Middlebury Institute of International Studies at Monterey. Formerly the Monterey Institute of International Studies

Katherine Punteney

First Name
Katherine
Last Name
Punteney
Katherine Punteney, Professor, Image
Job Title
Program Chair, Assistant Professor in International Education Management
Location
CF 300 F
City, State, ZIP
Monterey, CA 93940
Phone
831.647.4625

Dr. Katherine Punteney’s experience in international education spans sectors including public and private higher education, and for-profit and non-profit organizations. She brings a passion for educating and advising students to her work, and is committed to assisting students in achieving their academic and career goals.

Expertise

International education theory, comparative international education, educational leadership, campus internationalization, intercultural communication and training, international student services, study abroad/international exchange management.

Faculty Program Tags
Course List

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

ICCO 9544 - Crossing Cultures      

This course will focus on the dynamics of crossing cultures. Through readings, discussion, and experiential activities, students will explore the challenges and processes of cultural adaptation. Examples will be drawn from immigrant stories, study abroad, and international business contexts.

Spring 2014 - MIIS

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ICCO 9562 - Biculturalism&Multiculturalism      

This course will focus on the experiences of people who identify as Bicultural or Multicultural. Though reading first-person accounts, engaging with experiential activities, and studying theories of identity development, the dynamics of biculturalism and multiculturalism will be explored. The course will conclude with recommendations for supporting individuals with bicultural and multicultural identities.

Fall 2013 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS

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IEMG 8500 - Principles & Practices Intl Ed      

This foundational course will introduce students to the breadth of the international education field. Course content will emphasize fundamental principles of international education through a focus on seminal literature in the field. Additionally, the course will emphasize exploration of career specializations through interactions with practitioners and individual course assignments.

Fall 2013 - MIIS, Spring 2014 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS, Spring 2015 - MIIS, Fall 2015 - MIIS

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IEMG 8544 - Crossing Cultures      

This course will focus on the dynamics of crossing cultures. Through readings, discussion, and experiential activities, students will explore the challenges and processes of cultural adaptation. Examples will be drawn from immigrant stories, study abroad, and international business contexts.

Spring 2014 - MIIS

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IEMG 8562 - Biculturalism&Multiculturalism      

This course will focus on the experiences of people who identify as Bicultural or Multicultural. Through reading first-person accounts, engaging with experiential activities, and studying theories of identity development, the dynamics of biculturalism and multiculturalism will be explored. The course will conclude with recommendations for supporting individuals with bicultural and multicultural identities.

Fall 2013 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS

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IEMG 8620 - Intl Student/Scholar Services      

Exploring the role of international student and school services (ISSS) offices in U.S. higher education, this course will explore the research and best practices in relation to orientation programs; academic and social integration of international students, scholars, and their families; ISSS office structures; U.S. visa types and immigrations regulations; restrictions on employment; and the role of the international student and scholar advisor.

Spring 2015 - MIIS

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IEMG 8625 - Student Services      

This course will introduce best practices, codes of conduct, and exemplars for a wide-range of student services including Records, Financial Aid, Admissions/Enrollment Management, Academic Advising, Orientation Programs, Career Services, Health Center, Counseling Center, Residential Life, Student Affairs, Employment Office, Judicial Affairs, Alumni relations, etc. Interactions between these offices and international education offices will be explored.

Spring 2014 - MIIS

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IEMG 8640 - Campus Internationalization      

With an emphasis on the latest research findings, this course will help students identify best practices, exemplar programs, challenges, and benefits in the growing movement towards campus internationalization.

Fall 2013 - MIIS

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IEMG 8650 - Intl Education Mgmt Practicum      

While undertaking an approved professional practicum in the International Education Management field, students will be responsible for rigorous academic performance, equivalent in quantity and quality to the requirements for equivalent on-campus coursework. Students will demonstrate their application of theory to practice through completion of multiple deliverables.

Fall 2013 - MIIS, Spring 2014 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS, Fall 2015 - MIIS

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Extra Information

Education

Ed.D. Educational Leadership, California State University, Sacramento

M.A.  International Education, SIT Graduate Institute

B.A. Communication and Asian Studies, University of Puget Sound

Faculty Type
Regular Faculty
Dynamic Features
Course Catalog

Kent Glenzer

First Name
Kent
Last Name
Glenzer
Kent, Picture
Job Title
Dean, Graduate School of International Policy and Management
Location
McCone 114
City, State, ZIP
Monterey, CA 93940
Phone
831.647.4149
Language(s)
Français
português

Associate Professor Kent Glenzer was appointed dean of the Graduate School of International Policy and Management in January 2015. Glenzer serves as the academic leader overseeing the school’s degree programs in Business Administration (MBA), International Education Management, International Environmental Policy, International Policy and Development, Nonproliferation and Terrorism Studies, and Public Administration (MPA), as well as a variety of related non-degree programs. In this role, he also serves as a member of the Institute’s senior leadership team.

Faculty Program Tags
Expertise

I have extensive work and research experience in sub-Saharan Africa, having lived there for 13 years and focused on it as both an external and internal consultant to NGOs and public sector agencies for 10 more years. I have a strong background, both practically and academically, in civil society, social movements, and policy advocacy. I specialize in organizations, organizational development, organizational behavior and culture, institutional and organizational fields, and organizational evolution and learning processes.

Course List

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

FMSC 8609 - CrossCulturalCompetnc&Survival      

Spring 2015 - MIIS

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IPMG 9609 - CrossCulturalCompetnc&Survival      

Spring 2015 - MIIS

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IPSG 9507 - QualitativeDataAnalysisMash-Up      

This lively, hands-on course focuses on analysis of qualitative data. By “data”, we mean interview, focus group, written reports and visual records, hundreds of pages of them. Students will have a choice of qualitative data sets – there is no time in this short course to engage in primary data collection -- and our entire focus will be on a) deciding how to interrogate the data (what is it you wish to know, demonstrate, reveal, test?), b) developing code books and coding, c) inter-coder reliability, and d) a wide variety of analytical approaches you can use, once you have qualitative data reduced and organized. The first seven weeks of the course focus on a-c. Then, during a final weekend workshop, students will engage in hands-on analysis, using techniques introduced rapid fire during the workshop: expect to practice no fewer than 20 qualitative analysis techniques over three days. This course emphasizes the importance of studying/reading high quality qualitative research studies as fundamental to learning – we will dissect one study each week to understand how the researchers put it together – while also emphasizing learning-through-doing, making mistakes, and collaborative analysis (qualitative inquiry is almost always improved through collaboration). Your final product will be a 10-page analysis, due two weeks after the final workshop.

Fall 2014 - MIIS

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MBAG 8501 - Intl Organizational Behavior      

Course is a core requirement in the MBA program.  Using a case-based method, students are introduced and work with organizational theory in international contexts, culture, leadership, conflict management, communication, negotiation, and team effectiveness.

Fall 2013 - MIIS, Spring 2014 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS, Fall 2015 - MIIS

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MBAG 8693 - Intl Business Consulting      

This course will address the key activities involved in delivering management consulting services to multinational corporations. Elements covered will include identifying consulting opportunities, framing the question with the client, developing the proposal, managing the engagement, delivering the results, understanding organizational change implications, managing client relations and client follow-up. The course will be delivered in a case format illustrating how the above elements were used in actual client situations that have been successfully carried out by the professor and his consulting teams. Students will have the opportunity to develop a client proposal and engagement plan.

Spring 2014 - MIIS

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MBAG 9508 - Power,SocialChange,Organizatns      

Fall 2014 - MIIS

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MPAG 8507 - QualitativeDataAnalysisMash-Up      

This lively, hands-on course focuses on analysis of qualitative data. By “data”, we mean interview, focus group, written reports and visual records, hundreds of pages of them. Students will have a choice of qualitative data sets – there is no time in this short course to engage in primary data collection -- and our entire focus will be on a) deciding how to interrogate the data (what is it you wish to know, demonstrate, reveal, test?), b) developing code books and coding, c) inter-coder reliability, and d) a wide variety of analytical approaches you can use, once you have qualitative data reduced and organized. The first seven weeks of the course focus on a-c. Then, during a final weekend workshop, students will engage in hands-on analysis, using techniques introduced rapid fire during the workshop: expect to practice no fewer than 20 qualitative analysis techniques over three days. This course emphasizes the importance of studying/reading high quality qualitative research studies as fundamental to learning – we will dissect one study each week to understand how the researchers put it together – while also emphasizing learning-through-doing, making mistakes, and collaborative analysis (qualitative inquiry is almost always improved through collaboration). Your final product will be a 10-page analysis, due two weeks after the final workshop.

Fall 2014 - MIIS

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MPAG 8508 - Power,SocialChange,Organizatn      

“Complex social problems are beyond the capacity of any single organization – or sector -- to solve. This case-based course looks at different ways of structuring, managing, and leading inter-organizational collaboration. First, we theorize power itself. Second, we build a sophisticated understanding of debates regarding how structural social change actually happens…vs. how we may wish it happens. Then, we look at specific, real-world cases – relative success stories -- where relations and structures of power have been de- and re-institutionalized. The goal is to understand what managers, leaders, and activists can actually do, pragmatically, to foster such social, political, and cultural change. Central to the course is looking at organizations themselves as social and cultural constructions, as sites where larger political struggles over power get enacted. In other words: the course will de-romanticize “NGOs” or “Social Enterprises” and unpack them as instantiations of extant power relations and forms of structural inequality rather than heroic actors somehow immune from such things. Our goal in this course is not to identify which kind of collective effort is uniformly best – students seeking black-and-white certainty and infallible “tools” will be very disappointed. Rather, our aim is to understand the strengths, weaknesses, limits, and opportunities of different approaches to collective action, depending on program goals and the operating context. Students will leave the course armed with broad strategies, approaches, tactics, and historical, comparative knowledge about what has worked, in what contexts…and the understanding that when it comes to shifting power relations in sustained ways…the next challenge demands creative thinking, not application of past “best practice.””

Fall 2014 - MIIS

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MPAG 8605 - Capstone:Rsch&Writing Proj-PA      

Overview

The capstone requirement has two objectives. First, it enables you to acquire, demonstrate, integrate, reflect on, apply, and deepen competencies central to the MPA degree and to your future. Second, a capstone project prepares you for a position you hope to get upon graduation. Your capstone project is a public demonstration of your learning process here at MIIS: through it, you show your peers and faculty how far you have progressed. A public sharing of your work is required. How you do that is open for negotiation.

The capstone seminar helps you produce a deliverable which you are proud to submit to employers, working professionals in the field you wish to enter, and/or journals. Choice of capstone projects is limitless and students who perform best are those that creatively identify a project and product that is meaningful to them.

Approach

My role as seminar faculty is threefold. I am process guide; I am learning/support group facilitator; I am quality standard upholder. I am not content help. I am not responsible for reminding you of everything you have or should have learned in your classes here at MIIS. Capstone is your chance to interrogate yourself, to look deep to see what you have and have not learned, to revisit previous class contents and tools. You should expect no new content, as a result, apart from – perhaps – public speaking and presentation/argumentation competencies.

While we have a formal weekly meeting time, we will not use it every week. Our schedule of meetings will be established month-by-month.

Fall 2013 - MIIS

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MPAG 8644 - Sem:ProgramEvaluation for SCOs      

This course will introduce different aspects of Program Evaluation in the first half of the semester. In the second half, students will conduct an evaluation in the field. Students will evaluate selected programs in organizations in the Monterey Bay area. The goals of the course include: a) understanding the process of evaluation; b) gaining familiarity with evaluation concepts, techniques and issues; c) choosing among different alternatives for conducting development evaluations, including data collection, analysis and reporting; and, d) designing an evaluation. We will have specific sessions on the following topics: a) evaluation models; b) new development evaluation approaches; c) impact, descriptive and normative evaluation designs; d) data collection and sampling; e) data analysis and interpretation; e) building a performance-based evaluation; and f) political, social and economic contexts of evaluation.

Spring 2014 - MIIS

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MPAG 8685 - Sem:Advanced Evaluation      

Special Topics in Evaluation locates itself within current debates about “impact evaluation” in social development. The’00s witnessed the rise of heated debate about evaluation, impact, rigor, and the production of knowledge. Far from merely academic or philosophical puffery, these debates are influencing policy, strategy, fundraising, hiring, and organizational behavior of donors, NGOs, governments, and private sector agencies. The broad goal of this seminar is to give students hands-on experience applying a core set of evaluation competencies while, at the same time, equipping students to understand how recent paradigmatic debates may be changing ideas of those very competencies. <B>

The seminar, therefore, will cover competencies such as developing logic models, hypothesis generation and testing, operationalizing concepts, kinds of indicators, evaluation designs, budgeting, and matching methods to questions and to the expectations of stakeholders. We will then move from core concepts and competencies to seeing how they inform some evaluation methods/approaches that are controversial yet (may) solve certain measurement challenges that have plagued social development. Specifically, we will look at evaluative practices – and concrete cases – in relation to:

• randomized controlled trials (RCTs)

• social return on investment (SROI)

• participatory numbers (“parti-numbers”)

• qualitative comparative analysis (QCA)

• portfolio or sector-wide evaluation

• collective impact assessment

• Comparative Constituency Voice (CCV)

• “watchdog” agencies‟ assessment of nonprofit organization‟s program quality and results

Fall 2013 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS

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Extra Information

All my work and thinking centralizes on the power dynamics, inequalities, and identity politics that surround and constitute development processes, programs, policies, and strategies.

Recent Accomplishments

  • Co-editor and chapter contributor in the forthcoming Action Research Handbook (3rd edition).
  • Appointed to Editorial Board of the Action Research Journal.
  • Led the formative evaluation of Save the Children’s $5 million program devoted to global knowledge sharing and building robust communities of practice related to food security programming.
  • Consulted with Geneva Global on a long-term program to build the civil society sector in western China. This work is ongoing.
  • Consulted with the Ford Foundation in China – and NGO partners there – on a strategic monitoring, evaluation, and learning system for the country office.
  • Contributed a chapter to a book on understanding culture and cultural change for the Army Research Institute, a book targeted at army officers, as well as being lead expert for a training module for army staff on using appreciative inquiry to advise host country staff on organizational development and change.
  • Authored Oxfam America’s Rights-Oriented Programming for Effectiveness and Oxfam International’s Program Principles, which both served to strategically frame the organization’s long-term and rights-based approaches to development and social change.
  • Oversaw a three-year, multi-level portfolio assessment of CARE’s work on women’s empowerment and oversaw the massaging of evaluation results into organizational practice.

Previous Work

Prior to accepting an appointment at MIIS, I worked for Oxfam America for four years, CARE USA for 12 years, during which time I had the opportunity to live and work in Mali for nearly seven years, Mozambique for four years, and Ethiopia for more than two years. My consulting has taken me to more than 30 countries in Africa, south and east Asia, and Latin America and the Caribbean. I’ve also worked with the Program for Appropriate Technology in Health and I was a Peace Corps volunteer in Mali.

Education

  • Bachelor in Journalism, Northwestern University, 1983
  • Masters in Communication, Cornell University, 1990
  • Ph.D., Emory University, 2005

Careers in Strategic Planning and Management

Students working with me will be well prepared for consulting on or full-time positions in program/project monitoring and evaluation, strategic planning, project and program management, and facilitating organizational change processes. You might find yourself in the human resources department of a large international NGO, as a learning or staff/management development specialist. You might find yourself the manager of a civil society strengthening project in sub-Saharan Africa financed by a philanthropic foundation. You might find yourself part of a team contracted to evaluate a program or project of Oxfam or CARE.

Publications/Professional Products

Faculty Type
Regular Faculty
Dynamic Features
Course Catalog

Alfredo Ortiz

First Name
Alfredo
Last Name
Ortiz
Alfredo Ortiz Photo
Job Title
Visiting Professor, Nonprofit Management and Social Change
Language(s)
Español

I believe:

Working for social change means being willing to challenge the way things are done and what is perceived as normal by many people, including ourselves.  By placing ourselves in the development picture as both agents and subjects of change we can work with others to construct a more meaningful future.

What excites me:

Course List

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

DPPG 8534 - Org Sustainability for SCOs      

This course explores a series of pathways for achieving organizational sustainability. Consideration will be given to how organizational practices, procedures and systems (including those related to budgeting, resource generation, resource management, and marketing) influence long-term organizational viability. We will focus on creating business models that contribute to mission achievement and sustainability for organizations that work in complex environments. The use of managerial performance metrics in relation to organizational sustainability will also be explored.

Fall 2015 - MIIS

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DPPG 8571 - Proposal Writing for Intl Dev      

This course trains participants in the process of developing a proposal, from strategy to writing, toward generating funding for international assistance projects. It asks the core question: what are key elements of proposal development processes in competitive bids for international development funding? In it, students will examine real, existing proposals prepared largely by non-governmental organizations pursuing grants, but also by for-profit development companies bidding on contracts. Proposal writing will be addressed from a strategic perspective—i.e. understanding where funding is (e.g. USAID, foundations, EC) today, and how to position a concept in a competitive environment. Visual presentation skills, charts, budgets, and narrative writing skills will be important. Students will put themselves in the shoes of program development officers soliciting funding in responses to RFAs, RFPs, framework agreements, or other leads with donor organizations.

Fall 2015 - MIIS

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DPPG 8574 - Systems Thinking      

This workshop focuses on the importance of systemic thinking for social change, with an emphasis on methodological use and management implications of systems thinking and practice for social change organizations (SCOs). We will explore core systems thinking concepts—e.g. relationships, emergence, layers, coordination and communication, feedback, worldviews / system philosophies, complexity and chaos, etc.—to help answer the core question:


“How can systems thinking and practice (i.e. use of methodology) support organizations to effectively develop and apply capacities, processes and systems to contribute to emergent social change in complex development environments?”<B>

The workshop, readings and exercises are designed to provide an introductory background on the history, schools of thought, and key principles of systems thinking; a practical understanding of the implications of systems theory on systems practice, and vice versa; and a particular in-depth look at two cross cutting systems thinking traditions: ‘Soft Systems’ thinking and methodology (SSM) and critical systems thinking (CST). This will include critically analyzing the boundaries that organizations draw for their capacity development and related systems, as well as critically and systemically analyzing issues of power and culture that affect SCO performance in the highly complex environments in which they operate. This also includes exploring the natural relationship between systems thinking and action research. Note: Although we will cover some of the theoretical background to systems thinking this class is designed primarily as a “hands on” workshop in which we use methodology to learn key systems concepts.

Fall 2015 - MIIS

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DPPG 8615 - Sem: Practicum Project      

• Only DPP students may enroll.

• Offered only to 3rd or 4th semester students who are using the course to fulfill their Practicum requirement.

• Students who are planning to enroll in FMS, DPMI+ or IPSS should not enroll. However, it is open to students who enrolled in FMS, DPMI+ or IPSS prior to completing two full semesters of coursework.

• Students may undertake projects individually or in teams (maximum 3 per team), but team justification must be compelling (the complexity of the project itself requires it--not just "we want to work as a team").

• Enrollment requires permission of the instructor. Permission will be granted on the basis on a simple application, which will include a short project concept proposal.

o Applications are due no later than two months prior to the beginning of the semester in which the student plans to enroll.

 For Spring DPPGs this is October 31st

 For Fall DPPGs this is March 31st, except in 2015 in which it will be April 17th.

Fall 2015 - MIIS

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MPAG 8534 - Org Sustainability for SCOs      

This course explores a series of pathways for achieving organizational sustainability. Consideration will be given to how organizational practices, procedures and systems (including those related to budgeting, resource generation, resource management, and marketing) influence long-term organizational viability. We will focus on creating business models that contribute to mission achievement and sustainability for organizations that work in complex environments. The use of managerial performance metrics in relation to organizational sustainability will also be explored.

Fall 2013 - MIIS, Spring 2014 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS, Spring 2015 - MIIS

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MPAG 8536 - Developing People (HR) in SCOs      

This workshop—combining lecture, case studies and significant group work—is designed to examine the key preconditions of success in effective ‘people development’ within the concept of human resource management (HRM) of social change organizations. Special attention will be given to HR processes that yield improved organizational results through highly capable, motivated and accountable personnel, as well as organizational commitment and systems that provide an enabling, productive work environment. The workshop will explore the following key themes: alignment between personnel and organizational objectives (for development SCOs); employee incentives and theories and practices of employee motivation and development; supervision and talent management; employee recruitment, selection and retention; and evaluation and performance management.

Fall 2013 - MIIS, Spring 2015 - MIIS

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MPAG 8571 - Proposal Writing for Intl Dev      

This course trains participants in the process of developing a proposal, from strategy to writing, toward generating funding for international assistance projects. It asks the core question: what are key elements of proposal development processes in competitive bids for international development funding? In it, students will examine real, existing proposals prepared largely by non-governmental organizations pursuing grants, but also by for-profit development companies bidding on contracts. Proposal writing will be addressed from a strategic perspective—i.e. understanding where funding is (e.g. USAID, foundations, EC) today, and how to position a concept in a competitive environment. Visual presentation skills, charts, budgets, and narrative writing skills will be important. Students will put themselves in the shoes of program development officers soliciting funding in responses to RFAs, RFPs, framework agreements, or other leads with donor organizations.

Fall 2013 - MIIS, Spring 2014 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS, Spring 2015 - MIIS

More Information »

MPAG 8574 - Wks: Systems Thinking      

This workshop focuses on the importance of systemic thinking for social change, with an emphasis on methodological use and management implications of systems thinking and practice for social change organizations (SCOs). We will explore core systems thinking concepts—e.g. relationships, emergence, layers, coordination and communication, feedback, worldviews / system philosophies, complexity and chaos, etc.—to help answer the core question:


“How can systems thinking and practice (i.e. use of methodology) support organizations to effectively develop and apply capacities, processes and systems to contribute to emergent social change in complex development environments?”<B>

The workshop, readings and exercises are designed to provide an introductory background on the history, schools of thought, and key principles of systems thinking; a practical understanding of the implications of systems theory on systems practice, and vice versa; and a particular in-depth look at two cross cutting systems thinking traditions: ‘Soft Systems’ thinking and methodology (SSM) and critical systems thinking (CST). This will include critically analyzing the boundaries that organizations draw for their capacity development and related systems, as well as critically and systemically analyzing issues of power and culture that affect SCO performance in the highly complex environments in which they operate. This also includes exploring the natural relationship between systems thinking and action research. Note: Although we will cover some of the theoretical background to systems thinking this class is designed primarily as a “hands on” workshop in which we use methodology to learn key systems concepts.

Fall 2013 - MIIS, Spring 2014 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS

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MPAG 8604 - Capstone Springboard Project      

Overview

The capstone springboard project permits students to combine capstone research with any of seven 2-credit courses offered in Spring 2015:

MPAG 8520 – Social Justice Advocacy (Glenzer)

MPAG 8521 – Action Research for Social Change (Glenzer/Ortiz)

MPAG 8540 – Social Sector Needs Assessment (Kardam)

MPAG 8542 – Communicating for Social Change (Kardam)

MPAG 8567 – Behavior Change Strategies in Public Health (Schooley)

MPAG 8571 – Proposal Writing (Ortiz)

MPAG 8583 – Starting Your Own SCO (Bloom)

Rather than signing up for MPAG 8605, students who wish to pursue capstone projects that are closely aligned with the content offered in any of these seven classes should sign up for the two-credit content class, then complete their capstone registration by signing up for MPAG 8604.

This new structure for capstone was developed in order to a) permit students to take a class that builds new content knowledge/competencies while doing their capstone, without pushing students over credit limits that can be costly, and b) give students who do not require or want the “learning and support community” approach of MPAG8605 a more appropriate structure.

Approach

The “2x2” capstone structure is appropriate for students who have a clear idea -- prior to Spring semester – of a topic they wish to focus on and who see the content one of the seven “capstone springboard classes” listed above as central to that project. MPAG 8604 will be run as a set of directed studies: all interactions, after our first class, will be one-on-one, between myself and individual students. My role will be coaching on process, being a sounding board, ensuring that each student understands the quality standards of the capstone project, and presentation mentoring.

Students who do not have a very good idea – in November 2014 – of the thematic focus of their capstone project or who do not have a project idea that could greatly benefit from one of the classes listed above should sign up for MPAG 8605, the standard Capstone Seminar.

Please note that classes taken under the 2x2 capstone option cannot be used to meet the MPA workshop requirement.

Spring 2015 - MIIS

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MPAG 8605 - Capstone:Rsch&Writing Proj-PA      

Overview

The capstone requirement has two objectives. First, it enables you to acquire, demonstrate, integrate, reflect on, apply, and deepen competencies central to the MPA degree and to your future. Second, a capstone project prepares you for a position you hope to get upon graduation. Your capstone project is a public demonstration of your learning process here at MIIS: through it, you show your peers and faculty how far you have progressed. A public sharing of your work is required. How you do that is open for negotiation.

The capstone seminar helps you produce a deliverable which you are proud to submit to employers, working professionals in the field you wish to enter, and/or journals. Choice of capstone projects is limitless and students who perform best are those that creatively identify a project and product that is meaningful to them.

Approach

My role as seminar faculty is threefold. I am process guide; I am learning/support group facilitator; I am quality standard upholder. I am not content help. I am not responsible for reminding you of everything you have or should have learned in your classes here at MIIS. Capstone is your chance to interrogate yourself, to look deep to see what you have and have not learned, to revisit previous class contents and tools. You should expect no new content, as a result, apart from – perhaps – public speaking and presentation/argumentation competencies.

While we have a formal weekly meeting time, we will not use it every week. Our schedule of meetings will be established month-by-month.

Spring 2015 - MIIS

More Information »

Expertise

Organizational development and strategy, social change organizations, organizational sustainability

Faculty Program Tags
Extra Information

Recent Activities

This summer I co-designed and co-facilitated a workshop in Perú on participatory methodologies for development, focusing on how to use these methodologies in complex and contested social change environments.  I also designed a facilitated a dialogue (including workshop) to help other facilitators figure out how to approach and differentiate strategic planning processes with different labor unions in the Lima, Perú area.  Also this summer I taught two sessions in the Masters in Development Policy Program at the Polytechnic University in Valencia, Spain, on monitoring and learning in complex environments.  I also co-taught week three of the MIIS DPMI module on strategic partnerships.

Over the past two years I have been carrying out my PhD action-research fieldwork with two organizations in Peru (one which focuses on community development in peri-urban slums; and one activist think tank that works with social movements) and a private conservation organization in Northwest Ecuador.  I have been looking into what systemic methodologies can help these organizations develop the capacities to support meaningful social change in their complex and contested social change environments.

Education

BA in Accounting and BA in Spanish (New Mexico State University), MA International Relations – Conflict Resolution and Development (St. Mary's University, San Antonio, TX), Ph.D Development Studies (Institute of Development Studies at the University of Sussex, UK

Selected Publications

  • ORTIZ ARAGÓN, Capacity building in complex environments—Seeking meaningful methodology for social change . Doctoral dissertation, (May 2013) [May be accessed from: http://sro.sussex.ac.uk/44684/ ]
  • ORTIZ ARAGÓN, Shifting identity from within the conversational flow of organisational complexity. IDS Bulletin, 43, 3 (May 2012).
  • BURNS, HARVEY & ORTIZ ARAGÓN, Action Research for development and social change. IDS Bulletin, 43, 3 (May 2012).
  • ORTIZ ARAGÓN, A. 2010a. Capacity development and rural territorial dynamics (RTD): A documentation and interpretation of how capacity building is being understood and shaped within the RTD program. RTD Topical inquiries. Santiago: RIMISP.
  • ORTIZ ARAGÓN, A. 2010b. A Case for Surfacing Theories of Change for Purposeful Organisational Capacity Development. IDS Bulletin, 41, 36-46.
  • ORTIZ ARAGÓN, A. & GILES MACEDO, J. C. 2010. A 'Systemic Theories of Change' Approach for Purposeful Capacity Development. IDS Bulletin, 41, 87-99.
  • ORTIZ, A. 2009. Interpreting Worldviews and Theories of Change on Capacity Development of Social Change Organizations Brighton: IDS.
  • ORTIZ ARAGÓN, A. & TAYLOR, P. 2009. Learning purposefully in capacity development: Why, what and when to measure? In: IIEP (ed.) Rethinking capacity development. Paris: IDS.
  • TAYLOR, P. & ORTIZ, A. 2008. Doing things better? How capacity development results help bring about change. IDRC Strategic Evaluation of Capacity Development. Institute of Development Studies (IDS).
  • ORTIZ, A. 2001. Core Costs and NGO Sustainability: Towards a Donor-NGO Consensus on the Importance of Proper Measurement, Control & Recovery of Indirect Costs. Washington, DC: The Nature Conservancy.
Faculty Type
Visiting Faculty
Dynamic Features
Course Catalog

Beryl Levinger

First Name
Beryl
Last Name
Levinger
Beryl Levinger Profile
Job Title
Distinguished Professor and Program Chair
Location
212 McCone
City, State, ZIP
Monterey,CA 93940
Phone
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I believe that people learn and grow when they work together to solve problems that hold meaning and significance for their lives. While experts are important, they are never smarter than a group of committed individuals working together in pursuit of social justice.

Here are seven short videos that offer my perspective on Social Change.

Faculty Program Tags
Expertise

Beryl Levinger is a highly regarded development professional who focuses on five issues: evaluationcapacity developmentstrategic planningeducation; and health

Course List

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

DPMI 8650 - DPMI Development Practicum      

The Development Project Practicum is an academic and professional program in which students complete professional assignments (typically three to seven months) with an organization that they have helped identify. The practicum is designed to afford students the opportunity to utilize DPMI skills in the field. Participants develop a set of negotiated deliverables which are reviewed and approved by the faculty program director and the Center for Advising and Career Services. Credit is offered on a pass/fail basis. The Development Project Practicum may be completed in conjunction with DPMI 8698 for 12 credits in any given semester, or at any time after a DPMI Certificate of Completion has been earned. Please visit http:miis.edu/dpmi">go.miis.edu/dpmi or contact dpmi@miis.edu for more information.

Summer 2013 - MIIS, Fall 2013 - MIIS, Spring 2014 - MIIS, Summer 2014 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS, Spring 2015 - MIIS, Summer 2015 - MIIS, Fall 2015 - MIIS

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DPMI 8684 - Kenya:NGO Capacity & Education      

The Development Planning, Management and Innovation Institute/Kenya program combines instruction, field visits, team-designed projects for client organizations (the Omega Foundation and a group of its NGO grantees), and readings. These elements are blended together to give program participants an in-depth understanding of the complexities of designing, delivering and monitoring projects that address the challenges that development organizations face in expanding educational opportunities for the populations they serve. Participants will work side-by-side with Kenyan professionals from leading NGOs to design innovative solutions that address local priorities. Learners will gain skills in fostering participatory development (with a thematic focus on education), leading change, measuring progress, crafting attractive funding proposals, and using monitoring data to communicate results.

By the program's conclusion, participants will be able to:

• Use a professionally recognized set of tools, techniques, and approaches to design a funding proposal that incorporates best practices for addressing a priority challenge related to education or general well-being

• Design a simple monitoring framework for this project

• Create a facilitated event plan to engage stakeholders

• Create an exit strategy, sustainability plan and implementation plan the project

• Incorporate a design thinking perspective into the project

• Create a working environment that builds social capital

Summer 2014 - MIIS

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DPMI 8686 - DPMI:Health,Educ,GendrInRWANDA      

Credit: course can be taken for no credit or for 4 units on a Pass/Fail basis. A certificate of completion will be awarded to participants who successfully complete all assignments.

Instructor of record: Dr. Beryl Levinger

The program will focus on use and mastery of tools and frameworks that represent “embedded theory.” Tool mastery will prepare participants to foster sustainable development. The tools to be featured in the program are widely used by bilateral and multinational organizations including USAID, the World Bank, and UNDP.
Note: While there may be some content overlap with current DPMI offerings, the examples and projects will all be Rwanda-specific and focused on HIV/AIDS, education or gender.

Students who enroll will be eligible to participate in DPMI8650A (DPMI+). Students who have already completed DPMI 8698 A and/or 8698 B are also eligible to enroll. For students who have previously participated in a DPMI session, this program will allow them to hone their skills further with more elaborate assignments.

Spring 2014 - MIIS, Spring 2015 - MIIS

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DPMI 8698 - Directed Study      

DPMI 8698A Foundations of Development Project Management

Participants will learn the necessary components of project design. Implementation of strategies to ensure sustainable benefits and alternative evaluation methods will also be discussed. At the module's completion, participants will create an overall evaluation plan for a project along with a detailed project implementation plan using the results framework (RF), an approach to project development that is widely used in bilateral and multinational organizations including USAID, the World Bank and UNDP.

DPMI 8698B Applied Development Project Management

This course features two modules. Participants master tools and skills needed to effectively assume the roles of facilitator, trainer, and change agent. Local human resource development is an important component in every development project. The module focuses on transferring skills to participants so they can conduct their own training programs. Topics covered include needs assessments, adult learning practices, community mobilization, stakeholder negotiation, conflict mediation, and the training of trainers. In the other module, participants, working within a context of social entrepreneurship, become proficient in the use of tools and techniques to conduct an analysis of vision and mission; identify core competencies; and forge strategic partnerships to enhance organizational effectiveness. Innovative software applications are introduced to support a simulation.

DPMI Directed Study Courses (DPMI 698):

DPMI participants may enroll in either one or two DPMI directed study courses. Although both courses carry the same number (DPMI 698), the course titles that appear on a student's transcript differ. The first DPMI 698 course (Foundations of Development Project Management) is a prerequisite for the second DPMI 698 offering (Applied Development Project Management). In other words, students may not enroll in Applied Development Project Management unless they have already completed Foundations of Development Project Management or are concurrently enrolled in it.

DPMI 698-Foundations of Development Project Management (3 credits)
Requires completion and submission of deliverables for Module I and the 5-page Statement of Development Philosophy. Students enrolled in this course during the Summer should submit their notebook link to Beryl and dpmi@miis.edu">miis.edu by August 27. Students registered in the Fall semester should submit their notebook link by November 15. The submission due date to post your week one deliverables online for students registered in the Spring semester is March 31. The development philosophy statement for January DPMI Monterey participants is due to dpmi@miis.edu by May 1. The development philosophy statement deadline for summer DPMI training participants is October 31.

DPMI 698-Applied Development Project Management (3 credits)
Requires completion and submission of deliverables for Modules II and III in the same presentation site used for Module I. Due dates are the same as above.

Summer 2013 - MIIS, Fall 2013 - MIIS, Spring 2014 - MIIS, Summer 2014 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS, Spring 2015 - MIIS, Summer 2015 - MIIS, Fall 2015 - MIIS

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DPPG 8501 - Policy Analysis      

Fall 2015 - MIIS

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DPPG 8533 - Intro to Program Evaluation      

This 1-unit course introduces participants a variety of evaluation approaches appropriate to public sector and nongovernmental organizations. Key issues include: uses of evaluation; the framing of evaluation meta-questions by project stage; indicator selection; the evaluation of project logic and project designs; and, the use of tools to strengthen evaluation design. Students will engage in lecture, discussion and in-class problem solving.

Fall 2015 - MIIS

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DPPG 8541 - Leading Capacity Development      

Organizational capacity development is considered a cornerstone of all sustainable development strategies. It entails enabling major development actors (e.g., civil society organizations, government entities, networks, and partnerships) to acquire and act on new knowledge and skills as well as to adopt new forms of interaction and reflection. Capacity development initiatives have traditionally focused on training and short-term technical assistance. Through a systematic introduction of tools and frameworks, we will present and critique the major capacity development paradigms over the last 30 years. The focus of the course, however, is the creation of new tools that support the most cutting edge thinking in capacity development. We will examine capacity development as behavior change and lead a “design lab” to create a comprehensive capacity development support approach (with associated tools) that reflects an ecosystems-based theory of change. Course activities will be packaged, with the participation of students, for online consumption by local development practitioners. Prior to our first meeting, students will be expected to complete a small individual assignment that includes readings and application of content to a real world problem.

Fall 2015 - MIIS

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DPPG 8644 - Sem:ProgramEvaluation for SCOs      

This seminar introduces participants to a variety of evaluation approaches appropriate to public sector and nongovernmental organizations engaged in social change, poverty alleviation, education, health and development work. Key issues include: uses of evaluation; alternative evaluation methodologies; evaluation as the process of testing hypotheses about linkages and causality; evaluating for sustainability; stakeholder identification; participatory approaches to evaluation; cross-cultural perspectives on evaluation; funding of evaluation; and, the role of organizational leadership and management in evaluation. Seminar participants review and critique evaluations of development assistance projects sponsored by bilateral, multilateral, and nongovernmental organizations. Additionally, they develop original evaluation designs that allow them to apply critical seminar concepts to a real-life project.

Fall 2015 - MIIS

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ICCO 9686 - DPMI:Health,Educ,GendrInRWANDA      

Credit: course can be taken for no credit or for 4 units on a Pass/Fail basis. A certificate of completion will be awarded to participants who successfully complete all assignments.

Instructor of record: Dr. Beryl Levinger

The program will focus on use and mastery of tools and frameworks that represent “embedded theory.” Tool mastery will prepare participants to foster sustainable development. The tools to be featured in the program are widely used by bilateral and multinational organizations including USAID, the World Bank, and UNDP.
Note: While there may be some content overlap with current DPMI offerings, the examples and projects will all be Rwanda-specific and focused on HIV/AIDS, education or gender.

Students who enroll will be eligible to participate in DPMI8650A (DPMI+). Students who have already completed DPMI 8698 A and/or 8698 B are also eligible to enroll. For students who have previously participated in a DPMI session, this program will allow them to hone their skills further with more elaborate assignments.

Spring 2015 - MIIS

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ICCO 9690 - Kenya:FoundationsOfDevelopment      

Summer 2015 - MIIS, Fall 2015 - MIIS

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IPSS 8530 - High-Value Org Consulting      

This workshop will be taught by organizational expert and successful government, nonprofit, and private-sector consultant, Dr. Beryl Levinger.  Participants will learn tools for analyzing an organization, its culture, its approach to meeting mission, and ecosystem analysis.  They will also master key skills for effective organizational consulting including client reconnaissance; client relationship management; and the creation of value-added consultant deliverables. The 15 contact hour workshop in January will be worth 1 credits. Students wishing to earn 2 credits for this workshop will turn additional deliverables during their internship applying the tools they have learned in this workshop to better understand their host organizations.

Spring 2014 - MIIS, Spring 2015 - MIIS

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IPSS 8531 - Designing/EvaluatngInterventns      

This two-day course will take participants through the process of designing an intervention with an accompanying monitoring and evaluation (M&E) system. Using a combination of presentations, discussions and participatory exercises, participants will gain practical experience. By the end of the course, participants will have mapped a project or program design and defined all the critical parts of the M&E System. This basic set of skills will be useful across sectors and specializations such as human rights, environment, education, trade, migration, conflict management, and security.

Spring 2014 - MIIS

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IPSS 8670 - High-ValueOrgCnsltingFieldWrk      

Students who take IPSS 8530A workshop may submit deliverables in the first month of their internship for one additional credit. These deliverables will help students apply the tools they have learned in the IPSS 8530 workshop to better understand their host organizations.

Spring 2015 - MIIS

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MPAG 8644 - Sem:ProgramEvaluation for SCOs      

This course will introduce different aspects of Program Evaluation in the first half of the semester. In the second half, students will conduct an evaluation in the field. Students will evaluate selected programs in organizations in the Monterey Bay area. The goals of the course include: a) understanding the process of evaluation; b) gaining familiarity with evaluation concepts, techniques and issues; c) choosing among different alternatives for conducting development evaluations, including data collection, analysis and reporting; and, d) designing an evaluation. We will have specific sessions on the following topics: a) evaluation models; b) new development evaluation approaches; c) impact, descriptive and normative evaluation designs; d) data collection and sampling; e) data analysis and interpretation; e) building a performance-based evaluation; and f) political, social and economic contexts of evaluation.

Fall 2014 - MIIS, Spring 2015 - MIIS

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Extra Information

Last year alone, she worked in eleven countries with such organizations as the World Bank, UNHCR, USAID, Save the Children, the Carter Center, the International Committee of the Red Cross, Freedom from Hunger, Project Concern International, Partners in Health, the Packard Foundation, the Inter-American Development Bank, and Stanford University’s Center for Ocean Solutions. With a career that includes senior positions at  AFS Intercultural Programs (president),  CARE (senior vice president) and Save the Children (vice president), Beryl draws on a rich array of experiences and intense interaction with students to enliven her classes. A former vice chair of both Pact and InterAction, Beryl has worked in nearly 90 countries. For the past 15 years, she been research director or co-director of Save the Children's State of the World's Mothers Report, a publication that offers a comparative perspective on the health, education and gender issues faced by girls and women throughout the world. Beryl has won numerous international awards for the quality of her contributions to the field of development.

Beryl's Teaching Philosophy

Here's what Beryl says about her teaching:

 "Research clearly demonstrates that learning a skill in one setting or around one particular challenge does not guarantee that the learner will automatically transfer that knowledge to a new setting or problem. To address the “learning transfer challenge," I use a cognitive apprentice approach to teaching and learning. This involves authentic problem-solving and the subsequent delinking of problem-solving skills from specific contexts in order to facilitate knowledge transfer. To help learners recognize the content  that they should be able to apply across settings and contexts, I close every class with a set of student-generated Big Ideas. I also liberally sprinkle my teaching with the introduction and application of “tools” that are designed to help students apply new knowledge to a wide variety of issues and places."

 "Collaboration is critical for an era where no single individual can have all the skills and knowledge needed to solve complex, wicked problems. Accordingly, I strive to be a facilitator and choreographer of diverse learning experiences that enable our students to work brilliantly with and learn from others."

Education

PhD, Educational Planning, University of Alabama; MA, Educational Administration, University of Alabama; BS, Social Sciences, Cornell University

Careers in Organizational Capacity Development

Students with this concentration will be ready to help social organizations become more effective as partners, implementers and public policy advocates. They will also be able to serve as internal or external consultants on projects designed to improve institutional effectiveness. Anyone with this concentration would be well prepared to assume a leadership role within an organization. They would know how to work with a governance structure; how to shape organizational culture; and how to help stakeholders set a direction and engage in activities that lead to mission fulfillment.

Faculty Type
Regular Faculty
Dynamic Features
Course Catalog

Edward J. Laurance

First Name
Edward
Last Name
Laurance
Ed Laurance
Job Title
Professor and Gordon Paul Smith Chair in International Policy and Development
Location
311 McCone
Phone
831.647.4144

I Believe:

One of the most critical challenges to development and indeed humanity is armed violence, especially in fragile states. This violence leads to death and injury, violations of human rights, lack of justice and the rule of law, lost productivity, lowering of already inadequate health budgets, and psychological costs. In short, development cannot proceed alongside such violence. I believe that this violence can and must be prevented, reduced and eventually eliminated. I have devoted most of my professional life to this end.

Expertise

Armed violence reduction, research methods for development practitioners, global governance, international organizations, proliferation and effects of conventional weapons and small arms, program evaluation and project management

Faculty Program Tags
MIIS Tags
Course List

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

DPPG 8528 - Supervised Stretch Work      

This learning opportunity consists of a student engaging in activities that result in their learning that knowledge and professional skills critical to their career path. Stretchwork is defined as those learning opportunities which a person takes on their own to grow in their career field. Put another way, once you graduate there are no advisors or courses your employer conducts. You have to “stretch” yourself into new knowledge and skills.

There are two basic rationales for learning through stretchwork at MIIS. First, your career path may require skills and knowledge that are not readily available in formal courses at MIIS. Examples may include careers in public health and humanitarian assistance, where jobs are plentiful. Stretchwork might include taking online courses, working with a local organization (e.g., M and E) or taking workshops at the DLC. The second rationale is preparing for life-ling learning by starting it while you are at MIIS.

Fall 2015 - MIIS

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DPPG 8626 - SemEvalArmedViolencReductnPgms      

Evaluation of violence reduction programs

This seminar presents three bodies of knowledge: Violence, Violence Reduction Programs, Programs , and Evaluation methods and tools used to evaluate these programs, to include program design. Participants will have access via Skype and in person to real programs taking place in local, national and global contexts. The main requirement of the course is an evaluation of a violence –reduction program. There are no prerequisites for this seminar and it counts as the MPA evaluation requirement.

Fall 2015 - MIIS

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DPPG 8634 - SEM: Security & Development      

In September 2015 the United Nations will formally announce the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs),which will be the international development framework that will replace the current Millennium Development Goals. The seventeen proposed goals and associated targets are planned to run until 2030. Among them, Goal 16 focuses on peaceful and inclusive societies, access to justice, rights-based development and accountable institutions. Examples of targets include significantly reducing all forms of violence; ending abuse, exploitation, trafficking and all forms of violence and torture against children; promoting the rule of law at the national and international levels, and ensure equal access to justice for all; by 2030 significantly reducing illicit financial and arms flows, strengthening recovery and return of stolen assets, and combating all forms of organized crime; and substantially reduce corruption and bribery in all its forms.

This will be the approach of this seminar. The seminar meets 2 hours each week with a voluntary Friday morning session for those who wish to consult on their research. The main learning outcome will be understanding how security and development issues and institutions intersect, and then applying these concepts in a real world situation.

Fall 2015 - MIIS

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IPMG 8541 - ResrchMethdsForDvlpmntPractice      

The focus of this course is on the methods used in designing, implementing and evaluating development programs, broadly defined. The methods covered are those currently in use in a variety of contexts. Examples of methods covered include data analysis (SPSS and Excel), survey research, interviewing, key informant interviewing, focus groups, direct observation, developing tools for analysis, rapid assessment, stakeholder analysis and conflict analysis. The methods will be taught in modular form, all involving completing a small team project utilizing the method. While much of the work will be done in teams, each student will be evaluated separately. Some projects will be conducted with local government and nonprofit organizations, while others will involve the MIIS community.

Fall 2013 - MIIS

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IPSG 8501 - Policy Analysis      

This course introduces students to the theory and practice of policy analysis. Students will be introduced to the stages of the public policy process, including agenda setting, formulation, implementation, and evaluation. Students will also develop basic policy analysis skills, including problem structuring, stakeholder identification, summarization of current policy, development of policy options, elaboration of criteria for selection, and recommendation of course of action. These concepts are illustrated by examples policies that fall within students' range of interests. This course also introduces students to scientific methods that are used as a means for structuring policy inquiry. A series of research approaches and techniques are presented in the context of forecasting, monitoring, and evaluation for the analysis of domestic and international policies.

Fall 2014 - MIIS, Spring 2015 - MIIS

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IPSG 8544 - Intro to HumanSecurity&Dvlpmnt      

The focus of this course is human security, the everyday security of individuals and the communities in which they live rather than the security of nation states. It is the gateway course into the field of human security and development. The key concepts of human security are freedom from fear, freedom from want, and freedom to live in a society of justice under the rule of law. Specific approaches and policies of human security covered in this course include conflict analysis, management and resolution, human rights, peacebuilding, legitimate institutions and good governance, rule of law and justice, and programs and policies designed to lower armed violence.

Spring 2015 - MIIS

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IPSG 8611 - Sem:ArmedViolence & Developmnt      

Armed violence resulting from internal conflict and criminal activity is posing a serious obstacle to political, social and economic development at the global, regional, national and local level. This seminar focuses on the reality of armed violence and its negative effects. The course addresses the global burden of violence, its impact on development, theories/risk factors/stresses of violence, and preventing armed violence. There are three main seminar research topics. The first is the demobilization and reintegration of ex-combatants, to include women and child soldiers. The second theme is the instruments of armed violence, namely, small arms and light weapons (SALW), to include land mines. Topics include the sources and methods of illegal arms proliferation, diversion from legal to illegal arms possession, misuse or proliferation. A third general theme is the various policies and programs being implemented to reduce urban gang violence, with a special focus on the public health approach to armed violence reduction. The typical student research project is on which develops (or evaluates) a program to reduce or prevent armed violence and enhance development at the local, national or global level. Students must have read the book The Better Angels of Our Nature: Why Violence Has Declined prior to the start of the seminar.

Spring 2014 - MIIS, Spring 2015 - MIIS

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IPSG 9541 - ResrchMethdsForDvlpmntPractice      

The focus of this course is on the methods used in designing, implementing and evaluating development programs, broadly defined. The methods covered are those currently in use in a variety of contexts. Examples of methods covered include data analysis (SPSS and Excel), survey research, interviewing, key informant interviewing, focus groups, direct observation, developing tools for analysis, rapid assessment, stakeholder analysis and conflict analysis. The methods will be taught in modular form, all involving completing a small team project utilizing the method. While much of the work will be done in teams, each student will be evaluated separately. Some projects will be conducted with local government and nonprofit organizations, while others will involve the MIIS community.

Fall 2013 - MIIS

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IPSG 9547 - Intl Orgs & Global Governance      

This course studies those global problems which have a multilateral element as part of the effort to manage and provide solutions- nonproliferation, terrorism, humanitarian crises, migration, armed violence, human rights and security, crime , public health and economic, political and social development. The course starts with a full inquiry into global governance (not world government!). [See the Council on Foreign Relations’ Global Governance Monitor at http://www.cfr.org/global-governance/global-governance-monitor/p18985] Who are the actors? What are the norms that govern national behavior? Which governments do/do not comply with these norms and why? Which problems are more “globally governed” than others? The second half of the course focuses on the role of international governmental organizations (IGOs)- their structure, influence, level of autonomy, etc. Are IGOs actors or just an arena where national governments make the decisions? Students have the opportunity to focus on those organizations involved in the management of their global problem of interest.

Spring 2014 - MIIS

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MPAG 8547 - Intl Orgs & Global Governance      

This course studies those global problems which have a multilateral element as part of the effort to manage and provide solutions- nonproliferation, terrorism, humanitarian crises, migration, armed violence, human rights and security, crime , public health and economic, political and social development. The course starts with a full inquiry into global governance (not world government!). [See the Council on Foreign Relations’ Global Governance Monitor at http://www.cfr.org/global-governance/global-governance-monitor/p18985] Who are the actors? What are the norms that govern national behavior? Which governments do/do not comply with these norms and why? Which problems are more “globally governed” than others? The second half of the course focuses on the role of international governmental organizations (IGOs)- their structure, influence, level of autonomy, etc. Are IGOs actors or just an arena where national governments make the decisions? Students have the opportunity to focus on those organizations involved in the management of their global problem of interest.

Spring 2014 - MIIS

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MPAG 8635 - Eval Practicum: DPP AOL system      

This course will allow students hands-on experience in developing an “Assessment of Learning (AOL)” system for the Development Practice and Policy program. Students will conduct primary research (interviews, FGDs) and data analysis related to faculty, student, and administration preferences on the system; review of best practices for AOL in other universities in the US; and a review of the academic literature pertaining to high quality AOL systems for Masters-level education. Students will have a chance to get wider, practical experience in action research, mixed methods research, formulating recommendations, and creating a high quality final report. Students in the class will form a single team and grading will be based on peer reviews of contributions to team products and process, participation in class, and quality of overall deliverable. The principal audience for the final deliverable will be the Chairs of the IPS and MPA degree programs.

Fall 2014 - MIIS

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MPAG 9541 - ResrchMethdsForDvlpmntPractice      

The focus of this course is on the methods used in designing, implementing and evaluating development programs, broadly defined. The methods covered are those currently in use in a variety of contexts. Examples of methods covered include data analysis (SPSS and Excel), survey research, interviewing, key informant interviewing, focus groups, direct observation, developing tools for analysis, rapid assessment, stakeholder analysis and conflict analysis. The methods will be taught in modular form, all involving completing a small team project utilizing the method. While much of the work will be done in teams, each student will be evaluated separately. Some projects will be conducted with local government and nonprofit organizations, while others will involve the MIIS community.

Fall 2013 - MIIS

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NPTG 9547 - Intl Orgs & Global Governance      

This course studies those global problems which have a multilateral element as part of the effort to manage and provide solutions- nonproliferation, terrorism, humanitarian crises, migration, armed violence, human rights and security, crime , public health and economic, political and social development. The course starts with a full inquiry into global governance (not world government!). [See the Council on Foreign Relations’ Global Governance Monitor at http://www.cfr.org/global-governance/global-governance-monitor/p18985] Who are the actors? What are the norms that govern national behavior? Which governments do/do not comply with these norms and why? Which problems are more “globally governed” than others? The second half of the course focuses on the role of international governmental organizations (IGOs)- their structure, influence, level of autonomy, etc. Are IGOs actors or just an arena where national governments make the decisions? Students have the opportunity to focus on those organizations involved in the management of their global problem of interest.

Spring 2014 - MIIS

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NPTG 9611 - Sem:ArmedViolence & Developmnt      

Armed violence resulting from intrastate conflict and criminal activity is posing a serious obstacle to political, social and economic development at the global, regional, national and local level. This seminar describes the global reality of armed violence and its negative effects. The focus is on the instruments of armed violence, namely, small arms and light weapons (SALW), to include land mines. Topics include the sources and methods of illegal arms proliferation, diversion from legal to illegal arms possession, misuse or proliferation, gang violence, election violence, the public health approach to armed violence reduction, and the path from conflict to armed conflict. Emphasis is placed on policies and programs at the local, national and global level to reduce armed violence and enable development, to include Disarmament, Demobilization and Reintegration of ex-combatants, weapons exchange for development programs, reducing access to SALW, and the efforts to integrate armed violence and development. The typical student project is a research paper which develops (or evaluates) a program to reduce or prevent armed violence and enhance development at the local, national or global level.

Spring 2014 - MIIS, Spring 2015 - MIIS

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Extra Information

Recent Activities

In the past several years I have:

  1. Led a team of students in observing the final negotiations of the Arms Trade Treaty at the United Nations in New York.
  2. Created and developed software that allows national government to track their progress towards complying with the UN’s International Small Arms Control Standards (ISACS). http://www.smallarmsstandards.org/isacs-news/
  3. Published two articles in Arms Control Today on the international arms trade.
  4. Served as Coordinator of Veterans Affairs at MIIS
  5. Conducted a major study for the UN Development Program on how security and development are integrated in UNDP programming.
  6. Worked with the Small Arms Survey in Geneva in developing and implementing a program evaluation of a weapons marking project in East Africa.
  7. Placed students in security and development organizations in MIIS Immersive Professional Learning programs.
  8. Since 2009 have served as an expert for the United Nations project ISACS, developing global standards for controlling the proliferation and misuse of small arms and light weapons.
  9. Advised the City of Salinas, California, on gang violence reduction and prevention.

Education

PhD, International Relations, University of Pennsylvania; MA, International Relations and Public Administration, Temple University; BS, United States Military Academy

Careers in Security and Development

Students who concentrate on security and development can do so as a specialization within the MPA program or the Human Security and Development Track in IPD. They normally take courses in conflict and conflict resolution, human security, human rights, and a full range of development courses. They also spend at least six months as a junior professional with an S and D organization while at MIIS. Graduates who entered this field have served as program managers for conflict management in South Sudan, field analysts for international governmental organizations as well as NGOs and think tanks, staff officers developing public security education and training for the UN, survey researchers in areas fraught with insecurity and conflict, and evaluators of programs designed to reduce armed violence and enable development.

For an excellent in-depth look at this field see the World Development Report 2011: Conflict, Security and Development. Washington: The World Bank

Selected Publications

laurance_chapter_final_version_pdf“The Small Arms Problem As Arms Control: A Policy-Driven Research Agenda” in The State of Arms: Consolidation, Innovation and Relevance in Small Arms Research: Essays in honour of Pablo Dreyfus. Eds: Kai Michael Kenkel and Peter Bachelor. London: Routledge, Summer 2013.

 
“1991 Arms Trade Control Efforts and Their Echoes” in Arms Control Today, July-August 2011. 
 

iccrThe UNDP Role in the Comprehensive Approach to Security in Fragile States: An Assessment, Edward J. Laurance Version 5.1 10 June 2010.

laurance-_managing_the_tools_of_war_and_violence "Managing the Tools of War and Violence: Global Governance or State-centric Realpolitik?  In Michael Brzoska and Axel Krohn (eds.) Overcoming Armed Violence in a Complex World: Essays in Honor of Herbert Wulf. Budrich UniPress Ltd. November 2009.

managing_the_global_problems_created_by_the_conventional_arms_trade With Hendrik Wagenmakers and Herbert Wulf. "Managing the Global Problems Created by the Conventional Arms Trade: An Assessment of the United Nations Register of Conventional Arms." Global Governance, Vol. 2, Spring 2005.

With Rachel Stohl. Making Global Public Policy: The Case of Small Arms and Light Weapons. Occasional Paper No. 7. Geneva: Small Arms Survey, December 2002.

<The United Nations Conventional Arms Register (UNCAR): Present Challenges, New Directions.

"Light Weapons and Human Development: The Need for Transparency and Early Warning." In Jeffrey Boutwell and Michael T. Klare, Light Weapons and Civil Conflict: Controlling the Tools of Violence (Boulder: Rowman and Littlefield Publishers, Inc., 1999), pp. 185-196.

"Monitoring the Flow, Availability and Misuse of Light Weapons," in Arms Watching: Integrating Small Arms and Light Weapons Into the Early Warning of Violent Conflict. Edward J. Laurance (Ed.) (London: International Alert, May 1999).

Arms Watching: Integrating Small Arms and Light Weapons Into the Early Warning of Violent Conflict(Ed.)(London: International Alert, May 1999).

Light Weapons and Intra-State Conflict: Early Warning Factors and Preventive Action. (Washington: Carnegie Commission on Preventing Deadly Conflict, July 1998).

"Small Arms, Light Weapons, and Conflict Prevention: The New Post-Cold War Logic of Disarmament" in Barnett R. Rubin Cases and Strategies for Preventive Action (The Century Foundation Press, 1998), pp. 135-168.

"Moratoria on Small Arms and Light Weapons: Conceptualization and Application to Central America" in Sverre Lodgaard and Carsten F. Ronnfeldt, A Moratorium on Light Weapons in West Africa (Oslo: Norwegian Institute of International Affairs, 1998), pp. 69-83.

"A Conceptual Framework for Arms Trade Transparency in South-East Asia." In Bates Gill and J.N. Mak (eds.), Arms Transparency and Security in South-East Asia. SIPRI Research Report No. 13. (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1997), pp. 10-24.

With Sarah E. Meek. The Role of Conventional Arms Buildups in the Outbreak of Conflict: Developing Early Warning and Preventive Measures. Report submitted to the United States Institute for Peace in fulfillment of grant SG-94-113. July 1996.

With Sarah E. Meek. The New Field of Micro-Disarmament: Addressing the Proliferation and Buildup of Small Arms and Light Weapons. Brief 7. (Bonn: Bonn International Center for Conversion, September 1996).

"The Role of Arms Control in Coping With Conflict after the Cold War." in Roger Kanet and Edward Kolodziej (Eds.), Coping With Conflict after the Cold War. (Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 1996), pp. 331-362.

"Addressing the Negative Consequences of Light Weapons Trafficking: Opportunities for Transparency and Restraint." in Jeffrey Boutwell, Michael Klare and Laura Reed, Editors, Lethal Commerce: The Global Trade in Small Arms and Light Weapons. (Cambridge: American Academy of Arts and Sciences, 1995), pp. 140-57.

"The UN Register of Conventional Arms: Rationales and Prospects for Compliance and Effectiveness," The Washington Quarterly , (Spring 1993).

"Reducing the Negative Consequences of Arms Transfers Through Unilateral Arms Control." in Bennett Ramberg (Ed.) Arms Control Without Negotiation: From the Cold War to the New World Order. (Boulder: Lynne Rienner Publishers, 1993), pp. 175-198

With Siemon Wezeman and Herbert Wulf. Arms Watch: SIPRI Report on the First Year of the UN Register of Conventional Arms. (Oxford: Oxford University Press, November 1993).

The International Arms Trade. (New York: Lexington Books, 1992).

"The Political Implications of Illegal Arms Exports From the United States." Political Science Quarterly, 107, 3 (Fall 1992), 501-533.

"Events Data and Policy Analysis: Improving the Potential for Applying Academic Research to Foreign and Defense Policy Problems." Policy Sciences , 23,1(1990).

"The New Gunrunning." Orbis (Spring 1989), 225-237.

Faculty Type
Regular Faculty
Dynamic Features
Course Catalog

Nükhet Kardam

First Name
Nükhet
Last Name
Kardam
nukhet_kardam_profile
Job Title
Professor
Location
Casa Fuente 300 E
Phone
831.647.4147
Language(s)
Türkçe

I am passionate about women’s human rights, how global human rights norms apply in specific cultures; about working, living and exploring multiple cultures and multiple identities; and about the nature of self and of identity.

What excites me about being a professor at MIIS is working with a socially committed, multicultural group of students and teaching within an environment of innovation and openness.

Watercolor Identities: Explore the Nature of Identity

Faculty Program Tags
Expertise

Women's Human Rights, Gender and International Development, Development Assistance, Implementation of Global Human Rights Norms in Local Contexts, Political and Cultural Context of Development Practice, Identity Politics.

Course List

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

DPPG 8518 - Women's Human Rights:Xcultural      

This course will focus on the global women’s human rights norms as embodied in legal instruments such as CEDAW (Convention on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women) and the Beijing Platform for Action and their acceptance, reinterpretation, redefinition or rejection in national and local contexts. How do religious, cultural and traditional norms complement and/or contradict global norms on women’s rights? What types of advocacy efforts at local, national and international levels are under way to establish a dialogue among different constituencies with different worldviews on women’s rights? We will explore different rights, such as the right to be free from violence of all forms, the right to freedom of movement, the right to political participation, to education, work and reproductive rights. We will examine some theoretical works, as well as case studies of different countries’ experiences, with a special focus on countries with Muslim majority countries.

Fall 2015 - MIIS

More Information »

DPPG 8643 - SemPwr&Idntity/MultiCultrlWrld      

In this seminar, we first examine our own identities in a reflective and critical way. Why are some identities complementary to each other, while others are contradictory? Why are some identities repressed or redefined? How and why do we express or suppress some of our identities and not others? How and why do we bring forth a particular set of identities in certain contexts and times and not others?

In the second section of the course, we investigate the social construction of identities. How do we construct the ‘other’? Under what circumstances does the ‘other’ become the enemy? We discuss nation building in this context as one group’s power over others in defining the national identity, its myths, history, language and other defining characteristics. How does nation building empower particular ethnic, religious, racial groups in this process at the expense of others? Whose cultures are privileged and others suppressed? Where is the balance between maintaining cultural diversity and group rights, at the same time creating a state which erases group privileges in order to promote individual rights and ‘citizens’ whose primary loyalty is to the ‘nation’? Where is the nation-state going in the future? Has globalization brought with it even greater identification with local cultures? The third and final section of the course focuses on the problems related to the recognition of multiculturalism. How are differences of language, religion, culture, ethnicity tolerated in today’s world? What are the conditions that promote a more effective management of multiculturalism? We attempt to explore these questions through reflective readings, discussions and investigation of multiple case studies from different parts of the world.

Fall 2015 - MIIS

More Information »

ICCO 9518 - Women's Human Rights:Xcultural      

This course will focus on the global women’s human rights norms as embodied in legal instruments such as CEDAW (Convention on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women) and the Beijing Platform for Action and their acceptance, reinterpretation, redefinition or rejection in national and local contexts. How do religious, cultural and traditional norms complement and/or contradict global norms on women’s rights? What types of advocacy efforts at local, national and international levels are under way to establish a dialogue among different constituencies with different worldviews on women’s rights? We will explore different rights, such as the right to be free from violence of all forms, the right to freedom of movement, the right to political participation, to education, work and reproductive rights. We will examine some theoretical works, as well as case studies of different countries’ experiences, with a special focus on countries with Muslim majority countries.

Fall 2013 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS

More Information »

ICCO 9643 - SemPwr&Idntity/MultiCultrlWrld      

In order to gain Multicultural Competence, we first need to know ourselves, and reflect on our own identities. Our ethnic, gender, religious, national identities define who we are and shape our interaction with others. In this seminar, we will first examine our own identities and the cultures we identify with in a reflective and critical way. We will then focus on conditions and activities that are designed to foster shifts of perspective, expanded awareness and emotional states that allow empathetic understanding to develop. We will embrace a holistic approach to intercultural training, focusing on individuals’ emotional, physical and intellectual experience of cultural difference. Activities will focus on the development and conscious application of key intercultural competencies, including mindfulness, frame shifting, and stretching beyond our comfort zones. The more we are able to be mindful, the more we understand our own stories and learn to extend themselves beyond their comfort zones, the more empathetic we can be when we make cultural transitions.

The second half of the seminar will focus on the political and sociological factors that shape national, ethnic, religious and gender identities through case studies of particular interest to seminar participants. What are the structural factors that constrain and what choices do we have as we construct our identities? We will examine the nation building projects in developing countries that constructed new ‘national myths’ and new identities in tension with existing ethnic, racial, religious and other identities. How has nation building empowered particular ethnic, religious, racial groups in this process at the expense of others? Whose cultures have been privileged, others suppressed? Where is the balance between maintaining cultural diversity and group rights, at the same time creating a state which erases group privileges in order to promote individual rights and ‘citizens’ whose primary loyalty is to the ‘nation’? Has globalization brought with it even greater identification with local cultures? This seminar will attempt to explore these issues in order to provide a deeper understanding of Power and Identity in a Multicultural World as students prepare to make cultural transitions.

Fall 2013 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS

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IPSG 8529 - Dev Theory & Practice      

This course introduces students to the field of International Development and its subfields (including the theories, major debates, practices, and professional opportunities). The first section covers economic, sociological and political theories of development with sensitivity to the historical context. The second section discusses specific development issues such as the theory and practice of development assistance, democratization, human rights, and governance, community development, gender, environment, poverty, human security and education. Students hear guest lectures from MIIS faculty who teach in the development subfields. In the third section, students work in teams and focus on a particular developing country and research different aspects of its development and present their findings in class. The purpose of this course is to provide students with a basic understanding of the field, and give them a chance to begin narrowing down their own interests.

Fall 2013 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS

More Information »

MPAG 8518 - Women's Human Rights:Xcultural      

This course will focus on the global women’s human rights norms as embodied in legal instruments such as CEDAW (Convention on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women) and the Beijing Platform for Action and their acceptance, reinterpretation, redefinition or rejection in national and local contexts. How do religious, cultural and traditional norms complement and/or contradict global norms on women’s rights? What types of advocacy efforts at local, national and international levels are under way to establish a dialogue among different constituencies with different worldviews on women’s rights? We will explore different rights, such as the right to be free from violence of all forms, the right to freedom of movement, the right to political participation, to education, work and reproductive rights. We will examine some theoretical works, as well as case studies of different countries’ experiences, with a special focus on countries with Muslim majority countries.

Fall 2013 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS

More Information »

MPAG 8540 - Social Sector Needs Assessment      

This course introduces participants to a variety of tools and methodologies for participatory needs assessment in the context of poverty. The goal of this course is to develop and apply the fundamental needs and assets assessment skills necessary for a career in international development. The following topics will be covered:

1) An overview of Poverty, Social Change, Participation, and Asset-Based Development (including the importance of an Asset-Based approach in sustainable development; types of assets, including social capital); 2) An overview of participatory methods, tools, techniques and strategies applied in Asset Based Development activities. 3) Managing, leading, and encouraging participatory identification of needs and assets: how external facilitators interact with local participants and other stakeholder groups; the political context and power relationships. 4) Country and sector specific discussions of needs and assets identification: education, health, democratization and governance, environment, gender equality, human rights are some sectors to be examined.

Students successfully completing this course will be able to:

a) Understand the different definitions of Poverty, the context of Poverty, and Participatory Development in conditions of poverty and Asset Based Community Development.

b) Learn, present and apply Needs Assessment tools.

c) Analyze needs assessment case studies and understand their social and political context.

d) Be able to conduct Needs Assessment in professional settings.

Spring 2014 - MIIS, Spring 2015 - MIIS

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MPAG 8542 - Communicatng for Social Change      

This two credit course explores effective modes of communication in interpersonal and intercultural dialogue. Thoughtful exchange requires an environment where one is both trusting and trustworthy. Emphasizing embodied discussion, sessions include movement and writing integrated with close readings of theoretical materials. Specific exercises foster self-knowledge and hone attentiveness to each other’s stories, in the belief that such reflective skills foster healthy communities and mutually respectful relationships [between groups and within nations]. Skills are directly applicable to daily life and multilingual/international work environments. Examples are drawn from Action Research whose major premise includes a commitment to non-violent social change in community development, in partnership with all stakeholders.

Spring 2014 - MIIS, Spring 2015 - MIIS

More Information »

MPAG 8618 - Sem:Grassroots Ldrshp Devlpmnt      

Through readings, case studies, field projects and contact with grassroots leaders, students will learn about the ecology of grassroots organizations; factors that contribute to effective grassroots leadership; strategies for leader development; and strategies to build grassroots organizational capacity. The purpose of this seminar is to prepare students to support, lead, analyze, manage, or govern grassroots social change organizations. The specific objectives are as follows:

a) Develop an understanding of existing theories and models of leadership and topics of relevance to grassroots leadership.

b) To analyze a grassroots organization in terms of patterns of relationships between the leaders and their environment by collecting and analyzing empirical data including recommendations for change.

c) To prepare a report on the case study, including the theory, data collection, data analysis, findings and recommendations sections.

d) To organize a public symposium and present their findings in partnership with the grassroots organizations.

Spring 2014 - MIIS

More Information »

MPAG 8643 - SemPwr&Idntity/MultiCultrlWrld      

In this seminar, we first examine our own identities in a reflective and critical way. Why are some identities complementary to each other, while others are contradictory? Why are some identities repressed or redefined? How and why do we express or suppress some of our identities and not others? How and why do we bring forth a particular set of identities in certain contexts and times and not others?

In the second section of the course, we investigate the social construction of identities. How do we construct the ‘other’? Under what circumstances does the ‘other’ become the enemy? We discuss nation building in this context as one group’s power over others in defining the national identity, its myths, history, language and other defining characteristics. How does nation building empower particular ethnic, religious, racial groups in this process at the expense of others? Whose cultures are privileged and others suppressed? Where is the balance between maintaining cultural diversity and group rights, at the same time creating a state which erases group privileges in order to promote individual rights and ‘citizens’ whose primary loyalty is to the ‘nation’? Where is the nation-state going in the future? Has globalization brought with it even greater identification with local cultures? The third and final section of the course focuses on the problems related to the recognition of multiculturalism. How are differences of language, religion, culture, ethnicity tolerated in today’s world? What are the conditions that promote a more effective management of multiculturalism? We attempt to explore these questions through reflective readings, discussions and investigation of multiple case studies from different parts of the world.

Fall 2013 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS

More Information »

Extra Information

Recent Accomplishments

  • INTERSECTION, Episode 46. Aslan Media. "Turkish Politics and Women's Human Rights" 2 Sept. 2014. Radio. Listen online here.
  • Kardam, Nükhet, and Meltrem, Agduk. "Mobilizing Religious Leaders to Combat Violence against Women in Turkey." The Women's International Perspective. 14 Aug. 2014. View online here. 
  • Kardam, Nükhet (April 2013), TEDxMonterey "Watercolor Identities."
  • Kardam, Nükhet and Fredric Kropp (2013), "Global Trends: Women as Social Entrepreneurs: a Case Study." In Women in the Global Economy: Leading Social Change. Global Education Research Reports 8, edited by Trish Tierney. San Francisco, Institute of International Education
  • Ongoing Research Project in “Intercultural Modes of Thinking and Reasoning” at the Monterey Institute with Fusun Akarsu, Philip Murphy and Katherine Punteney - in countries like Macedonia, Israel, USA, Kyrgyzstan and Turkey.
  • Turkey’s Response to the Global Gender Regime”, GEMC (Gender Equality and Multicultural Conviviality Journal), Tohoku University, no. 4, 2011
  • Leslie Eliason Teaching Excellence Award, 2010
  • Contributing author, UNIFEM, “Aid and Security.” In Progress of the World’s Women Report, 2008-2009.

Previous Work

I have been interested in change in international organizations and researched how gender was mainstreamed in several international development organizations. I engage in consulting with development organizations, including evaluation of women’s human rights programs and projects and women’s political participation, gender and governance. More recently I have turned to exploring how global women’s rights norms are interpreted and implemented in local cultural contexts.

Education

PhD, Political Science, Michigan State University; MA, International Relations, University of British Columbia; BA, Philosophy, Istanbul University; IB, Arts, Robert College

Faculty Type
Regular Faculty
Dynamic Features
Course Catalog

Mahabat Baimyrzaeva

First Name
Mahabat
Last Name
Baimyrzaeva
Maha Faculty Page
Job Title
Associate Professor
Location
120 McCone
Phone
831.647.4143
Language(s)
Русский
Türkçe
Кыргыз тили

What is it that you are most passionate about?

Faculty Program Tags
Expertise

Institution Building and Development, Institutional Change and Theory, Organizational Management and Development, Capacity Building and Development, Public Sector Reform, Corruption, Culture Analysis and Change, Policy Analysis, Applied Research Methods, Democratic Transition, and Innovative Teaching and Learning Methods.

Regional expertise: Kyrgyzstan, Central Asia, Post-Soviet Countries.

Course List

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

IPSS 8670 - High-ValueOrgCnsltingFieldWrk      

Students who take IPSS 8530A workshop may submit deliverables in the first month of their internship for one additional credit. These deliverables will help students apply the tools they have learned in the IPSS 8530 workshop to better understand their host organizations.

Spring 2014 - MIIS

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IPSS 8675 - IPSS Field Deliverables      

During their IPSS internships students complete applied academic deliverables for which they earn six academic credits. The academic credit is not awarded for the internship itself, but for the work that applies students’ academic training to contribute to their host organizations’ mission in area of student’s career interest. The letter grades will be assigned based on the assessment of the following four deliverables:

IPSS Field Project: By the end of their internships students must have completed an ambitious project or other relatively autonomous contribution that presents value for the host organization and builds on students’ strengths and advances his/her skills and knowledge. The field project can take the form of a policy or consultancy report, evaluation, analysis, a website, or other substantive contribution to their host organization that integrates high quality research, analysis, and other skills and subject-matter knowledge. Faculty with relevant expertise and assigned peers will provide every student regular feedback on the major steps of the field project. Student’s regular internship responsibilities ideally should overlap with, but are not limited to the core field assignment. The organizations receiving interns are encouraged to help students identify such assignments prior to their arrival or at the very latest within one month after the start of student’s internship. The organization should provide assistance and guidance in completing this assignment.

Presentation: In the final part of the internship students will present on their field project to their colleagues at their host organizations. The video recording of that presentation will be then reviewed by the MIIS faculty who will invite students for Q&A and also provide additional feedback to students to improve the quality of their final deliverable(s).

Peer feedback: Interns will collaborate with their assigned peers by providing mutual peer feedback on their core field assignments to improve the quality of their work and learn from each other.

Final reflection: Interns will submit a final reflection to IPSS faculty and staff near the end of their internship- summarizing their most important insights and lessons they obtained from the internship experience for their professional and academic development.

Optional: Students are also highly encouraged to blog about their reflections on their internship experiences and comment on each others’ blogs throughout the internship assignment to maximize their learning.

Spring 2014 - MIIS

More Information »

MPAG 8519 - Managing Public Organizations      

This course introduces students to different aspects of public organizations and key management concepts, ideas, tools, practices, and functions. Management here is broadly defined as a field of practice concerned with running organizations and implementing policies, programs, and projects.

Fall 2014 - MIIS

More Information »

MPAG 8527 - Public Policy & Social Change      

This class will prepare students to do policy analysis. Students will acquire skills and knowledge essential for engaging in policy development and change and for conducting applied policy research. The course uses a case-based approach to explore the complexities of policy systems, processes, and outcomes.

Spring 2014 - MIIS

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MPAG 8573 - PublicSector&SocialInnovation      

Fall 2014 - MIIS

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MPAG 8605 - Capstone:Rsch&Writing Proj-PA      

Overview

The capstone requirement has two objectives. First, it enables you to acquire, demonstrate, integrate, reflect on, apply, and deepen competencies central to the MPA degree and to your future. Second, a capstone project prepares you for a position you hope to get upon graduation. Your capstone project is a public demonstration of your learning process here at MIIS: through it, you show your peers and faculty how far you have progressed. A public sharing of your work is required. How you do that is open for negotiation.

The capstone seminar helps you produce a deliverable which you are proud to submit to employers, working professionals in the field you wish to enter, and/or journals. Choice of capstone projects is limitless and students who perform best are those that creatively identify a project and product that is meaningful to them.

Approach

My role as seminar faculty is threefold. I am process guide; I am learning/support group facilitator; I am quality standard upholder. I am not content help. I am not responsible for reminding you of everything you have or should have learned in your classes here at MIIS. Capstone is your chance to interrogate yourself, to look deep to see what you have and have not learned, to revisit previous class contents and tools. You should expect no new content, as a result, apart from – perhaps – public speaking and presentation/argumentation competencies.

While we have a formal weekly meeting time, we will not use it every week. Our schedule of meetings will be established month-by-month.

Spring 2014 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS

More Information »

Extra Information

Recent Accomplishments

During 2011-2014, as the program’s academic lead, Mahabat redesigned the International Professional Service Semester Program to ensure it best meets students’ and employers’ needs and interests.  In this capacity she also designed and implemented a new set of pre-departure training modules offering skills highly sought-after by our students and most employers; delivered professional development trainings on consulting and applied research design; advised program fellows on their consultancy projects conducted during their internships with influential intergovernmental organizations around the world; and coordinated the work of a dozen faculty advising the program fellows.

In 2014 Mahabat consulted for the Global Citizenship Report Card initiative to refine its methodology for performance ranking of all countries on internationally agreed norms and standards in poverty reduction, gender equity, environmental stewardship, human rights, humanitarian response, and global peace and justice.

In 2012 Mahabat published a single authored book “Institutional Reforms in Public Sector: What Did We Learn?” concerned with recurring failures in public sector institutional reforms promoted by international development agencies.  It focuses on the following pressing questions in international development theory and practice: What does it take to design effective government institutions and sustain positive changes?  What have we learned about the attempts to deliberately design and redesign public sector institutions in different countries?  What works and what doesn't, and why?  What happens when reforms fail?  This book pushes the boundaries of existing theories on institutional change and draws insights for researchers and practitioners of institutional reforms by synthesizing lessons from past experiences and findings from multiple disciplines.

In 2012 Mahabat designed and delivered an intensive session titled “Strategic Planning in the Context of Counter Terrorism Efforts” at the Strategic Level Small Craft Combating Terrorism training organized by Naval Small Craft Instruction and Technical Training School (NAVSCIATTS) for participants from anti-terrorism units from 14 different countries around the world.   

In 2012-2015 Mahabat I consulted for the Interactive Flow Studies (educational start-up) on strategic management and marketing.

In 2011 and 2012 Mahabat designed and delivered intensive trainings on policy analysis in Russian language for government policy analysts and civil society representatives from various Central Asian states, by invitation from the OSCE Academy in Bishkek. 

In Spring 2011 Mahabat coordinated the colloquium on Nation Building Colloquium which brought together leading experts globally specializing in various dimensions of nation building to weekly evening talks and social events with students.

Previous Work

Prior to joining the Monterey Institute, Mahabat held various positions in local and international organizations in Kyrgyzstan working on development, humanitarian assistance, and institutional capacity building. She also worked as a teaching associate at the University of Southern California. 

Education

-  Ph.D. in Public Administration, University of Southern California, 2003-2010

-  Master of Public Administration, University of Hawaii, 2001-2003

-  International Management Graduate Certificate, College of Business Administration, University of Hawaii, 2002-2003

-  Leadership and Culture Program, East-West Center, Honolulu, 2002-2003

-  Undergraduate Degree in International Law, International University of Kyrgyzstan, 1994-1998

Select journal publications

- “The Role of Supreme Audit Institutions in Improving Citizen Participation in Governance,” International Journal of Public Administration, 2014, volume 15, issue 2, pp. 77-90  

- “Policy Analysis as a Profession in Government: Who Does What and How?” Occasional Paper No 2, November 2013, University of Central Asia (in English and Russian)

- “Kyrgyzstan’s Public Sector Reforms: 1991 – 2010,” International Journal of Public Administration, 2011, volume 34, issue 9, pp. 555-566

- “Analysis of Public Administration Reforms in Kyrgyzstan in Light of Its Recent Governance Crises,” International Public Management Review, 2011, Volume 12, issue 1. pp. 22-46

- “Corruption and Legitimacy Problems in Post-Communist States” (a book review), Public Administration Review, 2007, May/June, pp. 592-594

- “Institutional Reforms in Kyrgyzstan,” Central Asian Studies Review, 2005, volume 4, issue 1, pp. 29-35

 

Select Conference Presentations

- “Bringing it All Together: Institutional Development in Light of National Policy Changes,” a closing address delivered at the Global Center Consortium Directors Conference, organized by the Global Center for Security Cooperation, Department of Defense, Monterey, CA, U.S.A on January 13, 2011

- “Collaborative Strategies in Combating Official Misconduct,” a talk delivered at the 68th National Conference of the American Society for Public Administration, Washington, DC, U.S.A. in April 2007

- “Assessing Institutional Reform: the Case of Kyrgyzstan” a paper delivered at the 20th International Political Science Association Conference, Fukuoka, Japan, in July 2006

- “Theoretical Framework for Understanding Anticorruption Strategies,” a paper delivered at the Sixth Annual Central Eurasian Studies Society Conference, Boston University, MA, U.S.A. in October 2010

- “Institution-Building Reforms in Kyrgyzstan,” a paper delivered at the Fifth Annual Central Eurasian Studies Society Conference, Indiana University, Bloomington, U.S.A. in October 2004

Faculty Type
Regular Faculty
Dynamic Features
Course Catalog