Middlebury Institute of International Studies at Monterey. Formerly the Monterey Institute of International Studies

Bruce Paton

First Name
Bruce
Last Name
Paton
Bruce Paton
Job Title
Adjunct Professor
Phone
831.647.4149

Bruce Paton teaches courses on sustainable business, corporate social responsibility, and global business strategy.

His research focuses on business strategies and public policies for sustainability. A major emphasis in this research is development of methods for designing and evaluating voluntary and collaborative initiatives to address social and environmental issues in management.

Faculty Program Tags
Expertise

Sustainable business, corporate social responsibility, global business strategy, social and environmental issues in management.

Course List
Extra Information

Education

B.A., Environmental Science, Wesleyan University; MBA, Stanford University; Ph.D., Environmental Studies, University of California, Santa Cruz.

Publications

Paton, B. and Halme, M. (2007) “Bringing the needs of the poor into the BOP debate”. Business Strategy and the Environment 16(8): 585-586.

Paton, B. and Halme, M. (2007) “Reframing the BOP Debate in GIN.” Business Strategy and the Environment 16(2): 169-170

Paton, B. (2006) ‘Collaboration among industry, civil society, and government for sustainability:a framework for identifying opportunities’, Progress in Industrial Ecology – An International Journal, Vol. 3, Nos. 1/2, pp.148–162.

Paton, B. (2006) “Dynamics of Voluntary Product Labeling Programs: An Energy Star Case Study” in T. deBruijn and V. Norberg-Bohm (eds.), Industrial Transformation: Environmental Policy Innovation in the United States and Europe, MIT Press.

Paton, B. (2005) “Efficiency Gains within Firms under Voluntary Environmental Initiatives”, in K. Hargroves and M.H. Smith (eds), The Natural Advantage of Nations - Business Opportunities, Innovation and Governance in the 21st Century, EA Press, Crows Nest, NSW Australia.

Paton, B. (2005). “Mental Models of Voluntary Environmental Initiatives”, in K. Hargroves and M.H. Smith (eds), The Natural Advantage of Nations - Business Opportunities, Innovation and Governance in the 21st Century, EA Press, Crows Nest, NSW Australia.

Howarth, R.B., Haddad, B. and B. Paton (2004). “Energy Efficiency and Greenhouse Gas Emissions: Correcting Market Failures Using Voluntary Participation Programs” in P. Thalman and A. Baranzini, (eds) Voluntary Approaches in Climate Policy Edward Elgar Publishing, Cheltenham, UK.

Faculty Type
Adjunct Faculty
Dynamic Features
Course Catalog

Sandra M. Dow

First Name
Sandra
Last Name
Dow
Sandra Dow profile
Job Title
Professor of International Finance and Chair of the Fisher MBA in Global Impact Management
Location
McCone 211
Phone
831.647.4187
Language(s)
Français

Dr. Sandra Dow has taught at the University of Quebec at Montreal (Canada), Concordia University (Canada), Wake Forest University (USA), Saint Mary's University (Canada), and Warsaw School of Economics (Poland).  During her academic career she has taught a range of courses including:  Corporate Finance, International Finance, International Investments, Corporate Governance, and Environmental/Social/Governance Risk Management. Professor Dow received her Ph.D.

MIIS Tags
Short Programs & Research Centers
Expertise

Corporate Governance; International Finance; Environmental, Social, and Governance (ESG) Risk Management.

Course List

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

MBAG 8536 - Financial Management      

This core course is designed to help students develop an understanding of the fundamental and practical analytical tools of corporate finance as well as its underlying concepts and principles through an encompassing analytical framework of both risk and return within qualitative and quantitative dimensions. The purpose of this course is to study the management of the firm from a financial point of view by focusing in the financial manager's primary task, which is to plan for the acquisition and use of funds so as to maximize the value of the firm.

Spring 2014 - MIIS, Spring 2015 - MIIS

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MBAG 8612 - Case Competition Prep Course      

This course prepares students for MBA Case Competition participation. We emphasize “raw cases” as our target competitions: The Economist, Corporate Knights, Hult Prize and Aspen have all adopted this format. In addition to introducing you to the “raw case” approach, you will acquire skills that can give teams a competitive edge in Case competition. Specifically, we provide (in collaboration with participants) possible information sources that you may consult in the course of your analyses, an overview of business methods. Further the differentiating characteristics in elite case competitions may rest not only on your analyses, but also on the crispness of your presentation – both written and oral. Thus the pre-case phase will allow you to improve these skills as well.

Fall 2014 - MIIS, Fall 2015 - MIIS

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MBAG 8619 - Corporate Govrnance      

Spring 2014 - MIIS, Spring 2015 - MIIS

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MBAG 8629 - Intl Financial Markets      

The course provides the student with the conceptual framework necessary to appreciate and understand the key financial markets and instruments that facilitate trade and investment activities in a dynamically evolving global financial environment. For this purpose, the course focuses on the global financial environment; the foreign exchange market; the foreign currency options market; the currency futures market; the currency forward market; the currency and interest rate swap markets; the international bond market; the international equity market; international portfolio diversification; and international parity relations.

Fall 2013 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS

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MBAG 8638 - Intl Investment Analysis      

This course covers theory and instruments used in developing international investment portfolios. Students gain an understanding of international capital and money markets through the development and management of their own portfolios. The course also covers the use of hedging strategies, asset pricing models and management of exchange risk.

Prerequisite: IMGT 8531 & IMGT 8536.

Fall 2013 - MIIS, Spring 2015 - MIIS

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MBAG 8688 - ESG Risk Assessment      

Successful investing is dependent upon the ability to determine the factors that influence the market's valuation of a company… and then judge the accuracy of that valuation. The goal of this course is to demonstrate how Environmental, Social, and Governance (ESG) factors can be used along with traditional financial metrics to assess risks and opportunities confronting firms. As such, this is a course in socially responsible investing taught from a finance perspective. The importance of “extra-financial” factors in evaluating the risks and opportunities confronting the firm is no longer a fringe area for finance professionals. In 2008 the Chartered Financial Analyst’s association introduced ESG into their curriculum. According to a Thomson Reuters survey released in May 2009, 84% of global buy-side investors said they evaluate ESG criteria to some degree when making investment decisions. Moreover, institutional investors are increasingly vocal in their demands that ESG risks be disclosed to the SEC. There are three themes to the course: Objectives of business (wealth maximization versus long term sustainability?), the pillars of socially responsible investing and the development of SRI funds.

Fall 2013 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS, Fall 2015 - MIIS

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Faculty Program Tags
Extra Information

Recent Publications in Academic and Practitioner Outlets

Dow, Sandra. “Managing Stakeholder Expectations”, in Reputation Risk Management in Banks, Petra Merl and Thomas Kaiser editors. RepRisk Books, 2014.

McGuire, Jean, Sandra Dow, and Bakr Ibrahim. “All in the family: Social performance and corporate governance in the family firm.” Journal of Business Research, Vol. 65, 11, 2012, pp. 1643–1650.

Aggarwal, Raj and Sandra Dow. "Dividends and strength of Japanese business group affiliation." Journal of Economics and Business, Vol. 64, 3, 2012, pp. 214–230.

Aggarwal, Raj and Sandra Dow. “Corporate governance and business strategies for climate change and environmental mitigation.” European Journal of Finance, Vol. 18, 3-4, 2012, pp. 311-331.

Dow, Sandra, Jean McGuire and Toru Yoshikawa. “Disaggregating the group effect: Vertical and horizontal keiretsu in changing economic times.” Asia Pacific Journal of Management, Vol. 28, 2, 2011, pp. 299-323.

Aggarwal, Raj and Sandra Dow. “Navigating the C2 economy.” The European Financial Review, April/May 2011, pp. 46-51.

Dow, Sandra and Jean McGuire. “Industrial networks in Japan: Blessing or curse?” The European Financial Review, February/March 2011, pp. 17-21.

Dow, Sandra and Jean McGuire. “Propping and tunneling: Empirical evidence from Japanese keiretsu.” Journal of Banking and Finance, Vol. 33, 10, 2009, pp. 1817-1828.

McGuire, Jean and Sandra Dow. “Japanese keiretsu: Past, present, future.” Asia Pacific Journal of Management, Vol. 26, 2, 2009, pp. 333-351.

Faculty Type
Regular Faculty
Dynamic Features
Course Catalog

Lyuba Zarsky

First Name
Lyuba
Last Name
Zarsky
Lyuba Zarsky, Professor, Image
Job Title
Associate Professor
Location
McGowan 320B
Phone
831.647.6436
Language(s)
Español

Professor Zarsky has a PhD in Economics and has a distinguished record of professional experience and publication in the fields of sustainable development and business and sustainability.

Faculty Program Tags
Short Programs & Research Centers
Course List

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

IEPG 8507 - Governing the Global Commons      

For most of human history, global commons have been utilized as open access resources. In the past fifty years, rapid economic development, globalization, and population growth have severely degraded the commons and the eco-system services they provide. To sustainably govern the global commons—to move from open access to common pool resource—requires global collective action. Nation-states have traditionally been understood as taking the lead by negotiating and implementing multilateral international environmental treaties. More recently, however, non-state actors and governments at regional and sub-national level are becoming engaged in multilateral governance and/or taking incremental actions to govern the global commons.

This course examines the emerging multi-level governance of three global commons: 1) the atmosphere; 2) the ocean; and 3) the global economy.

Part One focuses on the governance of the atmospheric commons. It first explores the theoretical underpinnings of commons governance and the policy options they imply. We start with Hardin’s “tragedy” framework which points to state regulation and/or private markets, and then probe Elinor Ostrom’s framework which highlights the possibility of robust institutions of collective self-governance. Given the lack of an overarching global government, governing the global commons is inherently a process of collective self-governance.

After a brief examination of climate science, we probe the emerging multi-level climate regime, the overarching goal of which is to de-carbonise the global economy. We focus first on the history, architecture, North-South dynamics and challenges of international climate negotiations under the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). We then turn to multi-level approaches to setting a carbon price, including via global carbon markets; regional, national and sub-national cap and trade systems; and business and financial market risk assessment and disclosure. We will explore how responses to climate change are challenging our existing paradigms of international, national and statewide authority and jurisdiction, as well as traditional concepts of environmental risk and liability. Part Two concludes with an in-class debate about how to overcome North-South differences over emission reduction responsibility in the design of a global treaty in the lead-up to the December, 2015 climate conference in Paris.

Part Two focuses on the governance of the global oceans commons, with a focus on the role of international cooperation to reduce marine pollution. We first examine the process of negotiating and implementing international environmental agreements. We then examine the key treaties governing marine pollution. After a brief introduction to the Law of the Sea and MARPOL, we take an in-depth look at the structure, dynamics and implementation of the London Convention. The London Convention is characterized not only by the active participation of nation-states but also by a high degree of stakeholder engagement, including shipping companies and port authorities. We conclude with a look at emerging issues in the governance of marine pollution, including land-based sources and the regional governance of the Arctic.

Part Three focuses on the global economic commons. We first consider the linkages between globalization and sustainable development and then explore existing and evolving approaches to trade and investment rules which hinder or promote de-carbonisation, or more broadly, externalize or internalize environmental costs and risks.

Fall 2013 - MIIS, Spring 2015 - MIIS

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IEPG 8598 - Business,Sustainablity&Society      

This course provides a foundation in the core concepts and strategic management tools in the dynamic field of global business sustainability. The central aim of the course is to prepare students to design and lead sustainability innovations in or in partnership with global business organizations. Students will work in teams to produce a sustainability strategy for a global corporation.

The course covers six key topics:

• Global sustainability challenges and the role of business in responding to them;

• New social expectations of business and the promise and limitations of corporate social responsibility;

• Sustainability as global business strategy and opportunity;

• Business opportunity and challenges in promoting development in poor markets;

• Managing sustainability, including performance metrics, partnerships, and financing

• Public policy innovations that support business sustainability.

Fall 2013 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS

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IEPG 8611 - Sustainable Coastal Management      

The coast is the most dynamic landscape on earth. It changes every time a wave breaks, a tide changes, or streams flow. About seventy percent of the world’s population lives within 100 km of the coast. This course provides a foundation in the core scientific principles, governance frameworks, and economic challenges and opportunities related to the quest for sustainable coastal management and adaptation. A central theme of the course is the need to assess and respond to coastal climate vulnerability, including via adaptive policy and planning at diverse scales of coastal governance. The case studies in the course encompass both developed and less developed countries, and an emphasis on management of large coastal cities, coastal ecosystems, and other coastal land-uses.

Fall 2014 - MIIS, Fall 2015 - MIIS

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IEPG 8620 - Sustainability Reporting      

Sustainability reporting is the primary vehicle by which global businesses internally assess and publicly communicate their sustainability commitments. This class introduces students to the concepts, frameworks and methodologies involved in global business assessment and public reporting of sustainability-related risks, targets and opportunities. After an introduction to the concept of “embedded sustainability” as business strategy, the class explores and evaluates three sustainability reporting frameworks: the Global Reporting Initiative (GRI); the Sustainability Standards Accounting Board (SASB); and CDP, especially climate and water reporting. We also explore the emerging “six capitals” Integrated Reporting Framework which integrates the assessment of financial and sustainability performance in one report. Students work in teams to develop an industry materiality matrix against which to compare and evaluate the three corporate sustainability reports. The class concludes by reflecting on the utility of mandatory reporting in driving systemic change towards sustainable economies.

Fall 2015 - MIIS

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IEPG 8623 - Sem:Bus Models for Sustain Dev      

This seminar explores the growing role of the private sector in promoting sustainable development goals in low and middle income countries through core business activities. The overarching aim of such business models is to reduce poverty and promote sustainability by: 1) stimulating access to global markets and supply chains; 2) delivering affordable and sustainable goods and services; 3) responding to the demands of climate change mitigation and adaptation; and/or 4) promoting local capacities for sustainable production. The seminar will examine case studies of five business models, ranging from small-scale, for-profit and non-profit enterprises to partnerships between multinational corporations and NGOs and/or development agencies. Students will work in teams to undertake their own case studies. Together, we will seek to draw lessons for scalability.

Spring 2015 - MIIS

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IEPG 9530 - Business and Global Issues      

Whether in business, government, or NGOs, leadership requires honing the ability to make strategic decisions in a complex, dynamic and high-risk global context -- and often in high-pressure, short-deadline work environments. This Workshop will provide students a rich and realistic opportunity to work in just such an environment.

The Workshop will provide participants with a wealth of complicated material in a variety of formats related to our case: Goldcorp’s highly conflicted Marlin gold mine in Guatemala. Students will be familiar with the case materials prior to the first meeting of the Workshop; the initial class will, through a series of group exercises, provide a platform for addressing issues of economic development, environmental risk, human rights, government policy, global business norms, chronic violence, and international trade and investment rules. How those dimensions are prioritized, conceptualized and understood will largely be student-driven, with the instructors playing a supportive role. Students will then be encouraged to explore, adapt and apply “solution” methodologies, which could include cost-benefit, risk assessment, and risk-performance analyses, scenario creation, deliberative stakeholder engagement, and supply chain reconfiguration.

Students will work in groups to combine issue knowledge and problem-solving methods to define and evaluate strategic options for different players—the company, the government, and the local communities and their NGO allies. This group work will largely be carried out in the lapse between the two class meetings; students will draw upon the expertise of GSIPM faculty (and possibly others) as needed. The second class meeting will end with a series of group presentations of their proposed solutions to the case problem, and a comparative assessment of the proposals by students and faculty.

The Workshop pilots an innovative “raw” case-study pedagogical approach to understand urgent global issues and build competencies to frame and address them. Our hope is to incorporate the lessons of this workshop to scale this approach up to a regular 2-credit course in the Fall, 2014 semester.

Spring 2014 - MIIS

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IPMG 8530 - Business and Global Issues      

Whether in business, government, or NGOs, leadership requires honing the ability to make strategic decisions in a complex, dynamic and high-risk global context -- and often in high-pressure, short-deadline work environments. This Workshop will provide students a rich and realistic opportunity to work in just such an environment.

The Workshop will provide participants with a wealth of complicated material in a variety of formats related to our case: Goldcorp’s highly conflicted Marlin gold mine in Guatemala. Students will be familiar with the case materials prior to the first meeting of the Workshop; the initial class will, through a series of group exercises, provide a platform for addressing issues of economic development, environmental risk, human rights, government policy, global business norms, chronic violence, and international trade and investment rules. How those dimensions are prioritized, conceptualized and understood will largely be student-driven, with the instructors playing a supportive role. Students will then be encouraged to explore, adapt and apply “solution” methodologies, which could include cost-benefit, risk assessment, and risk-performance analyses, scenario creation, deliberative stakeholder engagement, and supply chain reconfiguration.

Students will work in groups to combine issue knowledge and problem-solving methods to define and evaluate strategic options for different players—the company, the government, and the local communities and their NGO allies. This group work will largely be carried out in the lapse between the two class meetings; students will draw upon the expertise of GSIPM faculty (and possibly others) as needed. The second class meeting will end with a series of group presentations of their proposed solutions to the case problem, and a comparative assessment of the proposals by students and faculty.

The Workshop pilots an innovative “raw” case-study pedagogical approach to understand urgent global issues and build competencies to frame and address them. Our hope is to incorporate the lessons of this workshop to scale this approach up to a regular 2-credit course in the Fall, 2014 semester.

Spring 2014 - MIIS

More Information »

IPSG 9530 - Business and Global Issues      

Whether in business, government, or NGOs, leadership requires honing the ability to make strategic decisions in a complex, dynamic and high-risk global context -- and often in high-pressure, short-deadline work environments. This Workshop will provide students a rich and realistic opportunity to work in just such an environment.

The Workshop will provide participants with a wealth of complicated material in a variety of formats related to our case: Goldcorp’s highly conflicted Marlin gold mine in Guatemala. Students will be familiar with the case materials prior to the first meeting of the Workshop; the initial class will, through a series of group exercises, provide a platform for addressing issues of economic development, environmental risk, human rights, government policy, global business norms, chronic violence, and international trade and investment rules. How those dimensions are prioritized, conceptualized and understood will largely be student-driven, with the instructors playing a supportive role. Students will then be encouraged to explore, adapt and apply “solution” methodologies, which could include cost-benefit, risk assessment, and risk-performance analyses, scenario creation, deliberative stakeholder engagement, and supply chain reconfiguration.

Students will work in groups to combine issue knowledge and problem-solving methods to define and evaluate strategic options for different players—the company, the government, and the local communities and their NGO allies. This group work will largely be carried out in the lapse between the two class meetings; students will draw upon the expertise of GSIPM faculty (and possibly others) as needed. The second class meeting will end with a series of group presentations of their proposed solutions to the case problem, and a comparative assessment of the proposals by students and faculty.

The Workshop pilots an innovative “raw” case-study pedagogical approach to understand urgent global issues and build competencies to frame and address them. Our hope is to incorporate the lessons of this workshop to scale this approach up to a regular 2-credit course in the Fall, 2014 semester.

Spring 2014 - MIIS

More Information »

MBAG 9530 - Business and Global Issues      

Whether in business, government, or NGOs, leadership requires honing the ability to make strategic decisions in a complex, dynamic and high-risk global context -- and often in high-pressure, short-deadline work environments. This Workshop will provide students a rich and realistic opportunity to work in just such an environment.

The Workshop will provide participants with a wealth of complicated material in a variety of formats related to our case: Goldcorp’s highly conflicted Marlin gold mine in Guatemala. Students will be familiar with the case materials prior to the first meeting of the Workshop; the initial class will, through a series of group exercises, provide a platform for addressing issues of economic development, environmental risk, human rights, government policy, global business norms, chronic violence, and international trade and investment rules. How those dimensions are prioritized, conceptualized and understood will largely be student-driven, with the instructors playing a supportive role. Students will then be encouraged to explore, adapt and apply “solution” methodologies, which could include cost-benefit, risk assessment, and risk-performance analyses, scenario creation, deliberative stakeholder engagement, and supply chain reconfiguration.

Students will work in groups to combine issue knowledge and problem-solving methods to define and evaluate strategic options for different players—the company, the government, and the local communities and their NGO allies. This group work will largely be carried out in the lapse between the two class meetings; students will draw upon the expertise of GSIPM faculty (and possibly others) as needed. The second class meeting will end with a series of group presentations of their proposed solutions to the case problem, and a comparative assessment of the proposals by students and faculty.

The Workshop pilots an innovative “raw” case-study pedagogical approach to understand urgent global issues and build competencies to frame and address them. Our hope is to incorporate the lessons of this workshop to scale this approach up to a regular 2-credit course in the Fall, 2014 semester.

Spring 2014 - MIIS

More Information »

MBAG 9614 - Business,Sustainablity&Society      

This course provides a foundation in the core concepts and strategic management tools in the dynamic field of global business sustainability. The central aim of the course is to prepare students to design and lead sustainability innovations in or in partnership with global business organizations. Students will work in teams to produce a sustainability strategy for a global corporation.

The course covers six key topics:

• Global sustainability challenges and the role of business in responding to them;

• New social expectations of business and the promise and limitations of corporate social responsibility;

• Sustainability as global business strategy and opportunity;

• Business opportunity and challenges in promoting development in poor markets;

• Managing sustainability, including performance metrics, partnerships, and financing

• Public policy innovations that support business sustainability.

Fall 2013 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS

More Information »

MBAG 9620 - Sustainablility Reporting      

Fall 2015 - MIIS

More Information »

MBAG 9623 - Sem:Bus Models for Sustain Dev      

This seminar explores the growing role of the private sector in promoting sustainable development goals in low and middle income countries through core business activities. The overarching aim of such business models is to reduce poverty and promote sustainability by: 1) stimulating access to global markets and supply chains; 2) delivering affordable and sustainable goods and services; 3) responding to the demands of climate change mitigation and adaptation; and/or 4) promoting local capacities for sustainable production. The seminar will examine case studies of five business models, ranging from small-scale, for-profit and non-profit enterprises to partnerships between multinational corporations and NGOs and/or development agencies. Students will work in teams to undertake their own case studies. Together, we will seek to draw lessons for scalability.

Spring 2015 - MIIS

More Information »

MIIS Tags
Expertise

Sustainable development, business and sustainability, foreign direct investment and the environment, collaborative governance, development economics, global environmental governance. 

Video interview of Dr. Zarsky

Extra Information

Education

Ph.D. Department of Economics, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, 2006; M.A. Economics, Department of Economics and Political Economy, New School for Social Research, New York 1986.

Publications

Can extractive industries promote sustainable development? A net benefits framework and a case study of the Marlin Mine in Guatemala, (co-author), Journal of Environment and Development, 20(2), 131-154, April, 2013.

Extractive industries and local communities: the elusive search for sustainable development, World Policy Review, July, 2013, available at http://www.worldpoliticsreview.com.

Searching for Gold in the Highlands of Guatemala: Economic Benefits and Environmental Risks of the Marlin Mine, (co-author), Global Development and Environment Institute, September, 2011.

"Climate Resilient Industrial Development: Design Principles and Alternative Models", in S.R. Khan and J. Christiansen, ed., Towards New Developmentalism: Market as Means Rather than Master, Routledge Economics, 2010.

Enclave Economy: Foreign Investment and Sustainable Development in Mexico’s Silicon Valley (co-author), Boston: MIT Press, 2007.

“No Miracle Drug: Foreign Direct Investment and Sustainable Development” (co-author), in L. Zarsky (ed.), International Investment for Sustainable Development: Balancing Rights and Rewards, London: Earthscan Press, 2005.

International Investment for Sustainable Development: Balancing Rights and Rewards (contributing editor), London: Earthscan Press, 2005.

“Stuck in the Mud? Nation-States, Globalisation and the Environment," in OECD, Globalisation and the Environment, Paris: OECD, 1997. Reprinted in K. Gallagher and J. Werksman (eds.), Earthscan Reader on International Trade and Sustainable Development, London:  Earthscan Press, 2002, pp. 19-44; and in  K. Conca and G. Dabelko, Green Planet Blues, Environmental Politics from Stockholm to Johannesberg, Westview Press, 2004.

Human Rights and the Environment: Conflicts and Norms in a Globalizing World (contributing editor) London: Earthscan Press, 2002.

Beyond Good Deeds: Case Studies and A New Policy Agenda for Corporate Accountability (co-author), Berkeley: Natural Heritage Institute, July 2002.

“APEC and the ‘Sustainable Development’ Agenda,’ in R. Steinberg (ed.), The Greening of Trade Law, Rowman and Littlefield, 2002.

“Global Reach: Human Rights and Environment in the Framework of Corporate Accountability,” in L. Zarsky (ed.), Human Rights and Environment: Conflicts and Norms in a Globalizing World, London: Earthscan Press, 2002, pp. 31-56.

“Civil Society and the Future of Environmental Governance in Asia,” (co-author), in D. Angel and M. Rock, (eds.), Asia's Clean Revolution: Industry, Growth and the Environment, Greenleaf Publishing, 2001, pp.128-154.

“From Bystanders to Collaborators, New Roles for Civil Society in Urban-Industrial Environmental Governance,” in Asian Development Bank, Asian Environment Outlook, Manila:  ADB, 2001.

“Environmental Norms in the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation Forum,” in D. Shelton (ed.), Commitment and Compliance, The Role of Non-Binding Norms in the International Legal System, New York: Oxford University Press, 2000, pp. 303-329.

“Havens, Halos, and Spaghetti: Untangling the Evidence About FDI and the Environment,” in OECD, Foreign Direct Investment and the Environment, Paris: OECD,  1999, pp. 47-74.

"Energy and the Environment in Asia-Pacific,” in P. Chasek, (ed.), The Global Environment in the 21st Century, Tokyo: United Nations University Press, 1999.

"Lessons of Liberalization in Asia: From Structural Adjustment to Sustainable Development," in Financing for Environmentally Sustainable Development,  Asian Development Bank: Manila, 1994.

“Towards an International Eco-Labeling Framework,” in OECD, Life Cycle Management and Trade, Paris: OECD, 1994, pp. 194-204.

“Sustainable Development: Challenges for Australia,” in Our Common Future, Australian Edition, Melbourne: Oxford University Press, 1990. Also published as a monograph by the Commission for the Future, Melbourne, February, 1990.

Faculty Type
Regular Faculty
Dynamic Features
Course Catalog

Ron Schill

First Name
Ron
Last Name
Schill
Ron Schill, Picture
Job Title
Adjunct Professor
Location
Casa Fuente 300C
Phone
(831) 647-6683
Language(s)
Français

Subject Expertise

Expertise

Marketing feasibility and market opportunity analysis, enterprise scale-up, international marketing plans, country market selection and market entry, regional and global expansion; frontier and emerging market social impact and business enterprise decisions, enterprise development, and marketing programs; marketing and sourcing decisions and relationships between business enterprises; marketing negotiations; international strategic partnerships; the interface between marketing and corporate competitive strategy; global marketing strategies; socially and environmentally responsible marketing programs; MBA core principles of marketing and brand management.

Faculty Program Tags
Extra Information

Education

Postdoctoral study in global supply chains and international high technology marketing at Harvard Business School; Ph.D. Marketing, University of Oregon; MBA, Finance, University of Utah; Graduate study in international development economics, University of California; B.S., Management/Human Resources, University of Utah.

Selected Publications

“Global Management of Technology Strategy in the Air Express Industry: Paradigms and Constructs”

“Managing the Strategic Competitive Unit: Toward a New Paradigm in Global Marketing”

“Managing International Joint Ventures and Collaborative R&D in High tech Organizations”

“Breeding and Raising Excellent Cash Cow Products”

“The Seven C’s of International Pricing”

“Contract Incentivization and Risk Distribution: Structuring Buyer/Seller Business Relationships”

“Organizational Buying Behavior in the U.S. Department of Defense”

Faculty Type
Adjunct Faculty

Luc Soenen

First Name
Luc
Last Name
Soenen
luc_soenen_picture
Job Title
Adjunct Professor

Professor Soenen has taught in the department of Industrial Engineering and Management Science, Eindhoven University of Technology; Antwerp Business School; Limburg University Centre; University of San Diego; California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo.

Expertise

Corporate finance, foreign exchange management, international capital markets, international finance

Course List
Faculty Program Tags
Faculty Type
Adjunct Faculty
Dynamic Features
Course Catalog

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