Past Events

Past Events Winter 2014


May 2, 2014, Time/Location:TBD

Sponsored By MCySec and CSWG.

“Identifying the Actors Behind Malware and Cyber Attacks” By Mr. Adam Meyers, Vice President of Intelligence, Crowdstike, Inc.

Adam Meyers has over a decade of experience within the information security industry. Meyers has authored numerous papers that have appeared at peer reviewed industry venues and has received awards for his dedication to the field. At CrowdStrike, he serves as the VP of Intelligence. Within this role it is his responsibility to oversee all of CrowdStrike’s intelligence gathering and analytic activities. His Global Team supports both the Product and Services divisions at CrowdStrike and he manages these endeavors and expectations. Prior to joining CrowdStrike, he was the Director of Cyber Security Intelligence with the NPO Division of SRA International. He served as a senior subject matter expert for cyber threat and cyber security matters for a variety of SRA projects. 

May 1, 2014, 10:00 am - 12:00 pm, V499 (Video Conference Room)

Sponsored By MCySec and CSWG.

“Hackback? Claptrap! An Active Defense Continuum for the Private Sector” By Dr. Irving Lachow, Principal Cyber Security Engineer, The MITRE Corporation

Dr. Irving Lachow has spent over 20 years working at the intersection of technology and policy issues, with the last 15 years being primarily focused on cybersecurity. Dr. Lachow is currently a Principal Cyber Security Engineer at The MITRE Corporation where he works on a wide range of cyber security issues both internally for government sponsors. In addition to working at MITRE, Dr. Lachow is a Non-Resident Fellow at the Center for Strategic and International Studies, Chair of the Board of Advisors of the National Cybersecurity Institute, and serves as an adviser to the State of Virginia's Mach37 Cyber Accelerator initiative. Dr. Lachow has authored or coauthored more than 30 publications, including books, articles, and reports. He has received fellowships from the Ford Foundation, the National Science Foundation, the Kennedy School of Government, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Notable media appearances include the PBS NewsHour, CNN, CSPAN, the Los Angeles Times, the Christian Science Monitor, and Time.com. Dr. Lachow received his Ph.D. in engineering and public policy from Carnegie Mellon University. He earned an A.B. in political science and a B.S. in physics from Stanford University.

Friday, April 18, 2014, 12:15 PM – 2:00 PM, CNS Videoconference Room

Sponsored By CNS. 

A Seminar: “The 1993 U.S.-Russia Highly Enriched Uranium Purchase Agreement:  The Most Successful Nuclear Nonproliferation Program Ever” By Greg Dwyer

 

The 1993 United States-Russian Federation Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) Purchase Agreement has been noted by many observers to be the most successful U.S.-Russia nonproliferation program ever undertaken.  The Agreement’s major goals of downblending 500 metric tons (MT) of Russian weapons-origin HEU, enough material for 20,000 nuclear warheads, to low enriched uranium (LEU) and delivering the LEU to the United States were achieved in late 2013.  Over the last fifteen years, this LEU has been responsible for producing 10% of the United States annual electricity output.  At its core, the 1993 Agreement was precedent setting in its requirements for both countries to undertake on-site and technical transparency measures to ensure the provisions of the Agreement were being verifiably fulfilled and in the unique Government-Industry cooperation that was critical to the Agreement’s commercial and nonproliferation success.

 

Greg Dwyer of the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA), Director of NNSA’s U.S.-Russia HEU Transparency Program and a graduate of the Monterey Institute of International Studies, will give a briefing on the 1993 HEU Agreement and share his views on future nuclear transparency and verification activities with Russia, within the P5, and beyond.

April 17, 2014, 2:00 pm, McGowan, Room MG 100 (Auditorium)

Sponsored By MCySec and CSWG.

“Combating Cybercrime with Cyber Intelligence” By Mr. Andrew Komarov, CEO of IntelCrawler Cyber Intelligence Firm

Mr. Andrew Komarov, CEO of Private Intelligence Firm IntelCrawler, will be providing a guest lecture on how he has been taking down Russian/Eastern European hackers, cyber criminals and threat groups.

Thursday April 17, 2014, 12pm - 1:30pm, Morse B105

Sponsored by MonTREP and the TSC.

Dr. Tristan James Mabry is the founding Executive Director of the Joint Foreign Area Officer Program and Assistant Research Professor in the Department of National Security Affairs, School of International Graduate Studies, at the Naval Postgraduate School. Dr. Mabry is a specialist in the comparative politics of nationalism, ethnic conflict, and identity politics across Eurasia. His current research addressees the intersection of ethnicity and Islam, particularly in the cases of separatist movements found across the Muslim world, from the Middle East to Central, South, and Southeast Asia.

Dr. Mabry holds four degrees in political science from three different countries. He received his B.A. in Canada from McGill University; his M.Sc. (with Distinction) in the United Kingdom from the London School of Economics and Political Science; and his M.A. and Ph.D. in the United States from the University of Pennsylvania. His international experience includes more than seven years of study abroad - in Honduras, China, Canada, the United Kingdom, and Egypt - and travel to more than forty countries.

Charlie Thorson, an NPTS student, will be presenting his honors thesis for 15-20 minutes prior to Dr. Tristan Mabry. Charlie will be presenting the work he as done so far on his thesis that explores the relationship between the Muslim Brotherhood and jihadist groups in the Sinai Peninsula. Using public statements and various open source materials, Charlie will speak briefly about his examination of the relationship in the context of the Mohamed Morsi presidency and to an extent after the June 30th coup in Egypt.

Wednesday, April 16, 2014, 12:15 PM – 2:00 PM, CNS Building (Seminar Room)

Sponsored By CNS.

A Seminar: “A 10-Year Retrospective of North Korea's Nuclear Program” By Speaker Dr. Siegfried Hecker

 

Dr. Siegfried Hecker is a research professor in the Department of Management Science and Engineering and a senior fellow at the Center for International Security and Cooperation at Stanford University. He previously served as Director of Los Alamos National Laboratory.

Tuesday, April 15, 2014, 12:15 PM – 2:00 PM, CNS Building (Videoconference Room)

Sponsored By CNS.

A Seminar: “Negotiating Nuclear Consensus - Lessons from the 2010 NPT-Review Conference”, Speaker Ambassador Alexander Marschik

Ambassador Marschik is the Austrian Permanent Representative to the Political and Security Committee of the European Union. He formerly served as the Director for Disarmament, Arms Control and Non-Proliferation at the Austrian Ministry for European and International Affairs. Ambassador Marschik holds a Masters and Doctor Degree of Law from the University of Vienna, Austria.

Friday, April 11, 2014, 9:30 AM – 11:30 AM, CNS Building (Seminar Room)

Sponsored By CNS.

A Seminar: “Evolution of U.S. Nuclear Fuel Policy Concepts” By Amy Seward and Thomas Wood

Amy Seward is a Senior Research Scientist at PNNL specializing in international nuclear energy policy analysis, specifically related to the nonproliferation and energy security aspects of the global use of nuclear energy.  She is particularly focused on technical research and analysis of the nuclear fuel cycle in support of the development of U.S. nonproliferation policy. Her work primarily supports the National Nuclear Security Administration’s Office of Nonproliferation and International Security. This work applies knowledge of the nuclear fuel cycle, the nuclear industry, country-level and global trends in nuclear energy.

 

Amy was a fellow Nonproliferation Graduate Program at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), during which time she supported the Elimination of Weapons Grade Plutonium (EWGPP) program. She has worked as English teacher in St. Petersburg, Russia, and at the Moscow News in Moscow, Russia.

 

Thomas Wood is currently program manager for PNNL programs with the NNSA office of Non-proliferation and International Security (NA-24). This DOE office conducts technical reviews for US export license applications, multilateral export control assessments, and classified interdiction cases. He has been with PNNL for 29 years and has conducted fuel cycle economics studies for many defense and civilian fuel cycle issues. He served as an energy fellow in the office of Senator Maria Cantwell in 2006.

 

Mr. Wood was responsible for USG estimates of Russian weapons plutonium production for several years, and is co-inventor of the isotopic ratio method for estimation of plutonium production in graphite reactors, developed under NA-22 funding for over decade at PNNL.

 

His recent technical work is focused on the economics of Iran's nuclear program (see http://cns.miis.edu/npr/141toc.htm), the Nuclear Archaeology Program (see http://scienceandglobalsecurity.org/archive/sgs22wood.pdf), and the economics of civilian nuclear power in oil exporting countries.

Friday, April 11, 2014, 12:15 PM – 2:00 PM, CNS Seminar Room

Sponsored By CNS.

A Seminar: “The Warrior State: Pakistan in the Contemporary World” By Speaker T.V. Paul

T.V. Paul is James McGill Professor of International Relations in the Department of Political Science at McGill University, Montreal.

 

In 2013 Pakistan ranked 133rd out of 148 countries in global competitiveness. Currently, Taliban forces occupy nearly 30% of the country. In recent years, many countries across the developing world have experienced impressive economic growth and have evolved into at least partially democratic states with militaries under civilian control. Yet Pakistan, a heavily militarized nation, has been a conspicuous failure. What explains Pakistan's unique inability to progress? Drawing on his new book The Warrior State, in this talk Paul will argue that a “geostrategic curse”—akin to the “resource curse” that plagues oil rich autocracies—is the main cause. Since its founding in 1947, Pakistan has been at the center of major geopolitical struggles—the US-Soviet rivalry, the conflict with India, and most recently the post 9/11 wars. No matter how ineffective the regime is, massive foreign aid keeps pouring in from major powers and their allies with a stake in the region. The reliability of such aid defuses any pressure on political elites to launch far-reaching domestic reforms that would promote sustained growth, higher standards of living, and more stable democratic institutions. Paul will show that excessive war-making efforts have drained Pakistan’s limited economic resources without making the country safer or more stable.

Commentator: BRIG Feroz Khan

Brigadier General (retired) Feroz Khan has served with the Pakistani Army for 32 years. Since 2008, he has served as a lecturer in the Department of National Security Affairs at the Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey.

April 11, 2014, Time/Location: TBD

Sponsored By MCySec and CSWG.

“Cyber Threats and Information Sharing as a Force Multiplier" By Cyber Unit Representative, Northern California Regional Intelligence Center (NCRIC)

April 4, 2014, 12:00 pm, CNS Building, Room V499 (Video Conference Room)

Sponsored By MCySec and CSWG.

“The Policy Gap Between Scientists, Engineers and Analysts in Cyber” By Mr. Michael Atkinson, System Engineer for RadWare and Private Penetration Tester

Mr. Michael Atkinson, a Systems Engineer for Radware, will be discussing the need for cyber security policy professionals within the unique dynamic of private-sector cyber security firms. Mr. Atkinson will discuss a variety of key topics relevant to cyber and explain where the weaknesses lie in regards to policy. Most importantly, Mr. Atkinson will also be discussing career opportunities and ways to develop desirable cyber skills.

 

This event will be a virtual conference as Mr. Atkinson currently works in Radware's Chicago, IL office.

Thursday April 3, 2014, 12pm - 1:30pm, Morse B105

Sponsored by MonTREP and the TSC.

Dr. Anna Simons is a Professor of Defense Analysis at the Naval Post Graduate School. She is the author of Networks of Dissolution: Somalia Undone and The Company They Keep: Life Inside the U.S. Army Special Forces. Most recently she is the co-author of The Sovereignty Solution: A Commonsense Approach to Global Security. Dr. Simons’ focus has been on conflict, intervention, and the military from an anthropological perspective. Her work examines ties that bind members of groups together as well as divides which drive groups apart. She is well versed in the anthropology of conflict, military advising, low intensity conflict in Africa, and political anthropology.

March 27, 2014, 12:00-1:15PM, Morse B105

Sponsored by MonTREP and the TSC.

Terrorism Studies Club Meeting

Navy Captain (Ret.) Paul Shemella has been working in the Center for Civil-Military Relations at NPS since 1998. His current program focuses on civil-military responses to terrorism of all types. Furthermore, he is the editor and principal author of Fighting Back: What Governments Can Do About Terrorism. Capt. Shemella retired from the Navy in 1996 after a career in Special Operations. During his military service, he planned and executed counterterrorism and counter narcotics operations in Latin America, Europe, and other regions.

Capt. Shemella will discuss his research at NPS and how governments can construct and execute the most effective strategies to combat terrorism - and how they can manage the consequences of those acts of terrorism they cannot prevent.

                                                                                                                            

March 26 at 12:15 -1:15 pm

Sponsored By CNS.

“Estimating missile defense footprints” By Iqtidar Khan

  

Our visiting fellow from Pakistan, Mr. Iqtidar Khan, would like to invite you to participate in a peer review of his research topic that forms the basis of what he is pursuing during his fellowship here at the CNS.  He will present his preliminary research findings.

Abstract: The footprint for any ballistic missile defense system can be loosely defined as the area that a BMD system might be able to protect against an incoming target missile. Its a kinematic measure and varies with the target missile's range, initial thrust, re-entry angle and the radar range.My algorithm for estimating BMD footprints is implemented on MATLAB and requires the target missile as well as the interceptor missiles' trajectories as input. These trajectories are calculated using Geoffrey Forden's GUI Missile Flyout. The routine then implements a simple algorithm to check if the impact point of the incoming target missile, for a given interceptor type, lies within the footprint or not. This talk would very much focus on explaining my algorithm and how results from this algorithm can be used in policy analysis.

March 25, 2014, 12:00 pm-2:00 pm, McGowan, Room MG 102 (Auditorium)

Sponsored By MCySec and CSWG.

“The Law of Hacking: A Legal Perspective for the World of Cyber” By Mr. Hanni Fakhoury, Staff Attorney for the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF)

Hanni Fakhoury, a staff attorney for the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF), focuses on criminal law, privacy and free speech litigation and advocacy. His work includes representing Andrew "Weev" Auernheimer on appeal, arguing before the Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals on the constitutionality of warrantless cell tracking, and serving as co-counsel in a First Amendment challenge to California's Proposition 35 in federal court. He's written numerous amicus briefs in state and federal courts and his writings have been published in the New York Times, Wired, Slate and JURIST. In addition, Hanni has testified before the California state legislature on proposed electronic privacy legislation and is a sought after speaker legal seminars and conferences on electronic privacy issues in criminal law. Before joining EFF, Hanni worked as a federal public defender in San Diego where he tried numerous jury and bench trials and argued and won multiple times before the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals. Hanni graduated from the University of California, Berkeley with a degree in political science and an honors degree in history. He received his law degree with distinction from Pacific McGeorge School of Law, where he was elected to the Order of Barristers for his excellence in written and oral advocacy. 

March 11, 2014, 12:15-2:00PM CNS Seminar Room

“Semipalatinsk Nuclear Test Site: Past and Present.” By CNS Visiting Fellow Mr. Zhanibek Yessimbekov

Sponsored By CNS.

Mr. Yessimbekov is a researcher at the Scientific Center of Radioecolological Research in Semey (former Semipalatinsk), Kazakhstan.

March 4, 2014, 12:00 - 1:15PM, Location TBD

"Unconventional Warfare, Counterinsurgency, Psychological Warfare, and Military Deception" By Dr. Hy Rothstein

Sponsored by MonTREP and the TSC.

Dr. Hy Rothstein, a Senior Lecturer in the Department of Defense Analysis, and amember of the Center of Terrorism and Irregular War at NPS. He earned a degree ingeneral engineering from the United States Military Academy, a Military Art and Science degree from the U.S. Army Command and General Staff College, a Master of Arts degree in Law and Diplomacy from the Fletcher School at Tufts University, and a Ph.D. in International Relations from Tufts.

Dr. Rothstein will lead a discussion about his research on unconventional warfare,counterinsurgency, psychological warfare, and military deception.

Friday, February 28, 2014, 12:15 PM – 2:00 PM CNS Video Conference

A Seminar: “Extended Deterrence and Strategic Stability in Northeast Asia” By Dr. Brad Roberts

Sponsored by CNS.

Dr. Brad Roberts is a consulting professor and William Perry Fellow with the Center for International Security and Cooperation at Stanford University. During the first Obama administration, he served as Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Nuclear and Missile Defense Policy, and in that capacity was responsible for helping to lead the administration's Nuclear Policy Review and Ballistic Missile Defense Review. Prior to 2009, he spent his career in the policy analytic community, with long tenures at the Institute for Defense Analyses and the Center for Strategic and International Studies.

Friday, February 14, 2014, 12:15 PM – 2:00 PM in CNS video conference

A Seminar: “The 1993 U.S.-Russia Highly Enriched Uranium Purchase Agreement:  The Most Successful Nuclear Nonproliferation Program Ever” By Greg Dwyer DOE/NNSA

Sponsored by CNS.

The 1993 United States-Russian Federation Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) Purchase Agreement has been noted by many observers to be the most successful U.S.-Russia nonproliferation program ever undertaken.  The Agreement’s major goals of downblending 500 metric tons (MT) of Russian weapons-origin HEU, enough material for 20,000 nuclear warheads, to low enriched uranium (LEU) and delivering the LEU to the United States were achieved in late 2013.  Over the last fifteen years, this LEU has been responsible for producing 10% of the United States annual electricity output.  At its core, the 1993 Agreement was precedent setting in its requirements for both countries to undertake on-site and technical transparency measures to ensure the provisions of the Agreement were being verifiably fulfilled and in the unique Government-Industry cooperation that was critical to the Agreement’s commercial and nonproliferation success.

Greg Dwyer of the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA), Director of NNSA’s U.S.-Russia HEU Transparency Program and a graduate of the Monterey Institute of International Studies, will give a [lunch time] [brown bag] briefing on the 1993 HEU Agreement and share his views on future nuclear transparency and verification activities with Russia, within the P5, and beyond.

Thursday, February 6, 2014, 12:15 PM – 2:00 PM, CNS Videoconference Room

A Seminar: “Where Does North Korea Build Its Missile Launchers? An Open Source Case-Study” By Dr. Jeffrey Lewis,  Director of the East Asia Nonproliferation Program at CNS

Sponsored By CNS.

Dr. Lewis also founded and maintains the leading blog on arms control, disarmament and nonproliferation, ArmsControlWonk.com. He is the author of Minimum Means of Reprisal: China’s Search for Security in the Nuclear Age (MIT Press, 2007), as well as a forthcoming International Institute for Strategic Studies Adelphi book on China’s nuclear policies, forces and posture. Dr. Lewis is also a non-resident affiliate at the Stanford University Center for International Security and Cooperation (CISAC).

Monday, February 3, 2014 from 12:00 PM – 1:30 PM, Morse B106

“FireEye's View of the World: Malware, Threats and Cyber Security” By Mr. Atif Mushtaq, FireEye

Sponsored By MCySec and MIIS CSWG.

Atif Mushtaq is a Senior Staff Scientist and Malware Researcher for FireEye. He developed FireEye's first post-infection malware detection engine, analyzed hundreds of different malware families and is considered an expert within his field. Mr. Mushtaq also manages FireEye's malware lab, monitoring the activities of thousands of different malware and botnets on a daily basis. Prior to working with FireEye, Mr. Mushtaq worked as a System Architect for PalmChip and as a Software Design Engineer for VisionEast.

 ***Following the seminar by Mr. Mushtaq, FireEye will hold a brief recruitment event for all interested students. This recruitment event will be lead by Ms. Fariha Naveed, one of FireEye's University Technical Recruiters. Attendees are encouraged to bring resumes and come prepared for informal interviews. As an incentive to attend this event, FireEye will also be providing free pizza for up to 30 people so be sure to come early!

Thursday January 30, 2014 from 12:15PM - 1:45PM, McGowan 100

"The Many Faces of Resilience In The Context of Terrorism" by Dr. Mark Dechesne, Senoir Researcher, Leiden University

Sponsored By NPTS.

The present contribution reflects on the nature of resilience in the context of ter-rorism. Here, resilience comes in many interrelated yet separate forms. The presentation will place these forms of resilience within a single conceptual frame, and will consider the most recent scientific insights regarding the sepa-rate forms of resilience. Terrorism is argued to be a dynamic process whereby government and violent opposition compete for support of their respective con-stituencies. Within this framework, five types of resilience are identified: psycho-logical resilience, communal resilience, ideological resilience, political resilience, and international resilience. The latter two types of resilience have been particu-larly understudied. It is argued that a collective sense of identity may be the criti-cal component for all the separate forms of resilience to jointly buffer against the adverse effects of terrorism.

Tuesday, January 28, 2014 from 12:15 PM – 1:45 PM, Morse B104

"Death of the Sri Lankan Tigers: Anatomy of a Blood-Soaked Victory" by Dr. Doug Borer, Associate Professor NPS Department of Defense Analysis

Sponsored By NPTS.

One of the most feared, lethal and enduringly capable insurgent organizations in the modern age was the Tamil Tigers of Sri Lanka. The Tigers, known formally as the “Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam” or LTTE, were thoroughly annihilated in the short period of 2007–2009 by the Armed Forces of Sri Lanka, a government force which had struggled to defeat them over the previous three decades. What changed? This talk will argue that the final blood-soaked victory over the Tigers was by and large a result of three interactive factors which combined to create the government’s advantage: 1) changes in the international environment which shifted the military, and diplomatic balance of power; 2) a loss of social and political legitimacy for the Tigers amongst the local Sri Lankan Tamils, and 3) A qualitative realignment in the operational military strategies of both sides.

Tuesday, January 28, 2014 from 1:50 PM – 3:50 PM, MG100

“Government and the Private-Sector in Cyberspace” by Speaker David Aucsmith

Sponsored by MCySec and MIIS CSWG

David Aucsmith is the Senior Director of Microsoft's Institute for Advanced Technology in Governments. He is responsible for technical relationships with United States and other government agencies, as well as on select special programs. He also oversees several advanced technology projects including research in quantum computing and digital imaging. Mr. Aucsmith previously served as a naval officer, has served on advisory councils for several intelligence agencies and holds 32 patents for digital security technology. 

To view past events from Fall 2013, click HERE.