Paul Cowles

First Name
Paul
Last Name
Cowles
Paul Cowles, Adjunct Professor, International Environmental Policy, IEP, Image
Job Title
Adjunct Professor
City, State, ZIP
Monterey, CA, 93940

Paul Cowles, is a CBNRM specialist with over 25 years of international and domestic experience and 12 years of direct management experience. He specializes in helping communities conserve and sustainably manage their natural resources. He has lived and worked in sub-Saharan Africa for 17 years, leading teams of up to 90 employees to implement three multimillion dollar programs for USAID. He understands how to work with communities; making community capacity development the centerpiece of his CBNRM work.

Expertise

Community-based natural resources management (CBNRM), Integrated Conservation and Development Projects (ICDPs) and community capacity building

Faculty Program Tags
Faculty Type
Adjunct Faculty

Casson Trenor

First Name
Casson
Last Name
Trenor
Casson Trenor, Adjunct Professor, International Environmental Policy, IEP, Image
Job Title
Adjunct Professor
City, State, ZIP
Monterey, CA, 93940

From saving the whales of the Antarctic to studying the salmon of Alaska, Casson Trenor has worked to support stewardship of our marine resources across the globe. Trenor has stalked the fetid warehouses of Tsukiji fish market in Tokyo, spent months journeying by ship through the icy waters of Antarctica, berthed on leaking wrecks off the African coast, and gone octopus fishing with holy men on the Island of Yap.

Expertise

Corporate Campaign Management, Sustainable Seafood, and Marine Resource Conservation

Faculty Program Tags
Faculty Type
Adjunct Faculty

Nikolas Strong-Cvetich

First Name
NIkolas
Last Name
Strong-Cvetich
Nik Strong, Adjunct Professor, International Environmental Policy, IEP, Image
Job Title
Adjunct Professor
Language(s)
Español
Français
italiano

Nik is the Executive Director of Save The Waves Coalition, where he oversees operations and World Surfing Reserves, Surfonomics and Endangered Waves programs.

MIIS Tags
Expertise

Ecosystems Management, Environmental Non-Profit Management, and Environmental Education

Faculty Program Tags
Faculty Type
Adjunct Faculty

Mark Schapiro

Mark Schapiro, Adjunct Professor, International Environmental Policy, IEP, Image
Job Title
Adjunct Professor

Mark Schapiro has been a journalist for more than twenty years in this country and abroad. He has long been exploring the intersection between the environment, economics and political power, most recently as a correspondent at the Center for Investigative Reporting, where he worked as senior correspondent from 2003 to 2012. His work has been published in Harpers, The Atlantic, Yale 360 and other publications, and he worked as a correspondent for the PBS newsmagazine FRONLTINE/World.

Expertise

Non-Fiction Writing, Internatonal and Environmental Issues, Climate Change and Economics

MIIS Tags
Faculty Program Tags
Faculty Type
Adjunct Faculty

Brett Melone

First Name
Brett
Last Name
Melone
Brett Melone, Adjunct Professor, International Environmental Policy, IEP, Image
Job Title
Adjunct Professor
Language(s)
Español

I am passionate about: the ingenuity and creativity of humans to harness natural systems to produce food, fiber and fuels

What excites me about being a professor at MIIS: I was drawn to MIIS as a student for its international and interdisciplinary approach to building the human capital needed to make the world a better place. The opportunity to stay connected to highly motivated and passionate students and faculty, and contribute to real solutions, has kept me coming back as a professor. 

Expertise

Sustainable and organic agriculture, small farm incubators and marine conservation

Faculty Program Tags
Extra Information

Additional Areas of Focus

Sustainable fisheries, economic development, microlending and nonprofit management

Education

B.A. International Relations, Business and Spanish, University of San Diego

M.A., International Environmental Policy, Monterey Institute of International Studies

Selected Publications / Research

In the Fields of Salinas: Cultivating Intercultural Leadership, Whole Thinking Journal, No. 6, Winter 2010-11.

Grassroots Guide to the Farm Bill – Spanish, National Sustainable Agriculture Coalition, 2011 - editor

Farmer Education Program Curriculum Resource Guide, ALBA, 2011.Farm Incubator Toolkit, ALBA, 2011.

Farming for the Future – Contributor, Editor and Translator for ALBA’s quarterly print newsletter, http://www.albafarmers.org.

Organic Agriculture Education, Crop Management, http://www.plantmanagementnetwork.org/ pub/cm/symposium/organics/Melone/ September 2006.

The Face of Food on the Central Coast: A Community Food Assessment, ALBA, 2006.

Local Agenda 21 in Latin America:  An Analytical Look at 10 Cases, ICLEI, 2000. (collaborator)

Tribal Wetland Program Highlights, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 2000.

Faculty Type
Adjunct Faculty

Enrique Alonso García

First Name
Enrique
Last Name
García
Enrique Alonso Garcia, Adjunct Professor, International Environmental Policy, IEP, Image
Job Title
Adjunct Professor and Permanent Councilor of State of the Spanish Government
City, State, ZIP
Monterey, CA 93940

For over 20 years, Enrique Alonso Garcia has been active in marine issues around the world, engaging in environmental activities both as an academic and as a professional.  He has made a number of important contributions to initiatives protecting the marine environment.

At this time, he is the president of the Division of Environmental, Rural and Marine Affairs & Science at the Council of State in Spain.

Faculty Program Tags
Short Programs & Research Centers
Expertise

Law of the Sea, International Environmental Law and Marine Policy

Extra Information

Additional Areas of Focus

Access to Marine Genetic Resources, Offshore Marine Protected Areas, Fisheries and Marine Resources Management, Energy and the Marine Environment, and Shipping.Marine Data Bases Interoperability, Seascapes, Marine Bioacoustics, North American Free Trade Agreement and Agreement on Environmental Cooperation, Vessels Interception, Oil Spills Prevention and Management, Multilateral Marine-related Conventions Negotiations, Cetaceans, Marine Animals Welfare, European Union Law and Policy, Food safety, Algae Collections Management.

Education

S.J.D. Law, Complutense University (Spain) 1982; L.L.M. University of Virginia 1981; J.D. Complutense University, 1976; Certified Environmental Manager, Bentley University, Waltham, MA,  1997.

Publications

Enrique Alonso García has published, among other areas, on marine issues in several languages (English, Spanish, German and Japanese). Some of his publications, limited to the marine policy, science and law, are the following:

Enrique Alonso García, "El Conocimiento y la Aplicación del Derecho Ambiental, un Ejemplo Práctico: las Areas Protegidas Marinas, en Especial, las Areas Protegidas en Mar Abierto", en Desarrollo Sostenible y Protección del Medio Ambiente, Luis Piñar Mañas (Director), ed. Civitas. 2002.

Case study.- "Farming in the Elkhorn Slough Watershed, Environmental Justice & the Hispanic Community", by Jason Benford (supervised by Enrique Alonso García & Ana Recarte Vicente-Arche). April 2004

Enrique Alonso García, “The Establishment and Management of Offshore Marine Protected Areas”, in Development of Marine Resources and Ocean Governance, Shigeaki Uno, Tetsuya Katsumura & Hideki Imaoka editors, Kokusai Shoin Pub., 2004 in Japanese.

Case study.- "The Meaning of Salmon in the Northwest: A Historical, Scientific and Sociological Study", by Luisa Molinero (supervised by Enrique Alonso García) April 2005.

Case study.- "The Boston Harbor Project", by Enrique Alonso García & Ana Recarte Vicente-Arche. January 2005.

Case study.- "Oil spill Prevention and Response: the U.S. Institutional System in the Coast of California", by Ana Tejedor & Larry Spinosa (supervised by Enrique Alonso García). May 2006

With Ree Brennin et al,  "1st International Workshop on Beluga Whale Research, Husbandry, and Management in Wild and Captive Environments. 2007.”, Workshop Position Information Document.

Case study.- "Cape Cod Off-Shore Wind Park: The Multivariate Nature of Energy Policy Issues", by Enrique Alonso & Ana Recarte Vicente-Arche,. May 2007.

With Fernando González Botija, Miguel A. Recuerda, Pedro Díaz Peralta, Anselmo Martínez Cañellas, Lucía Roda Ghisleri, Alejandro Lago Candeira,, Maria Rosa Martínez-Larrañaga, and  Arturo Anadón, "Legal Regulation of Risk Analysis and Genetically Modified Foods", en European Food and Feed Law núm.4. 2009

With Lucía Roda Ghisleri, Arturo Anadón, Miguel A. Recuerda, Pedro Díaz Peralta, Fernando González Botija, Anselmo Martínez Cañellas, Alejandro Lago Candeira, andy Maria Rosa Martínez-Larrañaga, "Risk Analysis and GM Foods: Scientific Risk Assessment", en European Food and Feel Law núm.4, 2009

Enrique Alonso García, "Introduction to International Environmental Law: Handbook with Cases and Materials for American Lawyers", Friends of Thoreau Program Series, núm.1, Ed. URJC-Friends of Thoreau, 2a. ed, 2009, ISBN: 84 95541 05 X

Enrique Alonso García y Ana Recarte Vicente-Arche, "La Técnica Normativa En EEUU, en Particular la Elaboración de las Leyes, en La Técnica Normativa: una Necesidad para la Realización de la Justicia, Pablo García Mexía y Jaime Rodríguez Arana (directores), CEU Ediciones, 2010

Enrique Alonso García, "La Reciente e Inminente Legislación Sobre Conservación y Uso Sostenible de la Biodiversidad del Medio Marino, ¿Celebración o Reto?", en Ambienta, núm.94, marzo 2011

Courses

Courses offered at MIIS in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

IPOL8652A-Spri12 Sem: International Marine Law

Faculty Type
Adjunct Faculty

Kristina Maria Gjerde

First Name
Kristina Maria
Last Name
Gjerde
Kristina Maria Gjerde, Adjunct Professor, International Environmental Policy, IEP, Image
Job Title
Adjunct Professor
Phone
+1 646 785 4946

I am passionate about:   

I am passionate about applying law, science, technology and economics to find a new balance in how we manage the global ocean commons.

What excites me about being a professor at MIIS: 

Faculty Program Tags
Expertise

International marine environmental law and policy, law of the sea and high seas governance 

Extra Information

Additional Areas of Focus

Marine science and policy, ecosystem-based management; marine protected areas; sustainable fisheries management; shipping; ocean geo-engineering; environmental impact assessments; marine migratory species conservation.

Recent Accomplishments 

  • Helped to trigger the transformation of high seas Marine Protected Areas from a controversial concept to a practical tool.  Since establishing a network of policy, scientific, management and legal experts through the IUCN (www.iucn.org/marine) and its World Commission on Protected Areas (http://www.iucn.org/about/union/commissions/wcpa22/) in 2003, eight high seas MPAs have been established: seven in the North-East Atlantic, one in the Southern Ocean, and more are under development.  

 

  • In 2008, co-founded the Global Ocean Biodiversity Initiative (http://www.gobi.org/) together with the Government of Germany and scientists from the Census of Marine Life, Duke University Marine Geospatial Ecology Lab, UNEP-WCMC, the Marine Conservation Institute and others to advance the scientific basis for conserving biological diversity in the deep seas and open oceans. GOBI partners are now providing technical assistance to governments and the Secretariat Convention on Biological Diversity (with 193 countries as members) through a series of CBD-facilitated regional workshops.

 

  • In 2010 co-founded the Sargasso Sea Alliance, a partnership led by the Government of Bermuda to protect the Sargasso Sea, a vast gyre in the Atlantic Ocean (http://www.sargassoalliance.org/). The Sargasso Sea Alliance works in collaboration with scientists, international marine conservation groups and private donors, who all share a vision of protecting the unique and vulnerable ocean ecosystem of the Sargasso Sea. It aims to mobilize support from a wide variety of national and international organizations and governments to ensure legal protection for this critical ecosystem and to provide insights for the establishment of Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) on the high seas.

 

  • In early 2011, co-founded the High Seas Alliance (http://highseasalliance.org/) a cooperative initiative of scientists and conservation organizations concerned with improving the management and conservation of high seas and seabed biodiversity beyond national jurisdiction.  The High Seas Alliance played a major role in bringing high-level attention at the UN Conference on Sustainable Development (Rio+20) to the importance of a new international agreement to safeguard the high seas.

 

  • In 2012, helped to secure the international recognition of marine “ecologically or biologically significant areas” by the Convention on Biological Diversity and the official transmission of these special areas to the United Nations and its Working Group on Biodiversity beyond National Jurisdiction as a demonstration of the compelling need for improving how we manage and protect the marine environment beyond national jurisdiction.

 

Bibliography

Gjerde, K.M. “The Environmental Provisions of the UN Law of the Sea Convention for the high seas and seabed Area beyond national jurisdiction” (2012) the International Journal of Marine and Coastal Law, special theme issue for the 30th anniversary of the Law of the Sea Convention.

Hastings J., et al. (2012). “Safeguarding the blue planet: Six strategies for accelerating ocean protection” 18 Parks Magazine 1-13 https://cmsdata.iucn.org/downloads/parks_hastings.pdf

Gjerde K. M. and Rulska-Domino A., (2012). “Marine Protected Areas Beyond National Jurisdiction: Some Practical Perspectives for Moving Ahead”, 27 International Journal of Marine and Coastal Law, 351-273. http://booksandjournals.brillonline.com/docserver/15718085/27/2/15718085...

Gjerde, K.M., (2011). High Seas Fisheries Governance: Prospects and Challenges, in THE WORLD OCEAN IN GLOBALISATION: CHALLENGES AND RESPONSES, (Vidas, D. and Schei, P.J. eds.) Fridtjof Nansen Institute, Martinus Nijhoff Publishers, pp. 221-232

Previous Work

Kristina M Gjerde is presently Senior High Seas Advisor to the International Union for the Conservation of Nature’s (IUCN) Global Marine and Polar Programme (www.IUCN.org/marine/). At IUCN she fosters international efforts to improve the conservation and management of the high seas and deep seabed beyond national jurisdiction. She serves as an advisor to governments, international organizations and non-governmental organizations and publishes widely on fisheries, shipping, law of the sea and marine conservation.

Kristina initially specialized in admiralty law at the New York City law firm of Lord, Day & Lord. She later served as a research fellow at the Marine Policy Center of the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution and research fellow/guest lecturer at the University of Hull Law School (UK), and represented WWF at the International Maritime Organization in London. In 2003, she was awarded a three-year Pew Fellowship in Marine Conservation (www.pewenvironment.org/research-programs/marine-fellows/) to support her work on high seas governance.

Education

NEW YORK UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF LAW, Juris Doctor, 1984

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA AT LOS ANGELES, Bachelor of Arts in History (summa cum laude), 1981 

Faculty Type
Adjunct Faculty

Michael Vincent McGinnis

First Name
Michael
Last Name
McGinnis
Michael Vincent McGinnis, Professor, International Environmental Policy, IEP, Image
Job Title
Associate Professor
Location
Craig Building
Phone
831-647-6615 x 8403

I am passionate about forging a more sustainable future that includes the protection of diverse maritime cultures and the ecosystems that we are irrevocably connected to and dependent on.

Expertise

Marine Policy, Climate Change, and Water/Watershed Planning

Faculty Program Tags
MIIS Tags
Course List

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

IEPG 8503 - Resrch Strategies for Env Pol      

Environmental policy-making requires high quality research at every stage of the process. This course introduces students to the design and implementation of research, with an emphasis on applied research into contemporary environmental policy problems.

Fall 2014 - MIIS

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IEPG 8506 - Public Policy & the Environmnt      

This two-unit course provides a foundation in the paradigms, principles, and tools that shape public policy in the service of environmental protection and sustainable development. We will first explore the sources and dynamics of public policymaking and the fundamental principles of environmental policy, including sustainability, precaution and cost internalization. We will then examine three policy paradigms: 1) regulatory (command and control); 2) collaborative (stakeholder based); and 3) market-based. For each paradigm, we will consider case studies of global and national policy options for particular environmental problems, including forest degradation and carbon emissions. Examples of policy options include substantive and process standards; taxes; eco-system service payments; public investment; etc. Students will work in a team to produce a policy analysis of a major environmental problem.

Fall 2013 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS

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IEPG 8522 - Environmental Ethics      

This course introduces the major themes of environmental ethics. In the face of a generalized claim of environmental crisis, numerous authors and schools of thought have suggested a variety of ethical and political responses. The central focus will be on the various ethical theories that have evolved regarding the relationships between humans and the rest of the natural world, and how technology, a sense of place and community, the science of ecology, diverse natural values, and political institutions have shaped the past and present treatment of the natural world. We will also explore and discuss how these diverse ethical theories and beliefs are articulated in politics today, and will characterize the ecological and social movements that are emerging that reflect these ethical and value orientations.

Spring 2014 - MIIS

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IEPG 8591 - Applied Conservation Science      

This course is about saving life on earth. It provides the scientific foundation required to formulate sound environmental policies capable of addressing human population growth, habitat destruction, resource overexploitation, and other anthropogenic factors that continue to undermine the earth’s ecological systems. The course focuses on scientific underpinnings of conserving the world’s remaining biological diversity (aka “biodiversity”). It draws from biology, ecology, and other natural sciences to deliver the broad scientific training that future policymakers need. As a short survey course, the goal is not to transform you into a biologist or an ecologist, but rather to equip you with the basic knowledge you need to understand how the natural world works, speak the language with confidence, and use science to develop sound environmental policy.

Spring 2013 - MIIS

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IEPG 8611 - Sustainable Coastal Management      

The coast is the most dynamic landscape on earth. It changes every time a wave breaks, a tide changes, or streams flow. About seventy percent of the world’s population lives within 100 km of the coast. This course provides a foundation in the core scientific principles, governance frameworks, and economic challenges and opportunities related to the quest for sustainable coastal management and adaptation. A central theme of the course is the need to assess and respond to coastal climate vulnerability, including via adaptive policy and planning at diverse scales of coastal governance. The case studies in the course encompass both developed and less developed countries, and an emphasis on management of large coastal cities, coastal ecosystems, and other coastal land-uses.

Spring 2013 - MIIS, Spring 2014 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS

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IEPG 8615 - Intl Watershed Management        

The study of watershed planning is a subject that combines the biophysical and social sciences. It requires that we explore the relationships and linkages between coastal, marine and aquatic habitats and the human activities, such as water use, water pollution, and habitat loss that impact watershed ecosystems. As a consequence, this course will focus on a characterization of the ecology of aquatic ecosystems, and the impacts of human beings and climate change on these ecosystems across diverse cultural contexts. It will include a review of government and non-governmental watershed-based programs and plans that exist in less developed and industrialized countries.

The Course Outline describes the major themes of the course and associated reading assignments (including recommended readings and useful web links), and lecture topics, including case study materials. The goals of this course are: (1) to introduce the ecological factors that influence disturbance of watershed ecosystems; (2) to describe integrative watershed management principles; (3) to review state, federal and international policies and programs that support watershed-based ecosystem management and integrative planning; and, (4) to provide an overview of the major policy initiatives and planning tools that support watershed-based ecosystem management in diverse contexts.

Fall 2013 - MIIS

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IEPG 8635 - Intl Marine Science & Policy      

The study of marine science and policy is a subject that combines the biophysical and social sciences with a comprehensive overview of marine policies, laws, and planning tools. It requires that we explore the relationships and nexus between science, policy and planning across diverse maritime cultures. The course will first provide a general overview of marine science, with a particular focus on the role of marine science in identifying pressures, threats and stressors to marine systems. The emphasis will be on the various factors that contribute to marine ecosystem disturbance and the role of marine science in policymaking and planning. The introduction to marine science will be followed by a general overview of state and federal marine policy and management. The US marine policy framework will be compared to international examples of ocean governance, including small island countries, New Zealand, England, the European Union, China, and less developed countries.

Fall 2013 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS

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IPOL 8615 - Intl Watershed Management        

-

Fall 2012 - MIIS

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IPOL 8635 - Intl Marine Science & Policy      

Fall 2012 - MIIS

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Extra Information

Research and Publications

Mike is interested in the interface between science and policymaking.  He has fifteen years of professional and academic experience in the area of large-scale environmental policymaking and planning in diverse cultural and socio-economic settings.

He has published over 100 journal articles, essays, books, government reports and technical documents on the subject of large-scale ecosystem-based planning and biodiversity conservation, with a focus on oceans, rivers, creeks, and islands.  His edited compendium Bioregionalism(Routledge, 1999) is the primary text in the field.  He has also contributed to federal and state policymaking and planning activities for marine sanctuary management plans and watershed-based plans across coastal California.

From 1993-2000 his research, funded by three awards from the USA National Science Foundation, focused on the role of worldviews, values, beliefs and science in the development of ecosystem-based planning. From 1999-2008 he was an advisor to federal agencies in the development of marine ecosystem-based planning in California. During this time, he assisted the National Marine Sanctuary (NMS) Program in all of the planning aspects associated with the designation of marine reserves within the Channel Islands NMS.  In 2008 he was a Fulbright Scholar in south-eastern Europe, and conducted a comparative study of marine governance supported by the European Union. In April 2012, he completed a two-year study on New Zealand's marine governance framework funded by the ministries of that country.  McGinnis is currently completing two books on the subject of the role of ecology and politics in large-scale ecosystem-based planning and decision-making.

Recent Accomplishments

  • Mike was one of the first Fulbright Scholars to the Republic of Montenegro in southeastern Europe in 2008. 
  • As a Senior Research Fellow at the University of Wellington New Zealand he has completed a comprehensive study of New Zealand’s marine governance framework in 2011; a study supported by the ministries of the country that offers a range of recommendations to improve New Zealand’s marine governance system.  This study will be revised as a major book on the subject of New Zealand’s environmental governance system.

Previous Work

Mike was Director of the Ocean and Coastal Policy Center at the University of California Santa Barbara from 1995-2010.  In 2008, he was a Fulbright Scholar to the Republic of Montenegro.  From 2010-2012 he was a Senior Fellow and Professor at the School of Government, Victoria University of Wellington (New Zealand).  He has published over 100 journal articles, essays, books, government reports and technical documents on the subject of biodiversity conservation and ecosystem-based planning.

Non-academic Interests

Mike has surfed since he was seven years old, and is enjoys hiking, sailing, and other ocean-going and backcountry wilderness activities.  He also in a painter and has been writing a series of vignettes and poems on the landscapes and seascapes of coastal California.

Education

Dr Michael Vincent McGinnis received a PhD in Political Science in 1993 from UC Santa Barbara.  His undergraduate degree was from UC Los Angeles.

Bibliography

Book, Marine Governance: The New Zealand Dimension. Victoria University Wellington Press. 2012 (December). (150 pages). mcginnis_ebook_nz_ocean_governance_victoria_university_wellington_press_2012
 
The Race for Marine Space: Science, Values and Aquaculture Planning in New Zealand,
Coastal Management 41, 5 (2013): 401-419. mcginnis_and_collins_coastal_management_2013_offprint

Adapting to Climate Impacts in California: The Importance of Civic Science in Local Coastal Planning, Coastal Management 39: 3 (April 2011): 225-241 (with C.E. McGinnis). 

Living up to the Brand: Greening New Zealand’s Ocean Policy, Policy Quarterly 8, 1 (February 2012): 17-28. policyquarterly_feb_2012final

A Bioregional Primer for Santa Barbara County, Funded by the Santa Barbara Foundation, December, 2012. (72 pages). regional_conservation_principles_final_mcginnis_nov201

Mindfulness of the Oceanic Commons, Pacific Ecologist 20 (Winter 2011): 55-60. mcginnis_pacific_ecologist_issue_201

Land Use, Agriculture, and the Environment, The 2010 Central Coast Survey, UC Santa Barbara, Published by Social Science Survey Center/Benton Survey Research Lab. 2010 (with Cleveland, David, Paolo Gardinali, Garrett Glasgow, John Mohr,
Eric Smith, Megan Carney, and Lauren Copeland). ag_report_ucsb

Protecting Climate Refugia Areas: The case of the Gaviota coast in southern California, Endangered Species Update 25, 4 (June 2008): 103-109. esu_vol_25_4

Negotiating Ecology: Marine Bioregions and the destruction of the Southern California Bight, Futures 38;3 (May 2006): 382-405.

The California Watershed Movement: Science and the Politics of Place. Natural Resources Journal 42, 1 (Winter 2002): 133-183 (with Woolley).

Bioregional Conflict Resolution: Rebuilding Community in Watershed-based Planning and Organizing, Environmental Management 24, 1 (1999): 1-12 (with Woolley and J.K. Gamman). 

Faculty Type
Regular Faculty
Dynamic Features
Course Catalog

Gireesh Shrimali

First Name
Gireesh
Last Name
Shrimali
Gireesh Shrimali, Professor, International Environmental Policy, IEP, Image
Job Title
Assistant Professor, Energy Economics and Business
Location
McGowan 320C
Phone
831-647-4159
Language(s)
हिन्दी

I am passionate about: climate change mitigation via development of new technologies

What excites me about being a professor at MIIS: is the opportunity to research in and teach internationally relevant topics

Faculty Program Tags
Expertise

Economics, Policy, and Business of Energy, Environment, and Sustainable Development

Course List

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

IEPG 8512 - Quant Mthd for Env Sci & Polcy      

This course introduces the use of quantitative methods in environmental analysis. Students will learn how to apply basic principles of natural science to a variety of globally important environmental problems. Topics covered include estimation techniques and stock-flow modeling; population and resource use; biogeochemical cycles; acid deposition; climate change; stratospheric ozone depletion; toxic pollution and public health; and ionizing radiation. Coursework features weekly readings, bi-weekly quantitative problem sets, a mid-term exam, and a final exam. This is a challenging course for students with limited math and science backgrounds, but no student who works diligently will be left behind. The methods taught in this course have proven useful not only for aspiring environmental scientists, but also for those working in public policy, environmental law, ecological economics, international development, business, and journalism.

Spring 2014 - MIIS

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IEPG 8623 - Sem:Bus Models for Sustain Dev      

This seminar explores the growing role of the private sector in promoting sustainable development goals in low and middle income countries through core business activities. The overarching aim of such business models is to reduce poverty and promote sustainability by: 1) stimulating access to global markets and supply chains; 2) delivering affordable and sustainable goods and services; 3) responding to the demands of climate change mitigation and adaptation; and/or 4) promoting local capacities for sustainable production. The seminar will examine case studies of five business models, ranging from small-scale, for-profit and non-profit enterprises to partnerships between multinational corporations and NGOs and/or development agencies. Students will work in teams to undertake their own case studies. Together, we will seek to draw lessons for scalability.

Spring 2014 - MIIS

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IEPG 8626 - Environmental Science &RiskMgt      

The first (and major) part of the course focuses on conventional (e.g., oil, gas, and coal) and renewable (e.g., bio-fuels, wind, and solar) energy finance, using tools from corporate finance. In this course, students will study financial statement analysis, valuation and capital budgeting, and risk management. Students will also analyze case problems and learn to apply theories to “real world” practice, which goes beyond energy to general environmental problems, such as in carbon as well as natural capital management.

The second part of the course briefly introduces the use of quantitative methods in environmental analysis. Students will learn how to apply basic principles of natural science to a variety of globally important environmental problems. The methods taught in this course have proven useful not only for aspiring environmental scientists and engineers, but also for those working in public policy, environmental law, ecological economics, international development, business, and journalism.

Fall 2014 - MIIS

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IEPG 8670 - Energy & Environmntal Markets      

In the past 30 years, some of the largest industries have made the transition from a regulated to market-based paradigm. Managers in many transportation, information technology, and energy companies have had to devise strategies to cope with changes in economic regulations and the evolution of new markets and trading platforms. The energy industries feature a complex mix of regulation and market-driven incentives. As classic economic regulation of energy markets has been reduced, however, environmental concerns have increased and spawned a new set of regulations leading to new business challenges and opportunities.
Drawing on the tools of economics and finance, we study the business and public policy issues that these changes have raised in energy markets. Topics include the effects of competition, scarcity and seller market power on energy prices; the regulation and deregulation of energy markets; environmental impacts and policies related to energy production and use; the economics of alternative energy sources; the development and effect of organized spot, futures, and derivative markets in energy; antitrust and competition policy; and the transportation and storage of energy commodities. We examine the economic determinants of industry structure and evolution of competition among firms in these industries; investigate successful and unsuccessful strategies for entering new markets and competing in existing markets; and analyze the rationale for and effects of public policies in energy markets.

OBJECTIVES

• To introduce students to energy markets by examining the underlying economic principles.

• To demonstrate how antitrust and competition policy affects the functioning of energy markets.

• To introduce basic concepts in energy finance as related to the functioning of energy markets.

• To examine environmental impacts and economics of energy production and use.

• To understand how economics of alternative energy sources work differently from conventional ones.

Fall 2013 - MIIS

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IEPG 8672 - Envrnmntl&NatrlResourceFinance      

Energy is not only a multi-trillion dollar industry but is also closely linked to the global warming problem. Further, efficient natural resource management is becoming key to ensuring a sustainable future. Financing, in addition to technology and policy, will play a key part in addressing the twin goals of energy security and a greener planet.
This is a course on natural resource finance, with focus on energy; using tools from corporate finance, with application to project finance as well as venture capital. In this course, students will study energy industry structure and terminology; financial statement analysis, capital budgeting and risk analysis, relative valuation, and risk management in the energy industry.
Students will also analyze case problems addressing various course topics and learn to apply finance theories to “real world” practice, which goes beyond energy to general environmental problems, such as in carbon as well as natural capital management.

Spring 2013 - MIIS

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IEPG 8683 - DiffusnSustTechBottomOfPyramid      

One third of the world’s population — more than 2 billion people — lacks access to modern energy services to meet their basic energy needs with deleterious impacts on health, gender equity, socioeconomic development, and the environment. Expanding access to cleaner, more efficient energy systems for cooking, productive uses of heat and to electricity is critical to achieve the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) for reducing global poverty.

Successful project design and implementation requires an integrated approach, that addresses not only technical aspects but also the socio-cultural, financial and institutional barriers and opportunities that projects may face. This course will provide students with a framework needed to better understand and participate in the design, implementation and evaluation of rural energy systems that are socially, financially, physically, and environmentally sustainable. The learning from this course will also be applicable to other sustainable technologies, addressing issues related to natural resource management in general.

Specific questions to be addressed include:

 Why do rural energy projects fail?

 How does one improve adoption and use of the proposed systems?

 How does a program increase financial affordability for low-income customers?

 What are institutional barriers to energy projects and how does one address them?

Spring 2013 - MIIS

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IPOL 8670 - BusinssModels&SustnablEnergy       

Fall 2012 - MIIS

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MBAG 8561 / IMGT 8561 - Managerial Economics      

This course will cover the fundamental economic principles that can enable managers to make more efficient and economical decisions. Students will be provided with selected tools that can be used to aid and improve the making of economic decisions; that is, decisions involving choice. Economic principles, theories and models will be introduced and discussed in order to develop a basis for consistently considering and evaluating economic policies, practices and activities. Student’s ability to apply the material presented in print and in lecture will be the primary measure of success in this course.

Fall 2012 - MIIS, Fall 2013 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS

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MBAG 9623 - Sem:Bus Models for Sustain Dev      

This seminar explores the growing role of the private sector in promoting sustainable development goals in low and middle income countries through core business activities. The overarching aim of such business models is to reduce poverty and promote sustainability by: 1) stimulating access to global markets and supply chains; 2) delivering affordable and sustainable goods and services; 3) responding to the demands of climate change mitigation and adaptation; and/or 4) promoting local capacities for sustainable production. The seminar will examine case studies of five business models, ranging from small-scale, for-profit and non-profit enterprises to partnerships between multinational corporations and NGOs and/or development agencies. Students will work in teams to undertake their own case studies. Together, we will seek to draw lessons for scalability.

Spring 2014 - MIIS

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MBAG 9670 - Energy & Environmntal Markets      

In the past 30 years, some of the largest industries have made the transition from a regulated to market-based paradigm. Managers in many transportation, information technology, and energy companies have had to devise strategies to cope with changes in economic regulations and the evolution of new markets and trading platforms. The energy industries feature a complex mix of regulation and market-driven incentives. As classic economic regulation of energy markets has been reduced, however, environmental concerns have increased and spawned a new set of regulations leading to new business challenges and opportunities.
Drawing on the tools of economics and finance, we study the business and public policy issues that these changes have raised in energy markets. Topics include the effects of competition, scarcity and seller market power on energy prices; the regulation and deregulation of energy markets; environmental impacts and policies related to energy production and use; the economics of alternative energy sources; the development and effect of organized spot, futures, and derivative markets in energy; antitrust and competition policy; and the transportation and storage of energy commodities. We examine the economic determinants of industry structure and evolution of competition among firms in these industries; investigate successful and unsuccessful strategies for entering new markets and competing in existing markets; and analyze the rationale for and effects of public policies in energy markets.

OBJECTIVES

• To introduce students to energy markets by examining the underlying economic principles.

• To demonstrate how antitrust and competition policy affects the functioning of energy markets.

• To introduce basic concepts in energy finance as related to the functioning of energy markets.

• To examine environmental impacts and economics of energy production and use.

• To understand how economics of alternative energy sources work differently from conventional ones.

Fall 2013 - MIIS

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MBAG 9672 - Envrnmntl&NatrlResourceFinance      

Energy is not only a multi-trillion dollar industry but is also closely linked to the global warming problem. Further, efficient natural resource management is becoming key to ensuring a sustainable future. Financing, in addition to technology and policy, will play a key part in addressing the twin goals of energy security and a greener planet.

This is a course on natural resource finance, with focus on energy; using tools from corporate finance, with application to project finance as well as venture capital. In this course, students will study energy industry structure and terminology; financial statement analysis, capital budgeting and risk analysis, relative valuation, and risk management in the energy industry.

Students will also analyze case problems addressing various course topics and learn to apply finance theories to “real world” practice, which goes beyond energy to general environmental problems, such as in carbon as well as natural capital management.

Spring 2013 - MIIS

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MBAG 9683 - DiffusnSustTechBottomOfPyramid      

One third of the world’s population — more than 2 billion people — lacks access to modern energy services to meet their basic energy needs with deleterious impacts on health, gender equity, socioeconomic development, and the environment. Expanding access to cleaner, more efficient energy systems for cooking, productive uses of heat and to electricity is critical to achieve the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) for reducing global poverty.

Successful project design and implementation requires an integrated approach, that addresses not only technical aspects but also the socio-cultural, financial and institutional barriers and opportunities that projects may face. This course will provide students with a framework needed to better understand and participate in the design, implementation and evaluation of rural energy systems that are socially, financially, physically, and environmentally sustainable. The learning from this course will also be applicable to other sustainable technologies, addressing issues related to natural resource management in general.

Specific questions to be addressed include:

 Why do rural energy projects fail?

 How does one improve adoption and use of the proposed systems?

 How does a program increase financial affordability for low-income customers?

 What are institutional barriers to energy projects and how does one address them?

Spring 2013 - MIIS

More Information »

Extra Information

Research Focus 

Policy for renewable energy, innovation in the energy sector, and climate change in general. My previous work has included topics such as design of feed in tariffs; impact of policy on penetration of renewable sources in the US; and analysis of the solar mission, low carbon innovation system and business models for sustainable cook-stoves in India. I am currently leading projects evaluating the impact of policy on the diffusion and cost of renewable technologies – in particular, solar and wind – in both US and India.

 

Recent Accomplishments

    • Teaching “Energy and Natural Resource Finance” – the first course of its kind at MIIS
    • Working closely with the Indian government on cost-effective renewable energy policies
    • Establishing “The CPI-ISB Energy and Environment Program” at the Indian School of Business

        Previous Work

        Before joining MIIS, I was the Interim-Director of CPI-ISB Energy and Environment Program at Climate Policy Initiative (CPI). Prior to CPI I worked as an Assistant Professor at the Indian School of Business (ISB).

        Education

        • PhD: Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, January 2008
        • MS: Electrical Engineering, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, June 1993
        • BTech: Electrical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Delhi, India, June 1991

        Bibliography

        • Gireesh Shrimali, David Nelson, Shobhit Goel, Charith Konda, and Raj Kumar, 2013, “Renewable Deployment in India: Financing Costs and Implications for Policy,” Energy Policy, 62: 28-43.
        • Gireesh Shrimali and Sumala Chetty, 2013, “Renewable Energy Certificate Markets in India: A Review,” Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, 26: 702-716.
        • Anshuman Sahoo and Gireesh Shrimali, 2013, “The Effectiveness of Domestic Content Criteria in India's Solar Mission,” Energy Policy, 62: 1470-1480.
        • Gireesh Shrimali and Steffen Jenner, 2013, “The Impact of State Policies on Deployment and Cost of Solar PV in the US: A Sector Specific Empirical Analysis,” Renewable Energy, 60: 679-690.
        • Santosh Harish, Shuba Raghavan, Milind Kandlikar, and Gireesh Shrimali, 2013, “Assessing the impact of the transition to LED-based solar lighting systems in India,” Energy for Sustainable Development, 17 (4), 363-370.
        • Carrie Armel, Abhay Gupta, Gireesh Shrimali, and Adrian Albert, 2013, “Disaggregation: The Holy Grail of Energy Efficiency?” Energy Policy, 52, 213-234.
        • Gireesh Shrimali and Sunali Rohra, 2012, “India’s Solar Mission: A Review,” Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, 16, 6317-6332.
        • Andrea Sarzynski, Jeremy Larrieu, and Gireesh Shrimali, 2012, “The Impact of State Financial Incentives on Consumer Adoption of Solar Technology in the US,” Energy Policy, 46, 550-557.
        • Gireesh Shrimali, Xander Slaski, Mark Thurber, and Hisham Zerriffi, 2011, “Improved Stoves in India: A Study of Sustainable Business Models,” Energy Policy, 39 (11), 7543-7556.
        • Gireesh Shrimali and Joshua Kneifel, 2011, “Are Government Policies Effective in Promoting Deployment of Renewable Electricity Resources (in the US)?” Energy Policy, 39 (9), 4726-4741. 
        • Gireesh Shrimali and Erin Baker, 2011, “Optimal Feed-in Tariff Schedules,” IEEE Engineering Management, 99, 1-13 
        Faculty Type
        Regular Faculty
        Dynamic Features
        Course Catalog

        Jason Scorse

        First Name
        Jason
        Last Name
        Scorse
        Jason Scorse, Professor, International Environmental Policy, IEP, Image
        Job Title
        Director, Center for the Blue Economy; Program Chair, International Environmental Policy; Associate Professor
        Location
        K23 Craig
        Phone
        831.647.3548
        Language(s)
        Español

        I am passionate about: Living sustainably, not just preaching/teaching it.

        What excites me about being a professor at MIIS: Seeing the amazing things our students are doing around the world. It is truly inspiring. I am always happy to talk with prospective, current, and former students by phone, skype, or in person. Please email me to set up an appointment.

        Faculty Program Tags
        Short Programs & Research Centers
        Course List

        Courses offered in the past four years.
        indicates offered in the current term
        indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

        ECPR 8500 - Economics Preparation-Micro      

        This intensive course in introductory microeconomics places emphasis on the fundamental principles necessary for success in International Economics (IPOL 8520), Development Economics (IPOL 8551) and Environmental & Natural Resource Economics (IPOL 8542). This course will examine the allocation of resources in different kinds of economies. Topics include the production possibilities curve, competitive markets, elasticities, monopoly, market failures, and the role of government.

        Summer 2011 - MIIS, Spring 2012 - MIIS, Summer 2012 - MIIS, Spring 2013 - MIIS, Summer 2013 - MIIS, Spring 2014 - MIIS, Summer 2014 - MIIS

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        IEPG 8542 - Envirn & Natural Resource Econ      

        The purpose of this course is to develop competency in economic theory as it relates to environmental issues, and the analytical skills necessary to evaluate, as well as craft, effective, efficient, and just environmental policies. We will highlight policies that influence (both directly and indirectly) the environment and natural resource use, and analyze their implications. The emphasis will be on identifying and assessing the appropriate economic tools for addressing current environmental issues. Students will learn how to “think like an economist,” which may not make for great party conversation, but is essential for conversing intelligently about the world’s major environmental problems and developing solutions.

        Fall 2013 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS

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        IEPG 8663 - Ocean & Coastal Economics      

        he purpose of this course is to develop advanced economic skills applied to development and resource issues in the world’s oceans and coasts. The course will focus heavily on analytical and data-driven techniques that can help illuminate the costs and benefits of various policies in the ocean and coastal zones, using a variety of metrics, and incorporating environmental and social values. The course will be divided into two parts: Market economics and coastal planning with Prof. DePaolis and non-market economics with Prof. Scorse.

        Student participation in both of these sections will be high, involving many in-class assignments, lab sessions, and extended discussions. Students will be expected to engage in original data collection, analysis, and research. This is an intensive course geared for people who want to pursue careers in marine-related fields, although the topics are more broadly applicable to a range of conservation and development-related careers.

        GIS is recommended.

        Spring 2013 - MIIS, Spring 2014 - MIIS

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        IEPG 8666 - OCRM Speaker Series      

        The primary purpose of this speaker series is to introduce incoming IEP students who are pursuing the “Ocean and Coastal Resource Management” concentration to a wide range of cutting-edge interdisciplinary topics. (In order to be eligible for the CBE Summer Fellows Program students must enroll in this course—auditing is acceptable—in addition to committing to the 16 units of advanced coursework in their second year.)

        The series will include topics from the local to international levels, with a focus on the policy and economic implications. Students are encouraged to use these talks as networking opportunities, catalysts for future research, and most importantly, to help focus their career goals.

        The series is open to all IEP and IPM students interested in ocean and coastal issues, as well as members of the MARINE network and the larger Monterey community.

        Fall 2013 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS

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        IPOL 8542 - Envirn & Natural Resource Econ      

        The purpose of this course is to develop competency in economic theory as it relates to environmental issues, and the analytical skills necessary to evaluate, as well as craft, effective, efficient, and just environmental policies. We will highlight policies that influence (both directly and indirectly) the environment and natural resource use, and analyze their implications. The emphasis will be on identifying and assessing the appropriate economic tools for addressing current environmental issues. Students will learn how to “think like an economist,” which may not make for great party conversation, but is essential for conversing intelligently about the world’s major environmental problems and developing solutions.

        Fall 2010 - MIIS, Spring 2011 - MIIS, Spring 2012 - MIIS, Fall 2012 - MIIS

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        IPOL 8587 - CaseStudiesIn Sustnblty Ldrshp      

        The primary purpose of this course is to provide students with the opportunity to hear firsthand accounts from sustainability leaders across a wide spectrum of organizations - businesses, NGOs, investment firms, R&D laboratories and community organizations -- and engage them in conversation in order to discover: 1. The characteristics that make for great sustainability leadership, 2. The cutting-edge opportunities for sustainable ventures and sustainable development in the U.S. and abroad, and 3. The risks and rewards of being a sustainability leader. Some of these talks will be more philosophical while others will be technical.

        An essential element of the course will be an exploration of what the term "sustainability" means in different contexts, and how it can be made operational. The featured speakers will be interspersed with readings and lectures/discussions on the larger issues of sustainability, sustainable business, and sustainable development.

        It is recommended that students also attend the workshop in Sustainable Investing as a complement to this course.

        Fall 2010 - MIIS

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        IPOL 8663 - Ocean & Coastal Economics      

        The purpose of this course is to develop advanced economic skills applied to development and resource issues in the world’s oceans and coasts. The course will focus heavily on analytical and data-driven techniques that can help illuminate the costs and benefits of various policies in the ocean and coastal zones, using a variety of metrics, and incorporating environmental and social values. The course will be divided into two parts: Market economics and coastal planning with Prof. DePaolis and non-market economics with Prof. Scorse.

        Student participation in both of these sections will be high, involving many in-class assignments, lab sessions, and extended discussions. Students will be expected to engage in original data collection, analysis, and research. This is an intensive course geared for people who want to pursue careers in marine-related fields, although the topics are more broadly applicable to a range of conservation and development-related careers.

        Spring 2012 - MIIS

        More Information »

        IPOL 8666 - IntlMarinePolcy Speaker Series      

        Fall 2012 - MIIS

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        MIIS Tags
        Expertise

        Environmental & Natural Resource Economics, Ocean and Coastal Resource Management, Behavioral Economics, International Economics & Development

        Extra Information

        Recent Accomplishments

        Professor Scorse’s major accomplishment over the past two years has been launching the new Center for the Blue Economy (CBE). Dr. Scorse is thrilled with the Center’s success so far, and is confident that it will make the International Environmental Policy program at the Monterey Institute the premier destination for aspiring ocean and coastal resource management professionals.
        He is currently spending almost all of his time building the new Center, including hiring faculty and staff, developing the Ocean and Coastal Resource Management curriculum, securing research funding, working with our visiting scholars, organizing the International Marine Policy Speaker series, expanding the Summer Fellows program, mapping out a strategic plan for the years ahead, and preparing to launch our new Journal of Ocean and Coastal Economics (JOCE) in 2014.
        Professor Scorse is also beginning to get involved in the national campaign to divest fossil fuel holdings from college endowments, believing that this could provide a major breakthrough in advancing climate change policy. He plans to finish a paper on the topic by spring 2014. His other current research includes new surfonomics work, a soon-to-be-released book chapter on “Ecosystem Services and their Economic and Social Value,” an article on the looming fiscal crisis in U.S. coastal states besieged by climate change, and updates to the non-market work done by the National Ocean Economics Program.

        Education

        Ph.D. UC-Berkeley, M.S. UC-Berkeley; M.S. UC-Santa Cruz; B.A. UC-Santa Cruz

        In the News

        Scorse, Jason. “Cheap Gas Hurts The Middle Class.” Fortune 6 December 2012.

        Scorse, Jason (and Judy Kildow). “End Federal Flood Insurance.” The New York Times 28 November 2012.

        Thomas, Gregory. "Surfonomics quantifies the worth of waves." The Washington Post 24 August 2012.

        Scorse, Jason. "My Word: Must never take coast's economic value for granted." Oakland Tribune 10 July 2012.

        Publications

        Scorse, Jason. What Environmentalists Need to Know about Economics. New York: Palgrave-Macmillan, 2010.

        Scorse, Jason (2010). Freeing the Market to Address Climate ChangeFreeing the Market to Address Climate ChangeThe Solutions Journal,1(6):29-32.

        Harrison, Ann, and Scorse, Jason. (2010). Multinationals and Anti-sweatshop ActivismMultinationals and Anti-sweatshop Activism, American Economic Review, 100(1): 247–273.

        Scorse, Jason. (2009) Non-Market Valuation of Ocean Resources in the National Ocean Economics ReportNon-Market Valuation of Ocean Resources in the National Ocean Economics Report (Judy Kildow ed.), National Ocean Economics Program, Moss Landing, CA.

        Harrison, Ann & Scorse, Jason. (2009).Do Foreign Firms Pay More? Evidence from the Indonesian Manufacturing Sector 1990-1999Do Foreign Firms Pay More? Evidence from the Indonesian Manufacturing Sector in Labour Markets and Economic Development, (Ravi Kanbur and Jan Svejnar eds.), Routledge Press, New York.

        Scorse, Jason. (2009).Making Matters WorseMaking Matters Worse. The International Journal of Climate Change: Impacts and Response, 1(1):1-6 中文中文

        Harrison, Ann & Jason Scorse. (2006).Improving the Conditions of Workers? Minimum Wage Legislation and Anti-Sweatshop ActivismImproving the Conditions of Workers? Minimum Wage Legislation and Anti-Sweatshop Activism. California Management Review, 2 (48):144-160. (Also issued as a Harvard Business School case study) Harrison, Ann & Scorse, Jason. 2004.

        Harrison, Ann & Jason Scorse. (2004). Improving the Conditions of Workers? Minimum Wage Legislation and Anti-Sweatshop ActivismThe Impact of Globalization on Compliance with Labor Standards: A Plant- Level Study in Brookings Trade Forum 2003 (Susan Collins and Dani Rodrik eds.), Brookings Institution Press, Washington D.C.

        Scorse, Jason. (2001). Reflections on the Free Trade Debate. Economia Rural, 1 (12):8-11.

        Working Papers

        Does Being a "Top 10" Worst Polluter Affect Facility Environmental Releases? Evidence from the U.S. Toxic Release Inventory (coauthored with Wolfram Schlenker), 2012.

        Environmental Policy and the Social Contract, 2012.

         The WTO's Environmental Mandate, 2011.

         The Capitalist Conundrum, 2010.

        Moving Beyond the Stale "Environment vs. Economy" Debate, 2010

        Book%20review%20of%20Economic%20Thought%20and%20U.S.%20Climate%20Change%20PolicyBook review of Economic Thought and U.S. Climate Change Policy. Edited by David M. Driesen. Cambridge, MA. MIT Press, 2010.

        Strong-Cvetich, Nikolas and Scorse, Jason. (2008). Ecotourism in Post-Conflict Peace-Building: A New Tool for Reconciliation? Ecoclub: International Ecotourism Magazine, 8 (96):10-17.

         Why Environmentalists Should Embrace Economics, 2006.

         Do Foreign Firms Pay More? Evidence from the Indonesian Manufacturing Sector 1990-1999. International Labor Organization, Working Paper No. 98, 2005 (coauthored with Ann Harrison and submitted).

        Is There Acquiescence in Yes-No Questions? (coauthored with Michael Hanemann & Jon Krosnick), 2005.

        Harrison, Ann & Jason Scorse. 2004. Moving Up or Moving Out? Anti-Sweatshop Activists and Labor Market Outcomes, National Bureau of Economic Research, Working Paper No. w10492.

        Faculty Type
        Regular Faculty
        Dynamic Features
        Course Catalog

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