Middlebury Institute of International Studies at Monterey. Formerly the Monterey Institute of International Studies

Cristina Silva

First Name
Cristina
Last Name
Silva
cris_silvas_profile_picture
Job Title
Adjunct Faculty
City, State, ZIP
Monterey, CA, 93940
Phone
831-647-4182
Language(s)
Español
Français
português

I am passionate about the Portuguese language, translation, interpretation and my native country, Brazil.

MIIS Tags
Faculty Program Tags
Expertise

Portuguese language, translation, interpretation

Language Tags
Course List

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

TIAG 8605 - Translation Practicum      

This course is designed to make students 1) self-critical of their individual translation processes, 2) aware of the contributions of new technologies to the actual act of translating, and 3) aware of the problems of project translating in coordinated groups. These aims can be met without reference to specific language pairs.

The aim of the course is not to tell students how to translate (there are many other courses for that). The aim is to provide students with tools that they can use to make their own discoveries.

Assessment will be on the basis of attendance and participation in weekly experiment sessions.

Spring 2015 - MIIS

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TIPG 8512 - Intro to Trans into Portuguese      

Introduces students to the basic theory and practice of translation, both written and sight. Students will learn to apply text analysis, text typology, and contrastive analysis of their working languages to identify, analyze, and resolve translation problems while independently developing an efficient and rational approach to the process of translation. The appropriate application of electronic translation tools will also be introduced. Fundamental translation theory will be emphasized at the beginning of the course and will be conveyed in the form of assigned readings, lectures, class discussions, and independent research. In addition, course assignments will include practice and graded exercises in sight and written translation, utilizing authentic texts drawn from an extensive variety of text categories that include, but are not limited to, current events, general political economy, general legal documents, and scientific and technical topics for general audiences. As the term progresses, student time and effort will increasingly be spent on the preparation and evaluation of written translation assignments. Students will be expected to take at least one midterm exam and one final exam, to be assigned at the discretion of the instructor(s) of record.

Fall 2013 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS, Fall 2015 - MIIS

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TIPG 8522 - IntrmTranslation to Portuguese      

Builds on the theoretical and practical foundation laid in Introduction to Translation and introduces the translation of specialized subject matter. Depending upon the language program in which they are enrolled, students will be expected to acquire and demonstrate basic proficiency in the sight and written translation of either commercial and economic texts, legal texts, or scientific and technical texts. The amount of emphasis accorded to a particular topic will depend on the specific professional requirements of each language program. Course assignments will include readings, research, presentations, practice and graded exercises in sight translation, and practice and graded written translation assignments, including exercises in speed translation. Students will also be expected to take at least one midterm and one final exam. The frequency, nature, and structure of course assignments and examinations are largely at the discretion of the instructor(s) of record.

Prerequisite: Introduction to Translation or equivalent background.

Spring 2014 - MIIS, Spring 2015 - MIIS

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TIPG 8632 - AdvTranslatn I into Portuguese      

This is the first of two complementary courses designed to bring translation knowledge and skills up to the level that would be required of someone working in a professional translation environment. Students will be expected to apply the knowledge and skills acquired during the first-year translation courses to produce translations that meet high standards for content, form, and presentation. A great deal of attention is given to subject matter knowledge and research, precision in text analysis and writing, and the appropriate application of translation technology. Some programs emphasize scientific and technical topics in this course, but others give considerable attention to commercial, economic, legal, and political texts, many of which have a technical component. The frequency, nature, and structure of course assignments and examinations are at the discretion of the instructor(s) of record. Students will, however, be expected to take at least one midterm exam and one final exam.

Prerequisite: 2nd-year student in good standing or equivalent background.

Fall 2013 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS, Fall 2015 - MIIS

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TIPG 8642 - AdvancedTrans II to Portuguese      

Spring 2014 - MIIS, Spring 2015 - MIIS

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Extra Information

Education

  • MA in Translation, Kent State University, Kent, Ohio, 1998
  • B.A. in English, French and Linguistics, University of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas, 1995
  • Credits towards a B.A. in English and Portuguese Languages and Literatures, Universidade de São Paulo, São, Paulo, Brazil, 1989-1991.

Continuing Education

  • Basic Certification as a Terminology Manager from the European Certification and Qualification Association, 2012
  • English to Portuguese Certification by the American Translators Association, 2010

Presentations at Translation and Interpretation Conferences

  • A Taste of Webcast Interpreting, ATA Annual Conference in San Diego, 10/2012
  • Bringing Terminology Management to Center Stage: Case Studies of How It Can Make or Break a Project, ATA Annual Conference in San Diego, 10/2012
  • Freelancing as a Remote and Distant Interpreter: Over-the-Phone and Webcast Interpreting, ATA Webinar Series, 1/2012
  • Social Media for Interpreters, Colorado Association for Professional Interpreters Annual Meeting, 5/2012
  • Lights, Camera, Action: Over-the-Phone and Webcast Interpreting, ATA Annual Conference in Boston, 11/2011
  • Educating the Next Generation of Translators, Colorado Translators Association Annual Conference in Boulder, 5/2011
  • What Every Translator Should Know About Software L10N Testing / Verification / QA, at ATA Annual Conference in Denver, 11/2010
  • Mixing Computer-Assisted Translation & Machine Translation: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly, ATA Annual Conference in New York, 11/2008
Faculty Type
Adjunct Faculty
Dynamic Features
Course Catalog

Miyuki Takeuchi

First Name
Miyuki
Last Name
Takeuchi
Miyuki Takeuchi
Job Title
Adjunct
Location
McCone Cubicle M
Phone
831-647-4185
Language(s)
日本語

I am passionate about knowing how people develop language proficiency. 

I enjoy teaching not only Japanese language but the content areas related to Japan and people there. It is very interesting to discuss various issues in Japan with students from various cultures and countries at MIIS. It enables me to see my own country from broader perspectives. 

MIIS Tags
Faculty Program Tags
Expertise

Second language acquisition (I am particularly interested in the pragmatic and grammatical development among learners of Japanese.)

Foreign language pedagogy

Course List

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

JALA 8312 - Japanese Society & Culture      

Fall 2014 - MIIS

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JALA 8341 - Aspects of Japanese Society      

This is an intermediate/advanced Japanese language course that is designed to further develop oral and written communication skills through the study of various topics of current Japanese society. The students will read authentic news articles, magazines, websites, etc., of their choice, and/or watch/listen to authentic TV/radio programs, engage in group and class discussions, use the language in the actual research in interview, questionnaire, and/or email survey, and present the findings of their research formally. Through these activities, the students will enlarge their vocabulary, including the knowledge on the kanji compound words as well while deepening the understanding of current-day Japan. All four skills will be developed to increase overall proficiency and grammatical accuracy, which will be accomplished through language exercises in class and as homework assignments, frequent reading and writing exercises, and writing up a research report with multiple drafts. Students are assumed to know at least 500 kanji and their combinations and to have good foundation on basic grammar structures.

Fall 2013 - MIIS

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JALA 8343 - Current Pol/Soc Issues Japan      

This is a Japanese language course for students at the intermediate level and above. The goal of the course is to further enhance the students’ language proficiency in the four communication skills (speaking, listening, reading, writing) through studying current social/political issues in Japan. While aiming to enhancing the communication skills holistically, particular emphasis is placed on reading of authentic materials, such as newspaper, online news articles, magazine, and speech manuscript. Activities will include reading of authentic materials that are both assigned by the instructor and chosen by students, having discussion about the topics, studying of intermediate-advanced grammar/vocabulary/kanji necessary to understand the authentic reading materials, writing summary and opinions, presenting group work to the class, and discussing language learning strategies that you could use for such activities.

Spring 2014 - MIIS

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JALA 8349 - Current News in Japan      

This is an intermediate (3rd-year college level) Japanese course designed to further develop oral and written communication skills through discussion on the current news in Japan. Students will watch the natural speed news, summarize and present the content in their own words, write their opinions/views on the issues, etc. The authentic NHK news will be utilized for materials as well as web-based news program, along with some newspaper/magazine articles for supplementary reading.

Spring 2015 - MIIS

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JALA 8375 - GlobalizatnInContemporaryJapan      

Spring 2015 - MIIS

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JALA 8391 - ContempTexts:PolBusIntlAffairs      

This course is for advanced Japanese readers focusing on further developing reading and communication skills by using authentic and current publications. The primary objective is to help students develop reading proficiencies in Japanese at the advanced level in the subject matter, such as international relations, economic affairs, energy and the environment, domestic politics social issues and defense and security issues. Some reading strategies will be introduced as well as advanced grammar/structural review. The students are assumed to know some basic terminology related to those subjects and have a solid foundation in Japanese grammar.

Spring 2014 - MIIS

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JALA 8494 - IndvidualizdProjectsInJapanese      

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Spring 2015 - MIIS

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Language Tags
Extra Information

Recent Accomplishments

Completion of my PhD dissertation (2014)

Presentation of my research on the acquisition of subject referential forms among learners of Japanese at SLRF (Second Language Research Forum, 2013) and ASPAC (Asian Studies on the Pacific Coast, 2013) conferences.

Previous Work

My career as an instructor of Japanese started at Indiana University, where I obtained MA and PhD degrees. Before the current engagement at MIIS, I taught Japanese at Santa Clara University.

Education

PhD in Linguistics at Indiana University, Bloomington

MA in TESOL and Applied Linguistics at Indiana University, Bloomington

BA in English and American at Kobe City University of Foreign Studies

Bibliography

Takeuchi, M. (2014).  Subject referential expressions and encoding of referential status in L2 narrative discourse by L1-English learners of Japanese. Doctoral Dissertation, Indiana University.

Takeuchi, M. (2010).  The Perception of Geminate Stops by L1 English Learners of Japanese.  Indiana University Linguistics Club Working Papers Online, Vol. 10.

Faculty Type
Adjunct Faculty
Dynamic Features
Course Catalog

Thomas Roe

First Name
Thomas
Last Name
Roe
Thomas Roe, Professor, Image
Job Title
Adjunct Professor in International Education Management
Location
460 Pierce St. McCone Building
City, State, ZIP
Monterey, CA 93940
Phone
831.647.4155

Dr. Thomas Roe is a clinical psychologist who currently specializes working with students and particularly students from underrepresented groups. He is the Coordinator for Graduate Student Counseling Services at University of California, Davis. Dr. Roe has hands on experience working closely with international students in a variety of contexts including mental health counseling, academic advising, and consultation. He also currently facilitates an international graduate student counseling group and works with members to be successful both in academics and in life.

MIIS Tags
Expertise

Counseling, therapy, students, social justice, intersections of identity, conflict resolution, and adjustment.

Faculty Program Tags
Extra Information

 

Argosy University, Seattle- Doctor of Psychology (Clinical)

Argosy University, Seattle- Master of Psychology (Clinical)

University of Puget- Bachelor of Arts (Psychology)

Faculty Type
Adjunct Faculty

María Jesús Iglesias-Barca

First Name
María Jesús
Last Name
Iglesias-Barca
Maria Iglesias2
Job Title
Lecturer
Location
McCone Building 125
City, State, ZIP
Monterey, CA 93940
Phone
831.647.3562
Language(s)
Español

Pursuing my passion for languages and foreign cultures, I studied English Philology at the University of Santiago de Compostela, Galicia (Northwestern Spain) from which I received a “Licenciatura” (five-year degree) in 1991. I then decided to move to Oxford, U.K. in order to experience the British language and culture first hand; I worked as a translator for i-Tech Translations and tutored Spanish for University of Oxford’s St. Anne’s College.

MIIS Tags
Faculty Program Tags
Expertise

Theoretical linguistics, English and Spanish grammar and composition, curriculum design, Integrating content and language in the L2 curriculum, Culture and Society in the Hispanic World.

Language Tags
Course List

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

SPLA 8291 - EvolvngSoc-HispanicCountries      

Fall 2013 - MIIS

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SPLA 8292 - Topics in the HispanicWorld II      

Spring 2015 - MIIS

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SPLA 8310 - Hispanic Language & Culture I      

Covers Spanish grammatical structures and idioms, combining oral practice and a systematic study of vocabulary. Expression of ideas on discussion topics related to contemporary trends, current events and everyday life.

Fall 2013 - MIIS, Spring 2014 - MIIS, Spring 2015 - MIIS

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SPLA 8320 - Contemp Language & Culture II      

Continuation of Language and Culture I, review of structures, idiomatic expressions, and features of Hispanic cultures of several regions and countries. Written exercises, frequent oral reports, discussions of current issues from authentic sources.

Spring 2014 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS, Fall 2015 - MIIS

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SPLA 8373 - Env&SustDvlp-SpanishSpkngWorld      

Class discussions and activities emphasize active use of the language in different contexts including professional discussions, interviews, cultural exchanges, debates on current topics, etc. The course has two distinct goals: (1) to expand the vocabulary related to environmental issues, as well as the ability to read, analyze and discuss articles on said topic; and (2) to present an overview of environmental issues and questions in the Hispanic countries today. Students will engage in vocabulary-expanding exercises, review of advanced grammar rules as needed, individual and group presentations, writing and speaking assignments related to the most current environmental issues today.

Fall 2015 - MIIS

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SPLA 8384 - Culture & Conflict in Latin Am      

Fall 2014 - MIIS

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Extra Information

Education

MA, Theoretical Linguistics, Reading University, Reading, United Kingdom.

BA, English Philology, University of Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela, Spain.

Faculty Type
Regular Faculty
Dynamic Features
Course Catalog

Wilhelm Weber

First Name
Wilhelm
Last Name
Weber
Wilhelm Weber
Job Title
Adjunct Faculty
Phone
831.647.4185
Language(s)
Deutsch

Professor Weber was raised in a bi-lingual family with German and French and completed high school in Germany. His other languages are English, Italian, Spanish and Dutch.

Besides MIIS, Prof. Weber has taught in Geneva, Korea, Taiwan, China, Hong Kong, and Panama.

He now teaches consecutive and simultaneous interpretation into German and French.

Faculty Program Tags
Expertise

Prof. Weber has worked in all sectors of the interpreting market (international organizations, including the United Nations and the EU, foreign ministries, summits of heads of state and government, and conventions) in Europe, the USA, Asia, and Latin America. He is also known as chief interpreter of seven Olympic Games.

From 1978 to 1992 he was Dean of what is now the GSTILE.

MIIS Tags
Language Tags
Course List

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

TIFR 8637 - Adv Intrp I Simul into English      

This is the first of two complementary courses designed to bring interpretation knowledge and skills up to the professional level. Students are expected to apply the knowledge and skills acquired during the first-year interpretation courses to produce interpretations that would be of acceptable quality in a professional setting. Content on a wide range of topics and current events is interpreted, with emphasis placed on business, economics, science, technology, and other topics congruent with current market demand for interpretation in the language combination in question. Course assignments include readings and research on class topics, presentations, practice, graded exercises, and peer and self-assessment.

In consecutive interpretation, students prepare by researching topics before each session, with emphasis on sequential logic in notetaking and accurate terminology in delivery. Students continue to hone their skills by diagnosing and correcting problems at all stages from listening through delivery, while progressing to increasingly difficult and challenging material. In simultaneous interpretation, the techniques learned in the previous semester are consolidated, which enables students to polish their delivery and language register. Focuses on nuance of meaning, accuracy of interpretation, research and preparation for conferences, and glossary development. Special attention is given to maintaining concentration while under significant psychological stress. Students learn to recognize SL discourse patterns and render them effectively in TL.

At the end of the course, students are able to interpret difficult passages that are derived from professional settings. In consecutive, students are able to interpret passages up to several paragraphs in length. In simultaneous interpretation, students are able to interpret passages that are between fifteen and twenty minutes in length. The frequency, nature, and structure of course assignments and examinations are at the discretion of the instructor(s) of record.

Fall 2015 - MIIS

More Information »

TIGR 8501 - Intro to Interp into English      

Introduces students to conference interpretation in general and consecutive interpretation in particular. Lays a foundation for the development of professional skills in consecutive interpretation, emphasizing the ability to understand and analyze a message in the source language (SL) and convey it in the target language (TL) in a straightforward and clear manner. Develops students’ ability to identify, analyze, and paraphrase the meaning in the SL and establish logical relations between its components. Emphasis is placed on active listening and concentration skills, memory, the ability to abstract information for subsequent recall, and basic elements of note-taking. At the end of the course, students are able to interpret extemporaneous passages that are on topics familiar to them and are between three and five minutes in length.

In language-specific sessions and joint sessions with other language programs, students are introduced to the skill of consecutive interpreting in both theory and practice. They practice listening to and repeating the content of passages of increasing length and difficulty. Students hone their public-speaking skills by developing and delivering speeches. Content is interpreted on topics from daily life, current events and the media, and general areas of personal interest to students.

Course assignments include readings and research on class topics, presentations, practice, graded exercises, and peer and self-assessment. The frequency, nature, and structure of course assignments and examinations are at the discretion of the instructor(s) of record.

Fall 2014 - MIIS

More Information »

TIGR 8635 - Adv Intrp I Consc into English      

This is the first of two complementary courses designed to bring interpretation knowledge and skills up to the professional level. Students are expected to apply the knowledge and skills acquired during the first-year interpretation courses to produce interpretations that would be of acceptable quality in a professional setting. Content on a wide range of topics and current events is interpreted, with emphasis placed on business, economics, science, technology, and other topics congruent with current market demand for interpretation in the language combination in question. Course assignments include readings and research on class topics, presentations, practice, graded exercises, and peer and self-assessment. In consecutive interpretation, students prepare by researching topics before each session, with emphasis on sequential logic in notetaking and accurate terminology in delivery. Students continue to hone their skills by diagnosing and correcting problems at all stages from listening through delivery, while progressing to increasingly difficult and challenging material. In simultaneous interpretation, the techniques learned in the previous semester are consolidated, which enables students to polish their delivery and language register. Focuses on nuance of meaning, accuracy of interpretation, research and preparation for conferences, and glossary development. Special attention is given to maintaining concentration while under significant psychological stress. Students learn to recognize SL discourse patterns and render them effectively in TL. At the end of the course, students are able to interpret difficult passages that are derived from professional settings. In consecutive, students are able to interpret passages up to several paragraphs in length. In simultaneous interpretation, students are able to interpret passages that are between fifteen and twenty minutes in length. The frequency, nature, and structure of course assignments and examinations are at the discretion of the instructor(s) of record.

Fall 2013 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS

More Information »

TIGR 8636 - Adv Intrp I Consc into German      

This is the first of two complementary courses designed to bring interpretation knowledge and skills up to the professional level. Students are expected to apply the knowledge and skills acquired during the first-year interpretation courses to produce interpretations that would be of acceptable quality in a professional setting. Content on a wide range of topics and current events is interpreted, with emphasis placed on business, economics, science, technology, and other topics congruent with current market demand for interpretation in the language combination in question. Course assignments include readings and research on class topics, presentations, practice, graded exercises, and peer and self-assessment. In consecutive interpretation, students prepare by researching topics before each session, with emphasis on sequential logic in notetaking and accurate terminology in delivery. Students continue to hone their skills by diagnosing and correcting problems at all stages from listening through delivery, while progressing to increasingly difficult and challenging material. In simultaneous interpretation, the techniques learned in the previous semester are consolidated, which enables students to polish their delivery and language register. Focuses on nuance of meaning, accuracy of interpretation, research and preparation for conferences, and glossary development. Special attention is given to maintaining concentration while under significant psychological stress. Students learn to recognize SL discourse patterns and render them effectively in TL. At the end of the course, students are able to interpret difficult passages that are derived from professional settings. In consecutive, students are able to interpret passages up to several paragraphs in length. In simultaneous interpretation, students are able to interpret passages that are between fifteen and twenty minutes in length. The frequency, nature, and structure of course assignments and examinations are at the discretion of the instructor(s) of record.

Fall 2014 - MIIS, Fall 2015 - MIIS

More Information »

TIGR 8637 - Adv Intrp I Simul into English      

This is the first of two complementary courses designed to bring interpretation knowledge and skills up to the professional level. Students are expected to apply the knowledge and skills acquired during the first-year interpretation courses to produce interpretations that would be of acceptable quality in a professional setting. Content on a wide range of topics and current events is interpreted, with emphasis placed on business, economics, science, technology, and other topics congruent with current market demand for interpretation in the language combination in question. Course assignments include readings and research on class topics, presentations, practice, graded exercises, and peer and self-assessment. In consecutive interpretation, students prepare by researching topics before each session, with emphasis on sequential logic in notetaking and accurate terminology in delivery. Students continue to hone their skills by diagnosing and correcting problems at all stages from listening through delivery, while progressing to increasingly difficult and challenging material. In simultaneous interpretation, the techniques learned in the previous semester are consolidated, which enables students to polish their delivery and language register. Focuses on nuance of meaning, accuracy of interpretation, research and preparation for conferences, and glossary development. Special attention is given to maintaining concentration while under significant psychological stress. Students learn to recognize SL discourse patterns and render them effectively in TL. At the end of the course, students are able to interpret difficult passages that are derived from professional settings. In consecutive, students are able to interpret passages up to several paragraphs in length. In simultaneous interpretation, students are able to interpret passages that are between fifteen and twenty minutes in length. The frequency, nature, and structure of course assignments and examinations are at the discretion of the instructor(s) of record.

Fall 2013 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS

More Information »

TIGR 8638 - Adv Intrp I Simul into German      

This is the first of two complementary courses designed to bring interpretation knowledge and skills up to the professional level. Students are expected to apply the knowledge and skills acquired during the first-year interpretation courses to produce interpretations that would be of acceptable quality in a professional setting. Content on a wide range of topics and current events is interpreted, with emphasis placed on business, economics, science, technology, and other topics congruent with current market demand for interpretation in the language combination in question. Course assignments include readings and research on class topics, presentations, practice, graded exercises, and peer and self-assessment. In consecutive interpretation, students prepare by researching topics before each session, with emphasis on sequential logic in notetaking and accurate terminology in delivery. Students continue to hone their skills by diagnosing and correcting problems at all stages from listening through delivery, while progressing to increasingly difficult and challenging material. In simultaneous interpretation, the techniques learned in the previous semester are consolidated, which enables students to polish their delivery and language register. Focuses on nuance of meaning, accuracy of interpretation, research and preparation for conferences, and glossary development. Special attention is given to maintaining concentration while under significant psychological stress. Students learn to recognize SL discourse patterns and render them effectively in TL. At the end of the course, students are able to interpret difficult passages that are derived from professional settings. In consecutive, students are able to interpret passages up to several paragraphs in length. In simultaneous interpretation, students are able to interpret passages that are between fifteen and twenty minutes in length. The frequency, nature, and structure of course assignments and examinations are at the discretion of the instructor(s) of record.

Fall 2015 - MIIS

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TIGR 8646 - Adv Intrp II-Consc to German      

Advanced Interpretation II – Consecutive and Simultaneous

This course is the counterpart to Advanced Interpretation I. Students are expected to interpret speeches of considerable difficulty and complexity and to cope with the types of challenges that are likely to be encountered in professional settings. Provides final preparation for the Professional Examinations.

In consecutive interpretation, emphasis is placed on both science and technology and political rhetoric, requiring particular attention to nuance and tone. Students learn the vernacular of political speeches and other challenging material while sharpening listening, processing, and notetaking functions.

In simultaneous interpretation, advanced instruction is given for difficult speeches. Emphasizes following the logic of complex scientific and technical discourse, and remaining faithful to the style and tone of persuasive political discourse. Students are also introduced to simultaneous interpretation with text. They learn how to draw upon outlines, transcripts, slides and transparencies, and other written materials to enhance the accuracy and completeness of their interpretation. Emphasis is placed on text preparation strategies and efficient use of textual materials while on the air.

Content on a wide range of topics and current events is interpreted, with emphasis placed on topics congruent with current market demand for interpretation in the relevant language combination(s). Course assignments include readings and research on class topics, presentations, practice, graded exercises, and peer and self-assessment.

At the end of the course, students are expected to interpret difficult speeches in professional settings. In consecutive, students are called upon to interpret passages that are several paragraphs in length. In simultaneous, students are able to interpret passages that are between fifteen and twenty minutes in length. The frequency, nature, and structure of course assignments and examinations are at the discretion of the instructor(s) of record.

Course prerequisites: Advanced Interpretation I or the equivalent

Spring 2015 - MIIS

More Information »

TIGR 8648 - Adv Intrp II-Siml into German      

Advanced Interpretation II – Consecutive and Simultaneous

This course is the counterpart to Advanced Interpretation I. Students are expected to interpret speeches of considerable difficulty and complexity and to cope with the types of challenges that are likely to be encountered in professional settings. Provides final preparation for the Professional Examinations.

In consecutive interpretation, emphasis is placed on both science and technology and political rhetoric, requiring particular attention to nuance and tone. Students learn the vernacular of political speeches and other challenging material while sharpening listening, processing, and notetaking functions.

In simultaneous interpretation, advanced instruction is given for difficult speeches. Emphasizes following the logic of complex scientific and technical discourse, and remaining faithful to the style and tone of persuasive political discourse. Students are also introduced to simultaneous interpretation with text. They learn how to draw upon outlines, transcripts, slides and transparencies, and other written materials to enhance the accuracy and completeness of their interpretation. Emphasis is placed on text preparation strategies and efficient use of textual materials while on the air.

Content on a wide range of topics and current events is interpreted, with emphasis placed on topics congruent with current market demand for interpretation in the relevant language combination(s). Course assignments include readings and research on class topics, presentations, practice, graded exercises, and peer and self-assessment.

At the end of the course, students are expected to interpret difficult speeches in professional settings. In consecutive, students are called upon to interpret passages that are several paragraphs in length. In simultaneous, students are able to interpret passages that are between fifteen and twenty minutes in length. The frequency, nature, and structure of course assignments and examinations are at the discretion of the instructor(s) of record.

Course prerequisites: Advanced Interpretation I or the equivalent

Spring 2015 - MIIS

More Information »

Extra Information

Education

He obtained a Master’s Degree in Conference Interpretation at the prestigious School of Translation and Interpretation at the University of Geneva/Switzerland, where he also taught from 1963 to 1978.

Faculty Type
Adjunct Faculty
Dynamic Features
Course Catalog

David Budgen

First Name
David
Last Name
Budgen
dbudgen
Job Title
Visiting Professor
City, State, ZIP
Monterey, CA, 93940
Phone
831.647.4185
Language(s)
Español
Français
Русский
italiano

David Budgen has been a practicing conference interpreter (and member of AIIC) for some twenty years, principally with international organizations, and was the first Head of NATO Russian Language Service for nearly fifteen years. During this time he travelled widely for the organization and accompanied four Secretaries-General to Russian-speaking countries. For many years he was Co-Chairman of the NATO-Russia Expert Group on Terminology. He has taught and examined in various interpretation schools in Europe.

Faculty Program Tags
MIIS Tags
Course List

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

TIRU 8501 - Intro to Interp into English      

Introduces students to conference interpretation in general and consecutive interpretation in particular. Lays a foundation for the development of professional skills in consecutive interpretation, emphasizing the ability to understand and analyze a message in the source language (SL) and convey it in the target language (TL) in a straightforward and clear manner. Develops students’ ability to identify, analyze, and paraphrase the meaning in the SL and establish logical relations between its components. Emphasis is placed on active listening and concentration skills, memory, the ability to abstract information for subsequent recall, and basic elements of note-taking. At the end of the course, students are able to interpret extemporaneous passages that are on topics familiar to them and are between three and five minutes in length.

In language-specific sessions and joint sessions with other language programs, students are introduced to the skill of consecutive interpreting in both theory and practice. They practice listening to and repeating the content of passages of increasing length and difficulty. Students hone their public-speaking skills by developing and delivering speeches. Content is interpreted on topics from daily life, current events and the media, and general areas of personal interest to students.

Course assignments include readings and research on class topics, presentations, practice, graded exercises, and peer and self-assessment. The frequency, nature, and structure of course assignments and examinations are at the discretion of the instructor(s) of record.

Fall 2015 - MIIS

More Information »

TIRU 8635 - Adv Intrp I Consc into English      

This is the first of two complementary courses designed to bring interpretation knowledge and skills up to the professional level. Students are expected to apply the knowledge and skills acquired during the first-year interpretation courses to produce interpretations that would be of acceptable quality in a professional setting. Content on a wide range of topics and current events is interpreted, with emphasis placed on business, economics, science, technology, and other topics congruent with current market demand for interpretation in the language combination in question. Course assignments include readings and research on class topics, presentations, practice, graded exercises, and peer and self-assessment.

In consecutive interpretation, students prepare by researching topics before each session, with emphasis on sequential logic in notetaking and accurate terminology in delivery. Students continue to hone their skills by diagnosing and correcting problems at all stages from listening through delivery, while progressing to increasingly difficult and challenging material. In simultaneous interpretation, the techniques learned in the previous semester are consolidated, which enables students to polish their delivery and language register. Focuses on nuance of meaning, accuracy of interpretation, research and preparation for conferences, and glossary development. Special attention is given to maintaining concentration while under significant psychological stress. Students learn to recognize SL discourse patterns and render them effectively in TL.

At the end of the course, students are able to interpret difficult passages that are derived from professional settings. In consecutive, students are able to interpret passages up to several paragraphs in length. In simultaneous interpretation, students are able to interpret passages that are between fifteen and twenty minutes in length. The frequency, nature, and structure of course assignments and examinations are at the discretion of the instructor(s) of record.

Fall 2013 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS, Fall 2015 - MIIS

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TIRU 8637 - Adv Intrp I Simul into English      

This is the first of two complementary courses designed to bring interpretation knowledge and skills up to the professional level. Students are expected to apply the knowledge and skills acquired during the first-year interpretation courses to produce interpretations that would be of acceptable quality in a professional setting. Content on a wide range of topics and current events is interpreted, with emphasis placed on business, economics, science, technology, and other topics congruent with current market demand for interpretation in the language combination in question. Course assignments include readings and research on class topics, presentations, practice, graded exercises, and peer and self-assessment.

In consecutive interpretation, students prepare by researching topics before each session, with emphasis on sequential logic in notetaking and accurate terminology in delivery. Students continue to hone their skills by diagnosing and correcting problems at all stages from listening through delivery, while progressing to increasingly difficult and challenging material. In simultaneous interpretation, the techniques learned in the previous semester are consolidated, which enables students to polish their delivery and language register. Focuses on nuance of meaning, accuracy of interpretation, research and preparation for conferences, and glossary development. Special attention is given to maintaining concentration while under significant psychological stress. Students learn to recognize SL discourse patterns and render them effectively in TL.

At the end of the course, students are able to interpret difficult passages that are derived from professional settings. In consecutive, students are able to interpret passages up to several paragraphs in length. In simultaneous interpretation, students are able to interpret passages that are between fifteen and twenty minutes in length. The frequency, nature, and structure of course assignments and examinations are at the discretion of the instructor(s) of record.

Fall 2013 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS, Fall 2015 - MIIS

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TIRU 8645 - Adv Intrp II-Consc to English      

The course is designed to continue building students’ consecutive interpretation skills for the Russian into English combination with the goal of preparing for Professional Exams. Heavy emphasis is placed on learning to interpret high register political texts from Russian into English as may be done in the context of major international organizations. Topics include: current political events, international organizations, diplomatic protocol, nonproliferation of nuclear weapons, resolution of political and economic conflicts. Students are expected to be able to interpret in a variety of simulated professional situations.

Final semester grade is calculated based on the midterm exam (30%), the semester exam (30%) and classroom performance (40%).

Spring 2014 - MIIS, Spring 2015 - MIIS

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TIRU 8647 - Adv Intrp II-Siml into English      

The course is designed to continue building students’ simultaneous interpretation skills for the Russian into English combination with the goal of preparing for Professional Exams. Heavy emphasis is placed on learning to interpret high register political texts from Russian into English as may be done in the context of major international organizations. Topics include: current political events, international organizations, diplomatic protocol, nonproliferation of nuclear weapons, resolution of political and economic conflicts. Students are expected to be able to interpret in a variety of simulated professional situations. Special attention is paid to relay interpretation (i.e. working both as a pivot interpreter and a user of relay). Various dialects and/or accents of the Russian language are introduced to improve source language comprehension. Source texts with a higher rate of delivery are regularly used.

Final semester grade is calculated based on the midterm exam (30%), the semester exam (30%) and classroom performance (40%).

Spring 2014 - MIIS, Spring 2015 - MIIS

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Extra Information

Recent Accomplishments:

Published, together with the Moscow Military University, NATO-Russia Council Consolidated Glossary of  Cooperation (Brussels, 2011, 700pp.).

Awarded medal For Military Cooperation by Russian Federation 2011.

Education:

MA (First class) in Modern Languages (Russian and French), Merton College, Oxford University; Voronezh State University (USSR); D.Phil (Ph.D), Oxford; Research Fellow at St.John's College, Oxford (eighteenth and early nineteenth-century Russian literature). Postgrad Diploma in Conference Interpreting Techniques, University of Westminster; EU freelance exams in Russian, French, Italian, Spanish.

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Philipp C. Bleek

First Name
Philipp
Last Name
Bleek
Philipp Bleek Image
Job Title
Assistant Professor
Location
205 McGowan
City, State, ZIP
Monterey, CA 93940
Phone
831.647.6509

Philipp C. Bleek is an Assistant Professor in the Graduate School of International Policy and Management and Fellow at the James Martin Center for Nonproliferation Studies at the Middlebury Institute of International Studies at Monterey (MIIS). His research and teaching focuses on the causes, consequences, and amelioration of nuclear, biological, and chemical weapons proliferation to states and non-state actors.

Expertise

Causes, consequences, and amelioration of nuclear, biological, and chemical weapons proliferation.

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NPTG 8531 - Writing & Briefing Memos      

Fall 2014 - MIIS, Spring 2015 - MIIS, Fall 2015 - MIIS

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NPTG 8574 - Intro to WMD Nonproliferation      

This course surveys the issues surrounding the proliferation of nuclear, chemical, and biological weapons and ballistic missiles. It also provides an introduction to nuclear and radiological terrorism, and an overview of the international nonproliferation regime.

The course is divided into three main parts: Part 1 provides an overview of the trends and technologies of WMD proliferation. Part 2 considers the nonproliferation regime in detail, concentrating on the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT), the conventions banning chemical and biological weapons, supplier regimes and export controls, and verification and compliance issues. Part 3 returns to challenges to the nonproliferation regime, including states of proliferation concern known or believed to be developing WMD outside or in defiance of the NPT, CWC, and BWC and tensions within the nonproliferation regime, and discusses the range of international, multilateral, and unilateral responses to these challenges

Fall 2013 - MIIS, Spring 2014 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS, Spring 2015 - MIIS, Fall 2015 - MIIS

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NPTG 8654 - Sem:WMDProliferatnInMiddleEast      

This seminar examines the proliferation of nuclear, biological, and chemical weapons in the Middle East, including historical developments, the present context, and alternate potential futures.

Although the focus is on state actors, proliferation risks posed by non-state terrorist organizations will be discussed as well. The course will begin with overview sessions on why states do and do not pursue and acquire nuclear, biological, and chemical weapons and on the internal and intrastate politics of the region. Subsequent sessions will focus on key regional countries. The course will conclude with integrative simulation sessions allowing participants to wrestle with the prospects for proliferation and nonproliferation in the region. Students will prepare weekly short memos, conduct group work for integrative simulation exercises, prepare an independent research project, and have various presentation opportunities.
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Spring 2014 - MIIS

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NPTG 8658 - Sem: CBRN Terrorism      

The goal of this seminar is to develop the skills necessary to analyze the motivations and capabilities of non-state actors to acquire and use weapons of mass destruction (WMD), more specifically chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear (CBRN) weapons and materials, for terrorist purposes. Through class discussions, simulation exercises, and individual research, students will review the technical aspects of CBRN, examine the history of CBRN use by terrorists, assess CBRN terrorism threats and vulnerabilities, and assess policy responses to CBRN terrorism. Students are required to have substantial background knowledge of either CBRN or terrorism before joining the seminar.

Students will prepare weekly short memos, conduct group work for integrative simulation exercises, prepare an independent research project, and have various presentation opportunities.

Fall 2013 - MIIS, Spring 2014 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS, Spring 2015 - MIIS

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