Kent Glenzer

First Name
Kent
Last Name
Glenzer
Kent, Picture
Job Title
Associate Professor (MPA/MBA)
Location
McCone 114
City, State, ZIP
Monterey, CA 93940
Phone
831.647.4149
Language(s)
Français
português

What I am most passionate about: I’m obsessed with the organizations and people who say that they are passionate about fighting poverty, social injustice, and abuse of human rights.  I’m obsessed with how these kinds of actors carve up the world a) conceptually, b) pragmatically, and c) in opposition to other actors.  I’m obsessed with the idea that there is no way to step outside of power – no way to extricate yourself or your organization from power relations, no privileged stance from which to pronounce or act in a world.  Along with many others, I believe that poverty –

Expertise

I have extensive work and research experience in sub-Saharan Africa, having lived there for 13 years and focused on it as both an external and internal consultant to NGOs and public sector agencies for 10 more years.   I specialize in organizations, organizational development, organizational behavior and culture, institutional and organizational fields, and organizational evolution and learning processes.  All my work and thinking centralizes the power dynamics, inequalities, and identity politics that surround and constitute development projects, programs, and strategies.  I have proven managerial and leadership competencies, and this understanding of how theory, big ideas, “best practice” and innovation actually get refracted through pragmatic choices of the working professional is perhaps the highest value I bring to my work with students.   Related to this is experience in program and organizational monitoring, evaluation, and learning systems, performance management, strategic planning, and social, cultural, and political economic analysis.   Finally, I have a strong background, both practically and academically, in civil society, social movements, and policy advocacy.

Faculty Program Tags
Extra Information

Recent Accomplishments

Appointed to Editorial Board of the Action Research Journal.

Led the formative evaluation of Save the Children’s $20 million program devoted to global knowledge sharing and building robust communities of practice related to food security programming. 

Worked with the Ford Foundation in China – and NGO partners there -- on a strategic monitoring, evaluation, and learning system for the country office.  This work is ongoing.

Contributed a chapter to a book on understanding culture and cultural change for the Army Research Institute, a book targeted at army officers, as well as being lead expert for a training module for army staff on using appreciative inquiry to advise host country staff on organizational development and change.  This work is ongoing.

Authored Oxfam America’s Rights-Oriented Programming for Effectiveness and Oxfam International’s Program Principles, which both served to strategically frame the organization’s long-term and rights-based approaches to development and social change.

Designed a three-year, multi-level portfolio assessment of CARE’s work on women’s empowerment and oversaw the massaging of evaluation results into organizational practice.

Previous Work

Prior to accepting an appointment at MIIS, I worked for Oxfam America for four years, CARE USA for 12 years, during which time I had the opportunity to live and work in Mali for nearly seven years, Mozambique for four years, and Ethiopia for more than two years. My consulting has taken me to more than 30 countries in Africa, south and east Asia, and Latin America and the Caribbean.  I’ve also worked with the Program for Appropriate Technology in Health and I was a Peace Corps volunteer in Mali.

Education

  • Bachelor in Journalism, Northwestern University, 1983.
  • Masters in Communication, Cornell University, 1990.
  • Ph.D., Emory University, 2005.

Careers in Strategic Planning and Management

Students working with me will be well prepared  for consulting on or full-time positions in program/project monitoring and evaluation, strategic planning, project and program management, and facilitating organizational change processes.  You might find yourself in the human resources department of a large international NGO, as a learning or staff/management development specialist.  You might find yourself the manager of a  civil society strengthening project in sub-Saharan Africa financed by a philanthropic foundation.  You might find yourself part of a team contracted to evaluate a program or project of Oxfam or CARE.

Publications

“Chutes, Ladders, and Sticky Institutions:  Understanding Social Change in Sub-Saharan Africa,” in Beret E. Strong, LisaRe Brooks, Michelle Ramsden Zbylut, and Linda Roan eds., Sociocultural Systems: The Next Step in Army Cultural Capability, forthcoming.

iccr "Addressing Root Causes of Economic and Social Injustice:  Considerations of Concept, Strategy, and Measurement from Oxfam America’s Rights-Based Programs.” In Building Sustainable Communities Through Multi-Party Collaboration.  New York:  Interfaith Council on Corporate Responsibility, 2011.  Pp. 29-34.

cjas_article “La Sécheresse:  The Social and Institutional Construction of a Development Problem in the Malian (Soudanese) Sahel, c.1900-1982.”Canadian Journal of African Studies 36, 1 (2002):  1-34.

dev_in_practice_article "Leading learning and change from the middle:  Re-conceptualizing strategy’s purpose, content and measures.”  Co-authored with Colin Beckwith and Alan Fowler.  Development in Practice 12, 3-4 (August 2001):  409-423.

state_donor_ngo_configurations “State, Donor and NGO Configurations in Malian Development 1960-1999:  The Enactment and Contestation of Global Rationalized Myths in an Organizational Field.” In Globalization, the Third World State and Poverty-Alleviation in the Twenty-First Century, ed. Ikubolajeh Logan,  Aldershot, England:  Ashgate Publishing, 2001. Pp. 161-180.
Faculty Type
Regular Faculty
Dynamic Features
Course Catalog

Bruce Paton

First Name
Bruce
Last Name
Paton
Bruce Paton
Job Title
Adjunct Professor
Phone
831.647.4149

Bruce Paton teaches courses on sustainable business, corporate social responsibility, and global business strategy.

His research focuses on business strategies and public policies for sustainability. A major emphasis in this research is development of methods for designing and evaluating voluntary and collaborative initiatives to address social and environmental issues in management.

Faculty Program Tags
Expertise

Sustainable business, corporate social responsibility, global business strategy, social and environmental issues in management.

Course List

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

IMGT 8626 - Poverty,BusStrategy&Sustainab      

A large portion of the world’s population experiences unmet needs for nutrition, clean water, sanitation, health care and education, as well as communication, financial and other services. Many business efforts have emerged to address unmet needs through for-profit and not-for-profit provision of goods and services. This course explores the “base of the pyramid hypothesis” which asserts that business and the poor can achieve mutual benefit through business efforts to address these unmet needs. The course will address critical questions including the following: What are the key factors that inhibit delivery of goods and services to the poor? How can businesses recognize the opportunities in these challenges? What strategies, concepts and tools will help businesses address the unmet needs of the poor effectively? How should we evaluate the effectiveness of business efforts to serve unmet needs? The course explores a wide range of potential solutions ranging from micro-credit and micro-enterprise to multi-national corporate ventures.

Spring 2011 - MIIS

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IMGT 8636 - BusStrtegies 4 PovertyAleviatn      

Fall 2011 - MIIS

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IMGT 8646 - FMS Professional Preparation      

Spring 2011 - MIIS

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IMGT 8651 - Global Business Strategies      

The primary focus of this course is on managing the business-level strategic management function in a global industry. In global industries, corporate performance is strongly influenced by the competitive strategies and organizational capabilities of companies, the economic structure of the industry, and the policies of home and host governments. Adaptive firms in global industries will face significant opportunities well into the next century. Those firms, which do not align themselves with the environment, will face contraction, acquisition, or extinction. Thus, firms that can develop and implement strategies based on (1) global scale economies, (2) production rationalization, (3) a coordinated worldwide network of activities, and/or (4) astute management of home and host government relations will find themselves in a position to outperform competitors that operate as local or national firms. The course will be conducted using both the lecture and case methods and active student participation is required.

Summer 2011 - MIIS

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IPOL 9646 - FMS Professional Preparation      

Spring 2011 - MIIS

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Extra Information

Education

B.A., Environmental Science, Wesleyan University; MBA, Stanford University; Ph.D., Environmental Studies, University of California, Santa Cruz.

Publications

Paton, B. and Halme, M. (2007) “Bringing the needs of the poor into the BOP debate”. Business Strategy and the Environment 16(8): 585-586.

Paton, B. and Halme, M. (2007) “Reframing the BOP Debate in GIN.” Business Strategy and the Environment 16(2): 169-170

Paton, B. (2006) ‘Collaboration among industry, civil society, and government for sustainability:a framework for identifying opportunities’, Progress in Industrial Ecology – An International Journal, Vol. 3, Nos. 1/2, pp.148–162.

Paton, B. (2006) “Dynamics of Voluntary Product Labeling Programs: An Energy Star Case Study” in T. deBruijn and V. Norberg-Bohm (eds.), Industrial Transformation: Environmental Policy Innovation in the United States and Europe, MIT Press.

Paton, B. (2005) “Efficiency Gains within Firms under Voluntary Environmental Initiatives”, in K. Hargroves and M.H. Smith (eds), The Natural Advantage of Nations - Business Opportunities, Innovation and Governance in the 21st Century, EA Press, Crows Nest, NSW Australia.

Paton, B. (2005). “Mental Models of Voluntary Environmental Initiatives”, in K. Hargroves and M.H. Smith (eds), The Natural Advantage of Nations - Business Opportunities, Innovation and Governance in the 21st Century, EA Press, Crows Nest, NSW Australia.

Howarth, R.B., Haddad, B. and B. Paton (2004). “Energy Efficiency and Greenhouse Gas Emissions: Correcting Market Failures Using Voluntary Participation Programs” in P. Thalman and A. Baranzini, (eds) Voluntary Approaches in Climate Policy Edward Elgar Publishing, Cheltenham, UK.

Faculty Type
Adjunct Faculty
Dynamic Features
Course Catalog

Sandra M. Dow

First Name
Sandra
Last Name
Dow
Sandra Dow profile
Job Title
Professor of International Finance and Fisher International MBA Program Chair
Location
McCone 211
Phone
831.647.4187
Language(s)
Français

Dr. Sandra M. Dow has taught at the University of Quebec at Montreal (Canada), Concordia University (Canada), Wake Forest University (USA), Saint Mary's University (Canada), and Warsaw School of Economics (Poland).  During her academic career she has taught a range of courses including:  Corporate Finance, International Finance, International Investments, Corporate Governance, and Money and Banking.

MIIS Tags
Short Programs & Research Centers
Expertise

Corporate Governance; International Finance; Environmental, Social, and Governance Risk Management (ESG)

Course List

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

IMGT 8619 - Corp Govrnance & ESG Risk Mgmt      

This workshop focuses on key components of corporate governance. We begin with an examination of the firm’s ownership structure and then zero in on two important internal governance mechanisms: the board of directors and executive compensation policy. An overview of external governance mechanism is provided that includes the market for corporate control and a discussion of gatekeepers (e.g. security analysts, lawyers, accountants, etc.) The course will be conducted using both lecture and cases and active student participation in both is encouraged and required.

Spring 2012 - MIIS

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IMGT 8658 - Corporate Governance      

The recent financial crisis underscores the importance of corporate governance regulation and enforcement. This course will combine various theoretical perspectives on corporate governance with practical applications through lectures, class discussion and case analysis. The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the theoretical foundations of corporate governance and demonstrate the complexity of corporate governance issues. In addition, students will become familiar with the various mechanisms of corporate governance and develop the skills necessary to evaluate the governance of a company.

Spring 2011 - MIIS, Fall 2011 - MIIS, Fall 2012 - MIIS

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IMGT 8668 - Environmental Risk Management      

This workshop examines the business case for addressing climate change issues. Strategic corporate responses to climate change and environmental challenges do not seem to be the primary domain of corporate management. Such decisions are often not seen as profit maximizing in the short run and are generally not consistent with executive incentives. Nevertheless, some climate change responses may indeed be firm value maximizing and so such decisions can be expected to reflect the nature of a firm’s corporate governance.In this workshop we examine the potential impact of climate change on firm value and examine how the quality of the firm’s governance can influence firm response. The course will be conducted using both the lecture and case methods and active student participation is both encouraged and required.

Spring 2011 - MIIS

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IMGT 8682 - Climate Risk & Corp Value      

This workshop examines the business case for addressing climate change issues. Strategic corporate responses to climate change and environmental challenges do not seem to be the primary domain of corporate management. Such decisions are often not seen as profit maximizing in the short run and are generally not consistent with executive incentives. Nevertheless, some climate change responses may indeed be firm value maximizing and so such decisions can be expected to reflect the nature of a firm’s corporate governance. In this workshop we examine the potential impact of climate change on firm value and examine how the quality of the firm’s governance can influence firm response. The workshop will be conducted using both lecture and cases and active student participation is both encouraged and required.

Spring 2012 - MIIS

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IMGT 8697 - Social Risk & Corporate Value      

This workshop provides a framework for analyzing the social risk of the firm and tries to find any links that may exist to corporate value. We will examine various attempts to measure social risk and work with social risk data from a leading data provider (Risk Metrics). The costs of adhering to high environmental and social standards can translate to higher operating costs that in turn may place the firm at a competitive disadvantage and lead to lower profitability. On the other hand strong social policies can confer a competitive advantage on the firm by stimulating technological innovations, improving the efficiency of resource use and thereby cutting costs, strengthening a firm’s reputation and brand, and reducing the firm’s operational risk. The workshop will be conducted using both lecture and cases and active student participation is both encouraged and required.

Spring 2012 - MIIS

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MBAG 8536 - Financial Management      

This core course is designed to help students develop an understanding of the fundamental and practical analytical tools of corporate finance as well as its underlying concepts and principles through an encompassing analytical framework of both risk and return within qualitative and quantitative dimensions. The purpose of this course is to study the management of the firm from a financial point of view by focusing in the financial manager's primary task, which is to plan for the acquisition and use of funds so as to maximize the value of the firm.

Spring 2013 - MIIS, Spring 2014 - MIIS, Spring 2015 - MIIS

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MBAG 8612 - Case Competition Prep Course      

This course prepares students for MBA Case Competition participation. We emphasize “raw cases” as our target competitions: The Economist, Corporate Knights, Hult Prize and Aspen have all adopted this format. In addition to introducing you to the “raw case” approach, you will acquire skills that can give teams a competitive edge in Case competition. Specifically, we provide (in collaboration with participants) possible information sources that you may consult in the course of your analyses, an overview of business methods. Further the differentiating characteristics in elite case competitions may rest not only on your analyses, but also on the crispness of your presentation – both written and oral. Thus the pre-case phase will allow you to improve these skills as well.

Fall 2014 - MIIS

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MBAG 8619 - Corporate Govrnance      

Spring 2014 - MIIS, Spring 2015 - MIIS

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MBAG 8629 / IMGT 8629 - Intl Financial Markets      

The course provides the student with the conceptual framework necessary to appreciate and understand the key financial markets and instruments that facilitate trade and investment activities in a dynamically evolving global financial environment. For this purpose, the course focuses on the global financial environment; the foreign exchange market; the foreign currency options market; the currency futures market; the currency forward market; the currency and interest rate swap markets; the international bond market; the international equity market; international portfolio diversification; and international parity relations.

Fall 2011 - MIIS, Fall 2012 - MIIS, Fall 2013 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS

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MBAG 8638 / IMGT 8638 - Intl Investment Analysis      

This course covers theory and instruments used in developing international investment portfolios. Students gain an understanding of international capital and money markets through the development and management of their own portfolios. The course also covers the use of hedging strategies, asset pricing models and management of exchange risk.

Prerequisite: IMGT 8531 & IMGT 8536.

Spring 2011 - MIIS, Spring 2012 - MIIS, Spring 2013 - MIIS, Fall 2013 - MIIS, Spring 2015 - MIIS

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MBAG 8688 / IMGT 8688 - ESG Risk Assessment      

Successful investing is dependent upon the ability to determine the factors that influence the market's valuation of a company… and then judge the accuracy of that valuation. The goal of this course is to demonstrate how Environmental, Social, and Governance (ESG) factors can be used along with traditional financial metrics to assess risks and opportunities confronting firms. As such, this is a course in socially responsible investing taught from a finance perspective. The importance of “extra-financial” factors in evaluating the risks and opportunities confronting the firm is no longer a fringe area for finance professionals. In 2008 the Chartered Financial Analyst’s association introduced ESG into their curriculum. According to a Thomson Reuters survey released in May 2009, 84% of global buy-side investors said they evaluate ESG criteria to some degree when making investment decisions. Moreover, institutional investors are increasingly vocal in their demands that ESG risks be disclosed to the SEC. There are three themes to the course: Objectives of business (wealth maximization versus long term sustainability?), the pillars of socially responsible investing and the development of SRI funds.

Fall 2011 - MIIS, Fall 2012 - MIIS, Fall 2013 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS

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Faculty Program Tags
Extra Information

Publications

Dow, Sandra and Aggarwal, Raj. (2011) Navigating the C2 Economy: The 21st Century Business Challenge. The European Financial Review, 15 April, 2011.

Dow, Sandra and McGuire, Jean. (2011) Industrial Networks in Japan: Blessing or Curse? The European Financial Review, 17 Feb. 2011.

Faculty Type
Regular Faculty
Dynamic Features
Course Catalog

Lyuba Zarsky

First Name
Lyuba
Last Name
Zarsky
Lyuba Zarsky, Professor, Image
Job Title
Associate Professor
Location
McGowan 320B
Phone
831.647.6436
Language(s)
Español

Professor Zarsky has a PhD in Economics and has a distinguished record of professional experience and publication in the fields of sustainable development and business and sustainability.

Faculty Program Tags
Short Programs & Research Centers
Course List

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

IEPG 8507 - Governing the Global Commons      

Earth’s life-supporting eco-systems are in crisis due to unsustainable human practices, especially economic production and consumption. At the same time, deep global economic inequities leave more than half of the world’s people living in poverty. The overarching aim of international environmental cooperation is to point human societies towards patterns of ecologically sustainable and equitable development.

This course provides an introduction to the political dynamics, legal structure, and institutions of international cooperation aimed at sustainable governance of the earth’s eco-systems. The course is in three parts.

Part One first examines global environmental problems and politics. After a brief look at the current state of global eco-system services, we examine the logic of global collective action via classical and cosmopolitan concepts of “the commons”. We then explore North-South conflicts based on perceived trade-offs between “environment” and “development” and evaluate current paradigms of economic and population growth.

Part Two examines the key principles, institutions, and treaties of international environmental law. We first examine the foundations of international environmental law, including legal principles, customary norms, and the treaty making process. We then explore treaties covering the atmosphere, viz, the Montreal Protocol and the climate regime, as well as the ocean and bio-diversity. We also consider the role of climate-geo-engineering in mitigating climate change and evaluate the technological, governance and ethical dilemmas it poses. Part Two concludes by examining the effectiveness of international environmental law to date in increasing the resilience of global eco-systems.

Part Three examines global collective action from the perspective of “global environmental governance” (GEG). We explore the role of non-state actors, especially business, scientists, and NGOs, and the efficacy of “soft law” and voluntary standards in changing global business practice. We examine the theory of network analysis and consider how networked governance is evident in multi-level approaches to GEG, including city actions on climate change and regional approaches to trans-boundary resource management.

Spring 2013 - MIIS, Fall 2013 - MIIS, Spring 2015 - MIIS

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IEPG 8598 - Business,Sustainablity&Society      

This course provides a foundation in the core concepts and strategic management tools in the dynamic field of global business sustainability. The central aim of the course is to prepare students to design and lead sustainability innovations in or in partnership with global business organizations. Students will work in teams to produce a sustainability strategy for a global corporation.

The course covers six key topics:

• Global sustainability challenges and the role of business in responding to them;

• New social expectations of business and the promise and limitations of corporate social responsibility;

• Sustainability as global business strategy and opportunity;

• Business opportunity and challenges in promoting development in poor markets;

• Managing sustainability, including performance metrics, partnerships, and financing

• Public policy innovations that support business sustainability.

Fall 2013 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS

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IEPG 8611 - Sustainable Coastal Management      

The coast is the most dynamic landscape on earth. It changes every time a wave breaks, a tide changes, or streams flow. About seventy percent of the world’s population lives within 100 km of the coast. This course provides a foundation in the core scientific principles, governance frameworks, and economic challenges and opportunities related to the quest for sustainable coastal management and adaptation. A central theme of the course is the need to assess and respond to coastal climate vulnerability, including via adaptive policy and planning at diverse scales of coastal governance. The case studies in the course encompass both developed and less developed countries, and an emphasis on management of large coastal cities, coastal ecosystems, and other coastal land-uses.

Spring 2013 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS

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IEPG 8623 - Sem:Bus Models for Sustain Dev      

This seminar explores the growing role of the private sector in promoting sustainable development goals in low and middle income countries through core business activities. The overarching aim of such business models is to reduce poverty and promote sustainability by: 1) stimulating access to global markets and supply chains; 2) delivering affordable and sustainable goods and services; 3) responding to the demands of climate change mitigation and adaptation; and/or 4) promoting local capacities for sustainable production. The seminar will examine case studies of five business models, ranging from small-scale, for-profit and non-profit enterprises to partnerships between multinational corporations and NGOs and/or development agencies. Students will work in teams to undertake their own case studies. Together, we will seek to draw lessons for scalability.

Spring 2013 - MIIS, Spring 2015 - MIIS

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IEPG 9530 - Business and Global Issues      

Whether in business, government, or NGOs, leadership requires honing the ability to make strategic decisions in a complex, dynamic and high-risk global context -- and often in high-pressure, short-deadline work environments. This Workshop will provide students a rich and realistic opportunity to work in just such an environment.

The Workshop will provide participants with a wealth of complicated material in a variety of formats related to our case: Goldcorp’s highly conflicted Marlin gold mine in Guatemala. Students will be familiar with the case materials prior to the first meeting of the Workshop; the initial class will, through a series of group exercises, provide a platform for addressing issues of economic development, environmental risk, human rights, government policy, global business norms, chronic violence, and international trade and investment rules. How those dimensions are prioritized, conceptualized and understood will largely be student-driven, with the instructors playing a supportive role. Students will then be encouraged to explore, adapt and apply “solution” methodologies, which could include cost-benefit, risk assessment, and risk-performance analyses, scenario creation, deliberative stakeholder engagement, and supply chain reconfiguration.

Students will work in groups to combine issue knowledge and problem-solving methods to define and evaluate strategic options for different players—the company, the government, and the local communities and their NGO allies. This group work will largely be carried out in the lapse between the two class meetings; students will draw upon the expertise of GSIPM faculty (and possibly others) as needed. The second class meeting will end with a series of group presentations of their proposed solutions to the case problem, and a comparative assessment of the proposals by students and faculty.

The Workshop pilots an innovative “raw” case-study pedagogical approach to understand urgent global issues and build competencies to frame and address them. Our hope is to incorporate the lessons of this workshop to scale this approach up to a regular 2-credit course in the Fall, 2014 semester.

Spring 2014 - MIIS

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IMGT 8614 - Business,Sustainablity&Society      

Fall 2012 - MIIS

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IPMG 8530 - Business and Global Issues      

Whether in business, government, or NGOs, leadership requires honing the ability to make strategic decisions in a complex, dynamic and high-risk global context -- and often in high-pressure, short-deadline work environments. This Workshop will provide students a rich and realistic opportunity to work in just such an environment.

The Workshop will provide participants with a wealth of complicated material in a variety of formats related to our case: Goldcorp’s highly conflicted Marlin gold mine in Guatemala. Students will be familiar with the case materials prior to the first meeting of the Workshop; the initial class will, through a series of group exercises, provide a platform for addressing issues of economic development, environmental risk, human rights, government policy, global business norms, chronic violence, and international trade and investment rules. How those dimensions are prioritized, conceptualized and understood will largely be student-driven, with the instructors playing a supportive role. Students will then be encouraged to explore, adapt and apply “solution” methodologies, which could include cost-benefit, risk assessment, and risk-performance analyses, scenario creation, deliberative stakeholder engagement, and supply chain reconfiguration.

Students will work in groups to combine issue knowledge and problem-solving methods to define and evaluate strategic options for different players—the company, the government, and the local communities and their NGO allies. This group work will largely be carried out in the lapse between the two class meetings; students will draw upon the expertise of GSIPM faculty (and possibly others) as needed. The second class meeting will end with a series of group presentations of their proposed solutions to the case problem, and a comparative assessment of the proposals by students and faculty.

The Workshop pilots an innovative “raw” case-study pedagogical approach to understand urgent global issues and build competencies to frame and address them. Our hope is to incorporate the lessons of this workshop to scale this approach up to a regular 2-credit course in the Fall, 2014 semester.

Spring 2014 - MIIS

More Information »

IPOL 8506 - Public Policy & the Environmnt      

This two-unit course provides a foundation in the paradigms, principles, and tools that shape public policy in the service of environmental protection and sustainable development. We will first explore the sources and dynamics of public policymaking and the fundamental principles of environmental policy, including sustainability, precaution and cost internalization. We will then examine three policy paradigms: 1) regulatory (command and control); 2) collaborative (stakeholder based); and 3) market-based. For each paradigm, we will consider case studies of global and national policy options for particular environmental problems, including forest degradation and carbon emissions. Examples of policy options include substantive and process standards; taxes; eco-system service payments; public investment; etc. Students will work in a team to produce a policy analysis of a major environmental problem.

Fall 2011 - MIIS, Fall 2012 - MIIS

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IPOL 8507 - Intl Environmental Law&Politcs      

This course provides a foundation in the core concepts, actors, drivers and institutions of global environmental politics and governance. The first half of the class focuses on global environmental politics and the second on international environmental law and more broadly, global environmental governance (GEG). The first half of the class is divided into two parts. Part One explores the state of the global environment, the nature of global environmental problems and the key actors in global environmental politics. Part Two examines seven underlying drivers of global environmental degradation: 1) technology, especially energy; 2) consumption; 3) values/cultural norms; 4) globalization; 5) capitalism and the growth imperative; 6) poverty and inequality; and 7 population growth. For each driver, we will explore a core conceptual framework and then consider and critically evaluate how it relates to global environmental problems, especially climate change. The second half of the class will examine international environmental regimes, including legal treaties and “soft law”. It will evaluate the overall effectiveness of global environmental governance (GEG) in addressing the underlying drivers of global environmental degradation and solving global environmental problems, especially climate change and biodiversity loss. The course will analyze and debate proposals to improve GEG, including the creation of a World Environment Organization, an increased role for regional governance, and a “multi-level” approach centered on a greater role for cities.

Spring 2011 - MIIS, Fall 2011 - MIIS, Spring 2012 - MIIS

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IPOL 8598 - Business,Sustainablity&Society      

Fall 2012 - MIIS

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IPOL 8617 - Sem:Partner w/Bus.for Sust.Dev      

Business is increasingly partnering with governments and NGOs to deliver a wide variety of global sustainable development goals, including poverty reduction, carbon mitigation, clean energy, access to clean water, and eco-resilience and climate adaptation. While there have some high-profile success stories, business partnerships have also suffered from "culture clashes", lack of clarity about goals, poor performance measurement, and lack of accountability mechanisms.

This course examines and critically evaluates four types of emerging global business partnerships: 1) business-government “private-public” partnerships in the provision of public infrastructure, especially water; 2) multi-stakeholder “collaborative governance” of global markets (e.g. forests, sea food, bio-fuels); 3) capacity-building business-NGO partnerships involving business philanthropy; and 4) “investment” partnerships aimed at increasing finance for sustainable development.

We will first explore the context for the emergence of business partnerships, examine the meaning and measurement of "sustainable development", and consider obstacles in both business and NGO culture to effective partnering. We will then examine case studies of the four types of partnerships in developing countries and conclude by considering what innovations in business, NGO and government practice would make partnerships more effective, scale-able and accountable. Students will work in teams to produce and orally present a collaborative case study.

Spring 2012 - MIIS

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IPOL 8623 - Sem:Bus Models for Sustain Dev      

This seminar explores the growing role of the private sector in promoting sustainable development goals in low and middle income countries through core business activities. The overarching aim of such business models is to reduce poverty and promote sustainability by: 1) stimulating access to global markets and supply chains; 2) delivering affordable and sustainable goods and services; 3) responding to the demands of climate change mitigation and adaptation; and/or 4) promoting local capacities for sustainable production. The seminar will examine case studies of five business models, ranging from small-scale, for-profit and non-profit enterprises to partnerships between multinational corporations and NGOs and/or development agencies. Students will work in teams to undertake their own case studies. Together, we will seek to draw lessons for scalability.

Fall 2011 - MIIS

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IPOL 8665 - Sem: Climate & Development      

This seminar explores emerging thinking and practice about climate resilient, low carbon development paths. The course is in three parts. After examining the economic challenges posed by climate change, Part I defines “climate resilient development” and probes design principles and alternative models. Part II examines the challenge of financing transitions to climate resilient, low-carbon development and considers public, private, and public-private initiatives at multiple scales (from global adaptation funds to micro-asset investors). Part III explores methodologies for selecting climate resilience among alternative investment options and examines case studies of climate resilient development at the project, city, sector, and national levels. The case studies highlight the roles of public policy and multi-stakeholder collaborative governance. The course consists of one third professor lecture, one third guest speakers, and one third student-led discussions and exercises. Students will produce a case study of climate resilient development and participate in a class debate.

Spring 2011 - MIIS

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IPSG 9530 - Business and Global Issues      

Whether in business, government, or NGOs, leadership requires honing the ability to make strategic decisions in a complex, dynamic and high-risk global context -- and often in high-pressure, short-deadline work environments. This Workshop will provide students a rich and realistic opportunity to work in just such an environment.

The Workshop will provide participants with a wealth of complicated material in a variety of formats related to our case: Goldcorp’s highly conflicted Marlin gold mine in Guatemala. Students will be familiar with the case materials prior to the first meeting of the Workshop; the initial class will, through a series of group exercises, provide a platform for addressing issues of economic development, environmental risk, human rights, government policy, global business norms, chronic violence, and international trade and investment rules. How those dimensions are prioritized, conceptualized and understood will largely be student-driven, with the instructors playing a supportive role. Students will then be encouraged to explore, adapt and apply “solution” methodologies, which could include cost-benefit, risk assessment, and risk-performance analyses, scenario creation, deliberative stakeholder engagement, and supply chain reconfiguration.

Students will work in groups to combine issue knowledge and problem-solving methods to define and evaluate strategic options for different players—the company, the government, and the local communities and their NGO allies. This group work will largely be carried out in the lapse between the two class meetings; students will draw upon the expertise of GSIPM faculty (and possibly others) as needed. The second class meeting will end with a series of group presentations of their proposed solutions to the case problem, and a comparative assessment of the proposals by students and faculty.

The Workshop pilots an innovative “raw” case-study pedagogical approach to understand urgent global issues and build competencies to frame and address them. Our hope is to incorporate the lessons of this workshop to scale this approach up to a regular 2-credit course in the Fall, 2014 semester.

Spring 2014 - MIIS

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MBAG 9530 - Business and Global Issues      

Whether in business, government, or NGOs, leadership requires honing the ability to make strategic decisions in a complex, dynamic and high-risk global context -- and often in high-pressure, short-deadline work environments. This Workshop will provide students a rich and realistic opportunity to work in just such an environment.

The Workshop will provide participants with a wealth of complicated material in a variety of formats related to our case: Goldcorp’s highly conflicted Marlin gold mine in Guatemala. Students will be familiar with the case materials prior to the first meeting of the Workshop; the initial class will, through a series of group exercises, provide a platform for addressing issues of economic development, environmental risk, human rights, government policy, global business norms, chronic violence, and international trade and investment rules. How those dimensions are prioritized, conceptualized and understood will largely be student-driven, with the instructors playing a supportive role. Students will then be encouraged to explore, adapt and apply “solution” methodologies, which could include cost-benefit, risk assessment, and risk-performance analyses, scenario creation, deliberative stakeholder engagement, and supply chain reconfiguration.

Students will work in groups to combine issue knowledge and problem-solving methods to define and evaluate strategic options for different players—the company, the government, and the local communities and their NGO allies. This group work will largely be carried out in the lapse between the two class meetings; students will draw upon the expertise of GSIPM faculty (and possibly others) as needed. The second class meeting will end with a series of group presentations of their proposed solutions to the case problem, and a comparative assessment of the proposals by students and faculty.

The Workshop pilots an innovative “raw” case-study pedagogical approach to understand urgent global issues and build competencies to frame and address them. Our hope is to incorporate the lessons of this workshop to scale this approach up to a regular 2-credit course in the Fall, 2014 semester.

Spring 2014 - MIIS

More Information »

MBAG 9614 - Business,Sustainablity&Society      

This course provides a foundation in the core concepts and strategic management tools in the dynamic field of global business sustainability. The central aim of the course is to prepare students to design and lead sustainability innovations in or in partnership with global business organizations. Students will work in teams to produce a sustainability strategy for a global corporation.

The course covers six key topics:

• Global sustainability challenges and the role of business in responding to them;

• New social expectations of business and the promise and limitations of corporate social responsibility;

• Sustainability as global business strategy and opportunity;

• Business opportunity and challenges in promoting development in poor markets;

• Managing sustainability, including performance metrics, partnerships, and financing

• Public policy innovations that support business sustainability.

Fall 2013 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS

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MBAG 9623 - Sem:Bus Models for Sustain Dev      

This seminar explores the growing role of the private sector in promoting sustainable development goals in low and middle income countries through core business activities. The overarching aim of such business models is to reduce poverty and promote sustainability by: 1) stimulating access to global markets and supply chains; 2) delivering affordable and sustainable goods and services; 3) responding to the demands of climate change mitigation and adaptation; and/or 4) promoting local capacities for sustainable production. The seminar will examine case studies of five business models, ranging from small-scale, for-profit and non-profit enterprises to partnerships between multinational corporations and NGOs and/or development agencies. Students will work in teams to undertake their own case studies. Together, we will seek to draw lessons for scalability.

Spring 2013 - MIIS, Spring 2015 - MIIS

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MIIS Tags
Expertise

Sustainable development, business and sustainability, foreign direct investment and the environment, collaborative governance, development economics, global environmental governance. 

Video interview of Dr. Zarsky

Extra Information

Education

Ph.D. Department of Economics, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, 2006; M.A. Economics, Department of Economics and Political Economy, New School for Social Research, New York 1986.

Publications

Can extractive industries promote sustainable development? A net benefits framework and a case study of the Marlin Mine in Guatemala, (co-author), Journal of Environment and Development, 20(2), 131-154, April, 2013.

Extractive industries and local communities: the elusive search for sustainable development, World Policy Review, July, 2013, available at http://www.worldpoliticsreview.com.

Searching for Gold in the Highlands of Guatemala: Economic Benefits and Environmental Risks of the Marlin Mine, (co-author), Global Development and Environment Institute, September, 2011.

"Climate Resilient Industrial Development: Design Principles and Alternative Models", in S.R. Khan and J. Christiansen, ed., Towards New Developmentalism: Market as Means Rather than Master, Routledge Economics, 2010.

Enclave Economy: Foreign Investment and Sustainable Development in Mexico’s Silicon Valley (co-author), Boston: MIT Press, 2007.

“No Miracle Drug: Foreign Direct Investment and Sustainable Development” (co-author), in L. Zarsky (ed.), International Investment for Sustainable Development: Balancing Rights and Rewards, London: Earthscan Press, 2005.

International Investment for Sustainable Development: Balancing Rights and Rewards (contributing editor), London: Earthscan Press, 2005.

“Stuck in the Mud? Nation-States, Globalisation and the Environment," in OECD, Globalisation and the Environment, Paris: OECD, 1997. Reprinted in K. Gallagher and J. Werksman (eds.), Earthscan Reader on International Trade and Sustainable Development, London:  Earthscan Press, 2002, pp. 19-44; and in  K. Conca and G. Dabelko, Green Planet Blues, Environmental Politics from Stockholm to Johannesberg, Westview Press, 2004.

Human Rights and the Environment: Conflicts and Norms in a Globalizing World (contributing editor) London: Earthscan Press, 2002.

Beyond Good Deeds: Case Studies and A New Policy Agenda for Corporate Accountability (co-author), Berkeley: Natural Heritage Institute, July 2002.

“APEC and the ‘Sustainable Development’ Agenda,’ in R. Steinberg (ed.), The Greening of Trade Law, Rowman and Littlefield, 2002.

“Global Reach: Human Rights and Environment in the Framework of Corporate Accountability,” in L. Zarsky (ed.), Human Rights and Environment: Conflicts and Norms in a Globalizing World, London: Earthscan Press, 2002, pp. 31-56.

“Civil Society and the Future of Environmental Governance in Asia,” (co-author), in D. Angel and M. Rock, (eds.), Asia's Clean Revolution: Industry, Growth and the Environment, Greenleaf Publishing, 2001, pp.128-154.

“From Bystanders to Collaborators, New Roles for Civil Society in Urban-Industrial Environmental Governance,” in Asian Development Bank, Asian Environment Outlook, Manila:  ADB, 2001.

“Environmental Norms in the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation Forum,” in D. Shelton (ed.), Commitment and Compliance, The Role of Non-Binding Norms in the International Legal System, New York: Oxford University Press, 2000, pp. 303-329.

“Havens, Halos, and Spaghetti: Untangling the Evidence About FDI and the Environment,” in OECD, Foreign Direct Investment and the Environment, Paris: OECD,  1999, pp. 47-74.

"Energy and the Environment in Asia-Pacific,” in P. Chasek, (ed.), The Global Environment in the 21st Century, Tokyo: United Nations University Press, 1999.

"Lessons of Liberalization in Asia: From Structural Adjustment to Sustainable Development," in Financing for Environmentally Sustainable Development,  Asian Development Bank: Manila, 1994.

“Towards an International Eco-Labeling Framework,” in OECD, Life Cycle Management and Trade, Paris: OECD, 1994, pp. 194-204.

“Sustainable Development: Challenges for Australia,” in Our Common Future, Australian Edition, Melbourne: Oxford University Press, 1990. Also published as a monograph by the Commission for the Future, Melbourne, February, 1990.

Faculty Type
Regular Faculty
Dynamic Features
Course Catalog

Ron Schill

First Name
Ron
Last Name
Schill
Ron Schill, Picture
Job Title
Adjunct Professor
Location
Casa Fuente 300C
Phone
(831) 647-6683
Language(s)
Français

Subject Expertise

Expertise

Marketing feasibility and market opportunity analysis, enterprise scale-up, international marketing plans, country market selection and market entry, regional and global expansion; frontier and emerging market social impact and business enterprise decisions, enterprise development, and marketing programs; marketing and sourcing decisions and relationships between business enterprises; marketing negotiations; international strategic partnerships; the interface between marketing and corporate competitive strategy; global marketing strategies; socially and environmentally responsible marketing programs; MBA core principles of marketing and brand management.

Faculty Program Tags
Extra Information

Education

Postdoctoral study in global supply chains and international high technology marketing at Harvard Business School; Ph.D. Marketing, University of Oregon; MBA, Finance, University of Utah; Graduate study in international development economics, University of California; B.S., Management/Human Resources, University of Utah.

Selected Publications

“Global Management of Technology Strategy in the Air Express Industry: Paradigms and Constructs”

“Managing the Strategic Competitive Unit: Toward a New Paradigm in Global Marketing”

“Managing International Joint Ventures and Collaborative R&D in High tech Organizations”

“Breeding and Raising Excellent Cash Cow Products”

“The Seven C’s of International Pricing”

“Contract Incentivization and Risk Distribution: Structuring Buyer/Seller Business Relationships”

“Organizational Buying Behavior in the U.S. Department of Defense”

Faculty Type
Adjunct Faculty

Luc Soenen

First Name
Luc
Last Name
Soenen
luc_soenen_picture
Job Title
Adjunct Professor

Professor Soenen has taught in the department of Industrial Engineering and Management Science, Eindhoven University of Technology; Antwerp Business School; Limburg University Centre; University of San Diego; California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo.

Expertise

Corporate finance, foreign exchange management, international capital markets, international finance

Course List

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

IMGT 8639 - Foreign Exchange Management      

This course deals with the diverse ways in which a company is exposed to foreign exchange risk and in particular how to manage these kinds of exposures. Emphasis is on the corporate view of international financial management. In additional to theoretical concepts, this course offers ample practical applications in the form of problems and case studies.
Prerequisites: IMGT 8536 or other finance course

Spring 2011 - MIIS

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IMGT 8696 - Wks:Treasury Management      

This course focuses on monitoring and controlling balance sheet variables with less than one year to maturity. Topics include financial planning, cash collection, concentration and disbursement, receivables, payables, inventory management, short-term investing and borrowing, interest risk management. An intensive case approach is the method of instruction.

Spring 2011 - MIIS

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Faculty Program Tags
Faculty Type
Adjunct Faculty
Dynamic Features
Course Catalog

Lynn Metcalf

First Name
Lynn
Last Name
Metcalf
metcalf_09
Job Title
Adjunct Professor

Dr. Lynn Metcalf has taught IM 8691: International Business Negotiation at MIIS for tour years. IM 8691 is an experiential workshop where participants are introduced to and practice negotiation skills through a variety of inter-cultural simulations.

She is Professor and Chair, Marketing Area at California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo.  Dr. Metcalf’s research interests are focused on cross-cultural negotiation; package design for marketability; and innovation and regional development.

Faculty Program Tags
Expertise

International marketing

Course List

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

MBAG 8691 / IMGT 8691 - Intl Business Negotiation      

This course aims to expand awareness, enhance understanding and facilitate development of a set of perspectives and skills essential to effectiveness in international negotiations. Specific focus is directed toward developing a framework for considering aspects of international negotiations, understanding the development of trust, dimensions of coalitional bargaining and the range of conflict handling modes.

Spring 2011 - MIIS, Spring 2012 - MIIS, Spring 2013 - MIIS, Spring 2014 - MIIS, Spring 2015 - MIIS

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Faculty Type
Adjunct Faculty
Dynamic Features
Course Catalog

Hugh McAllister

First Name
Hugh
Last Name
McAllister
mcallister
Job Title
Adjunct Professor

Professor McAllister presently teaches full-time at Saint Mary's College.  He has taught a variety of finance and management courses at the graduate level in organizations including Santa Clara University, Eckerd College, and the University of Tampa.

Faculty Program Tags
Expertise

Corporate finance, foreign direct investment, international capital markets, international finance

Course List

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

IMGT 8561 - Managerial Economics      

This course will cover the fundamental economic principles that can enable managers to make more efficient and economical decisions. Students will be provided with selected tools that can be used to aid and improve the making of economic decisions; that is, decisions involving choice. Economic principles, theories and models will be introduced and discussed in order to develop a basis for consistently considering and evaluating economic policies, practices and activities. Student’s ability to apply the material presented in print and in lecture will be the primary measure of success in this course.

Fall 2011 - MIIS

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IMGT 8622 - Mergers & Acquisitions      

This workshop is designed to address a special topic in corporate financial management involving the combination of corporate enterprises. It will include some historical background about the market for mergers and acquisitions, followed by the rationale for pursuing an acquisition. The course also includes information and analysis on the various ways created value is distributed.
Prerequisite: IMGT 8536

Spring 2012 - MIIS

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IMGT 8624 - Debt Analysis      

All assets must have a source of financing. For private sector financing the alternatives can include the use of equity through a new stock issuance or by utilizing undistributed profits, combined with the use of debt financing. Public sector entities are limited to using debt. This workshop gives an expanded explanation of the differences between these sources of financing in terms of definition, rationale for use, risk considerations and impact on the user’s wealth. Much attention will be placed on the theoretical underpinning of finance that provide guidance to decision makers’ regarding the use of debt, the extent of its use and its impact on risk and return. The types of debt instruments used will be fully addressed along with discussions highlighting the different characteristics of public sector vs. private sector debt.

Fall 2011 - MIIS

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IMGT 8637 - Advanced Finance Topics      

This course presents an overview of topics, including cost of capital, financial structure, cost estimation, financial forecasting, management control, initial public offerings, mergers and acquisitions, and small business and personal financial planning, including computer applications.
Prerequisite: IMGT 8531 & IMGT 8536

Spring 2011 - MIIS

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Faculty Type
Adjunct Faculty
Dynamic Features
Course Catalog

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