple “rules of thumb” to use in constructing estimates even when data are poor or non-existent, as is often true in developing countries.

Fall 2011 - MIIS, Fall 2013 - MIIS

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IPSG 8687 - Adv Quant Analysis for Trade      

Spring 2015 - MIIS

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Extra Information

Education

PhD, Economics, Stanford University, BA, Economics, University of Hawaii

Publications

“The Washington Consensus: A Post Mortem,” with Fernando De Paolis, in Asian Development, Miracles and Mirages: Essays in Honor of Seiji Naya, Sumner La Croix, ed., Summer 2006.

“NAFTA and the Broader Impacts of Trade Agreements on Industrial Development: When ‘Second-Order Effects’ Dominate,” in Empirical Methods in International Economics: Essays in Honor of Mordechai Kreinin, Edward Elgar (Michael Plummer, ed.) 2004, pp.216-228.

“Bangladesh: Searching for a Workable Development Path,” with Seiji Naya and Fernando De Paolis, Journal of East Asian Studies, Vol.1 No.3, Dec. 2004, pp.1-20.  Japanese translation published in Development and Poverty in Asia: Women's Empowerment and Quality Of Life, Yukio Ikemoto and Noriatsu Matsui, eds., forthcoming April 2006.

“NAFTA as a Metaphor for the Globalization Debate,” with Raul Hinojosa Ojeda in NAFTA in the New Millennium, Peter Smith and Edward Chambers, eds., (University of Alberta Press, 2003).

Working with Economic Data in Trade Policy Advocacy, with Moyara Ruehsen and Geza Feketekuty, (Monterey: International Commercial Diplomacy Project, 2001) published on-line at http://www.commercialdiplomacy.org/instructional_modules.htm.  Revised, with the assistance of Fernando De Paolis, October 2002.

Human Resource Development and Sustainable Growth,” Malaysian Journal of Economic Studies Vol. 37, No. 1&2, 2000, pp. 27-51.

Faculty Type
Regular Faculty
Dynamic Features
Course Catalog

Fernando DePaolis

First Name
Fernando
Last Name
DePaolis
fernando-depaolis
Job Title
Associate Professor
Location
McCone Building 113
Phone
831.647.3568
Language(s)
Español
português
italiano

I am passionate about finding alternative points of view that could solve the world’s biggest problems. In my case, this is done by combining critical thinking with the most sophisticated computer analysis and visualization techniques.

I love being a professor at MIIS because our students challenge me to be connected to the real world of practice and to maintain the highest professional standards. In the end this helps all of us, as we form a dynamic learning community that aims at producing highly effective professionals.

Faculty Program Tags
Expertise

Economic Development. Regional Economics. Econometrics. Spatial Statistics.

Short Programs & Research Centers
Course List

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

IEPG 8663 - Ocean & Coastal Economics      

he purpose of this course is to develop advanced economic skills applied to development and resource issues in the world’s oceans and coasts. The course will focus heavily on analytical and data-driven techniques that can help illuminate the costs and benefits of various policies in the ocean and coastal zones, using a variety of metrics, and incorporating environmental and social values. The course will be divided into two parts: Market economics and coastal planning with Prof. DePaolis and non-market economics with Prof. Scorse.

Student participation in both of these sections will be high, involving many in-class assignments, lab sessions, and extended discussions. Students will be expected to engage in original data collection, analysis, and research. This is an intensive course geared for people who want to pursue careers in marine-related fields, although the topics are more broadly applicable to a range of conservation and development-related careers.

GIS is recommended.

Spring 2013 - MIIS, Spring 2014 - MIIS, Spring 2015 - MIIS

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IPOL 8663 - Ocean & Coastal Economics      

The purpose of this course is to develop advanced economic skills applied to development and resource issues in the world’s oceans and coasts. The course will focus heavily on analytical and data-driven techniques that can help illuminate the costs and benefits of various policies in the ocean and coastal zones, using a variety of metrics, and incorporating environmental and social values. The course will be divided into two parts: Market economics and coastal planning with Prof. DePaolis and non-market economics with Prof. Scorse.

Student participation in both of these sections will be high, involving many in-class assignments, lab sessions, and extended discussions. Students will be expected to engage in original data collection, analysis, and research. This is an intensive course geared for people who want to pursue careers in marine-related fields, although the topics are more broadly applicable to a range of conservation and development-related careers.

Spring 2012 - MIIS

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IPSG 8504 / IPOL 8504 - Data Analysis for Public Polcy      

The course is an introduction to inferential statistics with an emphasis on Policy Analysis applications. Topics to be covered include sampling, estimation, hypothesis testing, analysis of variance, and simple and multiple regression analysis. The course will also include an introduction to the use of the computer as a tool for data analysis using leading statistical packages, as well as Excel statistical functions.

Spring 2011 - MIIS, Fall 2011 - MIIS, Spring 2013 - MIIS, Spring 2014 - MIIS, Spring 2015 - MIIS

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IPSG 8551 / IPOL 8551 - Development Economics      

The question of why poverty is so persistent and why some countries remain poor, seemingly against all odds, has intrigued economists and other social scientists, and is the central concern of modern development economics. Since the mid-twentieth century, when many former colonies gained independence and started out on their own, experimenting with new economic policies, the questions of development economics have come to acquire an urgency that was not there earlier. And the last twenty years or so have seen an enormous resurgence of research interest in development economics. With so many international organizations and so many governments trying to craft effective policy for development, the rise of interest in development economics is not surprising. But apart from this practical importance, the foundational questions of development economics are also intellectually exciting. This course will give a fairly comprehensive account of modern development economics. We will cover the basics of development theory and policy. Fundamental to this are issues of definition and measurement, testing of theories, familiarity with problems of both short and long run, application of both micro and macroeconomics, interdisciplinary analysis, use of social benefit-cost analysis, and sources and uses of data for use as a country-desk officer of a bank or international agency.

Fall 2011 - MIIS, Fall 2013 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS

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IPSG 8673 - Advanced Data Analysis      

The advanced data analysis course was designed to provide students with the opportunity to expand upon the skills developed in the introductory course (IPSG 8504), and introduce new skills that address a greater range of analytic needs. This is a project-based, applied course. Class discussions will include both how and why to use these tools, with a strong emphasis on policy applications. Among others, the course covers modules on Factor Analysis, Non-Linear Regression, Spatial Analysis and Time Series Analysis, and its design has a strong emphasis on policy applications. Multiple data sets will be used, but students are encouraged to use their own data and background knowledge.

Fall 2013 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS

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IPSG 8675 - Adv Topics in Policy Analysis      

WHY?

The course is designed to complete a full-cycle experience of research applied to policy processes, from conceptualization and design to effective deliverables. The sequence starts with the foundations offered in the Fall class, and continues with the field work in J-term. The Spring class delves deeper into the same relevant policy issues from the Fall and J-term, seeking to close the cycle with a report to stakeholders. While this report is not expected to be the final word on a complex policy issue, it should be more relevant and useful than could have been accomplished without the field research component.

WHAT?

• The main themes of the Spring class are additional theoretical/conceptual topics in design and policy analysis, as well as specific tools. Please keep in mind that not all tools will be applicable to all, or even perhaps any, of the specific projects chosen, but may be vital to future policy-relevant research and writing in your academic and professional careers.

• Hands-on analysis of the specific projects conducted in J-term, including further refining hypotheses to be tested, bolstering understanding of background materials and context, strengthening argumentation, analyzing data (from surveys, interviews, and/or other sources), and interjecting research findings effectively into the policymaking process.

HOW?

The hallmark of this class is the intersection of theoretical discussions (covering aspects of policy analysis and research methods, economic development and its measurement, data analysis and effective data presentation, etc.) and the practical imperative of the specific projects, carried over from the first two classes. Student’s ownership of their topics supports a creative environment, assisted by the full faculty team, in which students can produce high-level reports worthy of inclusion in their professional portfolios. Teams will continue their analysis of concrete policy issues in El Salvador, Monterey, and Peru, although the range of research and policy analysis skills and techniques taught will not be limited to those directly applicable to all of these projects. Final deliverables must satisfy your “client,” who may not be one of the course instructors.

Spring 2014 - MIIS, Spring 2015 - MIIS

More Information »

IPSS 8520 - IPSS Professional Training      

The IPSS pre-departure training, consisting of six modules taught by select faculty, intends to help students refresh and/or obtain basic new knowledge and skills essential for successful professional service and future careers. These modules intend to provide a foundation – key skills, points, tools, and guiding resources – which students can use and build on in the future. The modules will use an interactive learning environment covering topics from facilitation, organizational context analysis, and applied research design to Excel essentials and communication and new media skills. A pass/fail grade will be assigned by the IPSS academic coordinator based on students’ attendance and performance in these modules.

Spring 2011 - MIIS

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IPSS 8675 - IPSS Field Deliverables      

During their IPSS internships students complete applied academic deliverables for which they earn six academic credits. The academic credit is not awarded for the internship itself, but for the work that applies students’ academic training to contribute to their host organizations’ mission in area of student’s career interest. The letter grades will be assigned based on the assessment of the following four deliverables:

IPSS Field Project: By the end of their internships students must have completed an ambitious project or other relatively autonomous contribution that presents value for the host organization and builds on students’ strengths and advances his/her skills and knowledge. The field project can take the form of a policy or consultancy report, evaluation, analysis, a website, or other substantive contribution to their host organization that integrates high quality research, analysis, and other skills and subject-matter knowledge. Faculty with relevant expertise and assigned peers will provide every student regular feedback on the major steps of the field project. Student’s regular internship responsibilities ideally should overlap with, but are not limited to the core field assignment. The organizations receiving interns are encouraged to help students identify such assignments prior to their arrival or at the very latest within one month after the start of student’s internship. The organization should provide assistance and guidance in completing this assignment.

Presentation: In the final part of the internship students will present on their field project to their colleagues at their host organizations. The video recording of that presentation will be then reviewed by the MIIS faculty who will invite students for Q&A and also provide additional feedback to students to improve the quality of their final deliverable(s).

Peer feedback: Interns will collaborate with their assigned peers by providing mutual peer feedback on their core field assignments to improve the quality of their work and learn from each other.

Final reflection: Interns will submit a final reflection to IPSS faculty and staff near the end of their internship- summarizing their most important insights and lessons they obtained from the internship experience for their professional and academic development.

Optional: Students are also highly encouraged to blog about their reflections on their internship experiences and comment on each others’ blogs throughout the internship assignment to maximize their learning.

Spring 2011 - MIIS

More Information »

Extra Information

Education

PhD, Urban Planning/Regional Economics (University of California-Los Angeles),

MA, Urban Planning/International Development (University of Kansas);

Advanced Diploma Architecture (National University of San Juan, Argentina).

Publications

“The Washington Consensus: A Post Mortem” (with Robert McCleery), in Seiji Naya’s festscrift Forthcoming University of Hawaii Press.

“NAFTA and the Broader Impacts of Trade Agreements on Industrial Development: When ‘Second-Order  Effects’ Dominate (with Robert McCleery), in Plummer, M. (editor) Empirical Methods in International Trade: Essays in Honor of Mordechai (Max) Keinin. 2005. Edward Elgar Publisher.

"Bangladesh: Searching for a Workable Development Path," with Seiji Naya and Robert McCleery, Journal of East Asian Studies, No 3, December 2004:1-20.

“A New Frontier in 21st Century America.” A book review of Terra Incognita by Bowman, A. and Pagano, M. Public Organization Review 4 December 2004.

"Trade and the Location of Industries in the OECD and the European Union." Journal of Economic Geography 2, 2002 (with Michael Storper and Yun-Chung Chen).

Faculty Type
Regular Faculty
Dynamic Features
Course Catalog