Miyuki Takeuchi

First Name
Miyuki
Last Name
Takeuchi
Miyuki Takeuchi
Job Title
Adjunct
Location
McCone Cubicle M
Phone
831-647-3550
Language(s)
日本語

I am passionate about knowing how people develop language proficiency. 

I enjoy teaching not only Japanese language but the content areas related to Japan and people there. It is very interesting to discuss various issues in Japan with students from various cultures and countries at MIIS. It enables me to see my own country from broader perspectives. 

MIIS Tags
Faculty Program Tags
Expertise

Second language acquisition (I am particularly interested in the pragmatic and grammatical development among learners of Japanese.)

Foreign language pedagogy

Course List

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

JALA 8230 - Intermediate Japanese      

Summer 2012 Language Programs

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JALA 8260 - Intermediate Japanese      

Summer 2012 Language Programs

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JALA 8300 - Advanced Japanese      

Summer 2012 Language Programs

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JALA 8301 - Advanced Japanese      

Summer 2012 Language Programs

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JALA 8312 - Japanese Society & Culture      

Fall 2014 - MIIS

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JALA 8341 - Aspects of Japanese Society      

Fall 2013 - MIIS

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JALA 8343 - Current Pol/Soc Issues Japan      

This is a Japanese language course for students at the intermediate level and above. The goal of the course is to further enhance the students’ language proficiency in the four communication skills (speaking, listening, reading, writing) through studying current social/political issues in Japan. While aiming to enhancing the communication skills holistically, particular emphasis is placed on reading of authentic materials, such as newspaper, online news articles, magazine, and speech manuscript. Activities will include reading of authentic materials that are both assigned by the instructor and chosen by students, having discussion about the topics, studying of intermediate-advanced grammar/vocabulary/kanji necessary to understand the authentic reading materials, writing summary and opinions, presenting group work to the class, and discussing language learning strategies that you could use for such activities.

Spring 2012 - MIIS, Spring 2014 - MIIS

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JALA 8349 - Current News in Japan      

This is an intermediate (3rd-year college level) Japanese course designed to further develop oral and written communication skills through discussion on the current news in Japan. Students will watch the natural speed news, summarize and present the content in their own words, write their opinions/views on the issues, etc. The authentic NHK news will be utilized for materials as well as web-based news program, along with some newspaper/magazine articles for supplementary reading.

Fall 2012 - MIIS, Spring 2015 - MIIS

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JALA 8375 - Media and Society      

Spring 2015 - MIIS

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JALA 8391 - ContempTexts:PolBusIntlAffairs      

This course is for advanced Japanese readers focusing on further developing reading and communication skills by using authentic and current publications. The primary objective is to help students develop reading proficiencies in Japanese at the advanced level in the subject matter, such as international relations, economic affairs, energy and the environment, domestic politics social issues and defense and security issues. Some reading strategies will be introduced as well as advanced grammar/structural review. The students are assumed to know some basic terminology related to those subjects and have a solid foundation in Japanese grammar.

Spring 2014 - MIIS

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Language Tags
Extra Information

Recent Accomplishments

Completion of my PhD dissertation (2014)

Presentation of my research on the acquisition of subject referential forms among learners of Japanese at SLRF (Second Language Research Forum, 2013) and ASPAC (Asian Studies on the Pacific Coast, 2013) conferences.

Previous Work

My career as an instructor of Japanese started at Indiana University, where I obtained MA and PhD degrees. Before the current engagement at MIIS, I taught Japanese at Santa Clara University.

Education

PhD in Linguistics at Indiana University, Bloomington

MA in TESOL and Applied Linguistics at Indiana University, Bloomington

BA in English and American at Kobe City University of Foreign Studies

Bibliography

Takeuchi, M. (2014).  Subject referential expressions and encoding of referential status in L2 narrative discourse by L1-English learners of Japanese. Doctoral Dissertation, Indiana University.

Takeuchi, M. (2010).  The Perception of Geminate Stops by L1 English Learners of Japanese.  Indiana University Linguistics Club Working Papers Online, Vol. 10.

Faculty Type
Adjunct Faculty
Dynamic Features
Course Catalog

Thomas Roe

First Name
Thomas
Last Name
Roe
Thomas Roe, Professor, Image
Job Title
Adjunct Professor in International Education Management
Location
460 Pierce St. McCone Building
City, State, ZIP
Monterey, CA 93940
Phone
831.647.4155

Dr. Thomas Roe is a clinical psychologist who currently specializes working with students and particularly students from underrepresented groups. He is the Coordinator for Graduate Student Counseling Services at University of California, Davis. Dr. Roe has hands on experience working closely with international students in a variety of contexts including mental health counseling, academic advising, and consultation. He also currently facilitates an international graduate student counseling group and works with members to be successful both in academics and in life.

MIIS Tags
Expertise

Counseling, therapy, students, social justice, intersections of identity, conflict resolution, and adjustment.

Faculty Program Tags
Extra Information

 

Argosy University, Seattle- Doctor of Psychology (Clinical)

Argosy University, Seattle- Master of Psychology (Clinical)

University of Puget- Bachelor of Arts (Psychology)

Faculty Type
Adjunct Faculty

Wilhelm Weber

First Name
Wilhelm
Last Name
Weber
Wilhelm Weber
Job Title
Adjunct Faculty
Phone
831.647.4185
Language(s)
Deutsch

Professor Weber was raised in a bi-lingual family with German and French and completed high school in Germany. His other languages are English, Italian, Spanish and Dutch.

Besides MIIS, Prof. Weber has taught in Geneva, Korea, Taiwan, China, Hong Kong, and Panama.

He now teaches consecutive and simultaneous interpretation into German and French.

Faculty Program Tags
Expertise

Prof. Weber has worked in all sectors of the interpreting market (international organizations, including the United Nations and the EU, foreign ministries, summits of heads of state and government, and conventions) in Europe, the USA, Asia, and Latin America. He is also known as chief interpreter of seven Olympic Games.

From 1978 to 1992 he was Dean of what is now the GSTILE.

MIIS Tags
Language Tags
Course List

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

TIGR 8501 - Intro to Interp into English      

Introduces students to conference interpretation in general and consecutive interpretation in particular. Lays a foundation for the development of professional skills in consecutive interpretation, emphasizing the ability to understand and analyze a message in the source language (SL) and convey it in the target language (TL) in a straightforward and clear manner. Develops students’ ability to identify, analyze, and paraphrase the meaning in the SL and establish logical relations between its components. Emphasis is placed on active listening and concentration skills, memory, the ability to abstract information for subsequent recall, and basic elements of note-taking. At the end of the course, students are able to interpret extemporaneous passages that are on topics familiar to them and are between three and five minutes in length.

In language-specific sessions and joint sessions with other language programs, students are introduced to the skill of consecutive interpreting in both theory and practice. They practice listening to and repeating the content of passages of increasing length and difficulty. Students hone their public-speaking skills by developing and delivering speeches. Content is interpreted on topics from daily life, current events and the media, and general areas of personal interest to students.

Course assignments include readings and research on class topics, presentations, practice, graded exercises, and peer and self-assessment. The frequency, nature, and structure of course assignments and examinations are at the discretion of the instructor(s) of record.

Fall 2014 - MIIS

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TIGR 8526 - Intrm Intrp-Consc to German      

Intermediate Interpretation – Consecutive and Simultaneous

Builds on the practical and theoretical foundation laid in Introduction to Interpretation. Consists of both language-specific and joint sessions with other language programs.

In consecutive, students learn to identify the implicit structural organization of an extemporaneous speech by presenting and interpreting speeches of this type. Reinforces ability to perceive essential meaning and further develops note-taking techniques. Emphasizes clarity of expression, correct style and grammar, proper diction, and polished presentation. Students also expand their active vocabulary to include the terms and idioms that frequently occur in extemporaneous speeches. At the end of the course, students are able to interpret passages that are delivered extemporaneously, are of moderate difficulty, and are derived from professional settings. These passages vary from one to several paragraphs in length depending upon language combination, direction, and source content.

In simultaneous, students are introduced to basic strategies of interpreting in this mode in the booth. Begins with a general introduction and follows up with a series of preparatory exercises helping students develop the concentration necessary for listening and speaking at the same time, mastering voice management, and acquiring smooth delivery techniques. Students learn to analyze discourse for meaning while rendering a coherent version in the TL with correct grammar, diction and style. At the end of the course, students are able to interpret passages that are between eight and ten minutes in length.

Content on a wide range of topics and current events is interpreted, with some emphasis placed on business and economics. Course assignments include readings and research on class topics, presentations, practice, graded exercises, and peer and self-assessment. The frequency, nature, and structure of course assignments and examinations are at the discretion of the instructor(s) of record.

Course prerequisites: Introduction to Interpretation or the equivalent

Spring 2015 - MIIS

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TIGR 8528 - Intrm Intrp-Siml into German      

Intermediate Interpretation – Consecutive and Simultaneous

Builds on the practical and theoretical foundation laid in Introduction to Interpretation. Consists of both language-specific and joint sessions with other language programs.

In consecutive, students learn to identify the implicit structural organization of an extemporaneous speech by presenting and interpreting speeches of this type. Reinforces ability to perceive essential meaning and further develops note-taking techniques. Emphasizes clarity of expression, correct style and grammar, proper diction, and polished presentation. Students also expand their active vocabulary to include the terms and idioms that frequently occur in extemporaneous speeches. At the end of the course, students are able to interpret passages that are delivered extemporaneously, are of moderate difficulty, and are derived from professional settings. These passages vary from one to several paragraphs in length depending upon language combination, direction, and source content.

In simultaneous, students are introduced to basic strategies of interpreting in this mode in the booth. Begins with a general introduction and follows up with a series of preparatory exercises helping students develop the concentration necessary for listening and speaking at the same time, mastering voice management, and acquiring smooth delivery techniques. Students learn to analyze discourse for meaning while rendering a coherent version in the TL with correct grammar, diction and style. At the end of the course, students are able to interpret passages that are between eight and ten minutes in length.

Content on a wide range of topics and current events is interpreted, with some emphasis placed on business and economics. Course assignments include readings and research on class topics, presentations, practice, graded exercises, and peer and self-assessment. The frequency, nature, and structure of course assignments and examinations are at the discretion of the instructor(s) of record.

Course prerequisites: Introduction to Interpretation or the equivalent

Spring 2015 - MIIS

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TIGR 8635 - Adv Intrp I Consc into English      

Fall 2013 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS

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TIGR 8636 - Adv Intrp I Consc into German      

Fall 2011 - MIIS, Fall 2012 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS

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TIGR 8637 - Adv Intrp I Simul into English      

Fall 2013 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS

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TIGR 8638 - Adv Intrp I Simul into German      

Fall 2011 - MIIS, Fall 2012 - MIIS

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TIGR 8646 - Adv Intrp II-Consc to German      

Advanced Interpretation II – Consecutive and Simultaneous

This course is the counterpart to Advanced Interpretation I. Students are expected to interpret speeches of considerable difficulty and complexity and to cope with the types of challenges that are likely to be encountered in professional settings. Provides final preparation for the Professional Examinations.

In consecutive interpretation, emphasis is placed on both science and technology and political rhetoric, requiring particular attention to nuance and tone. Students learn the vernacular of political speeches and other challenging material while sharpening listening, processing, and notetaking functions.

In simultaneous interpretation, advanced instruction is given for difficult speeches. Emphasizes following the logic of complex scientific and technical discourse, and remaining faithful to the style and tone of persuasive political discourse. Students are also introduced to simultaneous interpretation with text. They learn how to draw upon outlines, transcripts, slides and transparencies, and other written materials to enhance the accuracy and completeness of their interpretation. Emphasis is placed on text preparation strategies and efficient use of textual materials while on the air.

Content on a wide range of topics and current events is interpreted, with emphasis placed on topics congruent with current market demand for interpretation in the relevant language combination(s). Course assignments include readings and research on class topics, presentations, practice, graded exercises, and peer and self-assessment.

At the end of the course, students are expected to interpret difficult speeches in professional settings. In consecutive, students are called upon to interpret passages that are several paragraphs in length. In simultaneous, students are able to interpret passages that are between fifteen and twenty minutes in length. The frequency, nature, and structure of course assignments and examinations are at the discretion of the instructor(s) of record.

Course prerequisites: Advanced Interpretation I or the equivalent

Spring 2012 - MIIS, Spring 2015 - MIIS

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TIGR 8648 - Adv Intrp II-Siml into German      

Advanced Interpretation II – Consecutive and Simultaneous

This course is the counterpart to Advanced Interpretation I. Students are expected to interpret speeches of considerable difficulty and complexity and to cope with the types of challenges that are likely to be encountered in professional settings. Provides final preparation for the Professional Examinations.

In consecutive interpretation, emphasis is placed on both science and technology and political rhetoric, requiring particular attention to nuance and tone. Students learn the vernacular of political speeches and other challenging material while sharpening listening, processing, and notetaking functions.

In simultaneous interpretation, advanced instruction is given for difficult speeches. Emphasizes following the logic of complex scientific and technical discourse, and remaining faithful to the style and tone of persuasive political discourse. Students are also introduced to simultaneous interpretation with text. They learn how to draw upon outlines, transcripts, slides and transparencies, and other written materials to enhance the accuracy and completeness of their interpretation. Emphasis is placed on text preparation strategies and efficient use of textual materials while on the air.

Content on a wide range of topics and current events is interpreted, with emphasis placed on topics congruent with current market demand for interpretation in the relevant language combination(s). Course assignments include readings and research on class topics, presentations, practice, graded exercises, and peer and self-assessment.

At the end of the course, students are expected to interpret difficult speeches in professional settings. In consecutive, students are called upon to interpret passages that are several paragraphs in length. In simultaneous, students are able to interpret passages that are between fifteen and twenty minutes in length. The frequency, nature, and structure of course assignments and examinations are at the discretion of the instructor(s) of record.

Course prerequisites: Advanced Interpretation I or the equivalent

Spring 2012 - MIIS, Spring 2015 - MIIS

More Information »

Extra Information

Education

He obtained a Master’s Degree in Conference Interpretation at the prestigious School of Translation and Interpretation at the University of Geneva/Switzerland, where he also taught from 1963 to 1978.

Faculty Type
Adjunct Faculty
Dynamic Features
Course Catalog

David Budgen

First Name
David
Last Name
Budgen
dbudgen
Job Title
Visiting Professor
City, State, ZIP
Monterey, CA, 93940
Phone
831.647.4185
Language(s)
Español
Français
Русский
italiano

David Budgen has been a practising conference interpreter (and member of AIIC) for some twenty years, principally with international organisations, and was the first Head of NATO Russian Language Service for nearly fifteen years. During this time he travelled widely for the Organisation and accompanied four Secretaries-General to Russian-speaking countries. For many years he was Co-Chairman of the NATO-Russia Expert Group on Terminology. He has taught and examined in various interpretation schools in Europe.

Faculty Program Tags
MIIS Tags
Course List

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

TIRU 8527 - Intrm Intrp-Siml into English      

The course introduces basic skills in simultaneous conference interpretation from Russian into English. Various contemporary texts in Russian by a variety of speakers (mass media, presentations, conference papers) are used to practice simultaneous interpretation skills in class and to illustrate the process of interpretation. Classes include interpretation sessions, theoretical discussions and exercises. Major topics covered by the course are: stages of simultaneous interpretation from Russian into English, Russian language source text analysis, semantic transformations, input-output lag management, output quality control, mental preparedness. Special attention is paid to voice quality and voice training as needed by individual students. Students will have an opportunity to build basic simultaneous interpretation skills and improve their knowledge of Russian realia and their cultural knowledge to prepare themselves for more advanced texts and exercises. Reading assignments are required.

Final semester grade is calculated based on the midterm exam (30%), the semester exam (30%) and classroom performance (40%).

Spring 2012 - MIIS

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TIRU 8635 - Adv Intrp I Consc into English      

This is the first of two complementary courses designed to bring interpretation knowledge and skills up to the professional level. Students are expected to apply the knowledge and skills acquired during the first-year interpretation courses to produce interpretations that would be of acceptable quality in a professional setting. Content on a wide range of topics and current events is interpreted, with emphasis placed on business, economics, science, technology, and other topics congruent with current market demand for interpretation in the language combination in question. Course assignments include readings and research on class topics, presentations, practice, graded exercises, and peer and self-assessment.

In consecutive interpretation, students prepare by researching topics before each session, with emphasis on sequential logic in notetaking and accurate terminology in delivery. Students continue to hone their skills by diagnosing and correcting problems at all stages from listening through delivery, while progressing to increasingly difficult and challenging material. In simultaneous interpretation, the techniques learned in the previous semester are consolidated, which enables students to polish their delivery and language register. Focuses on nuance of meaning, accuracy of interpretation, research and preparation for conferences, and glossary development. Special attention is given to maintaining concentration while under significant psychological stress. Students learn to recognize SL discourse patterns and render them effectively in TL.

At the end of the course, students are able to interpret difficult passages that are derived from professional settings. In consecutive, students are able to interpret passages up to several paragraphs in length. In simultaneous interpretation, students are able to interpret passages that are between fifteen and twenty minutes in length. The frequency, nature, and structure of course assignments and examinations are at the discretion of the instructor(s) of record.

Fall 2011 - MIIS, Fall 2012 - MIIS, Fall 2013 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS

More Information »

TIRU 8637 - Adv Intrp I Simul into English      

This is the first of two complementary courses designed to bring interpretation knowledge and skills up to the professional level. Students are expected to apply the knowledge and skills acquired during the first-year interpretation courses to produce interpretations that would be of acceptable quality in a professional setting. Content on a wide range of topics and current events is interpreted, with emphasis placed on business, economics, science, technology, and other topics congruent with current market demand for interpretation in the language combination in question. Course assignments include readings and research on class topics, presentations, practice, graded exercises, and peer and self-assessment.

In consecutive interpretation, students prepare by researching topics before each session, with emphasis on sequential logic in notetaking and accurate terminology in delivery. Students continue to hone their skills by diagnosing and correcting problems at all stages from listening through delivery, while progressing to increasingly difficult and challenging material. In simultaneous interpretation, the techniques learned in the previous semester are consolidated, which enables students to polish their delivery and language register. Focuses on nuance of meaning, accuracy of interpretation, research and preparation for conferences, and glossary development. Special attention is given to maintaining concentration while under significant psychological stress. Students learn to recognize SL discourse patterns and render them effectively in TL.

At the end of the course, students are able to interpret difficult passages that are derived from professional settings. In consecutive, students are able to interpret passages up to several paragraphs in length. In simultaneous interpretation, students are able to interpret passages that are between fifteen and twenty minutes in length. The frequency, nature, and structure of course assignments and examinations are at the discretion of the instructor(s) of record.

Fall 2011 - MIIS, Fall 2012 - MIIS, Fall 2013 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS

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TIRU 8645 - Adv Intrp II-Consc to English      

The course is designed to continue building students’ consecutive interpretation skills for the Russian into English combination with the goal of preparing for Professional Exams. Heavy emphasis is placed on learning to interpret high register political texts from Russian into English as may be done in the context of major international organizations. Topics include: current political events, international organizations, diplomatic protocol, nonproliferation of nuclear weapons, resolution of political and economic conflicts. Students are expected to be able to interpret in a variety of simulated professional situations.

Final semester grade is calculated based on the midterm exam (30%), the semester exam (30%) and classroom performance (40%).

Spring 2012 - MIIS, Spring 2013 - MIIS, Spring 2014 - MIIS, Spring 2015 - MIIS

More Information »

TIRU 8647 - Adv Intrp II-Siml into English      

The course is designed to continue building students’ simultaneous interpretation skills for the Russian into English combination with the goal of preparing for Professional Exams. Heavy emphasis is placed on learning to interpret high register political texts from Russian into English as may be done in the context of major international organizations. Topics include: current political events, international organizations, diplomatic protocol, nonproliferation of nuclear weapons, resolution of political and economic conflicts. Students are expected to be able to interpret in a variety of simulated professional situations. Special attention is paid to relay interpretation (i.e. working both as a pivot interpreter and a user of relay). Various dialects and/or accents of the Russian language are introduced to improve source language comprehension. Source texts with a higher rate of delivery are regularly used.

Final semester grade is calculated based on the midterm exam (30%), the semester exam (30%) and classroom performance (40%).

Spring 2012 - MIIS, Spring 2013 - MIIS, Spring 2014 - MIIS, Spring 2015 - MIIS

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Extra Information

Recent Accomplishments:

Published, together with the Moscow Military University, NATO-Russia Council Consolidated Glossary of  Cooperation (Brussels, 2011, 700pp.).

Awarded medal For Military Cooperation by Russian Federation 2011.

Education:

MA (First class) in Modern Languages (Russian and French), Merton College, Oxford University; Voronezh State University (USSR); D.Phil (Ph.D), Oxford; Research Fellow at St.John's College, Oxford (eighteenth and early nineteenth-century Russian literature). Postgrad Diploma in Conference Interpreting Techniques, University of Westminster; EU freelance exams in Russian, French, Italian, Spanish.

Dynamic Features
Course Catalog

Philipp C. Bleek

First Name
Philipp
Last Name
Bleek
Philipp Bleek, Professor, Image
Job Title
Assistant Professor
Location
205 McGowan
City, State, ZIP
Monterey, CA 93940
Phone
831.647.6509

Philipp C. Bleek is an Assistant Professor in the Graduate School of International Policy and Management and Fellow at the James Martin Center for Nonproliferation Studies at the Monterey Institute of International Studies (MIIS). His research and teaching focuses on the causes, consequences, and amelioration of nuclear, biological, and chemical weapons proliferation to states and non-state actors.

Expertise

Causes, consequences, and amelioration of nuclear, biological, and chemical weapons proliferation.

MIIS Tags
Faculty Program Tags
Course List

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

NPTG 8531 - Wks: Writing & Briefing Memos      

Fall 2014 - MIIS, Spring 2015 - MIIS

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NPTG 8574 / IPOL 8574 - Intro to WMD Nonproliferation      

This course surveys the issues surrounding the proliferation of nuclear, chemical, and biological weapons and ballistic missiles. It also provides an introduction to nuclear and radiological terrorism, and an overview of the international nonproliferation regime.

The course is divided into three main parts: Part 1 provides an overview of the trends and technologies of WMD proliferation. Part 2 considers the nonproliferation regime in detail, concentrating on the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT), the conventions banning chemical and biological weapons, supplier regimes and export controls, and verification and compliance issues. Part 3 returns to challenges to the nonproliferation regime, including states of proliferation concern known or believed to be developing WMD outside or in defiance of the NPT, CWC, and BWC and tensions within the nonproliferation regime, and discusses the range of international, multilateral, and unilateral responses to these challenges

Spring 2011 - MIIS, Fall 2011 - MIIS, Spring 2012 - MIIS, Fall 2013 - MIIS, Spring 2014 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS, Spring 2015 - MIIS

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NPTG 8654 / IPOL 8654 - Sem:WMDProliferatnInMiddleEast      

This seminar examines the proliferation of nuclear, biological, and chemical weapons in the Middle East, including historical developments, the present context, and alternate potential futures.

Although the focus is on state actors, proliferation risks posed by non-state terrorist organizations will be discussed as well. The course will begin with overview sessions on why states do and do not pursue and acquire nuclear, biological, and chemical weapons and on the internal and intrastate politics of the region. Subsequent sessions will focus on key regional countries. The course will conclude with integrative simulation sessions allowing participants to wrestle with the prospects for proliferation and nonproliferation in the region. Students will prepare weekly short memos, conduct group work for integrative simulation exercises, prepare an independent research project, and have various presentation opportunities.
.

Spring 2011 - MIIS, Spring 2012 - MIIS, Spring 2014 - MIIS

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NPTG 8658 - Sem: CBRN Terrorism      

The goal of this seminar is to develop the skills necessary to analyze the motivations and capabilities of non-state actors to acquire and use weapons of mass destruction (WMD), more specifically chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear (CBRN) weapons and materials, for terrorist purposes. Through class discussions, simulation exercises, and individual research, students will review the technical aspects of CBRN, examine the history of CBRN use by terrorists, assess CBRN terrorism threats and vulnerabilities, and assess policy responses to CBRN terrorism. Students are required to have substantial background knowledge of either CBRN or terrorism before joining the seminar.

Students will prepare weekly short memos, conduct group work for integrative simulation exercises, prepare an independent research project, and have various presentation opportunities.

Fall 2013 - MIIS, Spring 2014 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS, Spring 2015 - MIIS

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Faculty Type
Regular Faculty
Dynamic Features
Course Catalog

Edgard Coly

First Name
Edgard
Last Name
Coly
Edgard Coly, Picture
Job Title
Assistant Professor
Location
McCone Building 226
Phone
831.647.3506
Language(s)
Français

Professor Coly joined the Institute after completing his Doctorate at the University of Colorado-Boulder where he also taught. He gave lectures for the Center for Teaching International Relations (CTIR) at the University of Denver. Prior to his postgraduate work, Professor Coly taught French to foreign service officers for their language exam. He also trained Peace Corps volunteers in French, Wolof and Jola. His professional experience also includes teaching French and African History to Youth at Risk at Washington Ethical High School.

MIIS Tags
Faculty Program Tags
Expertise

African politics and cultures, Africa in the arena of globalization, contemporary France, Francophone literature, twentieth century French literature, postmodernism and postcolonial theory

Course List

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

FRLA 8200 - Intermediate French I      

Summer 2012 Language Programs

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FRLA 8260 - Intermediate French      

Summer 2012 Language Programs

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FRLA 8310 - Social Issues Contemp France I      

This course aims at informing students about contemporary France. It will also aim at improving students’ oral and written competencies in French. This course is linguistically accessible. Readings are mostly from the chapters of the sole required book. The readings are approximately 15 pages a week, divided in segments of two. The course will be looking at the following issues:

1. Social life: family and sexuality, work and leisure, social welfare.

2. Cultural life: religions, immigration and education.

3. Information and technology: media, technology and trade.

Besides the readings from the book: Edmiston & Duménil, La France Contemporaine, 4th edition. (Heinle Cengage Learning, 2009), students will watch the news from TV5 or France24 and search the internet for supplementary information. Furthermore, a student will be chosen each day to summarize a one-page article from the editorial page of Le Monde; an exercise that will allow students to be up-to date with French life. www.lemonde.fr

Students will practice the lexicon and structures that are related to their professional goals through class discussions and readings.

There will be a grammar component on structures that may be problematic to most of the students.

This class will focus mostly on improving speaking, reading and listening skills. The writing component of language acquisition will weigh less than other skills.

The level of French proficiency recommended is Intermediate Low to Intermediate Mid on the ACTFL language proficiency scale. http://www.actfl.org/publications/guidelines-and-manuals/actfl-proficiency-guidelines-2012/english

Fall 2011 - MIIS, Fall 2012 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS

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FRLA 8320 - Soc Issues in Contmp France II      

The objective of this course is to inform students about issues in contemporary France, and also to improve their skills in oral and written communication. The course will deal with the following issues:

1. France and Europe: the geography of France, Paris and the urban life, the regions and provinces, languages spoken in France, the European union.

2. The political life: the French Republic, the State, the political parties and elections.

In addition to the readings from the book La France Contemporaine 4th edition by Edmiston and Dumémil (Heinle Cengage Learning, 2009), students will watch news from the French TV stations France 2 or TV5and will do research using the internet, newspapers, and periodicals available at the MIIS library.

Students will practice using the lexicon and structures relevant to their professional objectives. They will have short oral presentations and writing assignments in which they will review the lexicon and grammatical structures encountered in the readings. The course will also include the review of grammar points that pose difficulties for non-native speakers.

Working in groups of 2, students will prepare an oral presentation on a contemporary topic not covered in class.

The level of French required for this course is about the equivalent of four semesters of college French. Students should be able to communicate their ideas clearly both orally and in writing.

Spring 2011 - MIIS, Spring 2012 - MIIS, Spring 2013 - MIIS, Spring 2014 - MIIS, Spring 2015 - MIIS

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FRLA 8325 - PublicHealthInSubSaharanAfrica      

This course is linguistically the most challenging among the 300 level courses. A strong knowledge of technical vocabulary related to health issues is required.

In this course, we will explore some of the most pressing health issues in sub-Saharan Africa. Our focus will be on the following areas:

- The work of African governments and NGOs in the area of public health.

- Infectious diseases (AIDS not included)

- HIV – AIDS

- Malnutrition

- Access to drinking water and decontamination

- Immigration and public health

- Public health in times of conflict

The professor will introduce each module, then each student will pick a topic within the module and present a case study at the end of which, they will suggest a solution that may lead to solving the problem.

This class will target all four skills: speaking, listening, reading and writing
The level of French proficiency recommended is Intermediate High to Advanced Low on the ACTFL language proficiency scale.

http://www.actfl.org/publications/guidelines-and-manuals/actfl-proficiency-guidelines-2012/english

Fall 2014 - MIIS

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FRLA 8335 - Topics in French      

Spring 2011 - MIIS, Fall 2012 - MIIS, Fall 2013 - MIIS, Spring 2015 - MIIS

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FRLA 8342 - ChallengesInPeaceBuildng-Congo      

This course aims to highlight the complexity and challenges of peace building in Burundi, a country that has been plagued by rooted conflicts. Students will learn to identify and understand the characteristics of this divided society and the nature of conflict amongst its ethnic groups. Students will learn the theories and framework that underlie the many peace building approaches and strategies and how they may (are?) be applied to Burundi. This will enhance their ability to match or evaluate the peace building strategies to the root causes of conflicts.

This course will also take a close look at the challenges faced by peacemakers engaged in peace building. The course will examine the possible tensions between actors engaged in peace building and the fighters on the ground.

Spring 2012 - MIIS, Spring 2013 - MIIS

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FRLA 8343 - ChallengesInPeaceBldng-Senegal      

Spring 2014 - MIIS

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FRLA 8383 - Reclaim Cultr/Pwr:Franc Africa      

Explores the cultural and political influence of former colonizers - and - on Africa. The struggle to gain independence through the deconstruction of the myth of European superiority. Post-independence: rejection / adaptation of European political systems and cultures.

Fall 2011 - MIIS, Fall 2013 - MIIS

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FRLA 8418 - China&AfricaDevl/HumanSecurity      

Spring 2015 - MIIS

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FRLA 8435 - PublicHealthInSubSaharanAfrica      

Fall 2012 - MIIS

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FRLA 8483 - Security/Democracy in Africa      

Spring 2014 - MIIS

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FRLA 8485 - Africa & Millennium Dev Goals      

This class addresses the challenges African States face in their quest to meet the Millennium Development Goals by

In the wake of the Cold War, many global social problems have emerged that have engaged the international community. One of these problem is the growing level of insecurity and armed violence that is preventing and interfering with desperately needed economic, social and political development, especially in fragile states emerging from conflict.

This courses explores the following (among others)

Human security: lack of freedom, injustice, forced (im)migrations

Disarmament, demobilization and reinsertion of ex-combatants

Gender inequality

Trade

This course targets all four language proficiency skills: speaking, reading, listening and writing.

The level of French proficiency recommended is Advanced Mid to Advanced High
http://www.actfl.org/publications/guidelines-and-manuals/actfl-proficiency-guidelines-2012/english

Spring 2011 - MIIS, Spring 2013 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS

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FRLA 8497 - Human Security      

This course is a part of the Monterey Model course and will introduce the concept of human security, its development and real-world applications, and implications for international policy through illustrative case examples.
The concept of "human security" was first introduced in the 1994 Human Development Report by the United Nations Development Program. It has since attracted growing attention in the academic and policy communities around the world. The concept has also become part of official policy, particularly in Japan and Canada. In contrast to the traditional concept of "national security" with its focus on the security of the state against military threats, "human security" emphasizes the protection of individual citizens’ security not only from war and other forms of physical violence but also from threats of a political, economic, social, cultural, and environmental nature. At the most fundamental level, “human security” has two components, human development and human dignity/human rights.

Spring 2012 - MIIS, Fall 2013 - MIIS

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Education

PhD, University of Colorado-Boulder; MA, American University-Washington, DC; Maîtrise en Lettres Modernes, Université Cheikh Anta Diop de Dakar, Senegal

Recent Accomplishments

Political Analyst for Voice of America

Faculty Type
Regular Faculty
Dynamic Features
Course Catalog

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