Jeffrey Knopf

First Name
Jeffrey
Last Name
Knopf
jeff_knopf_photo
Job Title
Professor and Program Chair, Nonproliferation and Terrorism Studies
Location
McGowan 200 C
City, State, ZIP
Monterey, CA 93940
Phone
831.647.7174

I am passionate about: Making whatever small contribution I can to reducing the dangers posed by nuclear weapons.

What excites me about being a professor at MIIS: Teaching at MIIS offers an opportunity to work with professional Master’s students who will go on to apply what they learn in real-world settings. I also appreciate getting to work in such a beautiful location. 

Course List

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

IPSG 9505 - US Natl Security Policy Making      

This course introduces students to the formulation of U.S. national security policy. It summarizes the roles played by different governmental actors, including the President, Congress, and relevant bureaucratic departments and agencies, and describes the interagency process. It then covers the influence of domestic politics on national security policy, including the impact of interest groups, the media, and public opinion.

Fall 2013 - MIIS

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NPTG 8501 - Intl Security Rsrch & Analysis      

This class will provide students with a basic foundation in how to understand and conduct policy-relevant academic research and analyze policy options for dealing with potential threats to international security. Topics covered will include designing research, evaluating sources, and communicating research findings effectively.

Fall 2014 - MIIS

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NPTG 8505 - US Natl Security Policy Making      

This course introduces students to the formulation of U.S. national security policy. It summarizes the roles played by different governmental actors, including the President, Congress, and relevant bureaucratic departments and agencies, and describes the interagency process. It then covers the influence of domestic politics on national security policy, including the impact of interest groups, the media, and public opinion.

Fall 2013 - MIIS

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NPTG 8574 / IPOL 8574 - Intro to WMD Nonproliferation      

This course surveys the issues surrounding the proliferation of nuclear, chemical, and biological weapons and ballistic missiles. It also provides an introduction to nuclear and radiological terrorism, and an overview of the international nonproliferation regime.

The course is divided into three main parts: Part 1 provides an overview of the trends and technologies of WMD proliferation. Part 2 considers the nonproliferation regime in detail, concentrating on the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT), the conventions banning chemical and biological weapons, supplier regimes and export controls, and verification and compliance issues. Part 3 returns to challenges to the nonproliferation regime, including states of proliferation concern known or believed to be developing WMD outside or in defiance of the NPT, CWC, and BWC and tensions within the nonproliferation regime, and discusses the range of international, multilateral, and unilateral responses to these challenges

Fall 2012 - MIIS, Spring 2013 - MIIS, Fall 2013 - MIIS

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NPTG 8639 - Sem:Deter&InfluencTerrorsm&WMD      

This seminar examines deterrence and other strategies for responding to security threats, with a focus on how those strategies might be adapted to deal with the dangers posed by terrorism and WMD proliferation. The course will survey existing research on deterrence and various alternative policy tools such as coercive diplomacy, assurance, positive incentives, and soft power. It will introduce some of the latest thinking about whether these tools are useful for influencing actors away from support for terrorism or WMD acquisition or use.

Spring 2013 - MIIS, Spring 2014 - MIIS

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Expertise

Nuclear Arms Control and Nonproliferation
Utility of Deterrence, Assurance, and other Strategies for Dealing with WMD and Terrorism
International Cooperation
Public Opinion and Foreign Policy

Faculty Program Tags
Extra Information

Recent Accomplishments

  • Received a grant from the U.S. Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA) to lead a collaborative research project, initiated in early 2012, to examine “Multilateral Cooperation on Nonproliferation: Lessons Learned.”
  • Was a member of a team commissioned in 2011 by the U.S. Defense Department Strategic Multilayer Assessment program to examine “Influencing Violent Extremist Organizations.”
  • Received the Bernard Brodie Prize for the best article in 2010 in the journal Contemporary Security Policy for “The Fourth Wave in Deterrence Research,” published in the April 2010 issue.

Previous Work

I have published research on U.S.-Soviet nuclear arms control, the consequences of nuclear proliferation, the denuclearization process in Argentina and Brazil, and strategies for countering WMD proliferation such as deterrence and assurance. I have also done work on strategies for combating terrorism. In addition to my academic experience, I have worked at several NGOs concerned with U.S. defense and nuclear weapons policies. This includes a previous stint at MIIS at the Center for Nonproliferation Studies, during which time I served as Editor of The Nonproliferation Review.

Education

I received an M.A. and Ph.D. in Political Science from Stanford University. At Stanford, I worked with the late Alexander L. George and Scott Sagan, two internationally renowned experts in international security and nuclear weapons issues. I have a B.A. in Social Studies from Harvard University.

Bibliography

“Nuclear Disarmament and Nonproliferation: Are They Linked?” International Security (forthcoming, winter 2012). PDF/link not available yet.

Editor, Security Assurances and Nuclear Nonproliferation (Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 2012).

NGOs, Social Movements, and Arms Control,” in Arms Control: History, Theory, and Policy, ed. Robert E. Williams, Jr. and Paul R. Viotti (ABC-CLIO/Praeger, 2012). 

The Concept of Nuclear Learning,” Nonproliferation Review 19, no. 1 (March 2012): 79-93.  

Faculty Type
Regular Faculty
Dynamic Features
Course Catalog

Brigadier General (Retired) Russell D. Howard

First Name
Russell
Last Name
Howard
Russ Howard
Job Title
Adjunct Professor
Location
McGowan 200F
City, State, ZIP
Monterey, CA 93940
Phone
831.647.6442

Brigadier General (retired) Russell D. Howard is President of Howard's Global Solutions,  and an Adjunct Professor at the Monterey Institute of International Studies. He is also a Senior Fellow at Joint Special Operations University, Senior Mentor for Development Alternatives Incorporated, Senior Advisor for the Singapore Home Team Academy, and on the Board of Advisers for Laser Shot Incorporated.

MIIS Tags
Expertise

Counterterrorism
Special Operations
Terrorist-Trafficking Nexus
Terrorism and Counterterrorism in Africa

Faculty Program Tags
Course List

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

NPTG 8577 - Special Ops & CounterTerrorism      

The role of special operations in combatting the terrorist threat has evolved since 9/11. Indeed, special operations forces (SOF) have been the post-9/11 military instrument of choice, particularly for sensitive, direct action operations of which failure--such as the killing of Osama bin Laden -- is not an option. Indeed, the skills and technologies that these combat forces apply are unmatched and highly effective. However, the fact that SOF forces are in such high demand and are used increasingly for a host of alternative mission assignments raises a contentious issue: are special operations units still “special”?
This workshop will explore several intelligence and SOF related capabilities and challenges related to their roles in countering terrorism. Intelligence and Special Operations Forces play critical roles in combating terrorist threats. To be sure, both intelligence and SOF have been instrumental in addressing all major threats to US national security for the past several decades, but since 9/11 both have increased in importance to U.S. policy makers as they address America's new enemies; transnational, non-state actors with global reach and who are seeking access to weapons of mass destruction.

Spring 2013 - MIIS, Spring 2014 - MIIS

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NPTG 8578 - Intel & Counterterrorism      

This workshop will explore several intelligence related capabilities and challenges related to their roles in countering terrorism. Intelligence has played a critical role in addressing all major threats to US national security for the past several decades. However, since 9/11 intelligence collection, analysis and dissemination have increased in importance to U.S. policy makers as they address America's new enemies; transnational, non-state actors with global reach and who are seeking access to weapons of mass destruction. The Intelligence in Counterterrorism Workshop describes intelligence capabilities and actions in countering terrorist operations and activities. With regards to intelligence the workshop discusses the "intelligence cycle," the full gamut of intelligence gathering disciplines will be discussed. However, signals, technical, and human intelligence gathering will be emphasized, as will the challenges of gathering intelligence in denied areas. The workshop relies heavily on case studies and guest lecturers to reflect the challenges and opportunities facing the intelligence community in America's counterterrorism efforts.

Fall 2013 - MIIS

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NPTG 8610 / IPOL 8610 - Seminar: Counterterrorism      

September 11, 2001 changed the way Americans view their security forever. Terrorism is no longer “someone else’s” problem. Now Americans are traumatically aware of how vulnerable they are to terrorism and terrorists. Given the events of the last decade and the ongoing campaign against global terrorism, it is imperative that citizens and their leaders understand and make sense of the threat, as well as conceptualize how terrorism might best be challenged and terrorists defeated. The “Counter-terrorism Seminar” is designed to address the challenges of terrorism in the current and future global security environment in a participatory format. Specifically, the seminar briefly reviews the threat terrorism poses to liberal democratic states, citizens and policymakers, then explores how liberal democracies can best predict, prevent, preempt and, if necessary, directly combat terrorism and terrorists. Five themes provide the course framework: Challenges to a Free Society, Strategies for Combating Terrorism, Eclectic (new) approaches to Countering Terrorism, Winning the (so called) War on Terrorism, and Counterterrorism in the post-bin Laden Security Environment. Also, controversial topics such as covert action, rendition, targeted killings, enhanced interrogation (torture), are discussed with particular emphasis on the legality of these and other counter-terror measures. The seminar culminates with a look into the future by discussing the challenges of the post-bin Laden terrorist threat and strategizing means to mitigate the threat.

Spring 2012 - MIIS, Fall 2012 - MIIS, Fall 2013 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS

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NPTG 8646 - Sem: Terror & CT in Africa      

The Terrorism and Counterterrorism in Africa Seminar will address increased terrorist activity in Africa, and familiarize students with known terrorist organizations throughout the continent such as al Qaeda in the Islamic Maghreb (AQIM), Al Shabaab, the Lords Revolutionary Army (LRA), Boka Haram, the Libyan Armed Fighters Group, and the Movement for the Emancipation of the Niger Delta (MEND) among others. Seminar participants will evaluate U.S. and international counterterrorism policy and operations in Africa. Based on their evaluation, students will be asked to suggest unilateral, multilateral, “alternative” and mutually supporting policies and operations to address terrorist activity in Africa. In an effort to best apply “theory to practice,” seminar participants will learn how to prepare and apply African related terrorist group profiles and terrorist threat matrices as part of a group exercise and culminating presentation.

Spring 2013 - MIIS, Spring 2014 - MIIS

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WKSH 8540 - The Terrorist-Traffickng Nexus      

The so-called “nexus” between organized criminal and terrorist organizations is a topic of increasing national and international security interest. The four most resilient and debilitating sectors of organized international crime affecting state security are human, weapons, drug and contraband trafficking (HWDC-trafficking). Sometimes interconnected and mutually supporting, HWDC-trafficking is not only pervasive in states where there is a culture of corruption, but also in democratic states where traffickers take advantage of the freedoms enjoyed in liberal democracies. HWDC-trafficking is responsible for channeling multiple billions of dollars in profit to criminal and terrorist organizations worldwide. Many believe HWDC-trafficking, in its most insidious forms, has been increasingly linked to the activities of violent extremist organizations such as al Qaeda and like-minded groups. To what extent the two types of entities cooperate is not clear and a matter of much debate. Some analysts frame the interactions among terrorist and criminal organizations as symbiotic alliances in which the comparative advantages among organizations determine divisions of labor for mutual benefit and profit. Others liken the relationships to short-term “marriages of convenience” that are executed for specific transactions and events.

Fall 2011 - MIIS, Fall 2012 - MIIS

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WKSH 8542 - Wks: Counterterrorism      

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Spring 2011 - MIIS, Spring 2012 - MIIS

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WKSH 8566 - Counterterrorism in Africa      

The “Africa Counterterrorism Workshop” will address increased terrorist activity in Africa, and familiarize students with known terrorist organizations throughout the continent such as Al Qaeda in the Islamic Maghreb (AQIM), Al Shabaab, the Lords Revolutionary Army (LRA), Boka Haram, the Libyan Armed Fighters Group, and the Movement for the Emancipation of the Niger Delta (MEND) among others. Workshop participants will evaluate U.S. and international counterterrorism policy and operations in Africa. Based on their evaluation, students will be asked to suggest “alternative” or mutually supporting policies. In an effort to “theory to practice” workshop participants will learn how to prepare and apply African related terrorist group profiles and terrorist threat matrices as part of a group exercise and culminating presentation.

Spring 2012 - MIIS

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Extra Information

Education

General Howard holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Industrial Management from San Jose State University, a Bachelor of Arts in Asian Studies from the University of Maryland, a Master of Arts degree in International Management from the Monterey Institute of International Studies, and a Masters of Public Administration degree from Harvard University.

Faculty Type
Adjunct Faculty
Dynamic Features
Course Catalog

Gordon Hahn

First Name
Gordon
Last Name
Hahn
MonTREP_Hahn
Job Title
Adjunct Professor and Researcher of Monterey Terrorism Research and Education Program
Location
McGowan 200-G
Phone
831.647.3535
Language(s)
Русский

1. What is it that you are most passionate about?   
I am most passionate about Russian politics, history and culture and the war against global jihadism.

Faculty Program Tags
Expertise

Russian Studies
Political Science
Islam and Politics in Russia and Eurasia
Russian Domestic and Foreign Policy
International Relations in Eurasia
Regime Transformation Theory
Nationalism
Islamism in Eurasia

Dr. Hahn is perhaps the world’s leading expert on the Caucasus Emirate mujahedin and an internationally recognized expert on Russian and Eurasian domestic and foreign politics, including the North Caucasus.

Short Programs & Research Centers
Course List

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

IPOL 8569 - Terrorism &Violence in Eurasia      

The course is an introductory overview of terrorism in the former Soviet Union (FSU). Topics include definitions of terrorism, theories on the causes of terrorism, non-state and state terrorism, jihadism, ultra-nationalism, and skinhead terrorism. The geographic scope of the course encompasses the former Soviet republics and, where relevant, adjacent territories affecting terrorism in the FSU. Approximately half of the course will address jihadi, skinhead, and state terrorism in Russia. Approximately a quarter of the course examines jihadism and state terrorism in Central Asia. The course details the ideologies, strategies, tactics, and specific operations employed by non-state terrorists and by states. The course uses both the lecture and case methods; active student participation is both encouraged and required.

Fall 2010 - MIIS, Fall 2011 - MIIS

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NPTG 8687 - Sem:Islam,Islmism&PolCntrlAsia      

This seminar’s core focus is the politics of Islam and Muslims and the rise of contemporary Islamism and jihadism in Central Asia. In particular, we examine non-state and state terrorism in the five former Soviet republics of Central Asia - Kazkahstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, and Uzbekistan. It focuses primarily on the history and current activity of Al Qa`ida-connected or Al`Qaida-inspired jihadist organizations such as the Islamic Movement of Uzbekistan, the Islamic Jihad Union, the Islamic Movement of Turkestan, as well as recently emerged smaller offshoot organizations operating in the region, most notably in Kazakhstan for the first time. The course examines causal factors for the rise of jihadi terrorism in Central Asia and elsewhere such as poverty, failing states, authoritarian regimes, bad governance, the resonance of Islamist ideologies, charismatic authority patterns, and complex network organization and leadership practices. The ties between jihadi terrorists in the five Central Asian states and other global jihadi revolutionary organizations in neighboring states such as Afghanistan, Pakistan, Russia and China as well as in Europe will also be examined. In addition, counter-terrorism and other policies of the authoritarian regimes of Central Asia will looked at, in particular evidence of state terrorism and massive human rights violations spread across most of the region. The remainder of this syllabus’s course schedule will be revised before the beginning of the 2013 spring semester.The ‘Politics and Islam in Russia’ seminar is designed for those interested in the causes and resolution of violent conflict, separatist insurgencies, terrorism, non-proliferation, and comparative Islamic politics. It offers students an in-depth introduction to the role played by Islam and the ‘forgotten Muslims’ of Russia in both domestic, regional, and international politics. Through the careful reading of primary and secondary sources, the seminar’s central purpose is to engage students in a detailed comparative examination of the historical, geographic, ethnic, theological, institutional, and global factors that shape identity politics and frame other political issues for Russia’s Muslims.

Spring 2013 - MIIS, Spring 2014 - MIIS

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NPTG 8689 / IPOL 8689 - Sem:Islam,Islamism&PolInRussia      

The ‘Politics and Islam in Russia’ seminar is designed for those interested in the causes and resolution of violent conflict, separatist insurgencies, terrorism, non-proliferation, and comparative Islamic politics. It offers students an in-depth introduction to the role played by Islam and the ‘forgotten Muslims’ of Russia. in both domestic, regional, and international politics. Through the careful reading of primary and secondary sources, the seminar’s central purpose is to engage students in a detailed comparative examination of the historical, geographic, ethnic, theological, institutional, and global factors that shape identity politics and frame other political issues for Russia’s Muslims. The course’s core focus is the politics of Islam and Muslims and the rise of contemporary Islamism and jihadism in Russia. Under these, major foci include: the complex history of the ambivalent relationship between the Russian Tsarist state and society, on the one hand, and Eurasia’s Muslims, on the other; the dramatic fate of Muslims under Soviet rule; the role of Muslims and Islam during the Soviet demise and the varied post-Soviet transformations; the competing explanations for the recent rise of jihadi terrorism in Russia and other parts of Eurasia; and the implications of jihadist terrorism in the region for the challenges of conflict resolution, non-proliferation, and global jihadi terrorism. In particular, we look closely at the peculiarities of ethnicity, national identity, and confession of Russia’s numerous Muslim ethnic groups, their relations both with each other, the states and the larger Russian society, and the rise of Islamism and jihadism in Russia in comparative perspective. By looking at these phenomena through the prism of nationalism theory, comparative nationalism, and comparative Islamism, the course focuses on the formation and consolidation of national identity, the politicization of such identity, and the transformation of ethno-nationalism into pan-Islamic, political Islamic, Islamist, and jihadist trends and movements. The seminar reviews socioeconomic, demographic, ideological, theological, and political trends in Russia, paying particular attention to the role of regime type, economic development, and the relative role of Islam as factors shaping the state, society, state-society relations, and Muslim-state relations. It also analyzes competing explanations of the causes of the Russo-Chechen conflict, Moscow’s ongoing accommodation with Tatarstan and the other constituent Muslim and national republics of the federation, and the rise of jihadism and terrorism. A broad set of ideological influences and trends affecting Russia’s Muslims are examined, including reformist jadidism, syncretic Eurasianism, and reactionary Islamist jihadism, among others. We also discuss cases of, and potential scenarios involving the use and proliferation of WMD materials and weapons by Central Asian jihadi terrorists. Finally, we look at the influence of Islam and Muslims on Russia’s foreign and national security policies and international security.

Spring 2011 - MIIS, Spring 2012 - MIIS, Fall 2012 - MIIS, Fall 2013 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS

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Extra Information

Education

PhD in Political Science, Boston University; BA and MA in Political Science, Boston College

Publications

Islam, Islamism, and Politics in Eurasia Report (IIPER) is an approximately bi-monthly compendium of news and analysis on politics involving Islam in the former Soviet Union. The main focus for the present is Russia's North Caucasus. However, IIPER seeks submissions on politics and Islam in other regions of not less than 1,000 words and no more than 5,000 words in length.


To be placed on the mailing list to recieve IIPER please send an email request to ghahn@miis.edu.

Unless otherwise indicated IIPER is written and edited by Dr. Gordon M. Hahn, Senior Researcher in the Terrorism Research and Education Program and Visiting Assistant Professor in the Graduate School of International Policy Studies at the Monterey Institute for International Studies.

                Faculty Type
                Adjunct Faculty
                Dynamic Features
                Course Catalog

                Sharad Joshi

                First Name
                Sharad
                Last Name
                Joshi
                sharad-photo1
                Job Title
                Assistant Professor, Nonproliferation and Terrorism Studies
                Location
                McGowan 200-F
                Phone
                831.647.6508
                Language(s)
                हिन्दी

                Dr. Sharad Joshi holds a PhD from the Graduate School of Public and International Affairs at the University of Pittsburgh. He joined the Monterey Institute in September 2006 as a Post-Doctoral Fellow at the James Martin Center for Nonproliferation Studies. At MIIS he has been a research associate at CNS and the Monterey Terrorism Research and Education Program (MonTREP). His current research focuses on various facets of terrorism in South Asia, as well as nonproliferation issues in the region. Dr.

                Faculty Program Tags
                Short Programs & Research Centers
                Course List

                Courses offered in the past four years.
                indicates offered in the current term
                indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

                PSCI 1039 - Security Issues in South Asia      

                Security Issues in South Asia
                In this course we will examine various security matters in South Asia, including interstate conflict, terrorism, and issues related to weapons of mass destruction. South Asia refers to the region encompassing Pakistan, India, Sri Lanka, Nepal, Bangladesh, Bhutan, and the Maldives. However, given that security matters in Afghanistan are linked closely to Pakistan, this course will include Afghanistan as part of the broader southern Asian region. We will look at topics from the historical, political-economic, and foreign policy perspective. We will discuss various conflicts between countries, including the India-Pakistan dyad, and the reasons behind the wars between them. Cases studies will include Islamist terrorism in the region, and the Tamil Tigers in Sri Lanka. This course will also consider nontraditional security matters such as environmental degradation and refugee movements. (International Relations)/

                AAL SOC WTR

                Winter 2014

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                IPOL 8517 - Terrorism in South-East Asia      

                Various parts of South-East Asia have been plagued by terrorist violence in recent decades. South-East Asia refers to the region eastward from Burma/Myanmar till the Philippines. This course studies the phenomenon of terrorism in countries of the region such as Thailand, Indonesia, Malaysia and the Philippines. Some of the groups that this course examines include – Jemaah Islamiyah, Abu Sayyaf, Moro Islamic Liberation Front – their objectives, characteristics, composition, ideologies, tactics and fund-raising. Apart from these cases, the course also examines thematic issues such as the prospect of WMD terrorism and proliferation of WMD material, maritime terrorism in the region, and U.S. policy on counter-terrorism in South-East Asia. We also discuss connections between groups in South-East Asia and regional and global terrorist groups elsewhere, such as Al Qaeda and the Taliban. Given the close security dynamics between Australia and South-East Asia, this course also looks at terrorism-related issues in Australia.

                Fall 2010 - MIIS

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                IPOL 8561 - Counterinsurgency in SouthAsia      

                This course examines various insurgent movements that have persisted in South Asia for several decades and the different strategies that have been employed by governments to roll back these insurgencies. Geographically, South Asia includes India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Nepal, Bangladesh, Bhutan, and the Maldives. For the purpose of this course, South Asia will also include Afghanistan, which is closely enmeshed in security dynamics related to other parts of the subcontinent, especially Pakistan. In the course of the semester, several case studies of insurgent movements will be examined, such as the Taliban insurgency in Afghanistan and Pakistan, and the Maoist insurgencies in Nepal and India. Other case studies will include the three-decade long campaign by the Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam (LTTE) in Sri Lanka, and several cases of insurgencies in northeastern India, involving groups such as the United Liberation Front of Assam (ULFA) and the National Socialist Council of Nagaland (NSCN).

                Spring 2012 - MIIS

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                IPOL 8627 - Sem:Militant Islamic Movements      

                This seminar is designed to provide a survey of various militant Islamic organizations – “gradualist” Islamist organizations that do not rely mainly on waging armed jihad, jihadist organizations that rely primarily on violence and terrorism, and other types of fundamentalist or Islamist organizations that do not fall clearly into either category – and is specifically intended for graduate students who have already taken lecture-oriented undergraduate or graduate courses dealing with terrorism. The class will be divided into two separate portions. In the first portion, the lectures and readings will focus on the basic tenets of Islam; an overview of Islamic history; the distinction between Islamic fundamentalism, political Islam, and Islamism; and important examples of the different types of Islamist organizations noted above in particular regions. Given the threat that such Islamist networks and their supporters currently pose to the security of the West, Russia, India, various states in Asia, and moderate Muslims everywhere, it is necessary for every student interested in contemporary subversion and terrorism to become much more knowledgeable about key Islamist and jihadist groups, their agendas, and their tactics. During the second portion of the course, each student will give an oral report in class to present and analyze his or her research findings, which will then be discussed by the entire class. Near the end of this second portion of the class, if not earlier, students must submit their completed research papers.

                Spring 2011 - MIIS

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                IPOL 8629 - Sem:NucPolcy-NPT OutlierStates      

                India, Israel, and Pakistan are the three de facto nuclear weapon states that have been outside the Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) since it came into force in 1970. This seminar examines the relationship of these three countries with the nonproliferation regime broadly, both from the perspective of the states in question as well as from the perspective of the international community.

                After a quick review of the nuclear history of these three states—including some discussions of similarities and dissimilarities among them—the seminar focuses on the examination of key themes and questions such as: What is the role of nuclear weapons in national security of the three countries? What are the policies on arms control and disarmament in these three countries? What are the attitudes within these countries regarding the different elements of the global nonproliferation regime, such as the NPT, the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT), and the (proposed) Fissile Material Cutoff Treaty (FMCT)? How did these positions evolve over several decades? How have these three countries responded to some of the more recent nonproliferation initiatives such as the Proliferation Security Initiative (PSI)? The seminar will also address the domestic mechanisms through which these three states deal with nuclear issues. Finally, the seminar also explores the different modalities that have been proposed by various parties to integrate the three countries into the nonproliferation regime.

                Spring 2012 - MIIS

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                IPSG 8501 / IPOL 8501 - Policy Analysis      

                This course introduces students to the theory and practice of policy analysis. Students will be introduced to the stages of the public policy process, including agenda setting, formulation, implementation, and evaluation. Students will also develop basic policy analysis skills, including problem structuring, stakeholder identification, summarization of current policy, development of policy options, elaboration of criteria for selection, and recommendation of course of action. These concepts are illustrated by examples policies that fall within students' range of interests. This course also introduces students to scientific methods that are used as a means for structuring policy inquiry. A series of research approaches and techniques are presented in the context of forecasting, monitoring, and evaluation for the analysis of domestic and international policies.

                Fall 2010 - MIIS, Fall 2011 - MIIS, Fall 2012 - MIIS, Fall 2013 - MIIS

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                NPTG 8584 - Introduction to Terrorism      

                This course is designed to provide a critical introduction to the subject of terrorism, an often misunderstood phenomenon that has assumed a particular salience in the wake of 9/11. Its aim is to clarify fundamental definitional and conceptual problems, introduce students to the burgeoning literature on the subject, describe basic terrorist organizational and operational methods, survey a wide range of terrorist groups and ideologies, examine certain high-profile terrorism themes, and tentatively assess the nature of the threat posed by terrorists to global security in the future.

                Fall 2014 - MIIS

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                NPTG 8624 - Sem:Countrinsurgency in S.Asia      

                Insurgency and Terrorism: According to Alex Schmid, an insurgency is: “an armed uprising, revolt, or rebellion by a political group or party against a domestic or foreign ruling in order to subvert it, overthrow it, expel it, and break away from it, or simply to enhance the group’s bargaining position for subsequent political compromise. Acts of terrorism are a frequent occurrence in many insurgencies.” According to Jeffrey Bale, terrorism refers to: “the use or threatened use of violence, usually directed against victims selected for their symbolic or representative value, as a means of instilling anxiety in, transmitting one or more messages to, and thereby manipulating the perceptions and behavior of wider target audiences.”

                This course examines various insurgent movements that have persisted in South Asia for several decades and the different strategies that have been employed by governments to roll back these insurgencies. Geographically, South Asia includes India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Nepal, Bangladesh, Bhutan, and the Maldives. For the purpose of this course, South Asia will also include Afghanistan, which is closely enmeshed in security dynamics related to other parts of the subcontinent, especially Pakistan. In the course of the semester, several case studies of insurgent movements will be examined, such as the Taliban insurgency in Afghanistan and Pakistan, and the Maoist insurgencies in Nepal and India. Other case studies will include the three-decade long campaign by the Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam (LTTE) in Sri Lanka, and several cases of insurgencies in northeastern India, involving groups such as the United Liberation Front of Assam (ULFA) and the National Socialist Council of Nagaland (NSCN).

                Spring 2014 - MIIS

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                NPTG 8668 / IPOL 8668 - Sem:Terrorism in South Asia      

                Terrorist violence has persisted in various parts of South Asia for several decades. A variety of interconnected reasons can be assigned to this phenomenon – state sponsorship, separatist tendencies, religious and sectarian divides, and political meddling. Terrorism in South Asia is also a crucial concern because of its broader connections to extra-regional terrorist networks. The two dominant states in South Asia possess nuclear weapons and have a long history of military conflict and have periodically experienced crises situations provoked by terrorist attacks. Additionally, the history of proliferation networks and concerns over Pakistan’s nuclear security further exacerbate the threat perception from terrorist networks.

                The object of this course is to understand the causes and dimensions of terrorism in South Asia and to analyze positions adopted by the involved parties, state and non-state. From the policy perspective, this is essential toward formulating responses to terrorism in the region. South Asia is conventionally defined as the region comprising the countries of India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Nepal, Sri Lanka, Bhutan and the Maldives. But for the purposes of this seminar we will also look at developments in Afghanistan (generally considered as South-West Asia), given its crucial links to terrorism issues in South Asia.

                Fall 2010 - MIIS, Fall 2011 - MIIS, Fall 2012 - MIIS, Fall 2013 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS

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                NPTG 8674 / IPOL 8674 - Sem:Terrorism in SouthEastAsia      

                Various parts of South-East Asia have been plagued by terrorist violence in recent decades. South-East Asia refers to the region eastward from Burma/Myanmar till the Philippines. This course studies the phenomenon of terrorism in countries of the region such as Thailand, Indonesia, Malaysia and the Philippines. Some of the groups that this course examines include – Jemaah Islamiyah, Abu Sayyaf, Moro Islamic Liberation Front – their objectives, characteristics, composition, ideologies, tactics and fund-raising. Apart from these cases, the course also examines thematic issues such as the prospect of WMD terrorism and proliferation of WMD materials, maritime terrorism and piracy, and U.S. policy on counter-terrorism in South-East Asia. We also discuss connections between groups in South-East Asia and regional and global terrorist groups elsewhere, such as Al Qaeda and the Taliban. In order to have a comprehensive picture of non-state security threats in the region, the course also examines the various insurgent movements in Myanmar. Finally, given the close security dynamics between Australia and South-East Asia, this course also looks at terrorism-related issues in Australia.

                Spring 2012 - MIIS, Spring 2013 - MIIS

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                NPTG 8683 / IPOL 8683 - Sem:South Asia & WMD      

                In the realm of weapons of mass destruction (WMD), South Asia is one of the key regions of analysis. This course takes a comprehensive look at the role of WMD in the strategic thinking of various actors involved in the South Asian security framework. It is important to note that South Asian nuclear issues cannot be studied in isolation from other regional and global dynamics. States such as the U.S., China, and Russia are crucial players in the South Asian strategic framework. The course examines various reasons behind WMD acquisition by India and Pakistan, concentrating especially on nuclear weapons. These factors include threat perceptions, domestic imperatives and nationalistic attitudes. A key element of nuclear weapons programs is the development of effective delivery systems such as missiles and aircraft. Analysis of such programs provides an indicator of current and future strategy. In this context, both India and Pakistan have made major strides in their cruise and ballistic missile programs to make their nuclear strategy more credible. At the same time, neither side has a clearly enunciated nuclear doctrine, although attempts have been made in this direction. This is crucial in context of a reliable command and control system and for crisis stability. Another major issue covered in this course is the proliferation of WMD materials to non-state actors or aspiring nuclear states by proliferation networks connected to South Asia. Relatedly, policymakers in the region and elsewhere are also concerned with the danger of nuclear terrorism. These are some of the prominent issues concerning weapons of mass destruction in South Asia. The two sides have periodically taken steps to prevent nuclear crises situations. Apart from nuclear weapons, this seminar also examines chemical and biological weapons policy in the two countries.

                Spring 2011 - MIIS, Spring 2012 - MIIS, Spring 2014 - MIIS

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                MIIS Tags
                Expertise

                International Security
                South Asia
                Terrorism
                Nuclear Proliferation
                Afghanistan
                Southeast Asia

                Dr. Joshi interviewed by NATO Review

                Extra Information

                Education

                PhD, Graduate School of Public and International Affairs, University of Pittsburgh, 2006; M.A. (Politics), School of International Studies, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi, 2000; B.A. (Honors-Economics), University of Rajasthan, Jaipur, 1997.

                Publications

                "Will killing of Taliban Chief Make a Difference in Pakistan?," Chatham House, November 7, 2013

                Woolwich Attack and the Changing Nature of Terrorism,” Chatham House, May 24, 2013

                The China-Pakistan Nuclear Deal: A Realpolitique Fait Accompli,” Issue Brief, Nuclear Threat Initiative, December 11, 2011.

                "Playing Politics:How the Regional Context Impedes Confronting Myanmar's Alleged Nuclear Program," Issue Brief, Nuclear Threat Initiative, February 4, 2011

                "AfPak: Negotiate from Strength,” Foreign Policy in Focus, April 15, 2009.

                "Deconstructing the Pakistani Response to the Mumbai Attack," International Institute for Counter-Terrorism, Herzliya, Israel, January 7, 2009.

                "Cooperative Threat Reduction and Pakistan," (co-authored with Togzhan Kassenova) Issue Brief, Nuclear Threat Initiative, August 4, 2008.

                "A Pause in the Indo-U.S. Nuclear Agreement," Issue Brief, Nuclear Threat Initiative, May 2, 2008.

                "Is Pakistan Appeasing the Taliban?" Foreign Policy in Focus, June 13, 2008.

                "A Ridge Too Far," Foreign Policy in Focus, November 6, 2007.

                “Unilateralism and Multilateralism: Analyzing American Nuclear Nonproliferation Policy,” World Affairs (Washington, DC), Spring 2005, Vol. 167, No. 4, pp. 147-161.

                “Israel’s Nuclear Policy: A Cost-Benefit Analysis,” Strategic Analysis, March 2000, Vol. XXIII, No. 12, pp. 2089-2110.

                Faculty Type
                Regular Faculty
                Dynamic Features
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                Jeffrey M. Bale

                First Name
                Jeffrey
                Last Name
                Bale
                No photo avatar
                Job Title
                Associate Professor
                Location
                McGowan 200-D
                Phone
                831.647.6603
                Language(s)
                Español
                Français
                Deutsch
                português
                italiano

                Dr. Jeffrey M. Bale is an Associate Professor in the Graduate School of International Policy and Management at the Monterey Institute of International Studies (MIIS). He also regularly teaches specialized courses on an adjunct basis at the Naval Postgraduate School. He obtained his BA in Middle Eastern and Islamic history at the University of Michigan, his MA in social movements and political sociology at the University of California at Berkeley, and his PhD in contemporary European history at Berkeley.

                Expertise

                Terrorism, Political and religious extremism, Insurgency and counterinsurgency, Unconventional warfare, Intelligence and covert operations, Conspiracy theories, Comparative revolutionary movements, Youth subcultures and counterculture, Terrorism and weapons of mass destruction, Organized crime, European history and politics, Middle Eastern history and politics, Islamic history, Military history, International politics

                Short Programs & Research Centers
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                Course List

                Courses offered in the past four years.
                indicates offered in the current term
                indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

                IPOL 8632 - SemAdvTerrrism:Eco-Radicalism      

                "This seminar is designed to provide an in-depth examination of certain key aspects of contemporary terrorism, and is specifically intended for graduate students who have already taken lecture-oriented undergraduate or graduate courses dealing with terrorism. The class will be divided into three separate portions. During the first portion, after a session devoted to the provision of basic information about terrorism and terrorism research methods, everyone in the class will read chapters from a series of important recent books that deal with apocalyptic millenarian groups and their objectives. Given the fact that groups of this type have periodically carried out serious acts of violence, either against “evil” outsiders or their own members, it is necessary for students interested in terrorism to obtain some knowledge about their characteristics. During the second portion of the course, students will spend their time working independently on the individual research topics they have selected, which can deal with any aspect of terrorism that interests them. During the third and final portion, each student will give an oral report in class to present and analyze his or her research findings, which will then be discussed by the entire class. Near the end of this last portion of the class, if not earlier, students must submit their completed research papers."

                Spring 2011 - MIIS, Fall 2011 - MIIS, Spring 2012 - MIIS, Fall 2012 - MIIS

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                NPTG 8584 / IPOL 8584 - Introduction to Terrorism      

                This course is designed to provide a critical introduction to the subject of terrorism, an often misunderstood phenomenon that has assumed a particular salience in the wake of 9/11. Its aim is to clarify fundamental definitional and conceptual problems, introduce students to the burgeoning literature on the subject, describe basic terrorist organizational and operational methods, survey a wide range of terrorist groups and ideologies, examine certain high-profile terrorism themes, and tentatively assess the nature of the threat posed by terrorists to global security in the future.

                Fall 2010 - MIIS, Fall 2011 - MIIS, Spring 2012 - MIIS, Fall 2012 - MIIS, Spring 2013 - MIIS, Fall 2013 - MIIS, Spring 2014 - MIIS

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                NPTG 8603 - Sem:The American Radical Right      

                This seminar is designed to provide an overview of several important right-wing ideological milieus, movements, and organizations operating in the United States, including violent paramilitary groups, and is specifically intended for graduate students who have already taken lecture-oriented undergraduate or graduate courses dealing with terrorism. The class will be divided into three separate portions. In the first portion, the lectures and readings will focus on defining the right, identifying the characteristic features of the American extreme right, and describing different types of right-wing organizations that may pose domestic security threats. Since certain violent far right paramilitary organizations nowadays constitute the greatest terrorist threat to the U.S. homeland (apart from foreign jihadist groups), it is necessary for every student interested in contemporary extremism, subversion, and terrorism to become more knowledgeable about key domestic radical right groups, their agendas, and their tactics. During the second portion of the course, students will spend their time working independently on the individual research topics they have selected, which can deal with any aspect of terrorism that interests them. During the third and final portion of the course, each student will give an oral report in class to present and analyze his or her research paper findings, which will then be discussed by the entire class. Near the end of this last portion of the class, if not earlier, students must submit their completed research papers.

                Spring 2014 - MIIS

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                NPTG 8627 / IPOL 8627 - Sem:Militant Islamic Movements      

                This seminar is designed to provide a survey of various militant Islamic organizations – “gradualist” Islamist organizations that do not rely mainly on waging armed jihad, jihadist organizations that rely primarily on violence and terrorism, and other types of fundamentalist or Islamist organizations that do not fall clearly into either category – and is specifically intended for graduate students who have already taken lecture-oriented undergraduate or graduate courses dealing with terrorism. The class will be divided into two separate portions. In the first portion, the lectures and readings will focus on the basic tenets of Islam; an overview of Islamic history; the distinction between Islamic fundamentalism, political Islam, and Islamism; and important examples of the different types of Islamist organizations noted above in particular regions. Given the threat that such Islamist networks and their supporters currently pose to the security of the West, Russia, India, various states in Asia, and moderate Muslims everywhere, it is necessary for every student interested in contemporary subversion and terrorism to become much more knowledgeable about key Islamist and jihadist groups, their agendas, and their tactics. During the second portion of the course, each student will give an oral report in class to present and analyze his or her research findings, which will then be discussed by the entire class. Near the end of this second portion of the class, if not earlier, students must submit their completed research papers.

                Spring 2011 - MIIS, Spring 2012 - MIIS, Fall 2013 - MIIS

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                NPTG 8633 - SemAdvTerrrism:Global Jihadism      

                This seminar is designed to provide a more in-depth examination of transnational jihadist organizations and networks with a global agenda, and is specifically intended for graduate students who have already taken lecture-oriented undergraduate or graduate courses dealing with terrorism. The class will be divided into three separate portions. During the first portion, after a session devoted to the provision of basic information about terrorism, terrorism research methods, Islam, and Islamism, everyone in the class will read chapters from a series of important recent books that deal with global jihadist networks and their objectives. Given the threat that such networks and their supporters currently pose to the security of the West, Russia, India, various states in Asia, and moderate Muslims everywhere, it is necessary for every student interested in terrorism to become much more knowledgeable about the jihadist agenda. During the second portion of the course, students will spend their time working independently on the individual research topics they have selected, which can deal with any aspect of terrorism that interests them. During the third and final portion, each student will give an oral report in class to present and analyze his or her research findings, which will then be discussed by the entire class. Near the end of this last portion of the class, if not earlier, students must submit their completed research papers. The course requirements are as follows: regular attendance and active participation in class discussions (30% of grade), an oral report to be delivered in class (30% of grade), and a 15-20 page research paper (40% of grade).

                Spring 2013 - MIIS, Spring 2014 - MIIS

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                NPTG 8634 - Sem:AdvTerrrism:Millenarianism      

                This seminar is designed to provide an in-depth examination of certain key aspects of contemporary terrorism, and is specifically intended for graduate students who have already taken lecture-oriented undergraduate or graduate courses dealing with terrorism. The class will be divided into three separate portions. During the first portion, after a session devoted to the provision of basic information about terrorism and terrorism research methods, everyone in the class will read chapters from a series of important recent books that deal with apocalyptic millenarian groups and their objectives. Given the fact that groups of this type have periodically carried out serious acts of violence, either against “evil” outsiders or their own members, it is necessary for students interested in terrorism to obtain some knowledge about their characteristics. During the second portion of the course, students will spend their time working independently on the individual research topics they have selected, which can deal with any aspect of terrorism that interests them. During the third and final portion, each student will give an oral report in class to present and analyze his or her research findings, which will then be discussed by the entire class. Near the end of this last portion of the class, if not earlier, students must submit their completed research papers. The course requirements are as follows: regular attendance and active participation in class discussions (30% of grade), an oral report to be delivered in class (30% of grade), and a 15-20 page research paper (40% of grade).

                Spring 2013 - MIIS

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                Extra Information

                Education

                PhD in Late Modern European History, University of California at Berkeley; MA in Political Sociology and Social Movements, University of California at Berkeley; BA in Middle Eastern, Islamic, and Central Asian History, University of Michigan

                Publications

                Bibliography

                "Al-Qa‘ida/Qa‘idat al-Jihad,” entry in Encyclopedia of Global Religion, ed. by Mark Juergensmeyer and Wade Clark Roof (Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage, 2011), forthcoming.

                “Terrorists as State ‘Surrogates’ or ‘Proxies’: Separating Fact from Fiction,” in Making Sense of Proxy Wars: The Politics of Armed Surrogacy, ed. by Michael A. Innes (Washington, DC: Potomac, 2010), forthcoming.

                "Jihadist Ideology and Strategy and the Possible Employment of ‘WMD,’” in Jihadists and Weapons of Mass Destruction, ed. by Gary Ackerman and Jeremy Tamsett (New York: CRC/Taylor & Francis, 2009), pp. 3-59.

                “Islamism and Totalitarianism,” in Totalitarian Movements and Political Religions 10:2 (June 2009), pp. 73-96.

                Co-Editor (with Bassam Tibi) of special issue of Totalitarian Movements and Political Religions 10:2 (June 2009), which is devoted to Islamism.

                (with Gary Ackerman), “Profiling the WMD Terrorism Threat,” in WMD Terrorism: Science and Policy Choices, ed. By Stephen M. Maurer and Christine Hartmann-Siantar (Cambridge, MA: M.I.T., 2008), pp. 11-45.

                “Hiding in Plain Sight in ‘Londonistan,’” in Denial of Sanctuary: Understanding Terrorist Safe Havens, ed. by Michael A. Innes (Westport, CT: Praeger, 2007), pp. 139-51, 192-8.

                “Political Paranoia versus Political Realism: On Distinguishing between Bogus ‘Conspiracy Theories’ and Genuine Conspiratorial Politics,” Patterns of Prejudice 41:1 (February 2007), pp. 45-60.

                “Review Essay: Deciphering Islamism and Terrorism,” The Middle East Journal 60:4 (Autumn 2006), pp. 777-88.

                (with Gary Ackerman and Kevin S. Moran), “Assessing the [Terrorist] Threat to Critical Infrastructure,” in Homeland Security: Protecting America’s Targets, ed. by James J. F. Forest (Westport, CT: Praeger, 2006), volume 3, pp. 33-60.

                “South Africa’s Project Coast: ‘Death Squads,’ Covert State-Sponsored Poisonings, and the Dangers of CBW Proliferation,” Democracy and Security 2:1 (January-June 2006), pp. 27-59.

                Review of Daniel Byman, Deadly Connections: States that Sponsor Terrorism, in The Middle East Journal 60:1 (Winter 2006), pp. 181-3.

                Multiple entries (including “Ba`thism,” “ODESSA,” “Michael Kühnen,” and “Skinhead Fascism”) in World Fascism: A Historical Encyclopedia, ed. by Cyprian Blamires (Santa Monica: ABC-Clio, 2006).

                Review of Michael Barkun, A Culture of Conspiracy: Apocalyptic Visions in Contemporary America, in Patterns of Prejudice 39:3 (September 2005), pp. 85-7.

                Review of Janja Lalich, Bounded Choice: True Believers and Charismatic Cults, in the European Consortium for Political Research’s e-Extreme Newsletter 6:3 (Fall 2005).

                Multiple entries (including “Islamism,” “Christian Identity,” and “Abu Sayyaf Group”) in Encyclopedia of Bioterrorism Defense, ed. by Richard F. Pilch and Raymond A. Zilinskas (New York: Wiley & Sons, 2005).

                “CBW: South Africa” entry in Weapons of Mass Destruction: An Encyclopedia of Worldwide Policy, Technology, and History, ed. by Jeffrey A. Larsen, James J. Wirtz, and Eric Croddy (Santa Monica: ABC-Clio, 2005).

                “[The Ideology of] Abu Sayyaf in the Philippines,” in Voices of Terror: Manifestos, Writings and Manuals of Al Qaeda, Hamas, and other Terrorists from around the World and throughout the Ages,, ed. by Walter Laqueur (New York: Reed, 2004), pp. 513-18.

                “The Islamization of the Chechen Resistance Movement and the Potential for Radiological Terrorism,” Nuclear Threat Initiative (NTI) Issue Brief, April 2004.

                “Fascism and Neo-Fascism: Ideology and ‘Groupuscularity’,” and “Still More on Fascist and Neo-Fascist Ideology and ‘Groupuscularity’,” Erwägen Wissen Ethik 15:3 (October-November 2004), pp. 304-6, 380-3 (also re-published in an edited volume entitled Fascism Past and Present, West and East, ed. by Roger Griffin, Werner Loh, and Andreas Umland [Stuttgart: Ibidem, 2006], pp. 74-82, 290-7.)

                (with Anjali Bhattacharjee, Eric Croddy, and Richard Pilch), “Ricin Reportedly Found in London: An al-Qā`ida Connection?,” Center for Nonproliferation Studies Report, 23 January 2003.

                (with Gary A. Ackerman), “Al-Qā`ida and Weapons of Mass Destruction,” San Jose Mercury News, 22 December 2002.

                "'National Revolutionary' Groupuscules and the Resurgence of 'Left-Wing' Fascism: The Case of France's Nouvelle Résistance," Patterns of Prejudice 36:3 (July 2002), pp. 24-49.

                Multiple entries (including “De Lorenzo Coup,” “Paix et Liberté,” “ASPIDA Affair,” and “Blas Piñar”) in Europe since 1945: An Encyclopedia, ed. by Bernard A. Cook (New York: Garland, 2001).

                Review of Martin A. Lee, The Beast Reawakens: Fascism’s Resurgence from Hitler’s Spymasters to Today’s Neo-Nazi Groups and Right-Wing Extremists, in Terrorism and Political Violence 10:1 (Spring 1998), pp. 174-7.

                Review of Sandro Setta, La destra nell'Italia del dopoguerra, in Journal of Modern Italian Studies 3:2 (Summer 1998), pp. 205-8.

                “The May 1973 Terrorist Attack at Milan Police Headquarters: Anarchist 'Propaganda of the Deed' or 'False Flag' Provocation?,” Terrorism and Political Violence 8:1 (Spring 1996), pp. 132-66.

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                Regular Faculty
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