Middlebury Institute of International Studies at Monterey. Formerly the Monterey Institute of International Studies.

Peace, Trade, & Development Faculty

Li Juan Zhang

First Name
Li Juan
Last Name
Zhang
lijuan
Job Title
Adjunct Professor
Language(s)
中文

Professor Zhang was a Fulbright Scholar at the Institute from 1997-1999 and served as a research fellow at the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University from 2006-2007. She is a full professor in the School of Economics at Shandong University in China. She has authored and co-authored five books and published about twenty academic papers in a number of professional journals.

Faculty Program Tags
Expertise

International Economics; International Trade Policy; Commercial Diplomacy; Trade Negotiations; US-China Trade Relations

Course List

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

DPPG 9573 - US-China Trade Relations      

This course offers an economic approach for addressing the US-China trade related issues in an effort to prepare MIIS students for the complex realities of US-China trade and commercial diplomacy. Given the fact that China may overtake the U.S. to become the world’s largest economy in the near future, the practical aim of this course is to prepare MIIS students for navigating the future US-China political and economic environment. This is critical as tensions within their roles as future government and business leaders are sure to be present. As a consequence, students will develop a better understanding of how US-China trade and economic diplomacy has been built based on increasing interdependence of the two large economies, growing bilateral trade, engaging American strategy, the rising power of China and their collective impacts on overall US-China relations.

Fall 2015 - MIIS

More Information »

IPMG 9574 - Shanghai Free Trade Zone      

China (Shanghai) Pilot Free Trade Zone (Shanghai FTZ) was launched in September 2013, which is thought to be one of the largest regulatory reforms of China since the 1980s. Shanghai FTZ is expected to spark wider economic reform and trigger a new wave of trade and financial liberalization in China. The eleven-square-mile area also promises financial deregulation, convertibility of China’s currency and freer flow of capital. This course offers a practical as well as economic approach exploring related issues surrounding the Shanghai FTZ in an effort to prepare MIIS students deal with real-world business issues.

This is an immersive learning courses aiming to create unique, high-impact learning experiences that result in real-world solutions. Students are expected to think up a practical problem in the real world. Faculty advisors will help students to turn knowledge into judgment and judgment into action through project research papers. To experience the real world issues, impacts and policy implications of Shanghai FTZ, students are encouraged to travel to Shanghai during the March Spring Break. In Shanghai, students will meet local policymakers and industry professionals, talk to those with an interest in your question, and discuss related issues. Students will also have the opportunity to meet with faculty and students from the School of Management at Shanghai University of Finance and Economics (SHUFE). A roundtable discussion and professional seminar will also be hosted at SHUFE campus.

The course will be divided into THREE sections:

1. Classroom lecture on MIIS campus: this section include lectures and background building on the topic.

2. Shanghai FTZ visiting and onsite research at Shanghai: this section will include a trip to Shanghai, interview policymakers and researchers in various industries, and conduct survey in Shanghai.

3. In-depth research and case analysis at MIIS: after returning from Shanghai, students will continue working on a team project. Each team is required to present its team project, revise based upon comments received and finalize by the end of the class. Research paper proceedings will be published if possible.

Spring 2014 - MIIS

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IPSG 8554 - US TradePolicy&USAsiaTrdRelatn      

This workshop is an, intensive exploration of the scope and nature of US trade policy. Trade policy is considered in the context of a 200-year history of economic development of the United States and its expanding geo-political role in the world. Geo-economic policy is viewed as part of U.S strategic foreign policy. In particular we shall examine the role of the American quest for a liberal (in the 18th century sense), rules-based system to build a modern, capitalist-friendly international order. It finishes with a detailed look at the newest and most dynamic and geopolitically impactful trade relationship: US Pivot to Asia and US-China relations.

Spring 2015 - MIIS

More Information »

IPSG 8573 - US-China Trade Relations      

This course offers an economic approach for addressing the US-China trade related issues in an effort to prepare MIIS students for the complex realities of US-China trade and commercial diplomacy. Given the fact that China may overtake the U.S. to become the world’s largest economy in the near future, the practical aim of this course is to prepare MIIS students for navigating the future US-China political and economic environment. This is critical as tensions within their roles as future government and business leaders are sure to be present. As a consequence, students will develop a better understanding of how US-China trade and economic diplomacy has been built based on increasing interdependence of the two large economies, growing bilateral trade, engaging American strategy, the rising power of China and their collective impacts on overall US-China relations.

Fall 2013 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS

More Information »

IPSG 8574 - Shanghai Free Trade Zone      

China (Shanghai) Pilot Free Trade Zone (Shanghai FTZ) was launched in September 2013, which is thought to be one of the largest regulatory reforms of China since the 1980s. Shanghai FTZ is expected to spark wider economic reform and trigger a new wave of trade and financial liberalization in China. The eleven-square-mile area also promises financial deregulation, convertibility of China’s currency and freer flow of capital. This course offers a practical as well as economic approach exploring related issues surrounding the Shanghai FTZ in an effort to prepare MIIS students deal with real-world business issues.

This is an immersive learning courses aiming to create unique, high-impact learning experiences that result in real-world solutions. Students are expected to think up a practical problem in the real world. Faculty advisors will help students to turn knowledge into judgment and judgment into action through project research papers. To experience the real world issues, impacts and policy implications of Shanghai FTZ, students are encouraged to travel to Shanghai during the March Spring Break. In Shanghai, students will meet local policymakers and industry professionals, talk to those with an interest in your question, and discuss related issues. Students will also have the opportunity to meet with faculty and students from the School of Management at Shanghai University of Finance and Economics (SHUFE). A roundtable discussion and professional seminar will also be hosted at SHUFE campus.

The course will be divided into THREE sections:

1. Classroom lecture on MIIS campus: this section include lectures and background building on the topic.

2. Shanghai FTZ visiting and onsite research at Shanghai: this section will include a trip to Shanghai, interview policymakers and researchers in various industries, and conduct survey in Shanghai.

3. In-depth research and case analysis at MIIS: after returning from Shanghai, students will continue working on a team project. Each team is required to present its team project, revise based upon comments received and finalize by the end of the class. Research paper proceedings will be published if possible.

Spring 2014 - MIIS

More Information »

ITDG 8573 - US-China Trade Relations      

This course offers an economic approach for addressing the US-China trade related issues in an effort to prepare MIIS students for the complex realities of US-China trade and commercial diplomacy. Given the fact that China may overtake the U.S. to become the world’s largest economy in the near future, the practical aim of this course is to prepare MIIS students for navigating the future US-China political and economic environment. This is critical as tensions within their roles as future government and business leaders are sure to be present. As a consequence, students will develop a better understanding of how US-China trade and economic diplomacy has been built based on increasing interdependence of the two large economies, growing bilateral trade, engaging American strategy, the rising power of China and their collective impacts on overall US-China relations.

Fall 2015 - MIIS

More Information »

Extra Information

Education

Ph.D., Economics, Shandong University; MA, Commercial Diplomacy, Monterey Institute of International Studies; BA Economics, Shandong University

Faculty Type
Adjunct Faculty
Dynamic Features
Course Catalog

Jason Scorse

First Name
Jason
Last Name
Scorse
Jason Scorse, Professor, Image
Job Title
Director, Center for the Blue Economy; Program Chair, International Environmental Policy; Associate Professor
Location
K23 Craig
Phone
831.647.3548
Language(s)
Español

I am passionate about: Living sustainably, not just preaching/teaching it.

What excites me about being a professor at MIIS: Seeing the amazing things our students are doing around the world. It is truly inspiring. I am always happy to talk with prospective, current, and former students by phone, skype, or in person. Please email me to set up an appointment.

Faculty Program Tags
Short Programs & Research Centers
Course List

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

ECPR 8500 - Economics Preparation-Micro      

This intensive course in introductory microeconomics places emphasis on the fundamental principles necessary for success in International Economics I (IPSG 8502), Development Economics (IPSG 8551) and Environmental & Natural Resource Economics (IEPG 8542). This course will examine the allocation of resources in different kinds of economies. Topics include the production possibilities curve, competitive markets, elasticities, monopoly, market failures, and the role of government.

Summer 2013 - MIIS, Spring 2014 - MIIS, Summer 2014 - MIIS, Spring 2015 - MIIS, Summer 2015 - MIIS

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IEPG 8542 - Envirn & Natural Resource Econ      

The purpose of this course is to develop competency in economic theory as it relates to environmental issues, and the analytical skills necessary to evaluate, as well as craft, effective, efficient, and just environmental policies. We will highlight policies that influence (both directly and indirectly) the environment and natural resource use, and analyze their implications. The emphasis will be on identifying and assessing the appropriate economic tools for addressing current environmental issues. Students will learn how to “think like an economist,” which may not make for great party conversation, but is essential for conversing intelligently about the world’s major environmental problems and developing solutions.

Fall 2013 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS, Fall 2015 - MIIS

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IEPG 8663 - Ocean & Coastal Economics      

he purpose of this course is to develop advanced economic skills applied to development and resource issues in the world’s oceans and coasts. The course will focus heavily on analytical and data-driven techniques that can help illuminate the costs and benefits of various policies in the ocean and coastal zones, using a variety of metrics, and incorporating environmental and social values. The course will be divided into two parts: Market economics and coastal planning with Prof. DePaolis and non-market economics with Prof. Scorse.

Student participation in both of these sections will be high, involving many in-class assignments, lab sessions, and extended discussions. Students will be expected to engage in original data collection, analysis, and research. This is an intensive course geared for people who want to pursue careers in marine-related fields, although the topics are more broadly applicable to a range of conservation and development-related careers.

GIS is recommended.

Spring 2014 - MIIS, Spring 2015 - MIIS

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IEPG 8666 - OCRM Speaker Series      

The primary purpose of this speaker series is to introduce incoming IEP students who are pursuing the “Ocean and Coastal Resource Management” concentration to a wide range of cutting-edge interdisciplinary topics. (In order to be eligible for the CBE Summer Fellows Program students must enroll in this course—auditing is acceptable—in addition to committing to the 16 units of advanced coursework in their second year.)

The series will include topics from the local to international levels, with a focus on the policy and economic implications. Students are encouraged to use these talks as networking opportunities, catalysts for future research, and most importantly, to help focus their career goals.

The series is open to all IEP and IPM students interested in ocean and coastal issues, as well as members of the MARINE network and the larger Monterey community.

Fall 2013 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS, Fall 2015 - MIIS

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MIIS Tags
Expertise

Environmental & Natural Resource Economics, Ocean and Coastal Resource Management, Behavioral Economics, International Economics & Development

Extra Information

Recent Accomplishments

Professor Scorse’s major accomplishment over the past two years has been launching the new Center for the Blue Economy (CBE). Dr. Scorse is thrilled with the Center’s success so far, and is confident that it will make the International Environmental Policy program at MIIS, the premier destination for aspiring ocean and coastal resource management professionals.

He is currently spending almost all of his time building the new Center, including hiring faculty and staff, developing the Ocean and Coastal Resource Management curriculum, securing research funding, working with our visiting scholars, organizing the International Marine Policy Speaker series, expanding the Summer Fellows program, mapping out a strategic plan for the years ahead, and preparing to launch our new Journal of Ocean and Coastal Economics (JOCE) in 2014.

Professor Scorse is also beginning to get involved in the national campaign to divest fossil fuel holdings from college endowments, believing that this could provide a major breakthrough in advancing climate change policy. He plans to finish a paper on the topic by spring 2014. His other current research includes new surfonomics work, a soon-to-be-released book chapter on “Ecosystem Services and their Economic and Social Value,” an article on the looming fiscal crisis in U.S. coastal states besieged by climate change, and updates to the non-market work done by the National Ocean Economics Program.

Education

Ph.D. UC-Berkeley, M.S. UC-Berkeley; M.S. UC-Santa Cruz; B.A. UC-Santa Cruz

In the News

Scorse, Jason. “Cheap Gas Hurts The Middle Class.” Fortune 6 December 2012.

Scorse, Jason (and Judy Kildow). “End Federal Flood Insurance.” The New York Times 28 November 2012.

Thomas, Gregory. "Surfonomics quantifies the worth of waves." The Washington Post 24 August 2012.

Scorse, Jason. "My Word: Must never take coast's economic value for granted." Oakland Tribune 10 July 2012.

Publications

Scorse, Jason. What Environmentalists Need to Know about Economics. New York: Palgrave-Macmillan, 2010.

Scorse, Jason (2010). Freeing the Market to Address Climate ChangeFreeing the Market to Address Climate Change. The Solutions Journal,1(6):29-32.

Harrison, Ann, and Scorse, Jason. (2010). Multinationals and Anti-sweatshop ActivismMultinationals and Anti-sweatshop Activism, American Economic Review, 100(1): 247–273.

Scorse, Jason. (2009) Non-Market Valuation of Ocean Resources in the National Ocean Economics Report Non-Market Valuation of Ocean Resources in the National Ocean Economics Report (Judy Kildow ed.), National Ocean Economics Program, Moss Landing, CA.

Harrison, Ann & Scorse, Jason. (2009). Do Foreign Firms Pay More? Evidence from the Indonesian Manufacturing Sector 1990-1999Do Foreign Firms Pay More? Evidence from the Indonesian Manufacturing Sector in Labour Markets and Economic Development, (Ravi Kanbur and Jan Svejnar eds.), Routledge Press, New York.

Scorse, Jason. (2009). Making Matters Worse Making Matters Worse. The International Journal of Climate Change: Impacts and Response, 1(1):1-6 中文中文

Harrison, Ann & Jason Scorse. (2006). Improving the Conditions of Workers? Minimum Wage Legislation and Anti-Sweatshop ActivismImproving the Conditions of Workers? Minimum Wage Legislation and Anti-Sweatshop Activism. California Management Review, 2 (48):144-160. (Also issued as a Harvard Business School case study) Harrison, Ann & Scorse, Jason. 2004.

Harrison, Ann & Jason Scorse. (2004). Improving the Conditions of Workers? Minimum Wage Legislation and Anti-Sweatshop ActivismThe Impact of Globalization on Compliance with Labor Standards: A Plant- Level Study in Brookings Trade Forum 2003 (Susan Collins and Dani Rodrik eds.), Brookings Institution Press, Washington D.C.

Scorse, Jason. (2001). Reflections on the Free Trade Debate. Economia Rural, 1 (12):8-11.

Working Papers

Does Being a "Top 10" Worst Polluter Affect Facility Environmental Releases? Evidence from the U.S. Toxic Release Inventory (coauthored with Wolfram Schlenker), 2012.

Environmental Policy and the Social Contract, 2012.

The WTO's Environmental Mandate The WTO's Environmental Mandate, 2011.

The Capitalist Conundrum The Capitalist Conundrum, 2010.

Moving Beyond the Stale "Environment vs. Economy" Debate, 2010

Book review of Economic Thought and U.S. Climate Change PolicyBook review of Economic Thought and U.S. Climate Change Policy. Edited by David M. Driesen. Cambridge, MA. MIT Press, 2010.

Strong-Cvetich, Nikolas and Scorse, Jason. (2008). Ecotourism in Post-Conflict Peace-Building: A New Tool for Reconciliation? Ecoclub: International Ecotourism Magazine, 8 (96):10-17.

Why Environmentalists Should Embrace Economics, 2006.

Do Foreign Firms Pay More? Evidence from the Indonesian Manufacturing Sector 1990-1999. International Labor Organization, Working Paper No. 98, 2005 (coauthored with Ann Harrison and submitted).

Is There Acquiescence in Yes-No Questions? (coauthored with Michael Hanemann & Jon Krosnick), 2005.

Harrison, Ann & Jason Scorse. 2004. Moving Up or Moving Out? Anti-Sweatshop Activists and Labor Market Outcomes, National Bureau of Economic Research, Working Paper No. w10492.

Faculty Type
Regular Faculty
Dynamic Features
Course Catalog

Moyara Ruehsen

First Name
Moyara
Last Name
Ruehsen
Moyara Ruehsen
Job Title
Associate Professor
Location
213 McCone
Phone
831.647.4145
Language(s)
العربية
Français

I am passionate about capacity building in the areas of financial regulatory compliance and investigations, and public policies related to illicit markets as well as the macro-economy.  While my research and consulting work can be invigorating, my first love will always be teaching.  I hope to convey my own passion for these subjects to my students and inspire them to go out and explore new career paths they might not have considered when they first began their studies here.

MIIS Tags
Short Programs & Research Centers
Expertise

Money laundering, terrorism financing, corruption, asset recovery,  illegal drug markets, and international macro-economy.

Prof. Ruehsen speaks on euro crisis May 2010

Course List

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

DPPG 8521 - Currncy CapitalFlows&FinCrises      

In this course, students will learn to recognize the predisposing factors of a financial crisis and policy options for optimal financial crisis management by looking at historical case studies. But first, we will look at how the ForEx market works, who are the different players, how are typical transactions structured, different exchange rate regimes (e.g. pegs, crawling bands, free floats, monetary union), factors influencing exchange rate determination, balance of payments, and sovereign debt sustainability. In the second half of the semester, we will parse multiple financial crises from both emerging markets and OECD economies. In addition to readings related to cases, students will also have regular reading assignments of current events. Learning how to discuss and explain monetary topics, and using economic jargon in an appropriate fashion, requires regular practice. It is similar to learning a foreign language, which is why readings should be done in a timely fashion.

Fall 2015 - MIIS

More Information »

ECPR 8501 - Economics Preparation-Macro      

This intensive course in introductory macroeconomics places emphasis on the fundamental principles necessary for success in International Economics II (IPSG 8503), Development Economics (IPSG 8551) and is strongly recommended for Money Laundering & AML Policies (IPSG 8581).

In this course, we examine how the overall level of national economic activity is determined, including output, employment, and inflation. We explore the roles of monetary and fiscal policies in stabilizing the economy and promoting growth, with a focus on contemporary policy debates.

Summer 2013 - MIIS, Spring 2014 - MIIS, Summer 2014 - MIIS, Spring 2015 - MIIS

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IPSG 8503 - IntEconIICurrncyCashFlowCrises      

This course focuses on international monetary theory and exchange rate determination, as well as macroeconomic policymaking in an open economy. Topics include balance of payments analysis, currency and debt crises, exchange rate regimes such as monetary unions, and more.

Fall 2013 - MIIS, Spring 2014 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS

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IPSG 8581 / IPSG 8582 - MoneyLaundering & AML Policies      

This course provides an introduction to money laundering and serves as a foundation for any of the related follow-up workshops and courses. Topics covered include the three typical stages of money laundering (placement, layering, integration), how to spot “red flag” indicators, trade-based money laundering techniques (false trade invoicing, use of high-value metals, black market peso exchange), misuse of informal value transfer systems, monitoring politically exposed persons, FIU’s and the Egmont Group, and finally global anti-corruption compliance and enforcement. Capital flows and payment methods will also be scrutinized, so an introductory Macroeconomics course is _strongly_ recommended. The goal of this workshop and the three that follow, is to prepare students to take and pass the Certification for Financial Crime Specialists (CFCS).

Spring 2014 - MIIS, Spring 2015 - MIIS

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IPSG 8583 - FraudDetctnTaxEvasnAssetRecvry      

This is the third installment of the CFCS preparation series. Topics covered include understanding and recognizing different types of financial fraud, tax evasion vs. tax avoidance, the use of offshore entities, FATCA, different types of asset recovery tools, and how to trace, forfeit and repatriate assets.

Spring 2014 - MIIS, Spring 2015 - MIIS

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IPSG 8584 - FinCrimeInvst,CompliancBstPrct      

This is the fourth and final installment of the CFCS preparation series. Topics covered include laws and investigative techniques for financial crime investigations, how to interpret financial documents, the risk-based approach to compliance, Basel Committee Guidance, Wolfsberg Group recommendations, KYC, KYE, compliance monitoring systems, ethics and best practices.

Spring 2014 - MIIS, Spring 2015 - MIIS

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IPSG 8595 - AdvPublcSpkngForPolicyProfsnls      

Public Speaking for Policy Professionals is an intensive, interactive workshop that will provide you with the basics for making skilled and professional presentations in a variety of venues. Our work together will provide you with the foundation to not only hone your skills, but will offer you practical tools for making expert presentations in other academic and professional venues.

In order to promote your effectiveness as a presenter, you will be called upon to participate in various activities and discussions that require both individual and team considerations. This will include group collaboration on a presentation in our workshop setting, as well as individual attention to your public speaking skills, including use of visual support tools. It is my explicit aim to help you become better presenters by providing you with skills and models to use for your professional development.

By the end of the workshop, you should have a greater understanding of how to present effectively and professionally as an individual and as a team. You should also garner critical tools to develop and hone your language and delivery skills, including non-verbal aspects, effectively organize and create interesting content, and expertly utilize visual support tools.

Fall 2013 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS

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IPSG 8608 - Sem:Topics in Devp: Corruption      

Corruption is a cancer that thwarts both political and economic development throughout the world. With the U.N. Convention on Corruption and now that corruption is a predicate offense for money laundering, it is easier to recover stolen assets that corrupt leaders and their associates have moved overseas. This course will look at the efforts underway to recover and return these stolen assets. For the final project, students will produce a 15-20 minute documentary looking at a case study of their choice. No prior film editing experience is needed (there will be tutorials provided by the DLC), but it helps.

Fall 2014 - MIIS

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IPSG 8613 - Sem: Illicit Drug Markets      

This course is divided into two segments. The first segment of the course covers illegal drug markets along their entire transaction chain from the growing regions of Latin America and Asia to the end-user markets. Emphasis is placed on the international markets for cocaine, heroin, and methamphetamines, and the negative impacts of trafficking and use. The second segment examines the cost-effectiveness and viability of different supply and demand strategies, ranging from crop eradication and border interdiction to treatment and prevention.

Spring 2015 - MIIS

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IPSG 8619 - Sem:Econ Anlysis:Emerging Mkts      

This seminar is designed to provide students with critical skills in the area of economic analysis and writing. It will also be an opportunity to go into more depth on several important economic policy issues such as sovereign debt, foreign direct investment, capital account liberalization, trade liberalization and facilitation, and exchange rate policy. Students will pick one country and write an extensive economic analysis of that country by way of several assignments during the course of the semester.

Fall 2013 - MIIS

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IPSG 8662 - Advanced Terrorism Financing      

This course is a follow-up to the two workshops on Money Laundering and Terrorism Financing. It will go beyond the techniques that terrorists groups use to raise and move funds, and focus on strategies employed to stop them. We will also examine specific case studies, including proliferation financing cases and the use of non-profits.

Spring 2014 - MIIS

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IPSS 8675 - IPSS Field Deliverables      

During their IPSS internships students complete applied academic deliverables for which they earn six academic credits. The academic credit is not awarded for the internship itself, but for the work that applies students’ academic training to contribute to their host organizations’ mission in area of student’s career interest. The letter grades will be assigned based on the assessment of the following four deliverables:

IPSS Field Project: By the end of their internships students must have completed an ambitious project or other relatively autonomous contribution that presents value for the host organization and builds on students’ strengths and advances his/her skills and knowledge. The field project can take the form of a policy or consultancy report, evaluation, analysis, a website, or other substantive contribution to their host organization that integrates high quality research, analysis, and other skills and subject-matter knowledge. Faculty with relevant expertise and assigned peers will provide every student regular feedback on the major steps of the field project. Student’s regular internship responsibilities ideally should overlap with, but are not limited to the core field assignment. The organizations receiving interns are encouraged to help students identify such assignments prior to their arrival or at the very latest within one month after the start of student’s internship. The organization should provide assistance and guidance in completing this assignment.

Presentation: In the final part of the internship students will present on their field project to their colleagues at their host organizations. The video recording of that presentation will be then reviewed by the MIIS faculty who will invite students for Q&A and also provide additional feedback to students to improve the quality of their final deliverable(s).

Peer feedback: Interns will collaborate with their assigned peers by providing mutual peer feedback on their core field assignments to improve the quality of their work and learn from each other.

Final reflection: Interns will submit a final reflection to IPSS faculty and staff near the end of their internship- summarizing their most important insights and lessons they obtained from the internship experience for their professional and academic development.

Optional: Students are also highly encouraged to blog about their reflections on their internship experiences and comment on each others’ blogs throughout the internship assignment to maximize their learning.

Spring 2015 - MIIS

More Information »

ITDG 8521 - Currncy CapitalFlows&FinCrises      

In this course, students will learn to recognize the predisposing factors of a financial crisis and policy options for optimal financial crisis management by looking at historical case studies. But first, we will look at how the ForEx market works, who are the different players, how are typical transactions structured, different exchange rate regimes (e.g. pegs, crawling bands, free floats, monetary union), factors influencing exchange rate determination, balance of payments, and sovereign debt sustainability. In the second half of the semester, we will parse multiple financial crises from both emerging markets and OECD economies. In addition to readings related to cases, students will also have regular reading assignments of current events. Learning how to discuss and explain monetary topics, and using economic jargon in an appropriate fashion, requires regular practice. It is similar to learning a foreign language, which is why readings should be done in a timely fashion.

Fall 2015 - MIIS

More Information »

MBAG 8561 - Managerial Economics      

This course will cover the fundamental economic principles that can enable managers to make more efficient and economical decisions. Students will be provided with selected tools that can be used to aid and improve the making of economic decisions; that is, decisions involving choice. Economic principles, theories and models will be introduced and discussed in order to develop a basis for consistently considering and evaluating economic policies, practices and activities. Student’s ability to apply the material presented in print and in lecture will be the primary measure of success in this course.

Fall 2015 - MIIS

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MBAG 8676 - Corruptn,TaxEvasion&AssetRcvry      

Corruption is a cancer that thwarts both political and economic development throughout the world. With the U.N. Convention on Corruption and now that corruption is a predicate offense for money laundering, it is easier to recover stolen assets that corrupt leaders and their associates have moved overseas. Tax evasion also hinders development. FATCA and similar reporting laws around the world now provide a tool to combat this type of crime. This course will look at how corrupt politicians steal with impunity, how offshore secrecy havens work, unilateral and multilateral efforts underway to recover and return stolen assets, legal and political challenges to asset recovery, and policies that can help prevent theft of public monies in the first place.

Fall 2015 - MIIS

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NPTG 9581 - MoneyLaundering & AML Policies      

Spring 2015 - MIIS

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NPTG 9582 - TerrorFinanceSanctnsCybercrime      

Spring 2015 - MIIS

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Faculty Program Tags
Extra Information

Education

PhD, International Economics and Middle East Studies, Johns Hopkins University Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS); MA, International Studies, MHS, International Health, BA, Social Science, Johns Hopkins University; CAMS (Certified Anti-Money Laundering Specialist); CFCS (Certified Financial Crime Specialist)

Publications

"Breaking the Ice In Baghdad," Toastmaster Magazine, September 2014.

Freeman, Michael and Moyara Ruehsen, "Terrorism Financing Methods: An Overview,"_Perspectives on Terrorism_Volume 7, Issue 4, August 2013.

"PKK" in Michael Freeman's_Financing Terrorism:Case Studies_, Ashgate Press, 2012.

"Afghanistan's Drug War - The Farmers Aren't the Enemy." LA Times 2 November 2009.

Arab Government Responses to the Threat of Terrorist Financing,” Chapter in J. Giraldo and H. Trinkunas, Terrorism Financing and State Responses in Comparative Perspective, Stanford University Press, Fall 2007.

“Choosing an Appropriate Palestinian Monetary Regime.” Research in Middle East Economics Volume 6, 2005, pp. 183-199.

Diamonds Are a Terrorist’s Best Friend,” moneylaundering.com, (September 2004).

Little Noticed UN Report Cites Alleged Saudi Terrorist Financing,” Money Laundering Alert, (October 2003).

Dirty Laundering: Financing Latin America’s Drug Trade,” (review essay) in Harvard International Review, (Winter 2003).

The Fallacy of Sanctions,” Middle East Insight (March-April 2002).

Tracing al-Qaeda’s Money,” Middle East Insight (January-February 2002).

Suspected UAE Links to Terrorist Funds Spark Anti-Laundering Efforts,” Money Laundering Alert (December 2001).

Arab Naming Customs Complicate Screening for Suspected Terrorists,” Money Laundering Alert (December 2001).

Faculty Type
Regular Faculty
Dynamic Features
Course Catalog

Robert McCleery

First Name
Robert
Last Name
McCleery
Robert McCleery
Job Title
Associate Professor, International Policy and Development
Location
McCone 112
Phone
831.647.4146
Language(s)
Español
日本語

I am passionate about the effort to reduce global poverty and inequality.  My research, consulting and teaching all point towards that goal.  It is the unifying theme of my work on trade, investment, infrastructure, migration and productivity, as well as the focus of my classes in development and trade.

Faculty Program Tags
Expertise

International economics, migration, trade and trade agreements, Asian and Latin American trade and development, foreign direct investment, international finance

Course List

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

DPPG 8520 - Intl Trade: Theory & Practice      

Trade theories and policies are studied, building from microeconomic principles and using a range of techniques, from rigorous economic modeling to simulations and role playing games. Topics include an analysis of the gains from free trade and the effects of barriers to trade such as tariffs, quotas, subsidies, and other instruments of commercial policy. Institutional frameworks for international trade – including regional trade agreements and the World Trade Organization – are also addressed.

Fall 2015 - MIIS

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DPPG 8551 - Development Economics      

The question of why poverty is so persistent and why some countries remain poor, seemingly against all odds, has intrigued economists and other social scientists, and is the central concern of modern development economics. Since the mid-twentieth century, when many former colonies gained independence and started out on their own, experimenting with new economic policies, the questions of development economics have come to acquire an urgency that was not there earlier. And the last twenty years or so have seen an enormous resurgence of research interest in development economics. With so many international organizations and so many governments trying to craft effective policy for development, the rise of interest in development economics is not surprising. But apart from this practical importance, the foundational questions of development economics are also intellectually exciting. This course will give a fairly comprehensive account of modern development economics. We will cover the basics of development theory and policy. Fundamental to this are issues of definition and measurement, testing of theories, familiarity with problems of both short and long run, application of both micro and macroeconomics, interdisciplinary analysis, use of social benefit-cost analysis, and sources and uses of data for use as a country-desk officer of a bank or international agency.

Fall 2015 - MIIS

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DPPG 8661 - SEM: Trade & Development      

The link between trade (and other aspects of globalization) and development is crucial to understanding the positions of developing countries towards trade liberalization and globalization in general and the Doha Round of WTO negotiations in particular. We will take a broad view of both trade and development, beginning with consensus definitions, then reviewing and critiquing expert analysis of these important interactions. You will be exposed to different viewpoints and different country cases, then encouraged to choose your own path in a very contentious field for your own case study. An overarching theme of the class is how to capture potential gains from trade, labor, and capital movements without a loss of sovereignty, social institutions, and cultural heritage.

Fall 2015 - MIIS

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IPSG 8502 - Intl Economics I: Trade      

This course looks at both the theory and practice of international trade. Topics include an analysis of the gains from free trade and the effects of barriers to trade such as tariffs, quotas, subsidies, and other instruments of commercial policy. Institutional frameworks for international trade – including regional trade agreements and the World Trade Organization – are also addressed.

Fall 2013 - MIIS, Spring 2014 - MIIS

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IPSG 8515 - Intro to Trade Policy      

This course serves as an introduction to the environments, processes, and main issues that compose the universe of trade policies. Because of the growing complexities of a more interdependent international environment, students need to expand their knowledge, sensitivity and skills in trade policies. Focus on the changing international environment, its trading institutions, key actors and issues; practices of analyzing, formulating and negotiating key trade policy issues.

Fall 2013 - MIIS

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IPSG 8551 - Development Economics      

The question of why poverty is so persistent and why some countries remain poor, seemingly against all odds, has intrigued economists and other social scientists, and is the central concern of modern development economics. Since the mid-twentieth century, when many former colonies gained independence and started out on their own, experimenting with new economic policies, the questions of development economics have come to acquire an urgency that was not there earlier. And the last twenty years or so have seen an enormous resurgence of research interest in development economics. With so many international organizations and so many governments trying to craft effective policy for development, the rise of interest in development economics is not surprising. But apart from this practical importance, the foundational questions of development economics are also intellectually exciting. This course will give a fairly comprehensive account of modern development economics. We will cover the basics of development theory and policy. Fundamental to this are issues of definition and measurement, testing of theories, familiarity with problems of both short and long run, application of both micro and macroeconomics, interdisciplinary analysis, use of social benefit-cost analysis, and sources and uses of data for use as a country-desk officer of a bank or international agency.

Spring 2015 - MIIS

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IPSG 8603 - Sem:Asia's Dvlopmnt Challenges      

Rapid economic growth in Asia lead to a wide discussion and sometimes emulation of the "Asian Miracle." Asia's growth was noteworthy not just for its pace, but for the accompanying improvements in social indicators (education, life expectancy, etc.). Yet challenges to its sustainability have been brought by economists, environmentalists, and other social scientists. New problems, from the 1997-98 financial crisis to the 2001 trade recession, are emerging in both the "miracle" countries and those who were left behind by the recent wave of growth. In this course, we will address questions such as: How can development policies in Asia be adjusted to make growth more sustainable? How should different Asian countries, at different levels of development, respond to challenges such as poverty alleviation, governance, financial development, the IT revolution, and regional cooperation? What lessons can be learned from high-growth Asian countries, and can and should they be applied to developing countries in Asia and other regions?

Fall 2014 - MIIS

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IPSG 8607 - Sem:IntlTrade&InvestmntSimlatn      

The story:

In this course, you will role-play the project leader/team of a new production venture outside the US. It is 2004, and your jeans manufacturing company (Levi’s or similar company) finds that US production is no longer competitive with overseas production, as trade barriers and transportation costs fall. You will compete for the position of “Overseas production coordinator,” then research, negotiate, finance, and manage the firm’s overseas production center. This will, of course, require detailed knowledge and analysis of national laws, culture, macroeconomic and trade policies, regulatory environment, and other factors of importance in both business and policy analysis.

For MBA students, the class provides an opportunity to put into practice your previous classroom exposure to accounting, economics, finance, and operations principles. The course counts as a seminar for TID students, but rather than reading and discussing scholarly articles, it requires hands-on research, management, negotiations, and collaboration. Dual degree students (MBA and TID in particular) are especially welcome, there will be numerous opportunities to integrate materials from their different programs.

Fall 2014 - MIIS

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IPSG 8661 - Sem: Trade & Development      

The link between trade (and other aspects of globalization) and development is crucial to understanding the positions of developing countries towards trade liberalization and globalization in general and the Doha Round of WTO negotiations in particular. We will take a broad view of both trade and development, beginning with consensus definitions, then reviewing and critiquing expert analysis of these important interactions. You will be exposed to different viewpoints and different country cases, then encouraged to choose your own path in a very contentious field for your own case study. An overarching theme of the class is how to capture potential gains from trade, labor, and capital movements without a loss of sovereignty, social institutions, and cultural heritage.

Spring 2014 - MIIS

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IPSG 8675 - Adv Topics in Policy Analysis      

WHY?

The course is designed to complete a full-cycle experience of research applied to policy processes, from conceptualization and design to effective deliverables. The sequence starts with the foundations offered in the Fall class, and continues with the field work in J-term. The Spring class delves deeper into the same relevant policy issues from the Fall and J-term, seeking to close the cycle with a report to stakeholders. While this report is not expected to be the final word on a complex policy issue, it should be more relevant and useful than could have been accomplished without the field research component.

WHAT?

• The main themes of the Spring class are additional theoretical/conceptual topics in design and policy analysis, as well as specific tools. Please keep in mind that not all tools will be applicable to all, or even perhaps any, of the specific projects chosen, but may be vital to future policy-relevant research and writing in your academic and professional careers.

• Hands-on analysis of the specific projects conducted in J-term, including further refining hypotheses to be tested, bolstering understanding of background materials and context, strengthening argumentation, analyzing data (from surveys, interviews, and/or other sources), and interjecting research findings effectively into the policymaking process.

HOW?

The hallmark of this class is the intersection of theoretical discussions (covering aspects of policy analysis and research methods, economic development and its measurement, data analysis and effective data presentation, etc.) and the practical imperative of the specific projects, carried over from the first two classes. Student’s ownership of their topics supports a creative environment, assisted by the full faculty team, in which students can produce high-level reports worthy of inclusion in their professional portfolios. Teams will continue their analysis of concrete policy issues in El Salvador, Monterey, and Peru, although the range of research and policy analysis skills and techniques taught will not be limited to those directly applicable to all of these projects. Final deliverables must satisfy your “client,” who may not be one of the course instructors.

Spring 2014 - MIIS, Spring 2015 - MIIS

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IPSG 8681 - Sem: Quant Methods for Trade      

Trade policy professionals who formulate, negotiate, advise, or lobby for trade policies need to understand the underlying stakes and motivations of the parties involved. To develop this understanding requires a firm grasp of micro and macroeconomics of trade and trade policy and an ability to do “back of the envelop calculations” of gains and losses to different parties, in addition to negotiation skills, basic knowledge of international laws and institutions, etc. This course strengthens students’ ability to conduct and interpret basic and intermediate economic and commercial analysis. These include the ability to estimate the impact of trade policies on: (1) production, price, and trade flows, using short-run and long-run elasticities of supply and demand, (2) consumer and producer surplus, (3) tariff equivalents of quotas, subsidies, and other non-tariff barriers, (4) deadweight social loss triangles, (5) changes in profits due to changes in quantity and/or price of traded goods or services, (6) employment impacts of trade flows, and (7) how the impacts of specific policies have "spillover effects" on other sectors and at the macroeconomic level. Students also learn some simple “rules of thumb” to use in constructing estimates even when data are poor or non-existent, as is often true in developing countries.

Fall 2013 - MIIS

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ITDG 8520 - Intl Trade: Theory & Practice      

Trade theories and policies are studied, building from microeconomic principles and using a range of techniques, from rigorous economic modeling to simulations and role playing games. Topics include an analysis of the gains from free trade and the effects of barriers to trade such as tariffs, quotas, subsidies, and other instruments of commercial policy. Institutional frameworks for international trade – including regional trade agreements and the World Trade Organization – are also addressed.

Fall 2015 - MIIS

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Extra Information

Education

PhD, Economics, Stanford University, BA, Economics, University of Hawaii

Publications

“The Washington Consensus: A Post Mortem,” with Fernando DePaolis, in Asian Development, Miracles and Mirages: Essays in Honor of Seiji Naya, Sumner La Croix, ed., Summer 2006.

“NAFTA and the Broader Impacts of Trade Agreements on Industrial Development: When ‘Second-Order Effects’ Dominate,” in Empirical Methods in International Economics: Essays in Honor of Mordechai Kreinin, Edward Elgar (Michael Plummer, ed.) 2004, pp.216-228.

“Bangladesh: Searching for a Workable Development Path,” with Seiji Naya and Fernando DePaolis, Journal of East Asian Studies, Vol.1 No.3, Dec. 2004, pp.1-20.  Japanese translation published in Development and Poverty in Asia: Women's Empowerment and Quality Of Life, Yukio Ikemoto and Noriatsu Matsui, eds., forthcoming April 2006.

“NAFTA as a Metaphor for the Globalization Debate,” with Raul Hinojosa Ojeda in NAFTA in the New Millennium, Peter Smith and Edward Chambers, eds., (University of Alberta Press, 2003).

Working with Economic Data in Trade Policy Advocacy, with Moyara Ruehsen and Geza Feketekuty, (Monterey: International Commercial Diplomacy Project, 2001) published on-line at http://www.commercialdiplomacy.org/instructional_modules.htm.  Revised, with the assistance of Fernando DePaolis, October 2002.

Human Resource Development and Sustainable Growth,” Malaysian Journal of Economic Studies Vol. 37, No. 1&2, 2000, pp. 27-51.

Faculty Type
Regular Faculty
Dynamic Features
Course Catalog

Tsuneo Akaha

First Name
Tsuneo
Last Name
Akaha
Tsuneo Akaha, Picture
Job Title
Professor
Location
Casa Fuente Building 300J
Phone
831.647.3564
Language(s)
日本語
I am passionate about finding local solutions to global human security problems through collaboration with colleagues around the world.
 
I love being a professor at MIIS because we are a community with a common goal: make a difference in the world.
 
MIIS Tags
Expertise

Japanese foreign and security policy, international relations of the Asia Pacific, international political economy, Asian studies, Asia-Pacific development, East Asia security, globalization, human rights, human security, international migration, international relations theory, Northeast Asia and security issues, US-Asia policy

Faculty Program Tags
Course List

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

DPPG 8560 - Intro to Intl Migration      

This course will introduce students to migration as an object of policy studies, various aspects of migration as a social phenomenon, and policies designed to encourage, discourage, or otherwise affect the flow of people within and between countries. Among the issues to be addressed are: economic-development aspects of migration; human trafficking and relevant policy; gender and migration; public health issues associated with migration; demography-development link; migration as a factor in international relations; terrorism & border control issues relative to migration; refugee issues and policy; and the integration of migrants at destination. The course will also introduce students to international laws and other norms and frameworks dealing with migration and migrants, as well as to international organizations and non-governmental organizations actively involved with migration issues. Illustrative examples of problems of migration, migrants, and policy responses will be drawn from various countries and regions of the world. Students will begin developing skills in analyzing demographic, social, economic, and political factors in the migration process; dynamics of and policy responses to forced migration, the effectiveness of legal and policy instruments to regulate migration, and national and human security implications of migration.

Fall 2015 - MIIS

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DPPG 8599 - HumanSecurity:Concept & Policy      

The concept of "human security" was first introduced in the 1994 Human
>Development Report by the United Nations Development Program. It has
>since attracted growing attention in the academic and policy
>communities around the world. The concept has also become part of
>official policy in some countries, including Japan and Canada. In
>contrast to the traditional concept of "national security" with its
>focus on the security of the state against military threats, "human
>security" emphasizes the protection of individual citizens¹ security
>not only from war and other forms of physical violence but also from
>threats of a political, economic, social, cultural, and environmental
>nature. At the most fundamental level, ³human security² is defined as
>"freedom from fear" and "freedom from want," but beyond that there are
>competing approaches to it, as well as critical challenges to it both
>as a concept and as a guide for national or international policy.
>This course will critically examine: (1) "human security" as a concept;
>(2) opportunities and challenges in translating the concept into
>policy"; and (3) case studies of human security problems and policies
>from around the world.

Fall 2015 - MIIS

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IPSG 8512 - Culture&InternationalRelations      

Culture in International Relations

What is “culture”? How do we know culture when we see it? How does it manifest itself? How does it influence the way individuals, communities, and nations interact with each other? What is the relationship between culture and civilization? Does it make sense to talk about cultural and/or civilizational conflict? If it does, what form does it take? Does it necessarily lead to violent conflict? Is there such a thing as an international or global culture? What might be its elements and their sources? What new insights does our explicit focus on culture add to our understanding of international relations? What can we do with those insights in analyzing international policy development and implementation? In order to answer these questions, we will explore culture at three levels: (1) individual and community; (2) nation and state; and (3) the international system. At the individual-community level, we will examine the way culture shapes a person’s identity and role within his/her community. At the national level, we will explore the sources of "national culture" and how it informs the way members of a nation see and behave toward members of other nations, with a particular focus on the (re)production of ethnic identities, national myths, and political ideologies. At the international system level, we will scrutinize the impact of "national cultures" on relations between states, with a particular focus on deepening conflict between nationalism and globalism. How does nationalism sustain itself against the ever-expanding forces of liberal globalism? By mid-term the student will develop a research proposal to analyze the impact of culture (at any of the three levels mentioned above) on the interaction between two or more nations over a policy problem of particular interest to the student. In the second half of the semester the student will carry out the proposed research and at the conclusion of the semester he/she will present his/her findings.

Spring 2015 - MIIS

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IPSG 8531 - East Asia: Politics & Security      

With the dramatically changed balance of power, historical issues continuing to color contemporary international relations, North Korea's nuclear and missile development seemingly unresolvable, and both the United States and Russia "pivoting" toward the region, East Asia today is a region in flux. This course will provide a review of the developments of major power relations and challenges facing political and security policy communities in the region. The course will include a scenario building exercise guided by competing theories of international relations. There are no prerequisites for this course.

Spring 2014 - MIIS

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IPSG 8544 - Intro to HumanSecurity&Dvlpmnt      

The focus of this course is human security, the everyday security of individuals and the communities in which they live rather than the security of nation states. It is the gateway course into the field of human security and development. The key concepts of human security are freedom from fear, freedom from want, and freedom to live in a society of justice under the rule of law. Specific approaches and policies of human security covered in this course include conflict analysis, management and resolution, human rights, peacebuilding, legitimate institutions and good governance, rule of law and justice, and programs and policies designed to lower armed violence.

Spring 2014 - MIIS

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IPSG 8560 - Intro to Intl Migration      

This course will introduce students to migration as an object of policy studies, various aspects of migration as a social phenomenon, and policies designed to encourage, discourage, or otherwise affect the flow of people within and between countries. Among the issues to be addressed are: economic-development aspects of migration; human trafficking and relevant policy; gender and migration; public health issues associated with migration; demography-development link; migration as a factor in international relations; terrorism & border control issues relative to migration; refugee issues and policy; and the integration of migrants at destination. The course will also introduce students to international laws and other norms and frameworks dealing with migration and migrants, as well as to international organizations and non-governmental organizations actively involved with migration issues. Illustrative examples of problems of migration, migrants, and policy responses will be drawn from various countries and regions of the world. Students will begin developing skills in analyzing demographic, social, economic, and political factors in the migration process; dynamics of and policy responses to forced migration, the effectiveness of legal and policy instruments to regulate migration, and national and human security implications of migration.

Fall 2013 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS

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IPSG 8599 - HumanSecurity:Concept & Policy      

The concept of "human security" was first introduced in the 1994 Human
>Development Report by the United Nations Development Program. It has
>since attracted growing attention in the academic and policy
>communities around the world. The concept has also become part of
>official policy in some countries, including Japan and Canada. In
>contrast to the traditional concept of "national security" with its
>focus on the security of the state against military threats, "human
>security" emphasizes the protection of individual citizens¹ security
>not only from war and other forms of physical violence but also from
>threats of a political, economic, social, cultural, and environmental
>nature. At the most fundamental level, ³human security² is defined as
>"freedom from fear" and "freedom from want," but beyond that there are
>competing approaches to it, as well as critical challenges to it both
>as a concept and as a guide for national or international policy.
>This course will critically examine: (1) "human security" as a concept;
>(2) opportunities and challenges in translating the concept into
>policy"; and (3) case studies of human security problems and policies
>from around the world.

Fall 2013 - MIIS

More Information »

IPSG 8606 - Intl Migration & Development      

International Migration and Development

This course will examine the nexus of international migration and development, that is, how international migration contributes to development around the world and how the positive and negative consequences of development drive international migration. The United Nations High Level Panel convened to discuss post-2015 global development goals submitted its report to the Secretary General, and the report states international migration is a key aspect of development and should be an important part of development strategy. The course will be of particular interest to students who are pursuing a career in the nexus of international migration and development. Each student will select a country of interest, assess the role of international migration (both in-migration and out-migration) in its development strategy (or lack thereof), conduct a research into the two-way influence, both positive and negative, between international migration and development in that country, and develop a policy recommendation for maximizing the positive development impact of international migration.

Spring 2015 - MIIS

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IPSG 8614 - SemFrgnPlcy,Trade&SecPolE.Asia      

(East Asia is a dynamic region of great importance by virtue of its population size, economic dynamism, and political and security challenges. The impact of the region’s international relations is felt not only by the countries geographically located in the region but also by the rest of the world. The region is characterized by diversity in terms of historical, civilizational, and ethno-cultural backgrounds, political systems, levels of economic development, and foreign relations, as well as global impact, making regional relations very complex and sometimes very difficult, for major powers and smaller powers alike. This course will examine a broad range of foreign policy, trade, and security issues that present both opportunities and challenges to the regional countries and the United States. A unique feature of this course is that it includes a field trip to Tokyo and Beijing from March 12 to 22.* The students will learn first-hand the perspectives of local experts on the regional issues the seminar addresses through guest-lectures, interviews, library research, and discussions with local university students.

* Dec 12 - $100 deposit due; Feb 27 - remainder of program fee due.

Spring 2015 - MIIS

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IPSG 8631 - Seminar: Russia & East Asia      

Seminar: Russia and East Asia

This seminar will examine Russia’s relations with and integration into the East Asian region. Russia’s recently declared “pivot” to the east is an indication of the growing importance Moscow attaches to its strategic, political, and economic interests in East Asia, particularly with respect to China, Japan, and South Korea. The seminar will examine the nature of those interests and policies Moscow is following in pursuit of those interests. A special feature of this seminar is that two MIIS and two Middlebury students will be selected on competitive basis to take a fully-paid field research trip to Vladivostok and Khabarovsk from March 21 to 29. Participants will be selected during the November 7-14 period. The trip will include: (1) a series of meetings with instructors, researchers, and students at the Far Eastern Federal University's School of International and Regional Studies in Vladivostok, as well as the Economic Research Institute, Far Eastern Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences in Khabarovsk; (2) interviews with officials of the regional administrations of Khabarovsk and Primorye; (3) a series of meetings with media reporters and nongovernmental organization representatives in Vladivostok and Khabarovsk; and (4) a questionnaire survey of instructors, researchers, and students at the two institutions named above regarding their views on evolving Russia-Japan relations. Upon return the students will write research papers with a particular focus on Russia’s integration with Northeast Asian countries. The other students will write a research paper on a topic approved by the instructor.

Spring 2015 - MIIS

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IPSG 8632 - SemIntergratdTheory,Rsrch&Prac      

Students ideally only take this course in their fourth semester of the Human Security and Development Track. Students spending their fourth semester doing IPSS, DPMI or the equivalent, can take this course in their third semester.
In this course students will map, review and connect the major theories they have studied. They will explore how the theories emerge and develop from the intersection of research and practice. At the same time, they will learn to understand the mutually reinforcing relationships between theory, research and practice. Through mapping and review of their own research and practice experiences, students will then develop their own theories of practice. By the end of the course, they will be able to present a portfolio of their informed approach to some of the global challenges, which they hope to tackle as they step into the ‘real’ world.

Spring 2014 - MIIS

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IPSG 8640 - Sem:Comprativ Migration Anlys      

Migration takes various forms, ranging from unskilled and skilled labor migration, regular and irregular migration, legal and illegal migration, temporary and permanent migration, refugees and asylum-seekers, to trafficking in persons and people smuggling. This seminar is designed for students to develop a comparative framework for analyzing one or more of these types and aspects of migration in two countries in two different regions of the world and to use that framework for research. The aim of such analysis is to: (1) identify the historical, geographical, political, economic, social, and cultural factors shaping the current state of migration in the countries compared, (2) the various factors informing the countries' current policies to deal with the situation, and (3) explain the differences and similarities in their approaches. In addition to the comparative analysis, students will choose one of the countries compared and prepare a "country profile," which offers a succinct summary of (1) and (2) above and a policy recommendation to improve the migration situation. Each student will present his/her country profile as if speaking to a group of journalists who have just been assigned to visit the country you have described and report on its current migration situation.

Fall 2014 - MIIS

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Extra Information

Recent Accomplishments

  • Completed a year-long contract with the Open Society Foundations to serve as an International Scholar for Smolny College at St. Petersburg State University, Russia.
  • Gave an invited lecture “Russia’s Pivot to East Asia,” at the Swedish Institute of International Affairs, Stockholm, Sweden, May 27, 2013.
  • Organized the annual conference of Asian Studies on the Pacific Coast at the Monterey Institute, June 7-9, 2013.
  • Submitted a book manuscript, co-edited  with Professor Vassilieva, on "Russia and East Asia: Increasing but Informal Integration" to Routledge, UK, to be published in December 2013.
  • Elected to serve as President of Asian Studies on the Pacific Coast for a one-year term, 2013-14.
  • Published: “Russia’s Mixed Prospects in Regional Integration in East Asia,” in “Expert Opinion,” School of Regional and International Relations, Far Eastern Federal University, Vladivostok, Russia, July 2013. http://ifl.wl.dvfu.ru/8323

Education

PhD, MA, International Relations, University of Southern California; BA, Political Science, Oregon State University; BA, Political Science, Waseda University, Tokyo

Faculty Type
Regular Faculty
Dynamic Features
Course Catalog

William Arrocha

First Name
William
Last Name
Arrocha
William Arrocha
Job Title
Assistant Professor
Location
Casa Fuente Building
Phone
831.647.4163
Language(s)
Español
Français

I am passionate about the struggle for human rights and social justice.

What excites me about being a professor at MIIS is teaching such a multi-cultural, multi-lingual and socially committed student body. I also enjoy the inter-disciplinary nature of our programs and the fact that I can teach content courses in multiple languages. I am fluent in Spanish and French and teach in both languages.

Faculty Program Tags
Expertise

International political economy, international relations, comparative politics (U.S., Canada, Latin America and Mexico), migration studies, human rights, human security and trade policy.

Course List

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

DPPG 8514 - Globalization and Development      

Today it would be hard to contest the deep international integration arising from the global expansion of capital, the ever-growing international division of labor, informational modes of development, new migration flows and the interchange of worldviews, products, ideas and other aspects of culture. A complex web of transnational corporations, inter-governmental organizations and non-governmental organizations help shape policies and practices of development. Cultural globalization, the expansion of global epistemic communities, transnational activism and an emerging global civil society are adding their voices to a global debate on how to make globalization work for all, including the environment. The goal of this course is to explore and debate the challenges and opportunities that globalization presents us in the development of policies and practices of development at a local, regional and global level.

Fall 2015 - MIIS

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DPPG 8529 - Dev Theory & Practice      

This course introduces students to the field of International Development and its subfields (including the theories, major debates, practices, and professional opportunities). The first section covers economic, sociological and political theories of development with sensitivity to the historical context. The second section discusses specific development issues such as the theory and practice of development assistance, democratization, human rights, and governance, community development, gender, environment, poverty, human security and education. Students hear guest lectures from MIIS faculty who teach in the development subfields. In the third section, students work in teams and focus on a particular developing country and research different aspects of its development and present their findings in class. The purpose of this course is to provide students with a basic understanding of the field, and give them a chance to begin narrowing down their own interests.

Fall 2015 - MIIS

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IPSG 8505 - Global Politics      

The course introduces students to key analytical concepts and normative views such as balance of power, unipolarity, multipolarity, unilateralism, multilateralism, etc., and major theoretical perspectives for analysis of international politics, as well as the major international events of the past century that have shaped the international system. Students will learn ways that international actors, including sovereign states and non-state entities such as multinational corporations, international organizations, and nongovernmental organizations, exercise power to pursue goals and influence international outcomes. Students will also learn how international institutions, norms, and structures of governance affect the exercise of power and other forms of influence and shape international outcomes. Students will also be introduced to some contemporary issues of national, international, and human security, including the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, and terrorism, as well as issues of globalization, food security, the plight of the LDC’s, and human rights.

Fall 2013 - MIIS

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IPSG 8506 - Politics of Development      

This course introduces students to the politics of development, its contemporary debates, agencies and issue-areas. Development is a contested concept and practice that originates from the exercise of power, which is at the core of politics. Governments, International Organizations (IO), Non Governmental Organizations (NGO), and other social actors within Civil Society, have kept alive and thriving the debate on the best development practices that can better the lives of billions of individuals. It is a debate that takes place at multiple spatial and socio-political contexts, within and beyond the institutions of the state, yet its concrete outcomes are located within the boundaries of a specific state, or group of states. It is often assumed that states and societies share common development goals, this is far from being the case, as the key ideas, agencies and practices of development are shaped within domestic and international political systems where political and economic power are far from being distributed equally. Such unequal distribution of power is even greater between states with different levels, or models, of development. Today the economic and political gains from the dominant model of development are also far from being distributed equally. For these reasons it is fundamental that future practitioners recognize the limits and reaches of development models, as these are intricately related to how political power is conceptualized, exercised and distributed through a wide range of social contexts at domestic and international levels.

Spring 2015 - MIIS

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IPSG 8529 - Dev Theory & Practice      

This course introduces students to the field of International Development and its subfields (including the theories, major debates, practices, and professional opportunities). The first section covers economic, sociological and political theories of development with sensitivity to the historical context. The second section discusses specific development issues such as the theory and practice of development assistance, democratization, human rights, and governance, community development, gender, environment, poverty, human security and education. Students hear guest lectures from MIIS faculty who teach in the development subfields. In the third section, students work in teams and focus on a particular developing country and research different aspects of its development and present their findings in class. The purpose of this course is to provide students with a basic understanding of the field, and give them a chance to begin narrowing down their own interests.

Spring 2014 - MIIS

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IPSG 8589 - ImigrtnIssueUS-LatAm:inSpanish      

Migration issues between the US and Latin America, particularly between the US and Mexico, are of such magnitude that they cannot be overseen. Through an inter-disciplinary approach, students will explore the causes of such massive migration as well as its security, development and political impacts. Finally, we will explore and discuss the potential policies that can help manage such pressing issues.

Spring 2014 - MIIS

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IPSG 8628 - Sem:IntlMigratn,Scurty&HumRgts      

In the context of a more integrated yet unequal global economic system, of growing international and national security concerns, humanitarian crises and skill shortages, migration and immigration have become central to economic, political and social debates. This seminar is meant to engage in these debates by studying the intricate links between the ever increasing flows of peoples across borders; the national and international security dilemmas facing states and regions; and the urgent need to fully implement and redefine the international and domestic laws pertaining to Human Rights.

Fall 2013 - MIIS

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IPSG 8645 - Sem: U.S. Immigration Policy      

This course introduce students to the complexities and challenges of US immigration policies with a particular focus on the changes that occurred since the last major reforms of 1996 under President Clinton, the tragic events of 9/11, and the present debates for a new overhaul of the immigration system. The United States was created by successive waves of immigrants, including forced migration in the form of slavery. From its territorial expansion in the mid-nineteenth century, followed by its industrialization and further economic expansion overseas that was consolidated after WW II, the US has always depended on large waves of immigrants, legal or undocumented. Ironically, after every massive wave of immigrants, the descendants of those who preceded them always saw those who followed with suspicion. Today the US is still in need of immigrants, yet it is going through one of its most polarized collective debate on who should be granted the opportunity to become a citizen, and enjoy the freedoms and liberties that come with such status, and who should be excluded while maintaining their labor. Such debate needs to be studied by any future policy expert dealing with migration and development as well as human security.

Spring 2015 - MIIS

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IPSG 8647 - Sem:US Mexico Relations      

The United States and Mexico share one of the longest borders in the world; they also have one of the most complex bilateral relationships yet, it is one that is not always understood and explored adequately. In this seminar students will be exposed to the key historical events that have shaped the present relationship. They will explore the similarities and differences of a relationship that makes it one of the toughest to manage. Students will explore the key aspects that make up a bilateral agenda that can be considered one of the most challenging in international policy: An uneasy past, constant immigration pressures, drug trafficking, trade issues, environmental problems and new security challenges. For more insights into this course please see the US-Mexico Relations Seminar website.

Fall 2013 - MIIS

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SPLA 8489 - Immigratn Issues US-Latin Amer      

Migration issues between the US and Latin America, particularly between the US and Mexico, are of such magnitude that they cannot be overseen. Through an inter-disciplinary approach, students will explore the causes of such massive migration as well as its security, development and political impacts. Finally, we will explore and discuss the potential policies that can help manage such pressing issues.

Spring 2014 - MIIS

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Extra Information

Education

PhD, International Relations, MA, International Relations, Queens University, Canada; Advanced Diploma in Canadian and United States Studies, Instituto Tecnológico Autónomo de México; BA, International Relations, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México.

Publications

William Arrocha (2013). Criminalization of Undocumented Workers and Labor: Increasing Fear and Exploitability within the Latino Community. Journal of Interdisciplinary Disciplines, Vol. XII, Fall 2013. pp. 107-126.

William Arrocha (2012). From Arizona’s S.B.1070 to Georgia’s H.B.87 and Alabama’s H.B 56: Exacerbating the Other and Generating New Discourse and Practices of Segregation. California Western Law Review, Vol. 48, No.2. pp. 245-278. 

William Arrocha. La Reforma Actual de los Estados Unidos ¿Una negación social y económica o la creación de nuevas formas de segregación en nombre del excepcionalísimo americano? Ivonne Solano Chávez (Coordinadora)Migrantes Somos y en el camino andamos: Ensayos sobre identidad, migración y cultura transfronteriza. Secretaria de Cultura de Michoacán y Ediciones Eón, 2011.

William Arrocha (2010). Arizona’s Senate Bill 1070: Targeting the Other and Generating Discourses and Practices of Discrimination and Hate. Journal of Hate Studies, Vol. 9, No 1, pp. 65-92.

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