Middlebury Institute of International Studies at Monterey

Kristina Maria Gjerde

First Name
Kristina Maria
Last Name
Gjerde
Kristina Maria Gjerde, Adjunct Professor, Image
Job Title
Adjunct Professor
Phone
+1 646 785 4946

I am passionate about:   

I am passionate about applying law, science, technology and economics to find a new balance in how we manage the global ocean commons.

What excites me about being a professor at MIIS: 

What excites me about being a professor at MIIS is the opportunity to teach the next generation of ocean leaders based on my twenty+ years experience as a lawyer and an ocean advocate. I am attracted by the inter-disciplinary nature of the programs and the international outlook of the faculty and student body.

Faculty Program Tags
Expertise

International marine environmental law and policy, law of the sea and high seas governance 

Extra Information

Additional Areas of Focus

Marine science and policy, ecosystem-based management; marine protected areas; sustainable fisheries management; shipping; ocean geo-engineering; environmental impact assessments; marine migratory species conservation.

Recent Accomplishments

  • Helped to trigger the transformation of high seas Marine Protected Areas from a controversial concept to a practical tool. Since establishing a network of policy, scientific, management and legal experts through the IUCN and its World Commission on Protected Areas in 2003, eight high seas MPAs have been established: seven in the North-East Atlantic, one in the Southern Ocean, and more are under development.

 

  • In 2008, co-founded the Global Ocean Biodiversity Initiative together with the Government of Germany and scientists from the Census of Marine Life, Duke University Marine Geospatial Ecology Lab, UNEP-WCMC, the Marine Conservation Institute and others to advance the scientific basis for conserving biological diversity in the deep seas and open oceans. GOBI partners are now providing technical assistance to governments and the Secretariat Convention on Biological Diversity (with 193 countries as members) through a series of CBD-facilitated regional workshops.

 

  • In 2010 co-founded the Sargasso Sea Alliance, a partnership led by the Government of Bermuda to protect the Sargasso Sea, a vast gyre in the Atlantic Ocean. The Sargasso Sea Alliance works in collaboration with scientists, international marine conservation groups and private donors, who all share a vision of protecting the unique and vulnerable ocean ecosystem of the Sargasso Sea. It aims to mobilize support from a wide variety of national and international organizations and governments to ensure legal protection for this critical ecosystem and to provide insights for the establishment of Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) on the high seas.

 

  • In early 2011, co-founded the High Seas Alliance a cooperative initiative of scientists and conservation organizations concerned with improving the management and conservation of high seas and seabed biodiversity beyond national jurisdiction. The High Seas Alliance played a major role in bringing high-level attention at the UN Conference on Sustainable Development (Rio+20) to the importance of a new international agreement to safeguard the high seas.

 

  • In 2012, helped to secure the international recognition of marine “ecologically or biologically significant areas” by the Convention on Biological Diversity and the official transmission of these special areas to the United Nations and its Working Group on Biodiversity beyond National Jurisdiction as a demonstration of the compelling need for improving how we manage and protect the marine environment beyond national jurisdiction.

 

Bibliography

Gjerde, K.M. “The Environmental Provisions of the UN Law of the Sea Convention for the high seas and seabed Area beyond national jurisdiction” (2012) the International Journal of Marine and Coastal Law, special theme issue for the 30th anniversary of the Law of the Sea Convention.

Hastings J., et al. (2012). “Safeguarding the blue planet: Six strategies for accelerating ocean protection” 18 Parks Magazine 1-13.

Gjerde K. M. and Rulska-Domino A., (2012). “Marine Protected Areas Beyond National Jurisdiction: Some Practical Perspectives for Moving Ahead”, 27 International Journal of Marine and Coastal Law, 351-273. http://booksandjournals.brillonline.com.

Gjerde, K.M., (2011). High Seas Fisheries Governance: Prospects and Challenges, in The World Ocean in Globalisation: Challenges and Responses, (Vidas, D. and Schei, P.J. eds.) Fridtjof Nansen Institute, Martinus Nijhoff Publishers, pp. 221-232

Previous Work

Kristina M Gjerde is presently Senior High Seas Advisor to the International Union for the Conservation of Nature’s (IUCN) Global Marine and Polar Programme. At IUCN she fosters international efforts to improve the conservation and management of the high seas and deep seabed beyond national jurisdiction. She serves as an advisor to governments, international organizations and non-governmental organizations and publishes widely on fisheries, shipping, law of the sea and marine conservation.

Kristina initially specialized in admiralty law at the New York City law firm of Lord, Day & Lord. She later served as a research fellow at the Marine Policy Center of the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution and research fellow/guest lecturer at the University of Hull Law School (UK), and represented WWF at the International Maritime Organization in London. In 2003, she was awarded a three-year Pew Fellowship in Marine Conservation to support her work on high seas governance.

Education

New York University School of Law, Juris Doctor, 1984

University of California at Los Angeles, Bachelor of Arts in History (summa cum laude), 1981

Faculty Type
Adjunct Faculty

Michael Vincent McGinnis

First Name
Michael
Last Name
McGinnis
Michael Vincent McGinnis, Professor, Image
Job Title
Associate Professor
Location
Craig Building
Phone
831-647-6615 x 8403

I am passionate about forging a more sustainable future that includes the protection of diverse maritime cultures and the ecosystems that we are irrevocably connected to and dependent on.

What excites me about being a professor at MIIS is teaching graduate level students who have diverse interests and backgrounds, and who are committed to addressing the major challenges that human society faces today. I look forward to the opportunity to learn from students, and to collaborate with faculty at MIIS.

Faculty Program Tags
MIIS Tags
Expertise

Marine Policy, Climate Change, and Water/Watershed Planning

Extra Information

Research and Publications

Mike is interested in the interface between science and policymaking.  He has fifteen years of professional and academic experience in the area of large-scale environmental policymaking and planning in diverse cultural and socio-economic settings.

He has published over 100 journal articles, essays, books, government reports and technical documents on the subject of large-scale ecosystem-based planning and biodiversity conservation, with a focus on oceans, rivers, creeks, and islands. His edited compendium Bioregionalism (Routledge, 1999) is the primary text in the field.  He has also contributed to federal and state policymaking and planning activities for marine sanctuary management plans and watershed-based plans across coastal California.

From 1993-2000 his research, funded by three awards from the USA National Science Foundation, focused on the role of worldviews, values, beliefs and science in the development of ecosystem-based planning. From 1999-2008 he was an advisor to federal agencies in the development of marine ecosystem-based planning in California. During this time, he assisted the National Marine Sanctuary (NMS) Program in all of the planning aspects associated with the designation of marine reserves within the Channel Islands NMS. In 2008 he was a Fulbright Scholar in south-eastern Europe, and conducted a comparative study of marine governance supported by the European Union. In April 2012, he completed a two-year study on New Zealand's marine governance framework funded by the ministries of that country. McGinnis is currently completing two books on the subject of the role of ecology and politics in large-scale ecosystem-based planning and decision-making.

Recent Accomplishments

  • Mike was one of the first Fulbright Scholars to the Republic of Montenegro in southeastern Europe in 2008.
  • As a Senior Research Fellow at the University of Wellington New Zealand he has completed a comprehensive study of New Zealand’s marine governance framework in 2011; a study supported by the ministries of the country that offers a range of recommendations to improve New Zealand’s marine governance system.  This study will be revised as a major book on the subject of New Zealand’s environmental governance system.

Previous Work

Mike was Director of the Ocean and Coastal Policy Center at the University of California Santa Barbara from 1995-2010. In 2008, he was a Fulbright Scholar to the Republic of Montenegro. From 2010-2012 he was a Senior Fellow and Professor at the School of Government, Victoria University of Wellington (New Zealand). He has published over 100 journal articles, essays, books, government reports and technical documents on the subject of biodiversity conservation and ecosystem-based planning.

Non-academic Interests

Mike has surfed since he was seven years old, and is enjoys hiking, sailing, and other ocean-going and backcountry wilderness activities. He also in a painter and has been writing a series of vignettes and poems on the landscapes and seascapes of coastal California.

Education

Dr Michael Vincent McGinnis received a PhD in Political Science in 1993 from UC Santa Barbara. His undergraduate degree was from UC Los Angeles.

Bibliography

Book, Marine Governance: The New Zealand Dimension. Victoria University Wellington Press. 2012 (December). (150 pages).

The Race for Marine Space: Science, Values and Aquaculture Planning in New Zealand,
Coastal Management 41, 5 (2013): 401-419.

Adapting to Climate Impacts in California: The Importance of Civic Science in Local Coastal Planning, Coastal Management 39: 3 (April 2011): 225-241 (with C.E. McGinnis).

Living up to the Brand: Greening New Zealand’s Ocean Policy, Policy Quarterly 8, 1 (February 2012): 17-28.

A Bioregional Primer for Santa Barbara County, Funded by the Santa Barbara Foundation, December, 2012. (72 pages).

Mindfulness of the Oceanic Commons, Pacific Ecologist 20 (Winter 2011): 55-60.

Land Use, Agriculture, and the Environment, The 2010 Central Coast Survey, UC Santa Barbara, Published by Social Science Survey Center/Benton Survey Research Lab. 2010 (with Cleveland, David, Paolo Gardinali, Garrett Glasgow, John Mohr,
Eric Smith, Megan Carney, and Lauren Copeland).

Protecting Climate Refugia Areas: The case of the Gaviota coast in southern California, Endangered Species Update 25, 4 (June 2008): 103-109.

Negotiating Ecology: Marine Bioregions and the destruction of the Southern California Bight, Futures 38;3 (May 2006): 382-405.

The California Watershed Movement: Science and the Politics of Place. Natural Resources Journal 42, 1 (Winter 2002): 133-183 (with Woolley).

Bioregional Conflict Resolution: Rebuilding Community in Watershed-based Planning and Organizing, Environmental Management 24, 1 (1999): 1-12 (with Woolley and J.K. Gamman).

Faculty Type
Regular Faculty
Dynamic Features
Course Catalog

Jason Scorse

First Name
Jason
Last Name
Scorse
Jason Scorse, Professor, Image
Job Title
Director, Center for the Blue Economy; Program Chair, International Environmental Policy; Associate Professor
Location
K23 Craig
Phone
831.647.3548
Language(s)
Español

I am passionate about: Living sustainably, not just preaching/teaching it.

What excites me about being a professor at MIIS: Seeing the amazing things our students are doing around the world. It is truly inspiring. I am always happy to talk with prospective, current, and former students by phone, skype, or in person. Please email me to set up an appointment.

Expertise

Environmental & Natural Resource Economics, Ocean and Coastal Resource Management, Behavioral Economics, International Economics & Development

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Faculty Program Tags
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Recent Accomplishments

Professor Scorse's major accomplishment over the past year was to help launch the Center for the Blue Economy's (CBE) new research initiatives in coastal climate change adaption, and to hire the Center's first Research Director, Charles Colgan. The CBE also just launched the new Journal of Ocean and Coastal Economics (JOCE), which is set to be the leader in this growing field.

Dr. Scorse is currently spending almost all of his time building the new Center, and increasing its partnerships across the world. The CBE recently entered into a cooperative agreement with The Nature Conservancy to pursue joint research projects over the next few years, and our partnerships with the Chinese National Marine Data Center and the Korean Maritime Institute continue to grow. The CBE is on strong financial footing and poised to grow in the coming years.

Education

Ph.D. UC-Berkeley, M.S. UC-Berkeley; M.S. UC-Santa Cruz; B.A. UC-Santa Cruz

In the News

Scorse, Jason. "Cheap Gas Hurts the Middle Class." Fortune 6 December 2012.

Scorse, Jason (and Judy Kildow). “End Federal Flood Insurance.” The New York Times 28 November 2012.

Thomas, Gregory. "Surfonomics quantifies the worth of waves." The Washington Post 24 August 2012.

Scorse, Jason. "My Word: Must never take coast's economic value for granted." Oakland Tribune 10 July 2012.

Publications

Scorse, Jason. What Environmentalists Need to Know about Economics. New York: Palgrave-Macmillan, 2010.

Scorse, Jason (2010). Freeing the Market to Address Climate ChangeFreeing the Market to Address Climate Change. The Solutions Journal,1(6):29-32.

Harrison, Ann, and Scorse, Jason. (2010). Multinationals and Anti-sweatshop ActivismMultinationals and Anti-sweatshop Activism, American Economic Review, 100(1): 247–273.

Scorse, Jason. (2009) Non-Market Valuation of Ocean Resources in the National Ocean Economics Report Non-Market Valuation of Ocean Resources in the National Ocean Economics Report (Judy Kildow ed.), National Ocean Economics Program, Moss Landing, CA.

Harrison, Ann & Scorse, Jason. (2009). Do Foreign Firms Pay MoreDo Foreign Firms Pay More? Evidence from the Indonesian Manufacturing Sector in Labour Markets and Economic Development, (Ravi Kanbur and Jan Svejnar eds.), Routledge Press, New York.

Scorse, Jason. (2009). Making Matters Worse Making Matters Worse. The International Journal of Climate Change: Impacts and Response, 1(1):1-6 中文 中文

Harrison, Ann & Jason Scorse. (2006). Improving the Conditions of Workers Improving the Conditions of Workers? Minimum Wage Legislation and Anti-Sweatshop Activism. California Management Review, 2 (48):144-160. (Also issued as a Harvard Business School case study) Harrison, Ann & Scorse, Jason. 2004.

Harrison, Ann & Jason Scorse. (2004). Improving the Conditions of Workers Minimum Wage Legislation and Anti-Sweatshop Activism The Impact of Globalization on Compliance with Labor Standards: A Plant- Level Study in Brookings Trade Forum 2003 (Susan Collins and Dani Rodrik eds.), Brookings Institution Press, Washington D.C.

Scorse, Jason. (2001). Reflections on the Free Trade Debate. Economia Rural, 1 (12):8-11.

Working Papers

Does Being a "Top 10" Worst Polluter Affect Facility Environmental Releases? Evidence from the U.S. Toxic Release Inventory (coauthored with Wolfram Schlenker), 2012.

Environmental Policy and the Social Contract, 2012.

The WTOs Environmental Mandate The WTO's Environmental Mandate, 2011.

The Capitalist Conundrum The Capitalist Conundrum, 2010.

Moving Beyond the Stale "Environment vs. Economy" Debate, 2010

Book review of Economic Thought and US Climate Change Policy Book review of Economic Thought and U.S. Climate Change Policy. Edited by David M. Driesen. Cambridge, MA. MIT Press, 2010.

Strong-Cvetich, Nikolas and Scorse, Jason. (2008). Ecotourism in Post-Conflict Peace-Building Ecoclub: International Ecotourism Magazine, 8 (96):10-17.

Why Environmentalists Should Embrace Economics, 2006.

Do Foreign Firms Pay More? Evidence from the Indonesian Manufacturing Sector 1990-1999. International Labor Organization, Working Paper No. 98, 2005 (coauthored with Ann Harrison and submitted).

Is There Acquiescence in Yes-No Questions? (coauthored with Michael Hanemann & Jon Krosnick), 2005.

Harrison, Ann & Jason Scorse. 2004. Moving Up or Moving Out? Anti-Sweatshop Activists and Labor Market Outcomes, National Bureau of Economic Research, Working Paper No. w10492.

Faculty Type
Regular Faculty
Dynamic Features
Course Catalog

Fernando DePaolis

First Name
Fernando
Last Name
DePaolis
fernando-depaolis-profile-photo.jpg
Job Title
Associate Professor
Location
McCone Building 113
Phone
831.647.3568
Language(s)
Español
português
italiano

I am passionate about finding alternative points of view that could solve the world’s biggest problems. In my case, this is done by combining critical thinking with the most sophisticated computer analysis and visualization techniques.

I love being a professor at MIIS because our students challenge me to be connected to the real world of practice and to maintain the highest professional standards. In the end this helps all of us, as we form a dynamic learning community that aims at producing highly effective professionals.

Expertise

Economic Development. Regional Economics. Econometrics. Spatial Statistics.

Short Programs & Research Centers
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Extra Information

Education

PhD, Urban Planning/Regional Economics (University of California-Los Angeles),

MA, Urban Planning/International Development (University of Kansas);

Advanced Diploma Architecture (National University of San Juan, Argentina).

Publications

“The Washington Consensus: A Post Mortem” (with Robert McCleery), in Seiji Naya’s festschrift Forthcoming University of Hawaii Press.

“NAFTA and the Broader Impacts of Trade Agreements on Industrial Development: When ‘Second-Order  Effects’ Dominate (with Robert McCleery), in Plummer, M. (editor) Empirical Methods in International Trade: Essays in Honor of Mordechai (Max) Keinin. 2005. Edward Elgar Publisher.

"Bangladesh: Searching for a Workable Development Path," with Seiji Naya and Robert McCleery, Journal of East Asian Studies, No 3, December 2004:1-20.

“A New Frontier in 21st Century America.” A book review of Terra Incognita by Bowman, A. and Pagano, M. Public Organization Review 4 December 2004.

"Trade and the Location of Industries in the OECD and the European Union." Journal of Economic Geography 2, 2002 (with Michael Storper and Yun-Chung Chen).

Faculty Type
Regular Faculty
Dynamic Features
Course Catalog

Jeff Langholz

First Name
Jeff
Last Name
Langholz
Jeff-Langholz-Profile
Job Title
Professor
Location
214 McCone
Phone
831.647.6418
Language(s)
Español

I am passionate about: research and teaching that makes a difference and focuses on the "real world" rather than the "ivory tower." 

What excites me about being a professor at MIIS: Our students and faculty are on fire! People here want to build a better world, and have the skills and knowledge to make it happen.

Expertise

Biodiversity conservation, environmental conflict management, international environmental policy, protected natural areas, research methods, project design, program evaluation, social entrepreneurship, adaptive management, conservation leadership, sustainable development

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Faculty Program Tags
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Education

PhD, Natural Resource Policy and Management, Cornell University; BA, History, Dana College; MS, Sustainable Development and Conservation Biology University of Maryland

Selected Publications

Langholz, J. (forthcoming in 2014). Private Protected Areas: A Global Movement for Biodiversity Conservation and Sustainable Development. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

Langholz, J. and A. Abeles. 2014. Rethinking postgraduate education for marine conservation. Marine Policy 43(1):372–375.

Langholz, J., Sand, K., Raak, L., Berner, A., Anderson, H., Geels, B., McKeehan, A., and A. Nelsen. 2013. Strategies and tactics for managing environmental conflicts: Insights from Goldman Environmental Prize recipients. Journal of Natural Resources Policy Research, 5(1): 1-17.

Langholz, J. and M. Jay-Russell. 2013. The potential role of wildlife in pathogenic contamination of fresh produce. Human-Wildlife Interactions 7(1):140–157.

Gennet S., Howard J., Langholz J., Andrews K., Reynolds M., and S. Morrison. 2013. Farm practices for food safety: An emerging threat to floodplain and riparian ecosystems. Frontiers in Ecology & Environment; doi:10.1890/120243.

Langholz, J. and F. DePaolis. 2013. Economic Contributions of Santa Cruz County Agriculture. Office of the Agricultural Commissioner, Santa Cruzy County, CA.

Langholz, J. and F. DePaolis. 2013. Economic Contributions of San Luis Obispo County Agriculture. Office of the Agricultural Commissioner, San Luis Obispo County, CA.

Langholz, J. and F. DePaolis. 2012. Economic Contributions of Monterey County Agriculture. Office of the Agricultural Commissioner, Monterey County, CA.

Langholz, J. 2010. Global Trends in Private Protected Areas and Their Implications for the Northern Great Plains. Great Plains Research 20(1): 9-16.

Lowell, K., Langholz, J. and D. Stuart. 2010. Safe and Sustainable: Co-Managing for Food Safety and Ecological Health in California’s Central Coast Region. Georgetown University and The Nature Conservancy. 131 pp.

Langholz, J. 2009. Saving Species, Privately. World Watch Magazine 22(5):7-11.

Langholz, J. and K. Turner. 2008. You Can Prevent Global Warming (and Save Money!): 51 Easy Ways (2nd Edition). Kansas City: Andrews McMeel Publishing.

Sims-Castley, R., G. Kerley, B. Geach, and J. Langholz. 2006. Socio-economic significance of ecotourism-based private game reserves in South Africa’s Eastern Cape Province. PARKS 15:2, 6-15.

Langholz, J. and Krug, W.  2004. New Forms of Biodiversity Governance: Non-State Actors and the Private Protected Area Action Plan.  Journal of International Wildlife Law & Policy 7:9-29.

Langholz, J. 2004. Forest Recreation on Private Lands. In: Encyclopedia of Life Support Systems. New York: United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO).

Langholz, J. 2004. Lessons from Global Climate Change: A Proposed Kyoto Protocol for the World’s Oceans. Pages 43-58, In:  S. Uno, T. Katsumura, and H. Imaoka (editors), Development of Marine Resources and Ocean Governance: The Environment of Coastal Regions along the Sea of Japan. Hamada, Japan: University of Shimane Press.

Langholz, J. and K. Turner. 2003. You Can Prevent Global Warming (and Save Money!): 51 Easy Ways. Kansas City: Andrews McMeel Publishing.

Langholz, J. 2003. Privatizing Conservation. Pages 117-135, In: S. Brechin, P. Wilshusen, P. West, and C. Fortwangler (editors), Contested Nature: Promoting International Biodiversity with Social Justice in the 21st Century. New York: State University of New York Press.

Langholz, J. 2002. Privately Owned Parks. Pages 172-188, In: J. Terborgh, C. van Schaik, L. Davenport, and M. Rao (editors), Making Parks Work: Strategies for Preserving Tropical Forests. Covelo, CA: Island Press.

Langholz, J.  2002. External Partnering for the Triple Bottom Line: People, Profits, and the Protection of Biodiversity. Corporate Environmental Strategy 9(1):1-10.

Kramer, R., Langholz, J. and N. Salafsky. 2002. The Role of the Private Sector in Protected Area Establishment and Management: A Conceptual Framework for Analyzing Effectiveness. Pages 335-351, In: J. Terborgh, C. van Schaik, L. Davenport, and M. Rao (editors), Making Parks Work: Strategies for Preserving Tropical Forests. Covelo, CA: Island Press.

Langholz, J., and J. Lassoie. 2002. Combining Conservation and Development on Private Lands: Lessons from Costa Rica. Environment, Development, and Sustainability.

Langholz, J. and K. Brandon. 2001.  Ecotourism and Privately Owned Protected Areas. Pages 303-314, In: D. Weaver (editor), The Encyclopedia of Ecotourism. Oxon, United Kingdom: CAB International.

Langholz, J., and  J. Lassoie. 2001. Perils and Promise of Privately Owned Protected Areas. BioScience 51(12):1079-1085.

Langholz, J., J. Lassoie, and J. Schelhas. 2000. Incentives for Biodiversity Conservation: Lessons from Costa Rica’s Private Wildlife Refuge Program. Conservation Biology 14(6): 1735-1743.

Langholz, J., J. Lassoie, D. Lee, and D. Chapman. 2000. Economic Considerations of Privately Owned Parks. Ecological Economics 33(2):173-183.

Langholz, J. 1999. Exploring the Effects of Alternative Income Opportunities on Rainforest Use: Insights from Guatemala’s Maya Biosphere Reserve. Society and Natural Resources 12:139-149.

Uphoff, N., and J. Langholz. 1998. Incentives for Avoiding the Tragedy of the Commons.  Environmental Conservation 25(3): 251-261.

Langholz, J. 1996. Economics, Objectives, and Success of Private Nature Reserves in Sub-Saharan Africa and Latin America. Conservation Biology 10(1):271-280.

Langholz, J. 1996. Ecotourism Impact at Independently Owned Nature Reserves in Latin America and Sub-Saharan Africa.  In:  Miller, Joseph and E.Malek-Zadeh (editors), The Ecotourism Equation: Measuring the Impacts. New Haven, CT: Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies Bulletin Series, No.99

Faculty Type
Regular Faculty
Dynamic Features
Course Catalog

Lyuba Zarsky

First Name
Lyuba
Last Name
Zarsky
Lyuba-Zarsky-profile.JPG
Job Title
Professor
Location
McGowan 320B
Phone
831.647.6436
Language(s)
Español

Professor Zarsky has a PhD in Economics and has a distinguished record of professional experience and publication in the fields of sustainable development and business and sustainability.

Expertise

Sustainable development, business and sustainability, foreign direct investment and the environment, collaborative governance, development economics, global environmental governance.

Video interview of Dr. Zarsky

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Education

Ph.D. Department of Economics, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, 2006; M.A. Economics, Department of Economics and Political Economy, New School for Social Research, New York 1986.

Publications

Can extractive industries promote sustainable development? A net benefits framework and a case study of the Marlin Mine in Guatemala, (co-author), Journal of Environment and Development, 20(2), 131-154, April, 2013.

"Extractive industries and local communities: the elusive search for sustainable development," World Policy Review, July, 2013.

Searching for Gold in the Highlands of Guatemala: Economic Benefits and Environmental Risks of the Marlin Mine, (co-author), Global Development and Environment Institute, September, 2011.

"Climate Resilient Industrial Development: Design Principles and Alternative Models", in S.R. Khan and J. Christiansen, ed., Towards New Developmentalism: Market as Means Rather than Master, Routledge Economics, 2010.

Enclave Economy: Foreign Investment and Sustainable Development in Mexico’s Silicon Valley (co-author), Boston: MIT Press, 2007.

“No Miracle Drug: Foreign Direct Investment and Sustainable Development” (co-author), in L. Zarsky (ed.), International Investment for Sustainable Development: Balancing Rights and Rewards, London: Earthscan Press, 2005.

International Investment for Sustainable Development: Balancing Rights and Rewards (contributing editor), London: Earthscan Press, 2005.

“Stuck in the Mud? Nation-States, Globalisation and the Environment," in OECD, Globalisation and the Environment, Paris: OECD, 1997. Reprinted in K. Gallagher and J. Werksman (eds.), Earthscan Reader on International Trade and Sustainable Development, London: Earthscan Press, 2002, pp. 19-44; and in K. Conca and G. Dabelko, Green Planet Blues, Environmental Politics from Stockholm to Johannesberg, Westview Press, 2004.

Human Rights and the Environment: Conflicts and Norms in a Globalizing World (contributing editor) London: Earthscan Press, 2002.

Beyond Good Deeds: Case Studies and A New Policy Agenda for Corporate Accountability (co-author), Berkeley: Natural Heritage Institute, July 2002.

“APEC and the ‘Sustainable Development’ Agenda,’ in R. Steinberg (ed.), The Greening of Trade Law, Rowman and Littlefield, 2002.

“Global Reach: Human Rights and Environment in the Framework of Corporate Accountability,” in L. Zarsky (ed.), Human Rights and Environment: Conflicts and Norms in a Globalizing World, London: Earthscan Press, 2002, pp. 31-56.

“Civil Society and the Future of Environmental Governance in Asia,” (co-author), in D. Angel and M. Rock, (eds.), Asia's Clean Revolution: Industry, Growth and the Environment, Greenleaf Publishing, 2001, pp.128-154.

“From Bystanders to Collaborators, New Roles for Civil Society in Urban-Industrial Environmental Governance,” in Asian Development Bank, Asian Environment Outlook, Manila: ADB, 2001.

“Environmental Norms in the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation Forum,” in D. Shelton (ed.), Commitment and Compliance, The Role of Non-Binding Norms in the International Legal System, New York: Oxford University Press, 2000, pp. 303-329.

“Havens, Halos, and Spaghetti: Untangling the Evidence About FDI and the Environment,” in OECD, Foreign Direct Investment and the Environment, Paris: OECD, 1999, pp. 47-74.

"Energy and the Environment in Asia-Pacific,” in P. Chasek, (ed.), The Global Environment in the 21st Century, Tokyo: United Nations University Press, 1999.

"Lessons of Liberalization in Asia: From Structural Adjustment to Sustainable Development," in Financing for Environmentally Sustainable Development, Asian Development Bank: Manila, 1994.

“Towards an International Eco-Labeling Framework,” in OECD, Life Cycle Management and Trade, Paris: OECD, 1994, pp. 194-204.

“Sustainable Development: Challenges for Australia,” in Our Common Future, Australian Edition, Melbourne: Oxford University Press, 1990. Also published as a monograph by the Commission for the Future, Melbourne, February, 1990.

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Regular Faculty
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