Middlebury Institute of International Studies at Monterey

Nonproliferation and Terrorism Course Listing

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

NPTG 8501 - Intl Security Rsrch & Analysis      

An introductory survey of research methods, with special attention to how research can be utilized to inform policies related to international security. The course gives particular emphasis to the processes of identifying research topics and designing research projects. It will also address the basic elements of doing policy analysis. Students who complete the course will be able to read with comprehension and critically assess research produced across a wide range of qualitative and quantitative research methods. The course will also address how to write up and present research proposals and finished research products, and will consider the ethics of doing research. The course will be conducted primarily in lecture format, but some class time will also be devoted to exercises that involve active student participation.

Spring 2015 - MIIS, Fall 2015 - MIIS, Spring 2016 - MIIS, Fall 2016 - MIIS

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NPTG 8504 - Global Politics      

Understanding the complex dynamics of global politics requires examination of a number of issues and characteristics of the international system. The key objective of this class is to provide students with the ability to approach different perspectives to any global political issue. These elements of the study of global politics include theoretical frameworks and historical trajectories, without which no global issue can be understood adequately. Other topics of discussion will include global governance, transnational global problems, and the international financial system.

The course reflects the evolving nature of international relations, a continuous process since recorded history, which included the rise of the Westphalian nation-state system. The continuous transformation now includes the rise of non-state actors as influential participants and protagonists (not necessarily always benign) in the global system; entities that include terrorist and insurgent groups, non-governmental organizations, multi-national corporations, for example.

Fall 2015 - MIIS, Spring 2016 - MIIS, Fall 2016 - MIIS

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NPTG 8506 - Nuc/RadioactvMaterials&Weapons      

This workshop is intended to take the student to the next steps beyond what is covered in the Introduction to Science and Technology course. It will provide an intensive exposure (no pun intended) in the fundamentals of nuclear material and other radioactive material, to the hazards of dealing with these materials, and to the effects of the various types of radiation associated with these materials. The student will gain knowledge in the effects of nuclear weapons and radiological weapons (such as radioactive dispersal devices) and the measurements used to discuss and quantify these hazards, such as yield, dose, and the International Atomic Energy Agency’s method for categorizing the hazards of radioactive materials.

After completion of the workshop the student should have a basic understanding of fundamental concepts and vocabulary such as half-life, decay modes, decay calculations, and other basic concepts that would assist them in acquiring scientific literacy to prepare them to work in areas that deal with these concepts. The workshop will cover basic calculations to enable the student to perform basic “back of the envelope” assessments of risks and hazards in various simple scenarios of interest and will provide the student with basic documentation that will be useful in performing these assessments.

Spring 2015 - MIIS, Fall 2016 - MIIS

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NPTG 8507 - CybrscurityAspctsOfNucSecurity      

This course is designed to provide the student with a basic knowledge of the issues relating to cyber security, from both a technical and historic perspective. The basic concepts of cyber security that will allow the student to understand the current concerns, vocabulary, and basic principles involved in cyber security will be considered, along with the technologies used to prevent and detect cyber-attacks. The history of cyber-attacks, basic concepts and considerations of cyber warfare, hacking, and basic concepts such as authentication and encryption will be covered along with the major efforts and initiatives that have been developed by the international community to deal with them. A particular focus of the course will be on cyber security as it relates to the field of nuclear security.

Fall 2015 - MIIS

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NPTG 8509 - Historical Research Methods      

Historical Methods and Source Evaluation for Nonproliferation and Terrorism Studies

This course is designed to provide an introduction to historical research methods, in particular the characteristics of various types of primary sources and basic techniques of source evaluation and criticism, with a focus on the areas of nonproliferation and terrorism studies. It is specifically intended for graduate students who have already taken lecture-oriented undergraduate or graduate courses dealing with terrorism or nonproliferation.

The class will be divided into several separate portions. The first portion will provide basic information about historical research, touching upon both philosophical issues (e.g., the nature of reality [ontology], human perceptions of reality [epistemology], etc.) and methodological issues (e.g., the distinction between primary and secondary sources, internal versus external source criticism, etc.). The second portion will provide some illustrative examples of the primary source research carried out by the two instructors, which students will analyze and discuss in class. In the third portion, everyone in the class will read selections from diverse primary source materials concerning both terrorism and nuclear age studies. Given that several states have already developed chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear (CBRN) weapons programs, and that certain violent non-state groups espousing extremist political and religious ideologies have expressed an interest in acquiring and deploying these so-called “weapons of mass destruction” (WMD) against their designated enemies, it is necessary for students interested in nonproliferation and terrorism to learn how to access, analyze, and evaluate the reliability of primary sources dealing with both terrorism and proliferation/nonproliferation cases. During the fourth portion of the course, students will be working independently on the individual research topics they have selected, which must involve the utilization of some primary historical sources. During the fifth and final portion, each student will give an oral report in class to present and analyze his or her own research findings, which will then be discussed by the entire class. By the end of this last portion of the class, if not earlier, students will submit their completed research papers, which must involve the use of primary historical sources. The course requirements are as follows: regular attendance and active participation in class discussions (30% of grade), an oral report to be delivered in class (30% of grade), and a 7-10 page research paper (40% of grade).

Spring 2015 - MIIS

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NPTG 8510 - Security&ArmsCntrl-N East Asia      

This course will examine contemporary issues relating to nuclear arms control, disarmament, and nonproliferation in Northeast Asia. Topics to be examined include China's strategic modernization, North Korea's nuclear and ballistic missile programs, and US extended deterrence commitments to Japan, South Korea and Taiwan.

Spring 2015 - MIIS, Spring 2016 - MIIS

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NPTG 8511 - From Islam to Islamism      

From Islam to Islamism: Exploring the Link between Ancient Religions and Modern Extremisms

What drives Muslim violence? Is there a link between Islam as an ancient tradition and Islamic extremism as a modern political movement? How should we understand the relationship between the Islamic faith and Islamist violence? In this workshop, we will explore the linkages and disjunctures between Islamic traditions and modern extremist practices. We will delve deeply into such concepts as sharia (Islamic law), jihad (holy war), istishhad (martyrdom), and takfir (excommunication). All these ancient concepts are central to modern-day extremism, including their justification of Islamic theocracy, violent rebellion, suicide terrorism, and sectarian genocide. These historic concepts are complex and subject to multiple interpretations, resulting in intense debates about their applicability in the modern era. In this workshop, we will put ourselves in the shoes of classical Islamic jurists, contemporary extremists, and Muslim moderates seeking to debunk present-day radicalism. This dialectic of the ancient and the modern should help us shed light on when religion drives political violence, and when it takes a back seat to worldly causes of extremism.

By the end of this workshop, you should be able to:

1. Identify the major sources of Islamic law (sharia), and explain how classical Islamic jurists developed interpretive approaches to resolve textual controversies in the Quran and the Prophetic traditions (Sunna).

2. Explain the three manifestations of jihad in the Quran, and how early Islamic scholars resolved tensions between peaceful and violent conceptions of jihad.

3. Discuss the difference between martyrdom (istishhad) and suicide in Islam, and how the two concepts were merged into suicidal martyrdom by present-day extremists.

4. Articulate historical and contemporary controversies over takfir (excommunication), and how this concept facilitates Muslim-on-Muslim violence today, including sectarian genocide.

5. Participate in a Red Team (ISIS propagandist) to understand the mindset of ideological extremists and how they deploy ancient texts to motivate modern-day violence.

6. Participate in a Blue Team (State Department Strategic Communication Center) to formulate a counter-ideological campaign to win the war of ideas against violent extremists.

Fall 2016 - MIIS

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NPTG 8512 - Cybersecurity Governance      

This course provides a comprehensive introduction to the issues surrounding the regulation and governance of cyberspace. Contrary to John Perry Barlow’s “Declaration of the Independence of Cyberspace” in 1996, cyberspace has become an arena for national and international regulation. Increased awareness of cyber threats and risks resulting in efforts to enhance cybersecurity has only added to this development. This course traces the various regulatory efforts in this space to investigate which institutions, norms, and processes govern the behavior of different actors, including states, companies, and individuals. Discussions will cover, among other things, Internet governance, norms of responsible state behavior during times of armed conflict as well as during peace time, human rights online, surveillance and data collection, as well as cybercrime.

Fall 2016 - MIIS

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NPTG 8516 - NPT Simulation      

This course is devoted to a simulation of the first NPT Preparatory Committee (PrepCom) meeting following the 2015 NPT Review Conference. This PrepCom is likely to be held in New York in spring 2017, and will constitute the first two-week session of the 2020 NPT review process cycle. It will involve multilateral negotiations on the implementation of the NPT, with special reference to issues of nuclear disarmament, nonproliferation, and peaceful uses of nuclear energy. Based on the outcomes of the most recent NPT Preparatory Committee (PrepCom) meetings, but in advance of the 2015 NPT Review Conference, one would expect major debates at the 2017 PrepCom on the subjects of the humanitarian consequences of nuclear weapons, further reductions in all types of nuclear weapons, creation of additional nuclear-weapon-free zones (especially in the Middle East), negative security assurances, nonproliferation compliance, international safeguards, nuclear terrorism, peaceful nuclear uses, and provisions for withdrawal from the Treaty. It remains to be seen if there will be an on-going crisis in Ukraine at the time of the PrepCom, but if there is, it also is apt to impact on deliberations at the NPT negotiations.

Students will assume the roles of delegates to the Rev Con from ten or more states, possibly including Canada, Chile, China, Egypt, France, Indonesia, Iran, Ireland, Japan, Mexico, Russia, South Africa, and the United States. In most instances, delegations will consist of two students. The precise number of states will depend on the size of the class.

The base point for the simulation is the “real world.” Dr. William Potter will be the principal instructor. He will be assisted in the course by other CNS experts, a number of whom also have participated in actual NPT meetings.

(1) The simulation places a premium on interpersonal skills and oral communication.

(2) Emphasis will be placed on developing analytical and political skills relevant to operation in a foreign ministry and other national and international organization bureaucracies. The written component of the course will entail preparation of concise policy papers and drafting of international legal texts.

(3) Students will be required to immerse themselves in the historical record of prior NPT negotiations, especially those related to the 2015 NPT Review Conference.

(4) Students will become familiar with the process of multilateral negotiations, which places a premium on coordinating positions across and gaining consensus from a large number of states with diverse national interests and objectives.

(5) Students will be expected to develop an understanding of the multiple expectations of the NPT regime by various states parties and regional groups, as well as to generate constructive ideas to meet the political challenges facing the NPT today.

Course Requirements: By the end of the first three weeks students should be familiar with the evolution of the nuclear nonproliferation regime and the basic domestic political and international security challenges it confronts. Students also are expected to be knowledgeable by the end of the third week about the principal concerns of the countries they represent with respect to the NPT review process. At a minimum, all class members should have read the following materials prior to the formal initiation of the simulation in the fourth week:

Darryl Howlett and John Simpson, eds., Nuclear Non-Proliferation: A Reference Handbook (1992), pp. 15-28, 51-56.

George Bunn, Arms Control by Committee: Managing Negotiations with the Russians (1992), pp. 59-83.

Tariq Rauf and Rebecca Johnson, “After the NPT’s Indefinite Extension: The Future of the Global Nonproliferation Regime,” Nonproliferation Review (Fall 1995), pp. 28-42 at http://cns.miis.edu/pubs/npr/vol03/31/raufjo31.pdf.

John Simpson, “The 2000 NPT Review Conference,” SIPRI Yearbook 2001, Appendix 6B, pp. 1-16.

William C. Potter, “The NPT Review Conference: 188 States in Search of Consensus,” The International Spectator, Vol. 3 (2005). (An assessment of the 2005 NPT Rev Con.)

William C. Potter, “The NPT & the Sources of Nuclear Restraint,” Daedalus (Winter 2010), pp. 68-81.

Jayantha Dhanapala, “The Management of NPT Diplomacy,” Daedalus (Winter 2010), pp. 57-67. )

Carlton Stoiber, “The Evolution of NPT Review Conference Final Documents, 1975-2000,” Nonproliferation Review (Fall-Winter 2003), pp. 126-147.

William C. Potter, Patricia Lewis, Gaukhar Mukhatzhanova, and Miles Pomper, “The 2010 NPT Review Conference: Deconstructing Consensus” at http://cns.miis.edu/treaty_npt/.

William C. Potter and Gaukhar Mukhatzhanova, Nuclear Politics and the Non-Aligned Movement (2012).

Thomas Markram, “The NPT’s Review Process and Some Options for Its Further Strengthening by 2015,” Unpublished manuscript, 2012.

Gaukhar Mukhatzhanova, 2014 Monitoring Report: Implementation of the Conclusions and Recommendations for Follow-on Actions Adopted at the 2010 NPT Review Conference at http://www.nonproliferation.org/2014-npt-action-plan-monitoring-report/. See also related reports by Reaching Critical Will available at http://www.reachingcriticalwill.org.

Gaukhar Mukhatzhanova, “Rough Seas Ahead: Issues for the 2015 NPT Review Conference,” Arms Control Today (April 2014).

Additional readings will be assigned following the conclusion of the 2015 NPT Review Conference.

In addition, students should all become very familiar with the NPT Briefing Book (2015 Edition) available at cns.miis.edu/treaty_npt/npt_briefing_book_2010/pdfs/npt_briefing_book_full-version.pdf.

Fall 2015 - MIIS, Fall 2016 - MIIS

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NPTG 8517 - Intl Crisis Negotiatn Exercise      

Jammu-Kashmir Simulation: Developed and facilitated by faculty and staff of the Army War College, this weekend long simulation takes the form of a strategic-level negotiation exercise at an internationally sanctioned peace conference. The conference has been called to break the long-standing conflict in Jammu-Kashmir. Participants role-play members of a diplomatic mission on one of seven negotiation delegations invited to the conference. The teams are charged by their governments with negotiating a solution advantageous to their national interests. Each team is mentored by a member of the university faculty, an invited regional subject matter expert, or a retired U.S. Ambassador. Exercise play is open-ended, run by the participants themselves without injects or predetermined outcomes – the situations are complex enough on their own merits to drive the exercise.

The immersion allows students to experience:

• Regional Situation Analysis

• Negotiation Techniques

• Strategic Thinking

• Leadership

• Planning and Evaluation

• Decision Making

• Team Building

• Time Management

A novel aspect of the simulation is that it will include students from Stanford, the Naval Postgraduate School, and CSUMB.

Spring 2016 - MIIS

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NPTG 8518 - Open Sources Tools for NPTS      

This course is an introduction to open source analysis used in the context of nonproliferation and terrorism studies. The instructors will give policy lectures as well as hands-on training in the lab. The course is designed as an overview of geospatial and data analysis techniques which are only just recently being applied to the nonproliferation and terrorism research fields. Students will study policy and intelligence analysis using deep web searching, ground and satellite imagery analysis, basic GIS, 3D modeling, crowd-sourcing, text mining, and network analysis.

Fall 2015 - MIIS

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NPTG 8523 - US Nuclear Weapons Hist &Cost      

This workshop explores how and why the United States spent more than $9 trillion (in today’s dollars) to build 66,000 nuclear weapons since the 1940s, conduct more than 1,000 nuclear tests, and deploy and maintain a worldwide network of delivery systems (including aircraft, missiles, ships, and submarines), sensors, and communications assets capable of unleashing (or defending against) unimaginable destruction. Key developments and turning points in the history of the U.S. nuclear weapons program will be discussed, and the substantial human health, environmental, and economic costs of the testing, production, and deployment of U.S. nuclear weapons will be quantified and assessed, along with the effectiveness—and effects—of efforts to keep secret large parts of the program. Guest speakers will address the management, cleanup, and disposal of radioactive and toxic wastes resulting from bomb production and testing as well as the consistency and effectiveness of congressional oversight of nuclear weapons programs. The ongoing and anticipated future costs of U.S. nuclear weapons (estimated to be as much as $1 trillion over the next 30 years) will also be discussed. Basic knowledge of nuclear weapons and the Cold War is helpful but not essential. Students majoring in Nonproliferation and Terrorism Studies are particularly encouraged to enroll.

Spring 2016 - MIIS

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NPTG 8528 - TheNuclearAge: HistoricalIntro      

The Nuclear Age: Historical Introduction

This course provides an historical narrative—constructed in a highly interdisciplinary fashion—of the nuclear age from the discovery of fission in the late 1930s until the 2015 nuclear deal with Iran. The course will trace the primary milestones—concepts, strategic doctrines, political and legal agreements, democratic and moral puzzles, and personalities—that were all involved in the making of the nuclear age. Our interest is twofold: the science and technology as well as the international and domestic politics of the bomb. As such the course provide basic familiarity with the history of the bomb—its invention, use, vertical and horizontal proliferation—and the history of the efforts to constrain, limit and even banning it. The course will be organized by looking at concrete historical milestones and their historical manifestation as well as by examining specific themes.

Spring 2016 - MIIS

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NPTG 8530 - Terrorism&MediaInTheMiddleEast      

The media and terrorism are soul mates-virtually inseparable – terrorist spectacles are high profile, ratings-building events. This course examines the interplay of terrorism, the media, publics and the political process in the Middle East. We will look at how the media shapes and is shaped by terrorism and the concepts and theories relating to terrorism and the news production process, the agenda-setting nature of the news media, the interrelationship between journalists and public officials, media and terrorism. This course evaluates how different media sources provide information about terrorism, and the institutional arrangements between the media and governments, particularly in the aftermath of the Arab Spring.

Spring 2015 - MIIS, Spring 2016 - MIIS

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NPTG 8531 - Writing & Briefing Memos      

The goal of this workshop is to hone students’ professionally-relevant, policy-oriented communication abilities, including memo writing and briefing. The course will include a combination of lectures, seminar-style discussion, small working group engagement, and individual student work.

Spring 2015 - MIIS, Fall 2015 - MIIS, Spring 2016 - MIIS, Fall 2016 - MIIS

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NPTG 8533 - Geospatial Tools forNPAnalysis      

This course serves to introduce students to the increasingly important role of overhead reconnaissance and imagery analysis in nonproliferation. Students will receive a background in the rise of commercial satellite imagery and its open-source intelligence applications. They will learn basic techniques for identifying nuclear- and missile-related facilities by using their knowledge of how these facilities work, ground photos, and crowd-sourcing. Students will also learn how to order and manipulate satellite imagery in Google Earth and SketchUp in order to derive new value-added information for their research.

Fall 2016 - MIIS

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NPTG 8534 - History US CounterterrorPolicy      

This course will examine the evolution of US approaches to international terrorism from the emergence of terrorism as a global phenomenon in the 1960s through the challenges of today. Students successfully completing this course will be able to:

 Understand the evolution of US approaches to terrorism.

 Appreciate the roles of perception, contingency and foreign actions in shaping US counterterrorism policy.

 Analyze the roles of intelligence and technology in shaping US policy responses to terrorism.

 Analyze the interplay between the White House and the constituents of the National Security Council.

 Appreciate the human factor, especially the strengths and weaknesses of the US president, in policy outcomes.

 Appreciate the role of domestic politics in US counterterrorism policy.

 Acquire competencies (knowledge, skills and attitudes) to participate effectively as an analyst or decision maker.

Spring 2015 - MIIS, Spring 2016 - MIIS

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NPTG 8536 - Intel Surprises and Deception      

Warning, Surprise and Deception: Topics in Intelligence Practice and Policy

Since 9/11 the public and even national security experts have demanded a lot of government intelligence services. This workshop uses historical case studies from various countries to introduce the basic concepts of the secret world. Through lectures and role-playing exercises, the instructor seeks to help students develop the skills necessary not only to understand the limits of intelligence-gathering institutions but to make best use of their product.

Fall 2016 - MIIS

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NPTG 8539 - Power,Plutonium& Proliferation      

Humankind gets 12 percent of its electrical energy from nuclear power plants, and even some environmentalists argue that an increase in nuclear energy will be essential in reducing climate-changing carbon emissions. But nuclear power is linked with nuclear weapons and weapons proliferation. How tight is that link, and how worrisome are its proliferation implications? The answer depends in part on technical details of nuclear power reactors as well as on a country’s general nuclear expertise and motivation for acquiring nuclear weapons. This workshop will focus on the proliferation implications of different nuclear power strategies, including specific reactor designs and associated fuel cycles. In addition to lecture and discussion, the workshop includes a component where students will work with software to model nuclear decays, the buildup of plutonium in power reactors, and other nuclear processes relevant to proliferation. The workshop will begin with a brief review basic nuclear science; however, an introduction at the level of NPTG8559A, “Science and Technology for NPTS,” is helpful but not essential.

Spring 2015 - MIIS

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NPTG 8545 - Jihad,Apocalypse and Terrorism      

Across 15 centuries of Islamic history, jihad fi sabil Allah ("holy war in the path of Allah") and eschatological fervor have often gone hand-in-hand, since the primary messianic figure in Islam, the Mahdi, operates first and foremost as an apocalyptic military commander. While not all jihads have been Mahdist, it's almost always the case that movements centered around such a "rightly-guided one"--whether Sunni or Shi`i--become violent: major examples of such include Ibn Tumart and his al-Muwahhids (Almohads) in the medieval Maghrib; Shah Isma'il and the 16th century Iranian Safavids; and Muhammad's Ahmad's 19th century Sudanese "dervishes." Such men created states which lasted for decades and even, at times, for centuries. Apocalyptic jihads more frequently, however, remained at the level of what today would be called non-state "insurgencies." The Ottoman Empire was bedeviled by such--as is the modern Muslim world, with overtly eschatological movements arising from Morocco to the Middle East. Both the Islamic State (ISIS) and Jabhat al-Nusra have openly proclaimed their End Times motivations. This seminar will compare and contrast, across space and time, jihadist and eschatological movements in the Islamic world, with an aim of allowing history to illuminate current, relevant Islamic doctrines, trends and organizations.

Spring 2015 - MIIS, Fall 2015 - MIIS

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NPTG 8546 - Insurgency & Security Policy      

In the post-Cold War era insurgency has become the predominant form of conflict and now tops the list of major security concerns. Understanding the origins and tactics of insurgency will allow students to develop nuanced analyses of how security strategy should be improved to combat the emergent non-state threats of the twenty-first century. How have insurgent tactics evolved in response to changing military, political, technological and geographical conditions? What are the implications of insurgency for international intervention and homeland security policy?

This course brings Middlebury and Monterey students together in pursuit of this broad policy objective.

Spring 2015 - MIIS, Spring 2016 - MIIS

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NPTG 8548 - Assistance&Protectn Against CW      

The Chemical Weapons Convention is the first global international disarmament treaty, which deals with chemical weapons as one category of weapons of mass destruction, and entered into force on 29 April 1997. This treaty prohibits development, production, stockpiling and use of chemical weapons, and is dealing with their destruction.

The Convention has four pillars – Destruction of chemical weapons and existing stockpiles, Non-proliferation, Assistance and protection and International cooperation. The assistance and protection issues are addressed under Article X. The Convention‟s provisions on assistance and protection have become more significant in terms of the security of Member States. Each Member State has the right to ask for assistance in case of the use or threat of use of chemical weapons, or feels threatened by activities prohibited by Article I of the Convention. The OPCW has the obligation to deliver assistance to a country in need. This assistance may consist of equipment of different types, military or civilian units and expert advice. The enhancement of the Member States‟ protective capacities against CW and the effective functioning of the Convention‟s mechanism for the provision of assistance are indispensable safeguards.

Fall 2016 - MIIS

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NPTG 8549 - Wks:Human Trafficking      

This workshop will examine human trafficking as an emerging public issue, while focusing on the real-world challenges to identifying and rescuing victims, prosecuting traffickers, while also addressing the socio-economic and cultural dynamics that are leveraged by traffickers. This course will focus heavily on the multi-disciplinary, victim-centered approach promoted through international and domestic anti-human trafficking protocols and policies, including the Trafficking Victims Protection Act of 2000 and the subsequent reauthorizations.

The course will include an examination of relevant existing data, types of trafficking, legal definitions, domestic and international efforts to combat trafficking, challenges faced by law enforcement, the nexus between trafficking and other transnational crime, the role of traditional NGOs and social entrepreneurs, and corporate social responsibility. Finally, we will examine potential career opportunities related to combating human trafficking and the leadership, collaboration and consensus-building skills necessary for success, whether working in the global arena or for a local agency.

Spring 2015 - MIIS

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NPTG 8550 - CreativityInFightingWMDTerror      

Creativity In Fighting WMD Terrorism

The goal of this workshop is to develop the skills necessary for creative thought needed to solve hard problems faced by the WMD Counter Terrorism community. This workshop will discuss various ideation techniques and apply these techniques across the spectrum of WMD Terrorism threats. Students will participate in different ideation techniques as it pertains to solving WMD Terrorism problems. Students will use the techniques taught in the workshop and work in small groups to develop an innovative concept that can improve the WMD Counter Terrorism community’s ability to identify, mitigate or prevent WMD Terrorism threats. For example, students may develop a concept utilizing new developments in science and technology, identifying new methods to counter violent extremism, or developing novel solutions to increase international cooperation on WMD security and terrorism issues.

Spring 2016 - MIIS

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NPTG 8551 - Terrorism Financing      

Spring 2016 - MIIS

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NPTG 8552 - Nuclear Trafficking      

This course is designed to provide the student with a basic knowledge of the issues relating to nuclear trafficking, from both a technical and historic perspective. The nuclear and other radioactive materials useful for either an improvised nuclear device, a dispersal device, or a simple exposure device will be considered, along with the technologies used to prevent and detect trafficking in these materials. The history of trafficking in these materials, design concepts, and hoaxes and scams relating to these issues will be covered along with the major efforts and initiatives that have been developed by the international community to deal with them.

Spring 2016 - MIIS

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NPTG 8555 - Pakistan & the Bomb      

This workshop is designed to provide understanding of the motivations of a state – in this case, Pakistan – that chooses to develop nuclear weapons despite severe political and economic conditions as means to redress its acute sense of insecurity.

Pakistan’s steadfast attachment to nuclear weapons is a product of its decades-old struggle to improve its precarious security predicament vis-à-vis India; a stronger and increasingly assertive neighbor. Over three decades since the original decision was made by Zulfiqar Ali Bhutto to initiate the bomb program, Pakistan has struggled through an extraordinarily difficult set of regional and international security problems in which its nuclear weapons posture was minimally commensurate to the array of threats. Today a staunch belief in the invincibility of its nuclear weapons, as the ultimate guarantor of national survivability, is central to Pakistan’s national security policy.

The security landscape around Pakistan is changing fast, and the transformative shifts in the international and regional environments are creating new predicaments and imperatives for Pakistan’s defense and security as it modernizes its armed forces and refines it nuclear strategy and force posture. The workshop provides the historical context that led to Pakistan’s decision to go nuclear, and explains the driving factors that affect its present and future policies. It will help develop understanding how and why international efforts and non-proliferation regime failed to stop Pakistan’s quest from acquiring the nuclear capability and how it transited into becoming an advance nuclear power. Finally, it will analyze the role of nuclear weapons in Pakistan’s security policy and its impact on regional security dynamics.

This workshop is developed from the instructor’s military, diplomatic, and scholarly experience – that includes contribution to Pakistan’s nuclear policy, strategic planning, and active participation in international negotiations on arms control and disarmament issues. The workshop will mainly derive from the experience of last two decades in which he was intimately involved in nuclear policies and subsequent life as scholar.

This workshop is premised under the assumption that the student maintains a baseline understanding of nuclear technologies, non-proliferation regimes, and norms and basic knowledge of history of South Asia. Students are encouraged to read authors book Eating Grass: The Making of the Pakistani Bomb (Stanford University Press, 2012).

Fall 2015 - MIIS, Fall 2016 - MIIS

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NPTG 8557 - Law Sanctions & NP Policy      

international law of treaties; the role of the United Nations; domestic nonproliferation policymaking structures and processes; the roles of the executive and legislative branches of government; the utility of international nonproliferation sanctions; the legality of the use of force to combat proliferation; legal solutions to the problem of nuclear smuggling; the effectiveness of multilateral safeguards and inspections; and rules governing civilian commerce in nuclear goods. Attention will be given to examining the hierarchy of legal instruments; mandatory versus voluntary measures and the evolution of norms and customary law; the interaction of international agreements and domestic law; and the interplay of programs, mandatory rules, and discretionary policy. In addition, the course will also explore the impact on the effectiveness of law-based nonproliferation measures of gaps in their scope, acceptance, implementation, and enforcement.

The course will be conducted using both the lecture and classroom exercises, and active student participation is both encouraged and required.

Spring 2015 - MIIS, Spring 2016 - MIIS

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NPTG 8558 - Israel and the Bomb      

This course is a comprehensive introduction to the study of Israel’s nuclear history and policy within the broader context of understanding the nuclear dimension of Middle East politics. The course focuses on the uniqueness and the exceptionality that constitutes Israel’s nuclear history and policy. By that uniqueness we mean the original policy which Israel devised to acquire and possess nuclear weapons that ultimately made Israel an exceptional case both vis-à-vis the United States non-proliferation policies and vis-a-vis the non-proliferation regime. That policy is known as Israel’s policy of “nuclear opacity” or “nuclear ambiguity,” under which Israel has never officially acknowledged to acquire or possess nuclear weapons, even though since 1970s Israel is universally presumed as a nuclear weapons state. The course ends with reflections about challenge that Israel’s nuclear uniqueness poses both to the United States nonproliferation policy and the non-proliferation regime as a whole.

Fall 2015 - MIIS, Fall 2016 - MIIS

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NPTG 8559 - Science & Technology for NPTS      

This course provides students with a solid foundation in scientific and technical fundamentals critical to nonproliferation and terrorism policy analysis. Such policy analyses often require strong foundational knowledge of basic scientific and technical concepts in order to understand, create, and inform policy decisions. The course begins with an introduction to science and the scientific method and then evolves into the three main areas: biological weapons, chemical weapons, nuclear weapons and relevant technologies. Topics covered in the biological component include fundamental concepts related to microorganisms, DNA, RNA, proteins, and processes of infection and disease. Topics covered in the chemistry component include fundamental concepts related to atomic structure and the periodic table, chemical structural representations, functional groups, reactivity, toxicity, as well as modern separation, purification and analytic techniques commonly used for chemical species. Applications of the fundamental concepts in the first two topics are further developed in relation to features of chemical and biological weapons and warfare, including agents, delivery methods and effects. Topics covered in the nuclear component part of the course includes radioactivity, uranium, nuclear weapons, radiation detection instrumentation and applications, environmental plumes, and various instrumentation and analysis techniques. Upon completion of this course students will have a deeper appreciation for the debate on various verification solutions that have been proposed for compliance under the Biological and Toxin Weapons Convention (BWC), Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC) and nuclear treaties.

Spring 2015 - MIIS, Fall 2015 - MIIS, Spring 2016 - MIIS, Fall 2016 - MIIS

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NPTG 8563 - Evolutn ofChineseNuclearPolicy      

This course, on the evolution of Chinese nuclear policy, is divided into three parts. The first part outlines early Chinese attitudes to nuclear weapons, proliferation and disarmament, prior to and immediately following China’s nuclear test in 1964. The second part examines enduring concepts in Chinese nuclear policy, such as No First Use, and introduces students to important debates in China since the 1980s on nuclear deterrence. The third part focuses on contemporary issues and challenges that shape Chinese nuclear policy, from ballistic missile defense, to the South Asian nuclear tests in 1999, and the North Korean nuclear crisis. The nature of the US-China nuclear relationship will also be explored. The principal objective of the course is to give students a better understanding of China’s nuclear policy, both past and present. A secondary objective is to introduce to students key literature and sources, both in English and Chinese, on this issue.

Fall 2015 - MIIS, Fall 2016 - MIIS

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NPTG 8574 - Intro to WMD Nonproliferation      

This course provides a comprehensive introduction to the issues surrounding the proliferation of nuclear, biological, chemical, and radiological (NBCR) weapons and their means of delivery, the consequences of proliferation, and means to stem it or ameliorate its dangers, including:

• Nuclear, biological, chemical, and radiological weapons technologies

• Means of delivery, including ballistic and cruise missile technology

• Alternative perspectives on the dangers of proliferation and the utility of the term “weapons of mass destruction” (WMD)

• Factors affecting why states do or don’t pursue and obtain nuclear, biological, chemical, and radiological weapons and their means of delivery

• Potential and actual non-state actor pursuit, acquisition, and use of NBCR weapons

• Profiles of key countries and their NBCR programs and policies

• Deterrence vis-à-vis states and non-state actors

• Counterproliferation, including the possible use of force

• The nuclear nonproliferation regime, including the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) safeguards system

• The Biological and Toxin Weapons Convention (BWC)

• The Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC)

• Missile control regimes and other export control arrangements

• Cooperative threat reduction and various post-9/11 initiatives

• Alternative futures, including new nuclear abolition debates

Spring 2015 - MIIS, Fall 2015 - MIIS, Spring 2016 - MIIS, Fall 2016 - MIIS

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NPTG 8584 - Introduction to Terrorism      

This course is designed to provide a critical introduction to the subject of terrorism, an often misunderstood phenomenon that has assumed a particular salience in the wake of 9/11. Its aim is to clarify fundamental definitional and conceptual problems, introduce students to the burgeoning literature on the subject, describe basic terrorist organizational and operational methods, survey a wide range of terrorist groups and ideologies, examine certain high-profile terrorism themes, and tentatively assess the nature of the threat posed by terrorists to global security in the future.

Spring 2015 - MIIS, Fall 2015 - MIIS, Spring 2016 - MIIS, Fall 2016 - MIIS

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NPTG 8601 - SemCounteringDomestcUSTerrrism      

Course Title: Seminar: Domestic Terrorism in the U.S.

Instructor: BG Russell Howard, USA (ret.)

This seminar combines both theoretical tools and practical analysis via a comprehensive study of “homegrown” terrorist threats within the United States. The course is divided into three sections culminating in a final “capstone” project. Section One will introduce the course by briefly summarizing the threat of “homegrown” extremist groups from across the political and ideological spectrum while briefly touching on “imported” extremist groups. This section also will also cover past and current domestic counterterrorism strategies through the use of case studies and other analytical products. Section Two will review current U.S. domestic terrorism laws, policies, and structures, the role of federal, state, and local law enforcement agencies, and the “interagency process”. Section Three will present how various analytical tools such as risk analysis, imagery and network analysis along with the intelligence cycle are used in counterterrorism operations in an effort to provide the students with the necessary skill set to complete their final “capstone” project. Finally, for their Capstone Project, “analytical teams” of 3-4 students will integrate everything they have learned throughout the course and conduct a “deep dive” analysis of a domestic terrorist group.

Spring 2016 - MIIS

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NPTG 8603 - Sem:The American Radical Right      

This seminar is designed to provide an overview of several important right-wing ideological milieus, movements, and organizations operating in the United States, including violent paramilitary groups, and is specifically intended for graduate students who have already taken lecture-oriented undergraduate or graduate courses dealing with terrorism. The class will be divided into three separate portions. In the first portion, the lectures and readings will focus on defining the right, identifying the characteristic features of the American extreme right, and describing different types of right-wing organizations that may pose domestic security threats. Since certain violent far right paramilitary organizations nowadays constitute the greatest terrorist threat to the U.S. homeland (apart from foreign jihadist groups), it is necessary for every student interested in contemporary extremism, subversion, and terrorism to become more knowledgeable about key domestic radical right groups, their agendas, and their tactics. During the second portion of the course, students will spend their time working independently on the individual research topics they have selected, which can deal with any aspect of terrorism that interests them. During the third and final portion of the course, each student will give an oral report in class to present and analyze his or her research paper findings, which will then be discussed by the entire class. Near the end of this last portion of the class, if not earlier, students must submit their completed research papers.

Spring 2016 - MIIS

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NPTG 8605 - CTBT:Policy & Technical Issues      

The Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT): Policy and Technical Issues

This workshop will review the history of weapons testing and agreements leading up to the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT). The CTBT and its organization (CTBTO) will be examined from both policy and technical perspectives, along with an analysis of subcritical testing and other CTBT-related issues of nonproliferation importance that may remain even if the CTBT comes into force.

Spring 2015 - MIIS, Fall 2016 - MIIS

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NPTG 8610 - Seminar: Counterterrorism      

The counterterrorism seminar is designed to address the challenges of terrorism in the current and future global security environment in a participatory format. Specifically, the seminar briefly reviews the threat terrorism poses to liberal democratic states, citizens and policymakers, then explores how liberal democracies can best predict, prevent, preempt and, if necessary, directly combat terrorism and terrorists. The course will assess the history and future of terrorism; analyze terrorist and state strategies; and then focus on the tools to fight terrorism - military, intelligence, police, diplomatic institutions and approaches; the "targets" of counterterrorism - leaders, finances, safe havens, networks, ideologies; and the technologies used to counter terrorism - drones, social media, and more. Case studies and simulations will be used throughout the course.

Fall 2015 - MIIS, Fall 2016 - MIIS

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NPTG 8612 - SemNucTreatyVerify/VirtualWrld      

This course aims to use avatar-based virtual reality to simulate the verification of a nuclear weapon by a fictional inspecting party team (see picture of the virtual verification facility in the syllabus). The goal will be to design a verification protocol to make the inspection possible without divulging weapons information to the inspecting party. In the process, you will learn a great deal about the science and technology of nuclear weapons verification but note that IPOL 8559 is not a prerequisite for the course. A background in computer programming is also not required. You will be trained in how to navigate the virtual worlds. There will be a lecture component (the first set of lectures) but the majority of the course will consist of the design and negotiation of the verification protocol. There will be several short assignments and a final individual 15 minute presentation.

Spring 2016 - MIIS

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NPTG 8620 - SEM: Drones & Surveillance      

We live in an era of satellite surveillance, video monitoring, and electronic surveillance and now the hot button topic of drones performing these tasks in addition to armed drones carrying out assassinations. This 4 unit seminar course will deal with the technical, policy, and legal issues involved in these subjects Privacy rights are often in conflict with the technical capabilities in these and other areas. Civil liberties are balanced against security interest, with or without the knowledge of the population. The course will provide the student with a working understanding of the issues involved in the current use of drones and overhead surveillance and will provide a look at the future uses and limitations, examining how civil liberties are and can be balanced against security interests.

Fall 2015 - MIIS

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NPTG 8625 - Sem:Morality& Contemp Security      

This seminar aims to examine moral dilemmas that have confronted us throughout the nuclear age as well as in the current war with terrorism. The seminar will start by exploring the basic concepts of moral thinking and the principles of the “just war tradition.” Then we explore how and to what extent the tools and concepts of “just war tradition” apply to the fundamentals of contemporary world—the nuclear age on the one hand, and the war on terrorism on the other. As such, we will examine historical cases and practices involving both nuclear weapons and terrorism: from the “decision” to drop the first atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, the practice of nuclear deterrence, through the morality of interrogation methods, intelligence gathering, and targeted assassination as tools against terrorism.

Fall 2016 - MIIS

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NPTG 8626 - Sem:StratTradeCntrls&Nonprolif      

Strategic trade controls -- which include export, brokering, transshipment and transit controls, as well as supply chain security issues -- are important tools in international nonproliferation efforts. These controls when used effectively can raise the cost of WMD acquisitions, prolong the time needed for development, and deny proliferant actors easy access to items and technologies necessary for WMD programs.

This seminar will focus on four important issues. One is how states balance between the pursuit of wealth and security. Second is the issue of cooperation among states on nonproliferation-related trade controls in light of a globalized economy. The third is the effectiveness of strategic trade controls as instruments in supporting nonproliferation objectives given the changing nature of technology and the global trade environment. The theoretical debate on these issues continues to revolve around the question of how states initiate, implement, and sustain international cooperation against the competing pressures of trade, domestic politics, and national security. Finally, the course will engage trade control practitioners from government agencies and industry as guest speakers and facilitators in order to fully understand how the issues surrounding strategic trade control impact the trade and security communities in today’s changing world.

Spring 2015 - MIIS, Spring 2016 - MIIS

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NPTG 8632 - Seminar: Eco-Radicalism      

This seminar is designed to provide an in-depth examination of certain key aspects of contemporary terrorism, and is specifically intended for graduate students who have already taken lecture-oriented undergraduate or graduate courses dealing with terrorism. The class will be divided into three separate portions. During the first portion, after a session devoted to the provision of basic information about terrorism, terrorism research methods, “light” and “dark” green environmentalism, and whether militant defense of the environment and “ecotage” fall into the category of terrorism, everyone in the class will read chapters from a series of important recent books that deal with radical ecology and animal rights organizations, as well as ideological treatises produced by activists associated with those milieus. Given that the FBI has identified eco-radical groups as a significant domestic terrorist threat, rightly or wrongly, it is necessary for every student interested in terrorism to become more knowledgeable about the ideologies, agendas, and activities of the “primitivist,” deep ecology, and animal liberation groups that promote and employ certain forms of violence. During the brief second portion of the course, students will spend their time working independently on the individual research topics they have selected, which can deal with any aspect of environmentalism or terrorism that interests them. During the third and final portion, each student will give an oral report in class to present and analyze his or her research findings, which will then be discussed by the entire class. Near the end of this last portion of the class, if not earlier, students must submit their completed research papers. The course requirements are as follows: regular attendance and active participation in class discussions (30% of grade), an oral report to be delivered in class (30% of grade), and/or a 15-20 page research paper (40% of grade).

Fall 2016 - MIIS

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NPTG 8633 - SemAdvTerrrism:Global Jihadism      

This seminar is designed to provide a more in-depth examination of transnational jihadist organizations and networks with a global agenda, and is specifically intended for graduate students who have already taken lecture-oriented undergraduate or graduate courses dealing with terrorism. The class will be divided into three separate portions. During the first portion, after a session devoted to the provision of basic information about terrorism, terrorism research methods, Islam, and Islamism, everyone in the class will read chapters from a series of important recent books that deal with global jihadist networks and their objectives. Given the threat that such networks and their supporters currently pose to the security of the West, Russia, India, various states in Asia, and moderate Muslims everywhere, it is necessary for every student interested in terrorism to become much more knowledgeable about the jihadist agenda. During the second portion of the course, students will spend their time working independently on the individual research topics they have selected, which can deal with any aspect of terrorism that interests them. During the third and final portion, each student will give an oral report in class to present and analyze his or her research findings, which will then be discussed by the entire class. Near the end of this last portion of the class, if not earlier, students must submit their completed research papers. The course requirements are as follows: regular attendance and active participation in class discussions (30% of grade), an oral report to be delivered in class (30% of grade), and a 15-20 page research paper (40% of grade).

Fall 2015 - MIIS, Fall 2016 - MIIS

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NPTG 8634 - Sem:Apocalyptic Millenarianism      

This seminar is designed to provide an in-depth examination of certain key aspects of contemporary terrorism, and is specifically intended for graduate students who have already taken lecture-oriented undergraduate or graduate courses dealing with terrorism. The class will be divided into three separate portions. During the first portion, after a session devoted to the provision of basic information about terrorism and terrorism research methods, everyone in the class will read chapters from a series of important recent books that deal with apocalyptic millenarian groups and their objectives. Given the fact that groups of this type have periodically carried out serious acts of violence, either against “evil” outsiders or their own members, it is necessary for students interested in terrorism to obtain some knowledge about their characteristics. During the second portion of the course, students will spend their time working independently on the individual research topics they have selected, which can deal with any aspect of terrorism that interests them. During the third and final portion, each student will give an oral report in class to present and analyze his or her research findings, which will then be discussed by the entire class. Near the end of this last portion of the class, if not earlier, students must submit their completed research papers. The course requirements are as follows: regular attendance and active participation in class discussions (30% of grade), an oral report to be delivered in class (30% of grade), and a 15-20 page research paper (40% of grade).

Spring 2015 - MIIS

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NPTG 8635 - Sem: State Terrorism      

This seminar is designed to provide an in-depth examination of certain important aspects of terrorism carried out directly by state security forces and/or indirectly by civilian paramilitary groups operating (wittingly or unwittingly) at the behest of states, and is specifically intended for graduate students who have already taken lecture-oriented undergraduate or graduate courses dealing with terrorism. Special attention will be paid to the covert manipulation of terrorism by states, the extent to which autonomous extremist groups function as their proxies, “death squads,” and “false flag” terrorist operations (real and imagined).

Fall 2015 - MIIS

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NPTG 8639 - Sem:Deter&InfluencTerrorsm&WMD      

This seminar examines deterrence and other strategies for responding to security threats, with a focus on how those strategies might be adapted to deal with the dangers posed by terrorism and WMD proliferation. The course will survey existing research on deterrence and various alternative policy tools such as coercive diplomacy, assurance, positive incentives, and soft power. It will introduce some of the latest thinking about whether these tools are useful for influencing actors away from support for terrorism or WMD acquisition or use.

Spring 2015 - MIIS, Spring 2016 - MIIS

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NPTG 8645 - Sem:Proliferation&Intellignce      

Throughout the nuclear age – from the Manhattan Project to our own challenge of assessing with Iran’s nuclear program – the history of nuclear proliferation intelligence has been largely an history of failures. No doubt, intelligence about nuclear proliferation is a tricky business. And yet policy makers do need intelligence to make decisions on proliferation matters.

The seminar is both a study of one generis problem, and also a story of a history of that problem. Understanding the complexity of the problem defines our historical survey, while history will be also an aid to appreciate better the problem. In a way, the seminar’s overall interest is to narrate and revisit the history of nuclear proliferation from the perspective of problem of intelligence.

The course examines the problem of nuclear intelligence by revisiting key cases in the history of nuclear proliferation: Germany in World War II, the Soviet Union in the mid-late 1940s, the early NIEs on proliferation, Israel in the late 50s and the 1960s, India in 1974, Pakistan in the 1980s, South Africa in the late 1970s and 1980s, Iraq (twice) in the 1980s, India (second time) in 1998, and Iran today.

Fall 2015 - MIIS, Fall 2016 - MIIS

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NPTG 8646 - Terror & CT in Africa      

The Terrorism and Counterterrorism in Africa Seminar will address increased terrorist activity in Africa, and familiarize students with known terrorist organizations throughout the continent such as al Qaeda in the Islamic Maghreb (AQIM), Al Shabaab, the Lords Revolutionary Army (LRA), Boka Haram, the Libyan Armed Fighters Group, and the Movement for the Emancipation of the Niger Delta (MEND) among others. Seminar participants will evaluate U.S. and international counterterrorism policy and operations in Africa. Based on their evaluation, students will be asked to suggest unilateral, multilateral, “alternative” and mutually supporting policies and operations to address terrorist activity in Africa. In an effort to best apply “theory to practice,” seminar participants will learn how to prepare and apply African related terrorist group profiles and terrorist threat matrices as part of a group exercise and culminating presentation.

Spring 2015 - MIIS, Spring 2016 - MIIS

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NPTG 8648 - SecurityArmsCntrlRssia/Eurasia      

This course will explore the complex, intertwined web of security issues in Eurasia with an emphasis on WMD nonproliferation and arms races as well as arms control. The course will review key explanatory frameworks as they relate to security and arms control in Russia and Eurasia. Primary attention will be paid to the role of Russia in the region – its interests, policies, and relations to other countries as well as the positive and negative impacts it has (or can have) on finding solutions to various outstanding issues. The course will also review the historical roots of current challenges to help students better understand the context, the limitations, and the opportunities as the international community strives to come to grips with various issues.

Spring 2015 - MIIS

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NPTG 8650 - SemNP Policymakng&IntelAnlysis      

This course provides an overview of U.S. national security policy formulation and related intelligence analysis as these apply to the nonproliferation domain. It examines the foreign policy roles and powers of key governmental actors: the president, executive branch departments and agencies, and Congress. It also addresses the characteristics and foreign policy influence of non-governmental actors: interest groups, the media, and public opinion. With this policy context as backdrop, students will then delve more extensively into the role of intelligence analysis in addressing proliferation threats. The class will provide information about the organizations that make up the U.S. intelligence community; the process by which raw information may become an intelligence assessment; and the various pressures and dynamic existing within the intelligence community. The class will also examine several cases, such as the South Asian nuclear weapons tests, North Korean uranium enrichment activities, accounting for Iraq's WMD, and Iran's uranium enrichment development efforts, where the intelligence community appears to have failed or at least faltered. Using these case studies, we will examine the reality and the fallacies underlying this perception.

Spring 2015 - MIIS, Spring 2016 - MIIS

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NPTG 8654 - SEM:Security & WMD in Mid East      

The idea of security is experienced or defined very differently in different quarters of the Middle East. If you are, say, in Mosul or Baghdad, in Damascus or Aleppo, in Gaza or Hebron, in Jerusalem or Kfar Etzion or Tel Aviv, in Amman or Beirut, in Cairo or El Arish, in Doha or Riyadh. Each of those places stimulates a different sense of security, in the personal or collective sense, and yet their overall security discourse is interconnected. The overall discourse on security in the Middle East is influenced, affected, interrupted, and shaped by what is going on in the region. They represent different facets of the larger issue and discourse of security in the Middle East.

The seminar will address the issue and the discourse of security in the Middle East, with stress on the two sides of the spectrum, from weapons of mass destruction (WMD) to acts of terrorism. We will look at the issue of security from both the national and the regional levels.

The seminar’s fundamental starting point is that to understand the issue of security in the region one must examine the broader historical fundamentals of the region. Religion, ethnicity, ideology, identity and, of course, politics are all closely related to the broader issue of security. Those issues are at the core of all regional conflicts as well as global terrorism; those issues shape the making of the modern Middle East. For this reason the seminar begins with a broad introduction on the making of the modern Middle East. Among the basic themes to be discussed in that introduction are:

• the idea of the “Middle East” as a distinct geo-political region;

• the fundamentals of the region: the religious, ethnic, and linguistic composition of the Middle East;

• The split Sunni versus Shia

• Islam as the major religion of the Middle East;

• the collapse of the Ottoman Empire as the cradle of the modern Middle East;

• the formation of the state system in the Middle East;

• the rise of political Zionism,

• the birth of the Arab-Israeli conflict;

• the rise of modern Iran;

• the creation of Modern Saudi Arabia and the Gulf;

Then, and against this introductory background, the seminar will examine the issue of contemporary security in the Middle East from both national and regional perspectives. We will look at the issue of security in the cases of the major states in the Middle East: Egypt, Iraq, Iraq, Saudi Arabia, Syria, and Israel. As it turns out, those countries –each in its unique way -- struggle now with issues of national identity and ideology that shapes their sense of security or lack therein.

The final part of the seminar will deal with regional issues involve regional security, WMD and ISIS. We will review not only the formation of the nuclear order in the Middle East where is Israel maintains a “benign monopoly” but also the history of the efforts to constrain and control the spread of WMD in the region, and why those efforts turned out not to be successful. The seminar will end by discussing the history as well as the desirability and feasibility of the efforts to establish the Middle East as WMD free zone.

Spring 2016 - MIIS

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NPTG 8656 - Sem: Nuclear Forensics      

Nuclear forensics deals with the science related to the determination of the origins of nuclear materials such as uranium and plutonium and to the policy considerations, such as attribution, which result from determinations that can be made. In addition to science and policy considerations the course will cover the current international efforts in nuclear forensics and survey the performance of conventional forensics in the presence of radioactive material and related issues such as radioactive crime scene management and expert testimony on nuclear forensics issues.

Spring 2015 - MIIS, Spring 2016 - MIIS

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NPTG 8657 - Sem: Homeland Security      

The Homeland Security Seminar is taught in three sections.

Section One examines natural and man-made threats, including terrorist threats, to the United States. It is vital that the origins, forms and potential consequences of threats to the nation be understood before effective policies to thwart them can be developed and implemented.

Section Two examines homeland security from the political and coordination perspectives. Homeland security policy, planning and operations require information sharing, communication and coordination at local, state, federal and international levels of governance; difficult undertakings in a democracy. Also, effective homeland security policy must balance the need for public security with the protection of civil liberties. Therefore, the Patriot Act is covered in detail in Section Two.

Section Three suggests policies to counter threats -- particularly terrorist threats -- to the United States. In Section Three the six critical mission components of the National Homeland Security Strategy are analyzed and critiqued in detail with a view to suggesting more effective national policies.

Spring 2015 - MIIS

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NPTG 8658 - Sem: CBRN Terrorism      

The goal of this seminar is to develop the skills necessary to analyze the motivations and capabilities of non-state actors to acquire and use weapons of mass destruction (WMD), more specifically chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear (CBRN) weapons and materials, for terrorist purposes. Through class discussions, simulation exercises, and individual research, students will review the technical aspects of CBRN, examine the history of CBRN use by terrorists, assess CBRN terrorism threats and vulnerabilities, and assess policy responses to CBRN terrorism. Students are required to have substantial background knowledge of either CBRN or terrorism before joining the seminar.

Students will prepare weekly short memos, conduct group work for integrative simulation exercises, prepare an independent research project, and have various presentation opportunities.

Spring 2015 - MIIS, Spring 2016 - MIIS, Fall 2016 - MIIS

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NPTG 8662 - MANPTS Honors Thesis      

The MANPTS Honors Thesis is a highly selective program through which a limited number of students will design and conduct individual research projects of professional length, scope, and quality under the guidance of a faculty advisor. Applications for the honors thesis will be accepted in the Spring from students in their second or subsequent semesters in the NPTS MA program who are currently maintaining a GPA of 3.7 or higher. Applications will require a personal statement, academic transcript, sample of research writing, proposal for the thesis, and recommendation from a member of the faculty or research staff. In recommending a student for the honors thesis, a faculty or staff member must agree to serve as the student’s thesis advisor if the student is selected for the program. The NPTS Program Chair will appoint a selection committee composed of NPTS faculty and staff from the appropriate MIIS research centers to review applications. Students will be selected for the honors thesis on the basis of GPA, demonstrated proficiency in research and analytical writing, and any other relevant criteria as determined by the selection committee. Throughout the Fall semester, thesis advisors will provide students enrolled in IPOL 8610 with individualized supervision of their thesis projects in a manner similar to a directed study. Thesis advisors will set a schedule for research and writing of the thesis and will meet with students as needed to review progress and provide comments and advice. At the end of the Fall semester, students will present their projects to the Monterey Institute community in a symposium at which invited experts will provide comments and suggestions for further development and publication of research.

Spring 2015 - MIIS, Fall 2015 - MIIS, Spring 2016 - MIIS, Fall 2016 - MIIS

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NPTG 8668 - Sem:Terrorism in South Asia      

Terrorist violence has persisted in various parts of South Asia for several decades. A variety of interconnected reasons can be assigned to this phenomenon – state sponsorship, separatist tendencies, religious and sectarian divides, and political meddling. Terrorism in South Asia is also a crucial concern because of its broader connections to extra-regional terrorist networks. The two dominant states in South Asia possess nuclear weapons and have a long history of military conflict and have periodically experienced crises situations provoked by terrorist attacks. Additionally, the history of proliferation networks and concerns over Pakistan’s nuclear security further exacerbate the threat perception from terrorist networks.

The object of this course is to understand the causes and dimensions of terrorism in South Asia and to analyze positions adopted by the involved parties, state and non-state. From the policy perspective, this is essential toward formulating responses to terrorism in the region. South Asia is conventionally defined as the region comprising the countries of India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Nepal, Sri Lanka, Bhutan and the Maldives. But for the purposes of this seminar we will also look at developments in Afghanistan (generally considered as South-West Asia), given its crucial links to terrorism issues in South Asia.

Fall 2015 - MIIS, Fall 2016 - MIIS

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NPTG 8674 - Sem:Terrorism in SouthEastAsia      

Various parts of South-East Asia have been plagued by terrorist violence in recent decades. South-East Asia refers to the region eastward from Burma/Myanmar till the Philippines. This course studies the phenomenon of terrorism in countries of the region such as Thailand, Indonesia, Malaysia and the Philippines. Some of the groups that this course examines include – Jemaah Islamiyah, Abu Sayyaf, Moro Islamic Liberation Front – their objectives, characteristics, composition, ideologies, tactics and fund-raising. Apart from these cases, the course also examines thematic issues such as the prospect of WMD terrorism and proliferation of WMD materials, maritime terrorism and piracy, and U.S. policy on counter-terrorism in South-East Asia. We also discuss connections between groups in South-East Asia and regional and global terrorist groups elsewhere, such as Al Qaeda and the Taliban. In order to have a comprehensive picture of non-state security threats in the region, the course also examines the various insurgent movements in Myanmar. Finally, given the close security dynamics between Australia and South-East Asia, this course also looks at terrorism-related issues in Australia.

Spring 2015 - MIIS, Spring 2016 - MIIS

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NPTG 8683 - Sem:South Asia & WMD      

In the realm of weapons of mass destruction (WMD), South Asia is one of the key regions of analysis. This course takes a comprehensive look at the role of WMD in the strategic thinking of various actors involved in the South Asian security framework. It is important to note that South Asian nuclear issues cannot be studied in isolation from other regional and global dynamics. States such as the U.S., China, and Russia are crucial players in the South Asian strategic framework. The course examines various reasons behind WMD acquisition by India and Pakistan, concentrating especially on nuclear weapons. These factors include threat perceptions, domestic imperatives and nationalistic attitudes. A key element of nuclear weapons programs is the development of effective delivery systems such as missiles and aircraft. Analysis of such programs provides an indicator of current and future strategy. In this context, both India and Pakistan have made major strides in their cruise and ballistic missile programs to make their nuclear strategy more credible. At the same time, neither side has a clearly enunciated nuclear doctrine, although attempts have been made in this direction. This is crucial in context of a reliable command and control system and for crisis stability. Another major issue covered in this course is the proliferation of WMD materials to non-state actors or aspiring nuclear states by proliferation networks connected to South Asia. Relatedly, policymakers in the region and elsewhere are also concerned with the danger of nuclear terrorism. These are some of the prominent issues concerning weapons of mass destruction in South Asia. The two sides have periodically taken steps to prevent nuclear crises situations. Apart from nuclear weapons, this seminar also examines chemical and biological weapons policy in the two countries.

Spring 2015 - MIIS

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NPTG 8684 - Sem:Bio&ChemWeapons&ArmsCntrl      

During the last 35 years, accusations have been made that various nations and terrorists have employed biological, chemical, and toxin weapons in international warfare, internal conflicts, or terrorist operations. Most prominently, in the 1980s the UN found conclusive evidence that Iraq has used chemical weapons against Iran and, eventually, Iran answered in kind. Twenty-seven years later, Syria used chemical weapons against insurgents and civilians. Returning to Iraq, in addition to its chemical weapons, Iraq had a sizeable biological weapons program; and the Soviet Union secretly instituted the world’s largest and most sophisticated biological warfare program before its dissolution in late 1991. As for terrorism, the Aum Shinrikyo developed and used both biological and chemical weapons during 1991-1995; while scientist Bruce Ivens appears to have sent envelopes containing Bacillus anthracis spores to various public figures during September-October 2001; and the al Qaeda leadership has made clear that it seeks to acquire all types of weapons of mass destruction. In view of these developments, security experts active in the international arena ought to be familiar with the health and environmental effects of these weapons, circumstances which favor their use, the international laws that seek to prevent these weapons from being used and, when laws fail, how to determine whether one of these three weapon systems has indeed been used and the appropriate response to their use.

Fall 2015 - MIIS, Fall 2016 - MIIS

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NPTG 8687 - Sem:Islam,Islmism&PolCntrlAsia      

This seminar’s core focus is the politics of Islam and Muslims and the rise of contemporary Islamism and jihadism in Central Asia. In particular, we examine non-state and state terrorism in the five former Soviet republics of Central Asia - Kazkahstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, and Uzbekistan. It focuses primarily on the history and current activity of Al Qa`ida-connected or Al`Qaida-inspired jihadist organizations such as the Islamic Movement of Uzbekistan, the Islamic Jihad Union, the Islamic Movement of Turkestan, as well as recently emerged smaller offshoot organizations operating in the region, most notably in Kazakhstan for the first time. The course examines causal factors for the rise of jihadi terrorism in Central Asia and elsewhere such as poverty, failing states, authoritarian regimes, bad governance, the resonance of Islamist ideologies, charismatic authority patterns, and complex network organization and leadership practices. The ties between jihadi terrorists in the five Central Asian states and other global jihadi revolutionary organizations in neighboring states such as Afghanistan, Pakistan, Russia and China as well as in Europe will also be examined. In addition, counter-terrorism and other policies of the authoritarian regimes of Central Asia will looked at, in particular evidence of state terrorism and massive human rights violations spread across most of the region. The remainder of this syllabus’s course schedule will be revised before the beginning of the 2013 spring semester.The ‘Politics and Islam in Russia’ seminar is designed for those interested in the causes and resolution of violent conflict, separatist insurgencies, terrorism, non-proliferation, and comparative Islamic politics. It offers students an in-depth introduction to the role played by Islam and the ‘forgotten Muslims’ of Russia in both domestic, regional, and international politics. Through the careful reading of primary and secondary sources, the seminar’s central purpose is to engage students in a detailed comparative examination of the historical, geographic, ethnic, theological, institutional, and global factors that shape identity politics and frame other political issues for Russia’s Muslims.

Spring 2015 - MIIS

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NPTG 8698 - Directed Study      

Fall 2016 - MIIS

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NPTG 9505 - Global Politics      

The course introduces students to key analytical concepts and normative views such as balance of power, unipolarity, multipolarity, unilateralism, multilateralism, etc., and major theoretical perspectives for analysis of international politics, as well as the major international events of the past century that have shaped the international system. Students will learn ways that international actors, including sovereign states and non-state entities such as multinational corporations, international organizations, and nongovernmental organizations, exercise power to pursue goals and influence international outcomes. Students will also learn how international institutions, norms, and structures of governance affect the exercise of power and other forms of influence and shape international outcomes. Students will also be introduced to some contemporary issues of national, international, and human security, including the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, and terrorism, as well as issues of globalization, food security, the plight of the LDC’s, and human rights.

Spring 2015 - MIIS

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NPTG 9510 - Intl Affairs inThe Digital Age      

This course is designed to provide the student with a basic knowledge of current issues of cybersecurity and international efforts to create international norms and agreements in cyberspace. The course will initially cover fundamental technical aspects of cyberspace in order to provide the student with a basic overview and vocabulary of technical issues. Cybercrime, cybersecurity, and various aspects of cyberwarfare will also be considered. The international aspects of these various cyber issues will be examined in the context of existing international law and prospective international agreements that states may agree to in order to control issues such as cybercrime and cyberespionage.

Spring 2016 - MIIS

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NPTG 9550 - Humanitarian Side of Cyber      

There are some 28 definitions of cyberspace, nearly all of which involve some form of digital networks. Digital networks are essential to the conduct of humanitarian operations. Such operations fall into three broad categories: (1) Preparations to improve humanitarian environments, such as capacity building, developing community and individual resilience, and conflict avoidance; (2) crisis activities, including disaster relief (domestic and foreign) and conflict resolution; (3) long term humanitarian activities, such as humanitarian assistance, peacekeeping operations, support to refugees and internally displaced persons, setting conditions for elections and return to civilian government, and foreign aid. The ability to disrupt, or support, such activities through cyber means also raises important policy, ethical and moral questions, as well as issues of International Humanitarian Law—what is humanitarian assistance to one party may be strategic war material to another. Digital humanitarians also may be at personal risk from cyberattack, as may their relatives in some countries. These topics are more wide-ranging than many realize and show the importance of the “humanitarian side of cyber” topic.

Fall 2015 - MIIS, Fall 2016 - MIIS

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NPTG 9565 - Intro to Network Analysis      

Fall 2016 - MIIS

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NPTG 9581 - MoneyLaundering & AML Policies      

Spring 2015 - MIIS

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NPTG 9582 - TerrorFinanceSanctnsCybercrime      

Spring 2015 - MIIS

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NPTG 9610 - Adv Disaster Communications      

This 2-unit workshop focuses on the complex field of disaster communications with a necessary introduction to the larger field of humanitarian assistance and disaster relief (HA/DR). It will include Information and Communications Technologies (ICT), Socio-Technical Information Operations (STIO), as well as reviewing observations and lessons learned from the instructor’s participation in numerous recent disasters and crises. The workshop will involve hands-on lab work with wireless networking equipment (to learn how to rebuild degraded ICT infrastructure in rapid fashion using Hastily Formed Networks (HFNs) as well as learning how these HFNs are typically used in disaster scenarios by the international humanitarian community (IHC).

Specifically, this workshop will include examples of how a multi-agency team conducts the creation of, participation in, and development of new techniques, tactics, and procedures for the analysis of information flows concerning early responders (to include military) via exercises and operations. The focus will be on the three layers of socio-technical operations: the technical layer (ICT infrastructure); on-the-ground operations; and the socio-technical innovation layer, where information is developed, used, constructed / deconstructed and shared. Guest lectures from first-responders in the IHC community in the private sector, government and/or NGOs will help students understand the various needs and constraints of each community.

A case study and student feedback on readings will be used as part of the learning process and will comprise 40% of the grade. Active participation will account for the other 40%. An 8-page (2,000 word) thought-piece on a select topic from the course will comprise 20%.

Spring 2016 - MIIS

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NPTG 9611 - Sem:ArmedViolence & Developmnt      

Armed violence resulting from intrastate conflict and criminal activity is posing a serious obstacle to political, social and economic development at the global, regional, national and local level. This seminar describes the global reality of armed violence and its negative effects. The focus is on the instruments of armed violence, namely, small arms and light weapons (SALW), to include land mines. Topics include the sources and methods of illegal arms proliferation, diversion from legal to illegal arms possession, misuse or proliferation, gang violence, election violence, the public health approach to armed violence reduction, and the path from conflict to armed conflict. Emphasis is placed on policies and programs at the local, national and global level to reduce armed violence and enable development, to include Disarmament, Demobilization and Reintegration of ex-combatants, weapons exchange for development programs, reducing access to SALW, and the efforts to integrate armed violence and development. The typical student project is a research paper which develops (or evaluates) a program to reduce or prevent armed violence and enhance development at the local, national or global level.

Spring 2015 - MIIS

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NPTG 9682 - SEM: Non-State Armed Actors      

There is growing acceptance to the argument that alienation of non-state armed groups does not bring an end to violence. A question being increasingly asked by third party interveners, policy makers/ analysts and scholars is: ‘how to effectively engage with such groups?’ ‘Understanding’ groups is the first step when attempting to intervene in the conflict. In order to do, one must examine the leadership of the group. This is central to any political analysis. The leader and the nature of leadership creates and to a large extent influences every other aspect of the group such as ideology, goals, leadership, structure, culture and commitment. Every student will examine the nature of leadership in one non-state armed group and comment on the implications for those choosing to engage with that particular group. Specifically, the students will research on: (1) Profile and Personality of the Leader/s; Origins of Leadership (2) Type of Leadership (3) Source of Power (4) Maintaining Authority and Control/Ensuring Follower Compliance and Commitment (5) Dealing with threats, change and Crisis Management (6) Negotiating with Leadership/Group - Implications for Practitioners, Policy Makers and Scholars.

Spring 2015 - MIIS, Fall 2016 - MIIS

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