Nonproliferation and Terrorism Course Listing

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

IPSS 8520 - IPSS Professional Training      

The IPSS pre-departure training, consisting of six modules taught by select faculty, intends to help students refresh and/or obtain basic new knowledge and skills essential for successful professional service and future careers. These modules intend to provide a foundation – key skills, points, tools, and guiding resources – which students can use and build on in the future. The modules will use an interactive learning environment covering topics from facilitation, organizational context analysis, and applied research design to Excel essentials and communication and new media skills. A pass/fail grade will be assigned by the IPSS academic coordinator based on students’ attendance and performance in these modules.

Spring 2011 - MIIS, Spring 2012 - MIIS, Spring 2013 - MIIS

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IPSS 8530 - High-Value Org Consulting      

This workshop will be taught by organizational expert and successful government, nonprofit, and private-sector consultant, Dr. Beryl Levinger ,with help from our alumnus Vladimir Cernavskis (Moscow, McKinsey Associates). Participants will learn tools for analyzing an organization, its culture, its approach to meeting mission, and ecosystem analysis. They will also master key skills for effective organizational consulting including client reconnaissance; client relationship management; and the creation of value-added consultant deliverables. The 15 contact hour workshop in January will be worth 1 credits. Students wishing to earn 2 credits for this workshop will turn addition deliverables in the first month of their internship – these deliverables will help them apply the tools they have learned in this workshop to better understand their host organizations.

Spring 2014 - MIIS

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IPSS 8531 - Designing/EvaluatngInterventns      

Workshop will cover basic tools and steps involved in designing successful interventions (i.e. projects and programs) and effectively evaluating these interventions. This workshop will prepare students to assist the growing number of organizations across various specializations that are trying to establish more systematic design and evaluation systems.

Spring 2014 - MIIS

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IPSS 8532 - QuantitativDataAnlysis W/Excel      

As a massive amount of quantitative data becomes readily available, organizations and decisions are becoming increasingly data-driven. As is common in the workplace, students will learn how this data can be analyzed in Excel without the need for more sophisticated software.

Spring 2014 - MIIS

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IPSS 8533 - AppldQualData-Collectn/Anlysis      

Students will acquire and practice tools essential for systematically analyzing qualitative data as a professional in the government, nonprofit, or private sectors.

Spring 2014 - MIIS

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IPSS 8534 - NetwrkdIntOrgs:NtwrksSocMedia      

This two-day workshop will help create an integrated communications strategy that makes effective use of social media and mobile tactics and tools to get results for their host organizations. Those results may be increased brand awareness, fundraising, inspiring and mobilizing stakeholders to take action, or outreach. The course will also help students develop a professional learning and networking strategy that will help them deepen the impact of their internship and support their career goals.

Spring 2014 - MIIS

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IPSS 8670 - High-ValueOrgCnsltingFieldWrk      

Students who take IPSS 8530A workshop may submit deliverables in the first month of their internship for one additional credit. These deliverables will help students apply the tools they have learned in the IPSS 8530 workshop to better understand their host organizations.

Spring 2014 - MIIS

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IPSS 8675 - IPSS Field Deliverables      

During their IPSS internships students complete applied academic deliverables for which they earn six academic credits. The academic credit is not awarded for the internship itself, but for the work that applies students’ academic training to contribute to their host organizations’ mission in area of student’s career interest. The letter grades will be assigned based on the assessment of the following four deliverables:

IPSS Field Project: By the end of their internships students must have completed an ambitious project or other relatively autonomous contribution that presents value for the host organization and builds on students’ strengths and advances his/her skills and knowledge. The field project can take the form of a policy or consultancy report, evaluation, analysis, a website, or other substantive contribution to their host organization that integrates high quality research, analysis, and other skills and subject-matter knowledge. Faculty with relevant expertise and assigned peers will provide every student regular feedback on the major steps of the field project. Student’s regular internship responsibilities ideally should overlap with, but are not limited to the core field assignment. The organizations receiving interns are encouraged to help students identify such assignments prior to their arrival or at the very latest within one month after the start of student’s internship. The organization should provide assistance and guidance in completing this assignment.

Presentation: In the final part of the internship students will present on their field project to their colleagues at their host organizations. The video recording of that presentation will be then reviewed by the MIIS faculty who will invite students for Q&A and also provide additional feedback to students to improve the quality of their final deliverable(s).

Peer feedback: Interns will collaborate with their assigned peers by providing mutual peer feedback on their core field assignments to improve the quality of their work and learn from each other.

Final reflection: Interns will submit a final reflection to IPSS faculty and staff near the end of their internship- summarizing their most important insights and lessons they obtained from the internship experience for their professional and academic development.

Optional: Students are also highly encouraged to blog about their reflections on their internship experiences and comment on each others’ blogs throughout the internship assignment to maximize their learning.

Spring 2011 - MIIS, Spring 2012 - MIIS, Spring 2013 - MIIS, Spring 2014 - MIIS

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NPTG 8501 - Intl Security Rsrch & Analysis      

This class will provide students with a basic foundation in how to understand and conduct policy-relevant academic research and analyze policy options for dealing with potential threats to international security. Topics covered will include designing research, evaluating sources, and communicating research findings effectively.

Fall 2014 - MIIS

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NPTG 8505 - US Natl Security Policy Making      

This course introduces students to the formulation of U.S. national security policy. It summarizes the roles played by different governmental actors, including the President, Congress, and relevant bureaucratic departments and agencies, and describes the interagency process. It then covers the influence of domestic politics on national security policy, including the impact of interest groups, the media, and public opinion.

Fall 2013 - MIIS

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NPTG 8506 - Nuc/RadioactvMaterials&Weapons      

This workshop is intended to take the student to the next steps beyond what is covered in the Introduction to Science and Technology course. It will provide an intensive exposure (no pun intended) in the fundamentals of nuclear material and other radioactive material, to the hazards of dealing with these materials, and to the effects of the various types of radiation associated with these materials. The student will gain knowledge in the effects of nuclear weapons and radiological weapons (such as radioactive dispersal devices) and the measurements used to discuss and quantify these hazards, such as yield, dose, and the International Atomic Energy Agency’s method for categorizing the hazards of radioactive materials.

After completion of the workshop the student should have a basic understanding of fundamental concepts and vocabulary such as half-life, decay modes, decay calculations, and other basic concepts that would assist them in acquiring scientific literacy to prepare them to work in areas that deal with these concepts. The workshop will cover basic calculations to enable the student to perform basic “back of the envelope” assessments of risks and hazards in various simple scenarios of interest and will provide the student with basic documentation that will be useful in performing these assessments.

Fall 2013 - MIIS

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NPTG 8507 - CybrscurityAspctsOfNucSecurity      

This course is designed to provide the student with a basic knowledge of the issues relating to cyber security, from both a technical and historic perspective. The basic concepts of cyber security that will allow the student to understand the current concerns, vocabulary, and basic principles involved in cyber security will be considered, along with the technologies used to prevent and detect cyber-attacks. The history of cyber-attacks, basic concepts and considerations of cyber warfare, hacking, and basic concepts such as authentication and encryption will be covered along with the major efforts and initiatives that have been developed by the international community to deal with them. A particular focus of the course will be on cyber security as it relates to the field of nuclear security.

Fall 2013 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS

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NPTG 8508 - Non-State actors in DigitalAge      

Almost every aspect of international affairs is impacted by cyber matters. This 2-unit course explores how the interplay of non-state actors and cyber issues has fundamentally changed our understanding of conflict and security in the digitized, twenty-first century.

The first portion will examine: a) traditional theories regarding the causes of conflicts involving one or more non-state actors; b) various types of non-state actors (terrorists, insurgents, criminal organizations, militias, the private sector, non-governmental organizations, international organizations and malicious cyber groups); c) how these non-state actors use information, communication and technology; and d) the implication of these digital-age factors on contemporary peace and security efforts.

The second portion will apply the theories and tools discussed in the class to case studies of Afghanistan, Brazil, China, Estonia, Georgia, Iraq, Libya, Nigeria and Russia. Another country or sub-topic may be explored upon approval. Participants will select a case of their choosing and conduct research in small groups. Each group is expected to submit one 20-30 page paper as well as a present their findings to the class. Each of these deliverables will count for 40 percent of the final grade. The remaining 20 percent is based on class participation.

Participants will learn about the complex of issues at play; develop critical thinking skills on how and when to apply theory to practice; gain experience in researching topics in a multi-disciplinary manner that mirrors considerations being factored in the policy environment; and gain exposure to executing the type of group papers and presentations that are expected in the workplace.

Spring 2014 - MIIS

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NPTG 8510 - Security&ArmsCntrl-N East Asia      

This course will examine contemporary issues relating to nuclear arms control, disarmament, and nonproliferation in Northeast Asia. Topics to be examined include China's strategic modernization, North Korea's nuclear and ballistic missile programs, and US extended deterrence commitments to Japan, South Korea and Taiwan.

Spring 2013 - MIIS, Spring 2014 - MIIS

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NPTG 8516 - NPT Simulation      

This course is devoted to a simulation of the 2015 NPT Review Conference (RevCon), which will be held in New York in spring 2015. The RevCon will be the culmination of the five-year review process since the 2010 NPT RevCon, and will involve multilateral negotiations on the implementation of the NPT, with special reference to issues of nuclear disarmament, nonproliferation, and peaceful uses of nuclear energy. Based on the outcomes of the 2010 NPT Review Conference and the 2012, 2013, and 2014 NPT Preparatory Committee (PrepCom) meetings, one would expect major debates at the 2015 RevCon on the subjects of the humanitarian consequences of nuclear weapons, further reductions in all types of nuclear weapons, creation of additional nuclear-weapon-free zones (especially in the Middle East), negative security assurances, nonproliferation compliance, international safeguards, nuclear terrorism, peaceful nuclear uses, and provisions for withdrawal from the Treaty. Depending on the current state of US-Russian relations following the 2014 crisis in Ukraine, there also may be major debates over the value of virtues of nuclear renunciation and the value of negative security assurances and extended deterrence.

Students will assume the roles of delegates to the PrepCom from ten or more states, possibly including Canada, Chile, China, Egypt, France, Indonesia, Iran, Ireland, Japan, Mexico, Peru, Russia, South Africa, and the United States. In most instances, delegations will consist of two students. The precise number of states will depend on the size of the class.

The base point for the simulation is the “real world.” Dr. William Potter will be the principal instructor. He will be assisted in the course by other CNS experts.

(1) The simulation places a premium on interpersonal skills and oral communication.

(2) Emphasis will be placed on developing analytical and political skills relevant to operation in a foreign ministry and other national and international organization bureaucracies. The written component of the course will entail preparation of concise policy papers and drafting of international legal texts.

(3) Students will be required to immerse themselves in the historical record of prior NPT negotiations, especially those related to the 2010 NPT Review Conference and the 2012, 2013, and 2014 NPT PrepComs.

(4) Students will become familiar with the process of multilateral negotiations, which places a premium on coordinating positions across and gaining consensus from a large number of states with diverse national interests and objectives.

(5) Students will be expected to develop an understanding of the multiple expectations of the NPT regime by various states parties and regional groups, as well as to generate constructive ideas to meet the political challenges facing the NPT today.

Fall 2013 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS

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NPTG 8520 - Intro to Homeland Security      

This course introduces students to principles, concepts, and structures of an all-hazards approach to homeland security. The course begins with a brief overview of natural and man-made hazards and the federal, state, local, and international agencies created and reoriented to respond to these hazards since 2001. The focus then shifts to functional areas of homeland security, including intelligence, border security, transportation security, cyber security, critical infrastructure protection, and emergency response and recovery. The course concludes by considering how capabilities in each of these functional areas can be integrated and enhanced by risk assessment, planning, communications, and science and technology.

Spring 2013 - MIIS, Spring 2014 - MIIS

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NPTG 8522 - Iran's Nuclear Program      

This workshop serves as an overview to Iran's nuclear program since its development during the Shah period in the 1970's to the Islamic Republic in the present. Topics that will be covered include the geopolitics of Iran, the proliferation of nuclear weapons in the Middle East, and Iranian threat perceptions. Also, Iranian national security in a regional and global context and the role of domestic Iranian politics in the state's nuclear policy will be examined. Finally, the workshop covers the concerns and objectives of U.S. policy towards Iran's nuclear program efforts and nonproliferation and arms control initiatives of international institutions vis-a-vis Iran.

Spring 2013 - MIIS, Spring 2014 - MIIS

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NPTG 8523 - Wks:US Nuclr Weapns Hist &Cost      

This workshop explores how and why the United States spent more than $8 trillion to build 66,000 nuclear weapons since the 1940s, conduct more than 1,000 nuclear tests, and deploy and maintain a worldwide network of delivery systems (including aircraft, missiles, ships, and submarines), sensors, and communications assets capable of unleashing (or defending against) unimaginable destruction. Key developments and turning points in the history of the US nuclear weapons program will be discussed, and the substantial human health, environmental, and economic costs of the testing, production, and deployment of US nuclear weapons will be quantified and assessed, along with the effectiveness—and effects—of efforts to keep secret large parts of the program. Guest speakers will address the management, cleanup, and disposal of radioactive and toxic wastes resulting from bomb production and testing as well as the effectiveness of congressional oversight of nuclear weapons programs. The ongoing and anticipated future costs of US nuclear weapons (as much as $1 trillion over the next 30 years) will also be discussed. Basic knowledge of nuclear weapons and the Cold War is helpful but not essential.

Spring 2013 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS

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NPTG 8529 - TabletopExerciseDesign&Operatn      

A tabletop exercise (TTX) is a guided discussion of a scenario—a time-compressed sequence of events—that facilitates group problem solving. TTXs are particularly advantageous to governmental and nongovernmental organizations, as well as private businesses because they permit participants to practice response to high-consequence/low-frequency problems. Based on results from a TTX, organizations can develop new plans, or enhance existing plans, for how they will meet the challenges of catastrophic events such as floods and fires, disease outbreaks, sabotage of facilities, and others. Public agencies and private sector entities alike have to ensure business and service continuity, as well as protecting the safety and security of employees, during times of duress, and thus all can benefit from testing their preparedness and response plans using TTXs. Given their utility in illuminating anticipated performance, expectations, and assumptions, TTXs can be also useful in many other situations that would benefit from enhancing teamwork and multi-agency collaboration while assessing the content of plans and policies. Following successful completion of this workshop, students will be able to plan, execute, and evaluate a TTX, as well as make appropriate decisions regarding when and where it is an applicable tool for planning and response purposes.

Spring 2013 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS

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NPTG 8530 - Terrorism&MediaInTheMiddleEast      

The media and terrorism are soul mates-virtually inseparable – terrorist spectacles are high profile, ratings-building events. This course examines the interplay of terrorism, the media, publics and the political process in the Middle East. We will look at how the media shapes and is shaped by terrorism and the concepts and theories relating to terrorism and the news production process, the agenda-setting nature of the news media, the interrelationship between journalists and public officials, media and terrorism. This course evaluates how different media sources provide information about terrorism, and the institutional arrangements between the media and governments, particularly in the aftermath of the Arab Spring.

Spring 2013 - MIIS, Spring 2014 - MIIS

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NPTG 8531 - Wks: Writing & Briefing Memos      

Fall 2014 - MIIS

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NPTG 8533 - Geospatial Tools forNPAnalysis      

This course serves to introduce students to the increasingly important role of overhead reconnaissance and imagery analysis in nonproliferation. Students will receive a background in the rise of commercial satellite imagery and its open-source intelligence applications. They will learn basic techniques for identifying nuclear- and missile-related facilities by using their knowledge of how these facilities work, ground photos, and crowd-sourcing. Students will also learn how to order and manipulate satellite imagery in Google Earth and SketchUp in order to derive new value-added information for their research.

Spring 2013 - MIIS, Fall 2013 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS

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NPTG 8544 - CreationWMD FreeZoneMiddleEast      

The course will review the efforts undertaken to create a Nuclear Weapons Free Zone in the Middle East, with particular emphasis on the positions of the main players: Egypt and the Arab World, Israel and Iran. The course will also attempt to draw lessons from the different experiences and offer suggested policy options and solutions to facilitate the creation of a NWFZ in the Middle East.

Spring 2013 - MIIS

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NPTG 8549 - Wks:Human Trafficking      

This workshop will examine human trafficking as an emerging public issue, while focusing on the real-world challenges to identifying and rescuing victims, prosecuting traffickers, while also addressing the socio-economic and cultural dynamics that are leveraged by traffickers. This course will focus heavily on the multi-disciplinary, victim-centered approach promoted through international and domestic anti-human trafficking protocols and policies, including the Trafficking Victims Protection Act of 2000 and the subsequent reauthorizations.

The course will include an examination of relevant existing data, types of trafficking, legal definitions, domestic and international efforts to combat trafficking, challenges faced by law enforcement, the nexus between trafficking and other transnational crime, the role of traditional NGOs and social entrepreneurs, and corporate social responsibility. Finally, we will examine potential career opportunities related to combating human trafficking and the leadership, collaboration and consensus-building skills necessary for success, whether working in the global arena or for a local agency.

Spring 2013 - MIIS, Spring 2014 - MIIS

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NPTG 8555 - Pakistan & the Bomb      

This workshop is designed to provide understanding of the motivations of a state – in this case, Pakistan – that chooses to develop nuclear weapons despite severe political and economic conditions as means to redress its acute sense of insecurity.

Pakistan’s steadfast attachment to nuclear weapons is a product of its decades-old struggle to improve its precarious security predicament vis-à-vis India; a stronger and increasingly assertive neighbor. Over three decades since the original decision was made by Zulfiqar Ali Bhutto to initiate the bomb program, Pakistan has struggled through an extraordinarily difficult set of regional and international security problems in which its nuclear weapons posture was minimally commensurate to the array of threats. Today a staunch belief in the invincibility of its nuclear weapons, as the ultimate guarantor of national survivability, is central to Pakistan’s national security policy.

The security landscape around Pakistan is changing fast, and the transformative shifts in the international and regional environments are creating new predicaments and imperatives for Pakistan’s defense and security as it modernizes its armed forces and refines it nuclear strategy and force posture. The workshop provides the historical context that led to Pakistan’s decision to go nuclear, and explains the driving factors that affect its present and future policies. It will help develop understanding how and why international efforts and non-proliferation regime failed to stop Pakistan’s quest from acquiring the nuclear capability and how it transited into becoming an advance nuclear power. Finally, it will analyze the role of nuclear weapons in Pakistan’s security policy and its impact on regional security dynamics.

This workshop is developed from the instructor’s military, diplomatic, and scholarly experience – that includes contribution to Pakistan’s nuclear policy, strategic planning, and active participation in international negotiations on arms control and disarmament issues. The workshop will mainly derive from the experience of last two decades in which he was intimately involved in nuclear policies and subsequent life as scholar.

This workshop is premised under the assumption that the student maintains a baseline understanding of nuclear technologies, non-proliferation regimes, and norms and basic knowledge of history of South Asia. Students are encouraged to read authors book Eating Grass: The Making of the Pakistani Bomb (Stanford University Press, 2012).

Fall 2013 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS

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NPTG 8557 - Nonproliferation Law & Policy      

international law of treaties; the role of the United Nations; domestic nonproliferation policymaking structures and processes; the roles of the executive and legislative branches of government; the utility of international nonproliferation sanctions; the legality of the use of force to combat proliferation; legal solutions to the problem of nuclear smuggling; the effectiveness of multilateral safeguards and inspections; and rules governing civilian commerce in nuclear goods. Attention will be given to examining the hierarchy of legal instruments; mandatory versus voluntary measures and the evolution of norms and customary law; the interaction of international agreements and domestic law; and the interplay of programs, mandatory rules, and discretionary policy. In addition, the course will also explore the impact on the effectiveness of law-based nonproliferation measures of gaps in their scope, acceptance, implementation, and enforcement.

The course will be conducted using both the lecture and classroom exercises, and active student participation is both encouraged and required.

Spring 2013 - MIIS, Spring 2014 - MIIS

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NPTG 8558 - Israel and the Bomb      

This course is a comprehensive introduction to the study of Israel’s nuclear history and policy within the broader context of understanding the nuclear dimension of Middle East politics. The course focuses on the uniqueness and the exceptionality that constitutes Israel’s nuclear history and policy. By that uniqueness we mean the original policy which Israel devised to acquire and possess nuclear weapons that ultimately made Israel an exceptional case both vis-à-vis the United States non-proliferation policies and vis-a-vis the non-proliferation regime. That policy is known as Israel’s policy of “nuclear opacity” or “nuclear ambiguity,” under which Israel has never officially acknowledged to acquire or possess nuclear weapons, even though since 1970s Israel is universally presumed as a nuclear weapons state. The course ends with reflections about challenge that Israel’s nuclear uniqueness poses both to the United States nonproliferation policy and the non-proliferation regime as a whole.

Fall 2013 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS

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NPTG 8559 - Science & Technology for NPTS      

This course provides students with a solid foundation in scientific and technical fundamentals critical to nonproliferation and terrorism policy analysis. Such policy analyses often require strong foundational knowledge of basic scientific and technical concepts in order to understand, create, and inform policy decisions. The course begins with an introduction to science and the scientific method and then evolves into the three main areas: biological weapons, chemical weapons, nuclear weapons and relevant technologies. Topics covered in the biological component include fundamental concepts related to microorganisms, DNA, RNA, proteins, and processes of infection and disease. Topics covered in the chemistry component include fundamental concepts related to atomic structure and the periodic table, chemical structural representations, functional groups, reactivity, toxicity, as well as modern separation, purification and analytic techniques commonly used for chemical species. Applications of the fundamental concepts in the first two topics are further developed in relation to features of chemical and biological weapons and warfare, including agents, delivery methods and effects. Topics covered in the nuclear component part of the course includes radioactivity, uranium, nuclear weapons, radiation detection instrumentation and applications, environmental plumes, and various instrumentation and analysis techniques. Upon completion of this course students will have a deeper appreciation for the debate on various verification solutions that have been proposed for compliance under the Biological and Toxin Weapons Convention (BWC), Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC) and nuclear treaties.

Spring 2013 - MIIS, Fall 2013 - MIIS, Spring 2014 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS

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NPTG 8563 - Evolutn ofChineseNuclearPolicy      

This course, on the evolution of Chinese nuclear policy, is divided into three parts. The first part outlines early Chinese attitudes to nuclear weapons, proliferation and disarmament, prior to and immediately following China’s nuclear test in 1964. The second part examines enduring concepts in Chinese nuclear policy, such as No First Use, and introduces students to important debates in China since the 1980s on nuclear deterrence. The third part focuses on contemporary issues and challenges that shape Chinese nuclear policy, from ballistic missile defense, to the South Asian nuclear tests in 1999, and the North Korean nuclear crisis. The nature of the US-China nuclear relationship will also be explored. The principal objective of the course is to give students a better understanding of China’s nuclear policy, both past and present. A secondary objective is to introduce to students key literature and sources, both in English and Chinese, on this issue.

Fall 2013 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS

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NPTG 8567 - The IAEA and Nuclear Politics      

The objective of this Workshop is to study the IAEA as a key component of the multilateral framework relating to nuclear issues. The Workshop will trace the historical evolution of the Agency since US President Eisenhower's Atoms for Peace address to the UNGA in 1953, study its relationship with the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty (NPT) which propelled the IAEA to the center of global political focus, and examine the issues that dominate the Agency’s current agenda. These issues include current deliberations on safeguards and verification, determinations of related non-compliance, the debates surrounding peaceful uses and the technical cooperation program, proposals on “assurance of supply” and the renewal of emphasis on nuclear safety and security.

The Workshop will also examine the dynamics of the policy-making organs of the Agency such as the Board of Governors and the General Conference. This includes the political and diplomatic interaction among the Member States of the Agency - the Western States, developing states of the G77 and the Non-Aligned Group , and the Arab group in implementing the “three pillars” of the mandate of the Agency: safeguards and verification , promotion of peaceful uses and safety and security. The Workshop will also examine whether the IAEA continues to remain a consensus –based organization characterized by the harmonious “spirit of Vienna”, or whether there is a gradual polarization of interests in an Organization which was established for the “technical” purpose of promoting nuclear energy for peaceful purposes.

This Workshop is recommended for students who wish to study the role of the IAEA in global nuclear issues , as well as for students who wish to develop an insight into the related diplomatic and political interactions. Students who are seeking a career/internship in an international organization will also benefit from the topical and functional emphasis of this course.

Spring 2013 - MIIS

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NPTG 8574 - Intro to WMD Nonproliferation      

This course surveys the issues surrounding the proliferation of nuclear, chemical, and biological weapons and ballistic missiles. It also provides an introduction to nuclear and radiological terrorism, and an overview of the international nonproliferation regime.

The course is divided into three main parts: Part 1 provides an overview of the trends and technologies of WMD proliferation. Part 2 considers the nonproliferation regime in detail, concentrating on the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT), the conventions banning chemical and biological weapons, supplier regimes and export controls, and verification and compliance issues. Part 3 returns to challenges to the nonproliferation regime, including states of proliferation concern known or believed to be developing WMD outside or in defiance of the NPT, CWC, and BWC and tensions within the nonproliferation regime, and discusses the range of international, multilateral, and unilateral responses to these challenges

Spring 2013 - MIIS, Fall 2013 - MIIS, Spring 2014 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS

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NPTG 8577 - Special Ops & CounterTerrorism      

The role of special operations in combatting the terrorist threat has evolved since 9/11. Indeed, special operations forces (SOF) have been the post-9/11 military instrument of choice, particularly for sensitive, direct action operations of which failure--such as the killing of Osama bin Laden -- is not an option. Indeed, the skills and technologies that these combat forces apply are unmatched and highly effective. However, the fact that SOF forces are in such high demand and are used increasingly for a host of alternative mission assignments raises a contentious issue: are special operations units still “special”?
This workshop will explore several intelligence and SOF related capabilities and challenges related to their roles in countering terrorism. Intelligence and Special Operations Forces play critical roles in combating terrorist threats. To be sure, both intelligence and SOF have been instrumental in addressing all major threats to US national security for the past several decades, but since 9/11 both have increased in importance to U.S. policy makers as they address America's new enemies; transnational, non-state actors with global reach and who are seeking access to weapons of mass destruction.

Spring 2013 - MIIS, Spring 2014 - MIIS

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NPTG 8578 - Intel & Counterterrorism      

This workshop will explore several intelligence related capabilities and challenges related to their roles in countering terrorism. Intelligence has played a critical role in addressing all major threats to US national security for the past several decades. However, since 9/11 intelligence collection, analysis and dissemination have increased in importance to U.S. policy makers as they address America's new enemies; transnational, non-state actors with global reach and who are seeking access to weapons of mass destruction. The Intelligence in Counterterrorism Workshop describes intelligence capabilities and actions in countering terrorist operations and activities. With regards to intelligence the workshop discusses the "intelligence cycle," the full gamut of intelligence gathering disciplines will be discussed. However, signals, technical, and human intelligence gathering will be emphasized, as will the challenges of gathering intelligence in denied areas. The workshop relies heavily on case studies and guest lecturers to reflect the challenges and opportunities facing the intelligence community in America's counterterrorism efforts.

Fall 2013 - MIIS

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NPTG 8584 - Introduction to Terrorism      

This course is designed to provide a critical introduction to the subject of terrorism, an often misunderstood phenomenon that has assumed a particular salience in the wake of 9/11. Its aim is to clarify fundamental definitional and conceptual problems, introduce students to the burgeoning literature on the subject, describe basic terrorist organizational and operational methods, survey a wide range of terrorist groups and ideologies, examine certain high-profile terrorism themes, and tentatively assess the nature of the threat posed by terrorists to global security in the future.

Spring 2013 - MIIS, Fall 2013 - MIIS, Spring 2014 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS

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NPTG 8600 - Sem:NucPolcyFormatnInNewAdmin      

This course will survey the main nuclear security and nonproliferation issues facing the new administration, including key elements of US-Russia nuclear weapons policy, regional proliferation including Iran and North Korea, nuclear weapon material security, missile defense and other issues. The class will track how the newly inaugurated president organizes his government, and how policies for these issue are developed. Students must have completed Intro to WMD.

Spring 2013 - MIIS

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NPTG 8603 - Sem:The American Radical Right      

This seminar is designed to provide an overview of several important right-wing ideological milieus, movements, and organizations operating in the United States, including violent paramilitary groups, and is specifically intended for graduate students who have already taken lecture-oriented undergraduate or graduate courses dealing with terrorism. The class will be divided into three separate portions. In the first portion, the lectures and readings will focus on defining the right, identifying the characteristic features of the American extreme right, and describing different types of right-wing organizations that may pose domestic security threats. Since certain violent far right paramilitary organizations nowadays constitute the greatest terrorist threat to the U.S. homeland (apart from foreign jihadist groups), it is necessary for every student interested in contemporary extremism, subversion, and terrorism to become more knowledgeable about key domestic radical right groups, their agendas, and their tactics. During the second portion of the course, students will spend their time working independently on the individual research topics they have selected, which can deal with any aspect of terrorism that interests them. During the third and final portion of the course, each student will give an oral report in class to present and analyze his or her research paper findings, which will then be discussed by the entire class. Near the end of this last portion of the class, if not earlier, students must submit their completed research papers.

Spring 2014 - MIIS

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NPTG 8605 - CTBT:Policy & Technical Issues      

The Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT): Policy and Technical Issues

This workshop will review the history of weapons testing and agreements leading up to the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT). The CTBT and its organization (CTBTO) will be examined from both policy and technical perspectives, along with an analysis of subcritical testing and other CTBT-related issues of nonproliferation importance that may remain even if the CTBT comes into force.

Spring 2014 - MIIS

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NPTG 8610 - Seminar: Counterterrorism      

September 11, 2001 changed the way Americans view their security forever. Terrorism is no longer “someone else’s” problem. Now Americans are traumatically aware of how vulnerable they are to terrorism and terrorists. Given the events of the last decade and the ongoing campaign against global terrorism, it is imperative that citizens and their leaders understand and make sense of the threat, as well as conceptualize how terrorism might best be challenged and terrorists defeated. The “Counter-terrorism Seminar” is designed to address the challenges of terrorism in the current and future global security environment in a participatory format. Specifically, the seminar briefly reviews the threat terrorism poses to liberal democratic states, citizens and policymakers, then explores how liberal democracies can best predict, prevent, preempt and, if necessary, directly combat terrorism and terrorists. Five themes provide the course framework: Challenges to a Free Society, Strategies for Combating Terrorism, Eclectic (new) approaches to Countering Terrorism, Winning the (so called) War on Terrorism, and Counterterrorism in the post-bin Laden Security Environment. Also, controversial topics such as covert action, rendition, targeted killings, enhanced interrogation (torture), are discussed with particular emphasis on the legality of these and other counter-terror measures. The seminar culminates with a look into the future by discussing the challenges of the post-bin Laden terrorist threat and strategizing means to mitigate the threat.

Fall 2013 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS

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NPTG 8612 - NucTreatyVerficatn/VirtualWrld      

Spring 2014 - MIIS

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NPTG 8620 - SEM: Drones & Surveillance      

We live in an era of satellite surveillance, video monitoring, and electronic surveillance and now the hot button topic of drones performing these tasks in addition to armed drones carrying out assassinations. This 4 unit seminar course will deal with the technical, policy, and legal issues involved in these subjects Privacy rights are often in conflict with the technical capabilities in these and other areas. Civil liberties are balanced against security interest, with or without the knowledge of the population. The course will provide the student with a working understanding of the issues involved in the current use of drones and overhead surveillance and will provide a look at the future uses and limitations, examining how civil liberties are and can be balanced against security interests.

Fall 2014 - MIIS

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NPTG 8624 - Sem:Countrinsurgency in S.Asia      

Insurgency and Terrorism: According to Alex Schmid, an insurgency is: “an armed uprising, revolt, or rebellion by a political group or party against a domestic or foreign ruling in order to subvert it, overthrow it, expel it, and break away from it, or simply to enhance the group’s bargaining position for subsequent political compromise. Acts of terrorism are a frequent occurrence in many insurgencies.” According to Jeffrey Bale, terrorism refers to: “the use or threatened use of violence, usually directed against victims selected for their symbolic or representative value, as a means of instilling anxiety in, transmitting one or more messages to, and thereby manipulating the perceptions and behavior of wider target audiences.”

This course examines various insurgent movements that have persisted in South Asia for several decades and the different strategies that have been employed by governments to roll back these insurgencies. Geographically, South Asia includes India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Nepal, Bangladesh, Bhutan, and the Maldives. For the purpose of this course, South Asia will also include Afghanistan, which is closely enmeshed in security dynamics related to other parts of the subcontinent, especially Pakistan. In the course of the semester, several case studies of insurgent movements will be examined, such as the Taliban insurgency in Afghanistan and Pakistan, and the Maoist insurgencies in Nepal and India. Other case studies will include the three-decade long campaign by the Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam (LTTE) in Sri Lanka, and several cases of insurgencies in northeastern India, involving groups such as the United Liberation Front of Assam (ULFA) and the National Socialist Council of Nagaland (NSCN).

Spring 2014 - MIIS

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NPTG 8626 - Sem:StratTradeCntrls&Nonprolif      

Strategic trade controls -- which include export, brokering, transshipment and transit controls, as well as supply chain security issues -- are important tools in international nonproliferation efforts. These controls when used effectively can raise the cost of WMD acquisitions, prolong the time needed for development, and deny proliferant actors easy access to items and technologies necessary for WMD programs.

This seminar will focus on four important issues. One is how states balance between the pursuit of wealth and security. Second is the issue of cooperation among states on nonproliferation-related trade controls in light of a globalized economy. The third is the effectiveness of strategic trade controls as instruments in supporting nonproliferation objectives given the changing nature of technology and the global trade environment. The theoretical debate on these issues continues to revolve around the question of how states initiate, implement, and sustain international cooperation against the competing pressures of trade, domestic politics, and national security. Finally, the course will engage trade control practitioners from government agencies and industry as guest speakers and facilitators in order to fully understand how the issues surrounding strategic trade control impact the trade and security communities in today’s changing world.

Spring 2013 - MIIS, Spring 2014 - MIIS

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NPTG 8627 - Sem:Militant Islamic Movements      

This seminar is designed to provide a survey of various militant Islamic organizations – “gradualist” Islamist organizations that do not rely mainly on waging armed jihad, jihadist organizations that rely primarily on violence and terrorism, and other types of fundamentalist or Islamist organizations that do not fall clearly into either category – and is specifically intended for graduate students who have already taken lecture-oriented undergraduate or graduate courses dealing with terrorism. The class will be divided into two separate portions. In the first portion, the lectures and readings will focus on the basic tenets of Islam; an overview of Islamic history; the distinction between Islamic fundamentalism, political Islam, and Islamism; and important examples of the different types of Islamist organizations noted above in particular regions. Given the threat that such Islamist networks and their supporters currently pose to the security of the West, Russia, India, various states in Asia, and moderate Muslims everywhere, it is necessary for every student interested in contemporary subversion and terrorism to become much more knowledgeable about key Islamist and jihadist groups, their agendas, and their tactics. During the second portion of the course, each student will give an oral report in class to present and analyze his or her research findings, which will then be discussed by the entire class. Near the end of this second portion of the class, if not earlier, students must submit their completed research papers.

Fall 2013 - MIIS

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NPTG 8633 - SemAdvTerrrism:Global Jihadism      

This seminar is designed to provide a more in-depth examination of transnational jihadist organizations and networks with a global agenda, and is specifically intended for graduate students who have already taken lecture-oriented undergraduate or graduate courses dealing with terrorism. The class will be divided into three separate portions. During the first portion, after a session devoted to the provision of basic information about terrorism, terrorism research methods, Islam, and Islamism, everyone in the class will read chapters from a series of important recent books that deal with global jihadist networks and their objectives. Given the threat that such networks and their supporters currently pose to the security of the West, Russia, India, various states in Asia, and moderate Muslims everywhere, it is necessary for every student interested in terrorism to become much more knowledgeable about the jihadist agenda. During the second portion of the course, students will spend their time working independently on the individual research topics they have selected, which can deal with any aspect of terrorism that interests them. During the third and final portion, each student will give an oral report in class to present and analyze his or her research findings, which will then be discussed by the entire class. Near the end of this last portion of the class, if not earlier, students must submit their completed research papers. The course requirements are as follows: regular attendance and active participation in class discussions (30% of grade), an oral report to be delivered in class (30% of grade), and a 15-20 page research paper (40% of grade).

Spring 2013 - MIIS, Spring 2014 - MIIS

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NPTG 8634 - Sem:AdvTerrrism:Millenarianism      

This seminar is designed to provide an in-depth examination of certain key aspects of contemporary terrorism, and is specifically intended for graduate students who have already taken lecture-oriented undergraduate or graduate courses dealing with terrorism. The class will be divided into three separate portions. During the first portion, after a session devoted to the provision of basic information about terrorism and terrorism research methods, everyone in the class will read chapters from a series of important recent books that deal with apocalyptic millenarian groups and their objectives. Given the fact that groups of this type have periodically carried out serious acts of violence, either against “evil” outsiders or their own members, it is necessary for students interested in terrorism to obtain some knowledge about their characteristics. During the second portion of the course, students will spend their time working independently on the individual research topics they have selected, which can deal with any aspect of terrorism that interests them. During the third and final portion, each student will give an oral report in class to present and analyze his or her research findings, which will then be discussed by the entire class. Near the end of this last portion of the class, if not earlier, students must submit their completed research papers. The course requirements are as follows: regular attendance and active participation in class discussions (30% of grade), an oral report to be delivered in class (30% of grade), and a 15-20 page research paper (40% of grade).

Spring 2013 - MIIS

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NPTG 8639 - Sem:Deter&InfluencTerrorsm&WMD      

This seminar examines deterrence and other strategies for responding to security threats, with a focus on how those strategies might be adapted to deal with the dangers posed by terrorism and WMD proliferation. The course will survey existing research on deterrence and various alternative policy tools such as coercive diplomacy, assurance, positive incentives, and soft power. It will introduce some of the latest thinking about whether these tools are useful for influencing actors away from support for terrorism or WMD acquisition or use.

Spring 2013 - MIIS, Spring 2014 - MIIS

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NPTG 8642 - SEM: Moral Dilemmas of Nuc Age      

The invention of the atom bomb and subsequent reality of living under threats of mutual assured destruction have created moral dilemmas and paradoxes of a scale that humanity has never before experienced. If waging a nuclear war is viewed as an unprecedented crime against humanity, something that can never be justified morally, how is it that we have created and legitimated a global world-order that relies on the pledge to commit these very crimes? This seminar will explore, from both a historical and an analytical perspective, the dilemmas and paradoxes of the nuclear age. Historically, we will try to examine some of the big decisions of the nuclear age as fundamentally moral decisions. Analytically, we will explore the moral dimensions of nuclear deterrence.

Fall 2013 - MIIS

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NPTG 8646 - Sem: Terror & CT in Africa      

The Terrorism and Counterterrorism in Africa Seminar will address increased terrorist activity in Africa, and familiarize students with known terrorist organizations throughout the continent such as al Qaeda in the Islamic Maghreb (AQIM), Al Shabaab, the Lords Revolutionary Army (LRA), Boka Haram, the Libyan Armed Fighters Group, and the Movement for the Emancipation of the Niger Delta (MEND) among others. Seminar participants will evaluate U.S. and international counterterrorism policy and operations in Africa. Based on their evaluation, students will be asked to suggest unilateral, multilateral, “alternative” and mutually supporting policies and operations to address terrorist activity in Africa. In an effort to best apply “theory to practice,” seminar participants will learn how to prepare and apply African related terrorist group profiles and terrorist threat matrices as part of a group exercise and culminating presentation.

Spring 2013 - MIIS, Spring 2014 - MIIS

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NPTG 8652 - Sem:Missiles,MissileDefense&NP      

Spring 2013 - MIIS

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NPTG 8653 - Sem: Nuclear Trafficking      

This course is designed to provide the student with a basic knowledge of the issues relating to nuclear trafficking, from both a technical and historic perspective. The nuclear and other radioactive materials useful for either an improvised nuclear device, a dispersal device, or a simple exposure device will be considered, along with the technologies used to prevent and detect trafficking in these materials. The history of trafficking in these materials, design concepts, and hoaxes and scams relating to these issues will be covered along with the major efforts and initiatives that have been developed by the international community to deal with them.

Fall 2013 - MIIS

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NPTG 8654 - Sem:WMDProliferatnInMiddleEast      

This seminar examines the proliferation of nuclear, biological, and chemical weapons in the Middle East, including historical developments, the present context, and alternate potential futures.

Although the focus is on state actors, proliferation risks posed by non-state terrorist organizations will be discussed as well. The course will begin with overview sessions on why states do and do not pursue and acquire nuclear, biological, and chemical weapons and on the internal and intrastate politics of the region. Subsequent sessions will focus on key regional countries. The course will conclude with integrative simulation sessions allowing participants to wrestle with the prospects for proliferation and nonproliferation in the region. Students will prepare weekly short memos, conduct group work for integrative simulation exercises, prepare an independent research project, and have various presentation opportunities.
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Spring 2013 - MIIS, Spring 2014 - MIIS

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NPTG 8656 - Sem: Nuclear Forensics      

Nuclear forensics deals with the science related to the determination of the origins of nuclear materials such as uranium and plutonium and to the policy considerations, such as attribution, which result from determinations that can be made. In addition to science and policy considerations the course will cover the current international efforts in nuclear forensics and survey the performance of conventional forensics in the presence of radioactive material and related issues such as radioactive crime scene management and expert testimony on nuclear forensics issues.

Spring 2013 - MIIS, Spring 2014 - MIIS

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NPTG 8658 - Sem: CBRN Terrorism      

The goal of this seminar is to develop the skills necessary to analyze the motivations and capabilities of non-state actors to acquire and use weapons of mass destruction (WMD), more specifically chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear (CBRN) weapons and materials, for terrorist purposes. Through class discussions, simulation exercises, and individual research, students will review the technical aspects of CBRN, examine the history of CBRN use by terrorists, assess CBRN terrorism threats and vulnerabilities, and assess policy responses to CBRN terrorism. Students are required to have substantial background knowledge of either CBRN or terrorism before joining the seminar.

Students will prepare weekly short memos, conduct group work for integrative simulation exercises, prepare an independent research project, and have various presentation opportunities.

Spring 2013 - MIIS, Fall 2013 - MIIS, Spring 2014 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS

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NPTG 8662 - MANPTS Honors Thesis      

The MANPTS Honors Thesis is a highly selective program through which a limited number of students will design and conduct individual research projects of professional length, scope, and quality under the guidance of a faculty advisor. Applications for the honors thesis will be accepted in the Spring from students in their second or subsequent semesters in the NPTS MA program who are currently maintaining a GPA of 3.7 or higher. Applications will require a personal statement, academic transcript, sample of research writing, proposal for the thesis, and recommendation from a member of the faculty or research staff. In recommending a student for the honors thesis, a faculty or staff member must agree to serve as the student’s thesis advisor if the student is selected for the program. The NPTS Program Chair will appoint a selection committee composed of NPTS faculty and staff from the appropriate MIIS research centers to review applications. Students will be selected for the honors thesis on the basis of GPA, demonstrated proficiency in research and analytical writing, and any other relevant criteria as determined by the selection committee. Throughout the Fall semester, thesis advisors will provide students enrolled in IPOL 8610 with individualized supervision of their thesis projects in a manner similar to a directed study. Thesis advisors will set a schedule for research and writing of the thesis and will meet with students as needed to review progress and provide comments and advice. At the end of the Fall semester, students will present their projects to the Monterey Institute community in a symposium at which invited experts will provide comments and suggestions for further development and publication of research.

Spring 2013 - MIIS, Fall 2013 - MIIS, Spring 2014 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS

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NPTG 8668 - Sem:Terrorism in South Asia      

Terrorist violence has persisted in various parts of South Asia for several decades. A variety of interconnected reasons can be assigned to this phenomenon – state sponsorship, separatist tendencies, religious and sectarian divides, and political meddling. Terrorism in South Asia is also a crucial concern because of its broader connections to extra-regional terrorist networks. The two dominant states in South Asia possess nuclear weapons and have a long history of military conflict and have periodically experienced crises situations provoked by terrorist attacks. Additionally, the history of proliferation networks and concerns over Pakistan’s nuclear security further exacerbate the threat perception from terrorist networks.

The object of this course is to understand the causes and dimensions of terrorism in South Asia and to analyze positions adopted by the involved parties, state and non-state. From the policy perspective, this is essential toward formulating responses to terrorism in the region. South Asia is conventionally defined as the region comprising the countries of India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Nepal, Sri Lanka, Bhutan and the Maldives. But for the purposes of this seminar we will also look at developments in Afghanistan (generally considered as South-West Asia), given its crucial links to terrorism issues in South Asia.

Fall 2013 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS

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NPTG 8674 - Sem:Terrorism in SouthEastAsia      

Various parts of South-East Asia have been plagued by terrorist violence in recent decades. South-East Asia refers to the region eastward from Burma/Myanmar till the Philippines. This course studies the phenomenon of terrorism in countries of the region such as Thailand, Indonesia, Malaysia and the Philippines. Some of the groups that this course examines include – Jemaah Islamiyah, Abu Sayyaf, Moro Islamic Liberation Front – their objectives, characteristics, composition, ideologies, tactics and fund-raising. Apart from these cases, the course also examines thematic issues such as the prospect of WMD terrorism and proliferation of WMD materials, maritime terrorism and piracy, and U.S. policy on counter-terrorism in South-East Asia. We also discuss connections between groups in South-East Asia and regional and global terrorist groups elsewhere, such as Al Qaeda and the Taliban. In order to have a comprehensive picture of non-state security threats in the region, the course also examines the various insurgent movements in Myanmar. Finally, given the close security dynamics between Australia and South-East Asia, this course also looks at terrorism-related issues in Australia.

Spring 2013 - MIIS

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NPTG 8675 - Sem:Nuc Renaissance& Nonprolif      

This seminar focuses on the nonproliferation, nuclear security, and safeguards challenges associated with the global spread of nuclear energy and other “peaceful” dual-use nuclear technologies, placing these issues in the larger context of the technical, diplomatic, legal, economic, infrastructure, and energy security dimensions of the so-called nuclear renaissance. We will examine key reactor and fuel cycle technologies, and look at the merits/shortcomings of attempts to “fix” proliferation, security, and safeguards challenges with technical innovations. In particular, we will look at Generation IV technologies, designs using the thorium fuel cycle, and safeguards technologies. We will discuss the economic, power infrastructure, regulatory, and capacity-building challenges faced by new nuclear build, especially among nuclear newcomers in the Middle East and Asia. Following discussion of the international organizations charged with assisting and overseeing the responsible implementation of nuclear power programs (and especially the IAEA), we will look at policy proposals to increase international control, such as the creation of multilateral fuel cycle facilities. We will also look at key players—who are the nuclear suppliers, and how do their policies agree/differ concerning export of sensitive nuclear technologies? The seminar is highly participatory, and will involve hands-on activities, such as a nuclear security satellite imagery analysis exercise, and an in-class simulation game.

Spring 2013 - MIIS, Fall 2013 - MIIS

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NPTG 8683 - Sem:South Asia & WMD      

In the realm of weapons of mass destruction (WMD), South Asia is one of the key regions of analysis. This course takes a comprehensive look at the role of WMD in the strategic thinking of various actors involved in the South Asian security framework. It is important to note that South Asian nuclear issues cannot be studied in isolation from other regional and global dynamics. States such as the U.S., China, and Russia are crucial players in the South Asian strategic framework. The course examines various reasons behind WMD acquisition by India and Pakistan, concentrating especially on nuclear weapons. These factors include threat perceptions, domestic imperatives and nationalistic attitudes. A key element of nuclear weapons programs is the development of effective delivery systems such as missiles and aircraft. Analysis of such programs provides an indicator of current and future strategy. In this context, both India and Pakistan have made major strides in their cruise and ballistic missile programs to make their nuclear strategy more credible. At the same time, neither side has a clearly enunciated nuclear doctrine, although attempts have been made in this direction. This is crucial in context of a reliable command and control system and for crisis stability. Another major issue covered in this course is the proliferation of WMD materials to non-state actors or aspiring nuclear states by proliferation networks connected to South Asia. Relatedly, policymakers in the region and elsewhere are also concerned with the danger of nuclear terrorism. These are some of the prominent issues concerning weapons of mass destruction in South Asia. The two sides have periodically taken steps to prevent nuclear crises situations. Apart from nuclear weapons, this seminar also examines chemical and biological weapons policy in the two countries.

Spring 2014 - MIIS

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NPTG 8684 - Sem:Bio&ChemWeapons&ArmsCntrl      

During the last 15 years, aggressive governments and terrorists have sought to acquire biological, chemical and toxin weapons for use in international warfare, internal conflicts, or terrorist operations. In a few instances, these weapons were actually deployed, causing casualties and generating mayhem. Most security experts expect that these weapons will see increased use in the foreseeable future. For these reasons, security experts active in the international arena ought to be familiar with these types of weapons systems. Accordingly, this course will address health and environmental effects of biological, chemical and toxin weapons, circumstances which favor their use, the international laws that seek to prevent these weapons from being acquired and used and, when laws fail, methods for determining whether one of these three weapon systems has indeed been used and, if so, the appropriate response.

Fall 2013 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS

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NPTG 8687 - Sem:Islam,Islmism&PolCntrlAsia      

This seminar’s core focus is the politics of Islam and Muslims and the rise of contemporary Islamism and jihadism in Central Asia. In particular, we examine non-state and state terrorism in the five former Soviet republics of Central Asia - Kazkahstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, and Uzbekistan. It focuses primarily on the history and current activity of Al Qa`ida-connected or Al`Qaida-inspired jihadist organizations such as the Islamic Movement of Uzbekistan, the Islamic Jihad Union, the Islamic Movement of Turkestan, as well as recently emerged smaller offshoot organizations operating in the region, most notably in Kazakhstan for the first time. The course examines causal factors for the rise of jihadi terrorism in Central Asia and elsewhere such as poverty, failing states, authoritarian regimes, bad governance, the resonance of Islamist ideologies, charismatic authority patterns, and complex network organization and leadership practices. The ties between jihadi terrorists in the five Central Asian states and other global jihadi revolutionary organizations in neighboring states such as Afghanistan, Pakistan, Russia and China as well as in Europe will also be examined. In addition, counter-terrorism and other policies of the authoritarian regimes of Central Asia will looked at, in particular evidence of state terrorism and massive human rights violations spread across most of the region. The remainder of this syllabus’s course schedule will be revised before the beginning of the 2013 spring semester.The ‘Politics and Islam in Russia’ seminar is designed for those interested in the causes and resolution of violent conflict, separatist insurgencies, terrorism, non-proliferation, and comparative Islamic politics. It offers students an in-depth introduction to the role played by Islam and the ‘forgotten Muslims’ of Russia in both domestic, regional, and international politics. Through the careful reading of primary and secondary sources, the seminar’s central purpose is to engage students in a detailed comparative examination of the historical, geographic, ethnic, theological, institutional, and global factors that shape identity politics and frame other political issues for Russia’s Muslims.

Spring 2013 - MIIS, Spring 2014 - MIIS

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NPTG 8689 - Sem:Islam,Islamism&PolInRussia      

The ‘Politics and Islam in Russia’ seminar is designed for those interested in the causes and resolution of violent conflict, separatist insurgencies, terrorism, non-proliferation, and comparative Islamic politics. It offers students an in-depth introduction to the role played by Islam and the ‘forgotten Muslims’ of Russia. in both domestic, regional, and international politics. Through the careful reading of primary and secondary sources, the seminar’s central purpose is to engage students in a detailed comparative examination of the historical, geographic, ethnic, theological, institutional, and global factors that shape identity politics and frame other political issues for Russia’s Muslims. The course’s core focus is the politics of Islam and Muslims and the rise of contemporary Islamism and jihadism in Russia. Under these, major foci include: the complex history of the ambivalent relationship between the Russian Tsarist state and society, on the one hand, and Eurasia’s Muslims, on the other; the dramatic fate of Muslims under Soviet rule; the role of Muslims and Islam during the Soviet demise and the varied post-Soviet transformations; the competing explanations for the recent rise of jihadi terrorism in Russia and other parts of Eurasia; and the implications of jihadist terrorism in the region for the challenges of conflict resolution, non-proliferation, and global jihadi terrorism. In particular, we look closely at the peculiarities of ethnicity, national identity, and confession of Russia’s numerous Muslim ethnic groups, their relations both with each other, the states and the larger Russian society, and the rise of Islamism and jihadism in Russia in comparative perspective. By looking at these phenomena through the prism of nationalism theory, comparative nationalism, and comparative Islamism, the course focuses on the formation and consolidation of national identity, the politicization of such identity, and the transformation of ethno-nationalism into pan-Islamic, political Islamic, Islamist, and jihadist trends and movements. The seminar reviews socioeconomic, demographic, ideological, theological, and political trends in Russia, paying particular attention to the role of regime type, economic development, and the relative role of Islam as factors shaping the state, society, state-society relations, and Muslim-state relations. It also analyzes competing explanations of the causes of the Russo-Chechen conflict, Moscow’s ongoing accommodation with Tatarstan and the other constituent Muslim and national republics of the federation, and the rise of jihadism and terrorism. A broad set of ideological influences and trends affecting Russia’s Muslims are examined, including reformist jadidism, syncretic Eurasianism, and reactionary Islamist jihadism, among others. We also discuss cases of, and potential scenarios involving the use and proliferation of WMD materials and weapons by Central Asian jihadi terrorists. Finally, we look at the influence of Islam and Muslims on Russia’s foreign and national security policies and international security.

Fall 2013 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS

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NPTG 8695 - Sem:NuclearWeapons&Intellignce      

This seminar aims to explore the rich nexus involving the proliferation of nuclear weapons and intelligence assessments. Due to the nature of the proliferation dynamics—i.e., nuclear weapons programs are conceived and evolved under strategic and operational secrecy, states tend to define their early nuclear commitments tentatively and ambiguously, the dual use nature of nuclear technology, etc.—identifying and tracing proliferation is epistemologically a difficult task for intelligence. The seminar will explore this difficulty on both the macro and micro levels, that is, from the broad/epistemological level to the narrow empirical/historical case by case level.

In addition, the seminar will examine historically the process by which the US intelligence organizations dealt with some historical cases of proliferation from the Manhattan Project era to the present. The seminar will also examine the process by which intelligence assessments are developed and disseminated, including technologies and human resources. Students will examine some case studies where intelligence assessments have played key roles, including cases of intelligence failures.

Spring 2013 - MIIS

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NPTG 9505 - Global Politics      

The course introduces students to key analytical concepts and normative views such as balance of power, unipolarity, multipolarity, unilateralism, multilateralism, etc., and major theoretical perspectives for analysis of international politics, as well as the major international events of the past century that have shaped the international system. Students will learn ways that international actors, including sovereign states and non-state entities such as multinational corporations, international organizations, and nongovernmental organizations, exercise power to pursue goals and influence international outcomes. Students will also learn how international institutions, norms, and structures of governance affect the exercise of power and other forms of influence and shape international outcomes. Students will also be introduced to some contemporary issues of national, international, and human security, including the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, and terrorism, as well as issues of globalization, food security, the plight of the LDC’s, and human rights.

Spring 2014 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS

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NPTG 9547 - Intl Orgs & Global Governance      

This course studies those global problems which have a multilateral element as part of the effort to manage and provide solutions- nonproliferation, terrorism, humanitarian crises, migration, armed violence, human rights and security, crime , public health and economic, political and social development. The course starts with a full inquiry into global governance (not world government!). [See the Council on Foreign Relations’ Global Governance Monitor at http://www.cfr.org/global-governance/global-governance-monitor/p18985] Who are the actors? What are the norms that govern national behavior? Which governments do/do not comply with these norms and why? Which problems are more “globally governed” than others? The second half of the course focuses on the role of international governmental organizations (IGOs)- their structure, influence, level of autonomy, etc. Are IGOs actors or just an arena where national governments make the decisions? Students have the opportunity to focus on those organizations involved in the management of their global problem of interest.

Spring 2014 - MIIS

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NPTG 9555 - Money Laundering&TerrorFinance      

This course will examine the different techniques employed in the three stages of money laundering (placement, layering and integration), the macroeconomic impacts of money laundering, the legal framework, the latest law enforcement strategies, and techniques employed by terrorist groups to move funds and their sources of funds. Examples will be taken from organized criminal groups around the world, and many different terrorist groups (as designated by the U.S. OFAC). Investigation and risk scoring techniques will also be introduced.

Macroeconomics and Data Analysis strongly recommended.

Spring 2013 - MIIS

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NPTG 9611 - Sem:ArmedViolence & Developmnt      

Armed violence resulting from intrastate conflict and criminal activity is posing a serious obstacle to political, social and economic development at the global, regional, national and local level. This seminar describes the global reality of armed violence and its negative effects. The focus is on the instruments of armed violence, namely, small arms and light weapons (SALW), to include land mines. Topics include the sources and methods of illegal arms proliferation, diversion from legal to illegal arms possession, misuse or proliferation, gang violence, election violence, the public health approach to armed violence reduction, and the path from conflict to armed conflict. Emphasis is placed on policies and programs at the local, national and global level to reduce armed violence and enable development, to include Disarmament, Demobilization and Reintegration of ex-combatants, weapons exchange for development programs, reducing access to SALW, and the efforts to integrate armed violence and development. The typical student project is a research paper which develops (or evaluates) a program to reduce or prevent armed violence and enhance development at the local, national or global level.

Spring 2014 - MIIS

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