Photo
Office Location
McCone Building

Email Address
wei.liang@miis.edu

Phone Number
831.647.4142

Language(s)
中文

Wei Liang

Associate Professor


I am passionate about exploring the relationship between politics and economics and the policy issues derived from the interaction, including trade, development and governance.

I love being a professor at MIIS because our faculty and students share the sense of consciousness and responsibility as citizens of global, national, and local communities. 

Professor Liang specializes in international trade and development policy, global governance and international negotiation, international political economy of East Asia and China. Her research and teaching have concentrated on the governance of the national and world economy—why governments and international organizations do what do in international economic relations. She has conducted field research in Asia, Europe and the United states, in order to learn directly from the policy practitioners. Many institutions have invited her to lecture--in the UK, China, Korea, as well as the United States. She is a member of International Studies Association, American Political Science Association and a board director of Association of Chinese Political Studies (ACPS).

A graduate of Peking University, People’s Republic of China, she received her M.A. and Ph.D. in International Relations from the University of Southern California. Before joining our faculty at MIIS, she had teaching and research appointments at Florida International University, San Francisco State University and Berkeley Roundtable on the International Economy (BRIE), UC Berkeley, where she did her postdoctoral research.

Professor Liang is the co-author of China and East Asia’s Post-Crises Community (2012). She is also author of many research articles and book chapters. Her recent journal articles and book chapters include “The Too “Hard” Sources of China’s Soft Power in Africa: Is Economic Power Sufficient?”, Asian Perspective, No.4, 2012 ( forthcoming). “U.S. Antidumping Actions against China: The Impact of China's Entry into the WTO”, (Coauthored with Ka Zeng), Review of International Political Economy, Vol. 17, Issue 3, August 2010, pp.562-588.  “China’s FTA Negotiation in Asia and the Prospect of Asian Integration”, in Baogang Guo, ed., China's Quiet Rise: Peace through Integration, Lexington Books, May 2011. “Changing Climate? China’s New Interest in Multilateral Climate Change Negotiation,” in Joel Kassiola ed., China’s Environmental Crisis: Domestic and Global Political Impacts and Responses, Palgrave Macmillan, 2010.“Primacy of Power: Regulatory Battles for Promoting National Standards in China”, in Ilan Alon ed., China Rules: Globalization and Political Transformation, Palgrave Macmillan, 2009. “China: Globalization and the Emergence of a New Status Quo Power?” Asia Perspective, Spring 2008.“New Africa Policy: China’s Quest for Oil and Influence”, in Sujian Guo and Jean-Marc F. Blanchard eds., Harmonious World and China's New Foreign Policy (Rowman & Littlefield-Lexington, 2008). “U.S.-China Semiconductor Disputes and its impacts on U.S. Semiconductor Industry” and “Two-Level Games: How Domestic Politics Affected China’s Foreign Economic Policy”, in Ka Zeng ed., The Making of China’s Foreign Trade Policy: Implications for the World Trading System, Routledge, 2007, “China’s WTO Accession Negotiation Process and Its Implications,” Journal of Contemporary China, Volume 11, Issue 32, August 2002.

Her current research focuses on Emerging markets in Global Economic and Environmental governance, FTA and WTO negotiations, U.S.-China Economic Relations and regional integration in East Asia.

Expertise

International Trade Policy and Trade Negotiation, Globalization and Global Economic and Environmental Governance, Trade and Development in Emerging Markets, International Political Economy of East Asia, US-Asia Policy, Chinese Politics and Foreign Policy.

Education

PhD, MA, International Relations and International Political Economy, University of Southern California; BA, International Politics, Peking University, China.

 

 

Courses

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

IMGT 8579 - The China Factor      

This course covers a wide array of topics in three areas: the international relations, the investment and trade, and market competition. A more detailed list of the topics in the international relations area includes the Chinese imperial legacies and revolution, the contemporary political institutions and policy making processes, the opening of China and reforms and their resulting challenges, China’s role in global peace and development, China’s relations with U.S., the other Asian powers and the other world powers, and the mainland-Taiwan relation. The major topics in the trade and investment area include the evolution of China’s trade and investment policy before and during the reform era, the Chinese economic regime and policy making process, China’s accession into the WTO and integration into global economy, the regional economic cooperation between China and East and Southeast Asia, China’s industrial policy and national standard strategy, Sino-US economic relations and China’s environmental and energy challenges and sustainable development. In the market competition area, the major topics are the rise of private businesses and reform of state-owned enterprises, the Chinese-style enterprise management, the changing consumer behavior, sourcing in China, and dynamic competition among Chinese firms and multinationals in China and in global marketplaces. In each of these areas, the learning focuses on the important institutional and individual players, processes, policies and strategies at the different levels of social, economic and political activities in China and beyond.

Fall 2011 - MIIS, Fall 2012 - MIIS

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IPOL 8593 - GP&S Colloquium:EmergngMarkets      

In the past two decades, emerging economies—including, but not limited to, the celebrated “BRICS” (Brazil, Russia, India, China, and South Africa). This course will take on, and contribute to, debates surrounding these emerging markets. How have they become the darlings of international capital markets, regional economic and political leaders, and the brightest lights in a gloomy global economic landscape? Along with this rapid economic growth, these same countries are also experiencing dramatic social changes, environmental problems, political transitions and foreign policy frictions. How can these growing pains be effectively managed?

Today’s global challenges often require global solutions and a small number of developed countries ( such as G8) can no longer effectively coordinate policy solution to address global crises, including economic recession, financial crisis, and climate change negotiations. As such, the G20, including a number of the emerging economies in its membership, has risen to prominence as a new forum for global governance. The experiences of these countries also offer an opportunity to think about larger questions of global order and national development. What constitutes power in the global political economy and how is it/should it be/is it beginning to be (re)distributed? How can state and market work together to generate equitable and participatory growth? How should the BRICS and other emerging economies be factored into the 21st century’s policy challenges, such as climate change or reworking international financial institutions after the recent economic crisis? What do the experiences of the emerging markets mean for the many people who still lack access to the fruits of such growth--- including over a billion citizens of these countries themselves?

Spring 2012 - MIIS

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IPOL 8638 - Sem:US&E Asia Trade&Invest Pol      

This course examines US economic relations with East Asia, defined for our purposes as including Japan, China, South and North Korea, Taiwan and the member states of ASEAN. The Asia-Pacific is a region of extraordinary importance across virtually all aspects of global politics and economics. It is also a region filled with apparent contradictions and unresolved questions. It is thus vitally important for students and practitioners of International relations to develop a reasonable grasp of the region and the policy implications for the United States. The United States, China, and Japan comprise the world’s three largest economies by purchasing power, but China is also a developing economy with a non-convertible currency. East Asian states are involved in an ambitious attempt to create regional institutions to support their growing economic integration, and yet suspicions between the two natural leaders of East Asia – China and Japan – have been conspicuous in numerous ways. The Asia-Pacific is being pushed together and pulled apart on an ongoing basis by military and economic trends arising both locally and globally. The key questions are whether the region is headed toward greater cooperation or conflict and how the U.S. may be able to affect the direction. The first half of the semester will focus on the trade and investment policies of the countries in the region and bilateral economic relations with the U.S. In the second half we will turn our attention to the regional economic integration and its implications for the U.S.

Spring 2011 - MIIS, Spring 2012 - MIIS

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IPOL 8648 - Sem:Glbl Econ & Env Governance      

Does a global order require global governance regimes and institutions? Can the world be effectively governed? Is justice a legitimate concern of global governance? This course identifies the critical issues of global economic and environmental governance in a highly interdependent world and formulates policy responses to them. The course is divided into four sections. The first section introduces to the various concepts, major theories and approaches to global governance. The second section analyzes the core architectural elements of the current system of global economic and environmental governance, including the WTO, IMF, World Bank and UNFCCC. In section III, we will build a nexus between trade and environment as both issues have a fundamental impact on global sustainable development. The concluding section examines the emerging trend of the nexus of trade and environment that will reshape current patterns in global governance.

Fall 2010 - MIIS, Fall 2011 - MIIS, Fall 2012 - MIIS

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IPSG 8515 / IPOL 8515 - Intro to Trade Policy      

This course serves as an introduction to the environments, processes, and main issues that compose the universe of trade policies. Because of the growing complexities of a more interdependent international environment, students need to expand their knowledge, sensitivity and skills in trade policies. Focus on the changing international environment, its trading institutions, key actors and issues; practices of analyzing, formulating and negotiating key trade policy issues.

Fall 2010 - MIIS, Fall 2011 - MIIS, Fall 2012 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS

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IPSG 8579 / IPOL 8579 - The China Factor      

The rise of China over the last two decades is one of the most significant events that shape global market competition, trade and economic development, and geopolitics. Its implications on worldly issues from global and regional peace and security to the sustainability of the environment are profound. The China factor is an amalgamation of dynamic, complex and interactive forces that appear as problems, puzzles or challenges to different people at different times. This course aims to provide an orientation for students to understand those forces, especially those related to the major stakeholders and their evolving relationships, policies and game rules, and collective behaviors. The orientation is grounded in both Chinese historical and cultural legacies and the contexts of China’s state building, modernization and globalization.

This course provides students with a broad introduction to Contemporary China’s political, economic, and strategic challenges. The discussion begins with the lowest point in Chinese history when the country was rendered as a semi-colony of Western powers and ends with China’s contemporary rise and implications for the world. The questions asked include: In what ways is China rising? How did it happen? How does China’s rise impact the U.S and the global system? The course covers a wide array of topics in primarily three areas: domestic politics, foreign policy challenges and global governance. More specifically, the topics include Chinese imperial legacies and revolution, contemporary political institutions and policy making processes, the opening of China and its reforms and their resulting challenges, China’s role in global peace and development, its relations with U.S., the other Asian powers and the other powers of the world powers, and the mainland-Taiwan relation, China’s trade and investment policy before and during the reform era, the Chinese economic regime and policy making process, China’s industrial policy and national standard strategy, and China’s environmental and energy challenges and sustainable development.

Fall 2010 - MIIS, Fall 2011 - MIIS, Fall 2012 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS

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IPSG 8625 - SEM: Cross-Strait Relations      

This course seeks to examine the political economy that has shaped the cross-strait relations between mainland China and Taiwan since 1949, with particular emphasis on the last two decades, and the evolution and the future prospects of Cross-Strait relations. The course focuses on two core themes (1) an analysis of PRC and Taiwan’s domestic institutions, politics and policy related to cross-strait relations and (2) analysis of Cross-Strait relations. The session on PRC and Taiwan’s domestic politics and policy will address a variety of issues, including China’s domestic decision-making process, its foreign policy toward Taiwan, China’s defense policy toward Taiwan, nationalism, Taiwan democratic transition, Taiwan’s party and electoral politics, the quality of its democracy, competing national identities in Taiwan’s politics, the role of new social movements and the formulation of public policy under democracy. The sessions on Cross-Strait relations will examine topics such as the nature and sources of political conflict across the Strait, the security dilemma facing the two sides, the increasing economic integration across the Strait and its impact on security, the role of the U.S. in the dyadic relationship, and prospects for political reconciliation between the PRC and Taiwan.

This course will feature a week-long field research and language immersion in Shanghai and Taipei (March 16-March 24, 2013). Students will take this opportunity to conduct interviews and collect primary source data for their respective research project related to Cross-Strait relations. Students will acquire the cultural, social, and business skills necessary to communicate on a daily basis with the public and professional community through an intensive one-week immersion in Taipei and Shanghai. The program offers not only seminars and roundtable discussions in collaboration with the most prestigious educational institutions such as Fudan University and National Chengchi University, but also extensive interactions with international companies and government offices in the two cities. Discussion and seminar topics will cover the history, politics, security, economics, and business aspects of cross-strait relations.

Spring 2013 - MIIS

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IPSG 8648 - Sem:Glbl Econ & Env Governance      

Fall 2014 - MIIS

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IPSG 8686 / IPOL 8686 - Sem:Intl Trade Negotiatn Simul      

requent negotiations between governments, international organizations, companies, and other nongovernmental actors are central in specifying what globalization and global governance mean for people. But what happens in these negotiations? What determines their outcomes? Could the negotiators do better? This seminar concentrates on this ubiquitous process of international negotiation over economic and other issues and helps students launch original research on this subject. This course is designed to help improve your skill as a negotiator, while you learn more about bargaining theory in the context of global political economy. It offers a conceptual framework to help you diagnose most bargaining situations. It begins simply and adds complications one at a time. You will develop a feel for the process by dissecting what professionals did in historical episodes--economic, environmental, and military-political--and by watching experienced negotiators and mediators on tape. You will practice applying these ideas by negotiating with other students through in-class simulation.

Spring 2011 - MIIS, Spring 2012 - MIIS, Spring 2013 - MIIS

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TICH 9579 - The China Factor      

The rise of China over the last two decades is one of the most significant events that shape global market competition, trade and economic development, and geopolitics. Its implications on worldly issues from global and regional peace and security to the sustainability of the environment are profound. The China factor is an amalgamation of dynamic, complex and interactive forces that appear as problems, puzzles or challenges to different people at different times. This course aims to provide an orientation for students to understand those forces, especially those related to the major stakeholders and their evolving relationships, policies and game rules, and collective behaviors. The orientation is grounded in both Chinese historical and cultural legacies and the contexts of China’s state building, modernization and globalization.

This course provides students with a broad introduction to Contemporary China’s political, economic, and strategic challenges. The discussion begins with the lowest point in Chinese history when the country was rendered as a semi-colony of Western powers and ends with China’s contemporary rise and implications for the world. The questions asked include: In what ways is China rising? How did it happen? How does China’s rise impact the U.S and the global system? The course covers a wide array of topics in primarily three areas: domestic politics, foreign policy challenges and global governance. More specifically, the topics include Chinese imperial legacies and revolution, contemporary political institutions and policy making processes, the opening of China and its reforms and their resulting challenges, China’s role in global peace and development, its relations with U.S., the other Asian powers and the other powers of the world powers, and the mainland-Taiwan relation, China’s trade and investment policy before and during the reform era, the Chinese economic regime and policy making process, China’s industrial policy and national standard strategy, and China’s environmental and energy challenges and sustainable development.

Fall 2011 - MIIS, Fall 2012 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS

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