Middlebury Institute of International Studies at Monterey. Formerly the Monterey Institute of International Studies.

Wei Liang

Associate Professor

I am passionate about exploring the relationship between politics and economics and the policy issues derived from the interaction, including trade, development and governance.

I love being a professor at MIIS because our faculty and students share the sense of consciousness and responsibility as citizens of global, national, and local communities. 

Professor Liang specializes in international trade and development policy, global governance and international negotiation, international political economy of East Asia and China. Her research and teaching have concentrated on the governance of the national and world economy—why governments and international organizations do what do in international economic relations. She has conducted field research in Asia, Europe and the United states, in order to learn directly from the policy practitioners. Many institutions have invited her to lecture--in the UK, China, Korea, as well as the United States. She is a member of International Studies Association, American Political Science Association and a board director of Association of Chinese Political Studies (ACPS).

A graduate of Peking University, People’s Republic of China, she received her M.A. and Ph.D. in International Relations from the University of Southern California. Before joining our faculty at MIIS, she had teaching and research appointments at Florida International University, San Francisco State University and Berkeley Roundtable on the International Economy (BRIE), UC Berkeley, where she did her postdoctoral research.

Professor Liang is the co-author of China and East Asia’s Post-Crises Community (2012). She is also author of many research articles and book chapters. Her recent journal articles and book chapters include “The Too “Hard” Sources of China’s Soft Power in Africa: Is Economic Power Sufficient?”, Asian Perspective, No.4, 2012 ( forthcoming). “U.S. Antidumping Actions against China: The Impact of China's Entry into the WTO”, (Coauthored with Ka Zeng), Review of International Political Economy, Vol. 17, Issue 3, August 2010, pp.562-588.  “China’s FTA Negotiation in Asia and the Prospect of Asian Integration”, in Baogang Guo, ed., China's Quiet Rise: Peace through Integration, Lexington Books, May 2011. “Changing Climate? China’s New Interest in Multilateral Climate Change Negotiation,” in Joel Kassiola ed., China’s Environmental Crisis: Domestic and Global Political Impacts and Responses, Palgrave Macmillan, 2010.“Primacy of Power: Regulatory Battles for Promoting National Standards in China”, in Ilan Alon ed., China Rules: Globalization and Political Transformation, Palgrave Macmillan, 2009. “China: Globalization and the Emergence of a New Status Quo Power?” Asia Perspective, Spring 2008.“New Africa Policy: China’s Quest for Oil and Influence”, in Sujian Guo and Jean-Marc F. Blanchard eds., Harmonious World and China's New Foreign Policy (Rowman & Littlefield-Lexington, 2008). “U.S.-China Semiconductor Disputes and its impacts on U.S. Semiconductor Industry” and “Two-Level Games: How Domestic Politics Affected China’s Foreign Economic Policy”, in Ka Zeng ed., The Making of China’s Foreign Trade Policy: Implications for the World Trading System, Routledge, 2007, “China’s WTO Accession Negotiation Process and Its Implications,” Journal of Contemporary China, Volume 11, Issue 32, August 2002.

Her current research focuses on Emerging markets in Global Economic and Environmental governance, FTA and WTO negotiations, U.S.-China Economic Relations and regional integration in East Asia.

Expertise

International Trade Policy and Trade Negotiation, Globalization and Global Economic and Environmental Governance, Trade and Development in Emerging Markets, International Political Economy of East Asia, US-Asia Policy, Chinese Politics and Foreign Policy.

Education

PhD, MA, International Relations and International Political Economy, University of Southern California; BA, International Politics, Peking University, China.

 

 

Course List

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

DPPG 8515 - Intro TradePolcy &Institutions      

This course serves as an introduction to the environments, processes, and main issues that compose the universe of trade policies. Because of the growing complexities of a more interdependent international environment, students need to expand their knowledge, sensitivity and skills in trade policies. Focus on the changing international environment, its trading institutions, key actors and issues; practices of analyzing, formulating and negotiating key trade policy issues.

Fall 2015 - MIIS

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DPPG 8648 - Sem:Glbl Econ & Env Governance      

Does a global order require global governance regimes and institutions? Can the world be effectively governed? Is justice a legitimate concern of global governance? This course identifies the critical issues of global economic and environmental governance in a highly interdependent world and formulates policy responses to them. Free trade, financial stability, development and climate Change mitigation are the paradigmatic cases for what economists term “externality”, thus raising the need for coordination of governmental actions at the global, or supra-national level. International economic and climate policy coordination is widely seen as fostering economic growth and sustainable development of its member states. Yet the benefits and burdens are often unevenly distributed within states.

This seminar will examine the politics of global economic and environmental governance, focusing on how global norms, rules and formal international institutions facilitate cooperation and mitigate conflict in the world economy. Our broader objective is to attain a sufficient level of historical and contemporary knowledge of global economic and environmental governance to be fully versant in current policy debates and to provide critical analyses of the relevance, legitimacy and effectiveness of these global institutions today.

The course is divided into four sections. The first section introduces to the various concepts, major theories and approaches to global governance. The second section analyzes the core architectural elements of the current system of global economic and environmental governance, including the WTO, IMF, World Bank and UNFCCC. In section III, we will build a nexus between trade, finance, development aid and environment as these issues have fundamental impact on global sustainable development. The concluding section examines the emerging trend of the nexus of economic and environment that will reshape current patterns in global governance.

Fall 2015 - MIIS

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IPSG 8515 - Intro to Trade Policy      

This course serves as an introduction to the environments, processes, and main issues that compose the universe of trade policies. Because of the growing complexities of a more interdependent international environment, students need to expand their knowledge, sensitivity and skills in trade policies. Focus on the changing international environment, its trading institutions, key actors and issues; practices of analyzing, formulating and negotiating key trade policy issues.

Fall 2014 - MIIS

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IPSG 8579 - The China Factor      

The rise of China over the last two decades is one of the most significant events that shape global market competition, trade and economic development, and geopolitics. Its implications on worldly issues from global and regional peace and security to the sustainability of the environment are profound. The China factor is an amalgamation of dynamic, complex and interactive forces that appear as problems, puzzles or challenges to different people at different times. This course aims to provide an orientation for students to understand those forces, especially those related to the major stakeholders and their evolving relationships, policies and game rules, and collective behaviors. The orientation is grounded in both Chinese historical and cultural legacies and the contexts of China’s state building, modernization and globalization.

This course provides students with a broad introduction to Contemporary China’s political, economic, and strategic challenges. The discussion begins with the lowest point in Chinese history when the country was rendered as a semi-colony of Western powers and ends with China’s contemporary rise and implications for the world. The questions asked include: In what ways is China rising? How did it happen? How does China’s rise impact the U.S and the global system? The course covers a wide array of topics in primarily three areas: domestic politics, foreign policy challenges and global governance. More specifically, the topics include Chinese imperial legacies and revolution, contemporary political institutions and policy making processes, the opening of China and its reforms and their resulting challenges, China’s role in global peace and development, its relations with U.S., the other Asian powers and the other powers of the world powers, and the mainland-Taiwan relation, China’s trade and investment policy before and during the reform era, the Chinese economic regime and policy making process, China’s industrial policy and national standard strategy, and China’s environmental and energy challenges and sustainable development.

Fall 2014 - MIIS

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IPSG 8614 - SemFrgnPlcy,Trade&SecPolE.Asia      

(East Asia is a dynamic region of great importance by virtue of its population size, economic dynamism, and political and security challenges. The impact of the region’s international relations is felt not only by the countries geographically located in the region but also by the rest of the world. The region is characterized by diversity in terms of historical, civilizational, and ethno-cultural backgrounds, political systems, levels of economic development, and foreign relations, as well as global impact, making regional relations very complex and sometimes very difficult, for major powers and smaller powers alike. This course will examine a broad range of foreign policy, trade, and security issues that present both opportunities and challenges to the regional countries and the United States. A unique feature of this course is that it includes a field trip to Tokyo and Beijing from March 12 to 22.* The students will learn first-hand the perspectives of local experts on the regional issues the seminar addresses through guest-lectures, interviews, library research, and discussions with local university students.

* Dec 12 - $100 deposit due; Feb 27 - remainder of program fee due.

Spring 2015 - MIIS

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IPSG 8648 - Sem:Glbl Econ & Env Governance      

Does a global order require global governance regimes and institutions? Can the world be effectively governed? Is justice a legitimate concern of global governance? This course identifies the critical issues of global economic and environmental governance in a highly interdependent world and formulates policy responses to them. Free trade, financial stability, development and climate Change mitigation are the paradigmatic cases for what economists term “externality”, thus raising the need for coordination of governmental actions at the global, or supra-national level. International economic and climate policy coordination is widely seen as fostering economic growth and sustainable development of its member states. Yet the benefits and burdens are often unevenly distributed within states.

This seminar will examine the politics of global economic and environmental governance, focusing on how global norms, rules and formal international institutions facilitate cooperation and mitigate conflict in the world economy. Our broader objective is to attain a sufficient level of historical and contemporary knowledge of global economic and environmental governance to be fully versant in current policy debates and to provide critical analyses of the relevance, legitimacy and effectiveness of these global institutions today.

The course is divided into four sections. The first section introduces to the various concepts, major theories and approaches to global governance. The second section analyzes the core architectural elements of the current system of global economic and environmental governance, including the WTO, IMF, World Bank and UNFCCC. In section III, we will build a nexus between trade, finance, development aid and environment as these issues have fundamental impact on global sustainable development. The concluding section examines the emerging trend of the nexus of economic and environment that will reshape current patterns in global governance.

Fall 2014 - MIIS

More Information »

IPSG 8686 - Sem:Intl Trade Negotiatn Simul      

requent negotiations between governments, international organizations, companies, and other nongovernmental actors are central in specifying what globalization and global governance mean for people. But what happens in these negotiations? What determines their outcomes? Could the negotiators do better? This seminar concentrates on this ubiquitous process of international negotiation over economic and other issues and helps students launch original research on this subject. This course is designed to help improve your skill as a negotiator, while you learn more about bargaining theory in the context of global political economy. It offers a conceptual framework to help you diagnose most bargaining situations. It begins simply and adds complications one at a time. You will develop a feel for the process by dissecting what professionals did in historical episodes--economic, environmental, and military-political--and by watching experienced negotiators and mediators on tape. You will practice applying these ideas by negotiating with other students through in-class simulation.

Spring 2015 - MIIS

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ITDG 8515 - Intro TradePolcy &Institutions      

This course serves as an introduction to the environments, processes, and main issues that compose the universe of trade policies. Because of the growing complexities of a more interdependent international environment, students need to expand their knowledge, sensitivity and skills in trade policies. Focus on the changing international environment, its trading institutions, key actors and issues; practices of analyzing, formulating and negotiating key trade policy issues.

Fall 2015 - MIIS

More Information »

TICH 9579 - The China Factor      

The rise of China over the last two decades is one of the most significant events that shape global market competition, trade and economic development, and geopolitics. Its implications on worldly issues from global and regional peace and security to the sustainability of the environment are profound. The China factor is an amalgamation of dynamic, complex and interactive forces that appear as problems, puzzles or challenges to different people at different times. This course aims to provide an orientation for students to understand those forces, especially those related to the major stakeholders and their evolving relationships, policies and game rules, and collective behaviors. The orientation is grounded in both Chinese historical and cultural legacies and the contexts of China’s state building, modernization and globalization.

This course provides students with a broad introduction to Contemporary China’s political, economic, and strategic challenges. The discussion begins with the lowest point in Chinese history when the country was rendered as a semi-colony of Western powers and ends with China’s contemporary rise and implications for the world. The questions asked include: In what ways is China rising? How did it happen? How does China’s rise impact the U.S and the global system? The course covers a wide array of topics in primarily three areas: domestic politics, foreign policy challenges and global governance. More specifically, the topics include Chinese imperial legacies and revolution, contemporary political institutions and policy making processes, the opening of China and its reforms and their resulting challenges, China’s role in global peace and development, its relations with U.S., the other Asian powers and the other powers of the world powers, and the mainland-Taiwan relation, China’s trade and investment policy before and during the reform era, the Chinese economic regime and policy making process, China’s industrial policy and national standard strategy, and China’s environmental and energy challenges and sustainable development.

Fall 2014 - MIIS

More Information »

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