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Office Location
311 McCone

Email Address
elaurance@miis.edu

Phone Number
831.647.4144

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Expertise: The Field of Security and Development

Edward J. Laurance

Professor and Gordon Paul Smith Chair in International Policy Studies, Public Administration


I Believe:

One of the most critical challenges to development and indeed humanity is armed violence, especially in fragile states. This violence leads to death and injury, violations of human rights, lack of justice and the rule of law, lost productivity, lowering of already inadequate health budgets, and psychological costs. In short, development cannot proceed alongside such violence. I believe that this violence can and must be prevented, reduced and eventually eliminated. I have devoted most of my professional life to this end.

What excites me:

Teaching at a professional school such as MIIS allows me as a faculty member to help students prepare for a career in security and development work. It means that I get to make a difference, not just my graduates. It also means that I will have these students as colleagues when they graduate. I continue to be involved in mutual projects with them. I can’t think of anything more rewarding than this.

Expertise

Armed violence reduction, research methods for development practitioners, global governance, international organizations, proliferation and effects of conventional weapons and small arms, program evaluation and project management

Recent Activities

In the past several years I have:

  1. Led a team of students in observing the final negotiations of the Arms Trade Treaty at the United Nations in New York.
  2. Created and developed software that allows national government to track their progress towards complying with the UN’s International Small Arms Control Standards (ISACS). http://www.smallarmsstandards.org/isacs-news/
  3. Published two articles in Arms Control Today on the international arms trade.
  4. Served as Coordinator of Veterans Affairs at MIIS
  5. Conducted a major study for the UN Development Program on how security and development are integrated in UNDP programming.
  6. Worked with the Small Arms Survey in Geneva in developing and implementing a program evaluation of a weapons marking project in East Africa.
  7. Placed students in security and development organizations in MIIS Immersive Professional Learning programs.
  8. Since 2009 have served as an expert for the United Nations project ISACS, developing global standards for controlling the proliferation and misuse of small arms and light weapons.
  9. Advised the City of Salinas, California, on gang violence reduction and prevention.

Education

PhD, International Relations, University of Pennsylvania; MA, International Relations and Public Administration, Temple University; BS, United States Military Academy

Careers in Security and Development

Students who concentrate on security and development can do so as a specialization within the MPA program or the Human Security and Development Track in IPS. They normally take courses in conflict and conflict resolution, human security, human rights, and a full range of development courses. They also spend at least six months as a junior professional with an S and D organization while at MIIS. Graduates who entered this field have served as program managers for conflict management in South Sudan, field analysts for international governmental organizations as well as NGOs and think tanks, staff officers developing public security education and training for the UN, survey researchers in areas fraught with insecurity and conflict, and evaluators of programs designed to reduce armed violence and enable development.

For an excellent in-depth look at this field see the World Development Report 2011: Conflict, Security and Development. Washington: The World Bank

http://siteresources.worldbank.org/INTWDRS/Resources/WDR2011_Full_Text.pdf

Selected Publications

laurance_chapter_final_version_pdf“The Small Arms Problem As Arms Control: A Policy-Driven Research Agenda” in The State of Arms: Consolidation, Innovation and Relevance in Small Arms Research: Essays in honour of Pablo Dreyfus. Eds: Kai Michael Kenkel and Peter Batchelor. London: Routledge, Summer 2013.


“1991 Arms Trade Control Efforts and Their Echoes” in Arms Control Today, July-August 2011. 
 

iccrThe UNDP Role in the Comprehensive Approach to Security in Fragile States: An Assessment, Edward J. Laurance Version 5.1 10 June 2010.

laurance-_managing_the_tools_of_war_and_violence "Managing the Tools of War and Violence: Global Governance or State-centric Realpolitik?  In Michael Brzoska and Axel Krohn (eds.) Overcoming Armed Violence in a Complex World: Essays in Honor of Herbert Wulf. Budrich UniPress Ltd. November 2009.

managing_the_global_problems_created_by_the_conventional_arms_trade With Hendrik Wagenmakers and Herbert Wulf. "Managing the Global Problems Created by the Conventional Arms Trade: An Assessment of the United Nations Register of Conventional Arms." Global Governance, Vol. 2, Spring 2005.

With Rachel Stohl. Making Global Public Policy: The Case of Small Arms and Light Weapons. Occasional Paper No. 7. Geneva: Small Arms Survey, December 2002.

<The United Nations Conventional Arms Register (UNCAR): Present Challenges, New Directions.

"Light Weapons and Human Development: The Need for Transparency and Early Warning." In Jeffrey Boutwell and Michael T. Klare, Light Weapons and Civil Conflict: Controlling the Tools of Violence (Boulder: Rowman and Littlefield Publishers, Inc., 1999), pp. 185-196.

"Monitoring the Flow, Availability and Misuse of Light Weapons," in Arms Watching: Integrating Small Arms and Light Weapons Into the Early Warning of Violent Conflict. Edward J. Laurance (Ed.) (London: International Alert, May 1999).

Arms Watching: Integrating Small Arms and Light Weapons Into the Early Warning of Violent Conflict(Ed.)(London: International Alert, May 1999).

Light Weapons and Intra-State Conflict: Early Warning Factors and Preventive Action. (Washington: Carnegie Commission on Preventing Deadly Conflict, July 1998).

"Small Arms, Light Weapons, and Conflict Prevention: The New Post-Cold War Logic of Disarmament" in Barnett R. Rubin Cases and Strategies for Preventive Action (The Century Foundation Press, 1998), pp. 135-168.

"Moratoria on Small Arms and Light Weapons: Conceptualization and Application to Central America" in Sverre Lodgaard and Carsten F. Ronnfeldt, A Moratorium on Light Weapons in West Africa (Oslo: Norwegian Institute of International Affairs, 1998), pp. 69-83.

"A Conceptual Framework for Arms Trade Transparency in South-East Asia." In Bates Gill and J.N. Mak (eds.), Arms Transparency and Security in South-East Asia. SIPRI Research Report No. 13. (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1997), pp. 10-24.

With Sarah E. Meek. The Role of Conventional Arms Buildups in the Outbreak of Conflict: Developing Early Warning and Preventive Measures. Report submitted to the United States Institute for Peace in fulfillment of grant SG-94-113. July 1996.

With Sarah E. Meek. The New Field of Micro-Disarmament: Addressing the Proliferation and Buildup of Small Arms and Light Weapons. Brief 7. (Bonn: Bonn International Center for Conversion, September 1996).

"The Role of Arms Control in Coping With Conflict after the Cold War." in Roger Kanet and Edward Kolodziej (Eds.), Coping With Conflict after the Cold War. (Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 1996), pp. 331-362.

"Addressing the Negative Consequences of Light Weapons Trafficking: Opportunities for Transparency and Restraint." in Jeffrey Boutwell, Michael Klare and Laura Reed, Editors, Lethal Commerce: The Global Trade in Small Arms and Light Weapons. (Cambridge: American Academy of Arts and Sciences, 1995), pp. 140-57.

"The UN Register of Conventional Arms: Rationales and Prospects for Compliance and Effectiveness," The Washington Quarterly , (Spring 1993).

"Reducing the Negative Consequences of Arms Transfers Through Unilateral Arms Control." in Bennett Ramberg (Ed.) Arms Control Without Negotiation: From the Cold War to the New World Order. (Boulder: Lynne Rienner Publishers, 1993), pp. 175-198

With Siemon Wezeman and Herbert Wulf. Arms Watch: SIPRI Report on the First Year of the UN Register of Conventional Arms. (Oxford: Oxford University Press, November 1993).

The International Arms Trade. (New York: Lexington Books, 1992).

"The Political Implications of Illegal Arms Exports From the United States." Political Science Quarterly, 107, 3 (Fall 1992), 501-533.

"Events Data and Policy Analysis: Improving the Potential for Applying Academic Research to Foreign and Defense Policy Problems." Policy Sciences , 23,1(1990).

"The New Gunrunning." Orbis (Spring 1989), 225-237.

Courses

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

IPMG 8526 - Implementing Humanitarianism      

This two-day workshop will provide participants with the knowledge and skills needed to adequately respond to disasters and post-conflict humanitarian emergencies. It focuses on implementing the core global standards described in the Sphere Handbook, which collects evidence-based universal minimum standards in four life-saving sectors: water supply, sanitation and hygiene promotion; food security and nutrition; shelter, settlement and non-food items; and health action. Based on moral and legal principles spelled out in the Humanitarian Charter, it also defines Protection Principles and Core Standards which inform any humanitarian response in a spirit of quality and accountability to the affected populations.

In preparing for the workshop, participants learn the basics of needs assessment and apply them to selected humanitarian emergences to include conflict, post-conflict and disaster situations. The first day of the workshop will cover the Sphere standards and how they are implemented, especially in the humanitarian emergencies studied prior to the course. The workshop will pay special attention to the protection of vulnerable populations during a disaster or conflict. Activities include practical team-based exercises, as well as interacting with real-world humanitarian emergency professionals, including Skype sessions with professionals in the field. The day concludes with assigning a team exercise on implementing Sphere standards to be presented and evaluated on the second day of the workshop. The final portion of the workshop is a personal reflection and assessment.

The workshop is designed for those participants who desire to work in humanitarian emergencies and disaster response. Sphere training is considered an essential qualification for such work. Given the continuing occurrence of conflicts, armed violence and natural disasters, opportunities for work in this field abound. The workshop provides critical skills for this work.

The lead instructor, Molly Lineberger, worked in Haiti for two and a half years with Catholic Relief Services, before, during and after the earthquake of January 2010. She has extensive experience in the application of the Sphere standards, to include training humanitarian staff in these standards. Professor Ed Laurance has extensive knowledge and experience working on armed violence and its humanitarian effects.

Spring 2013 - MIIS

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IPMG 8541 - ResrchMethdsForDvlpmntPractice      

The focus of this course is on the methods used in designing, implementing and evaluating development programs, broadly defined. The methods covered are those currently in use in a variety of contexts. Examples of methods covered include data analysis (SPSS and Excel), survey research, interviewing, key informant interviewing, focus groups, direct observation, developing tools for analysis, rapid assessment, stakeholder analysis and conflict analysis. The methods will be taught in modular form, all involving completing a small team project utilizing the method. While much of the work will be done in teams, each student will be evaluated separately. Some projects will be conducted with local government and nonprofit organizations, while others will involve the MIIS community.

Fall 2013 - MIIS

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IPOL 8541 - ResrchMethdsForDvlpmntPractice      

The focus of this course is on the methods used in designing, implementing and evaluating development programs, broadly defined. The methods covered are those currently in use in a variety of contexts. Examples of methods covered include data analysis (SPSS and Excel), survey research, interviewing, key informant interviewing, focus groups, direct observation, developing tools for analysis, rapid assessment, stakeholder analysis and conflict analysis. The methods will be taught in modular form, all involving completing a small team project utilizing the method. While much of the work will be done in teams, each student will be evaluated separately. Some projects will be conducted with local government and nonprofit organizations, while others will involve the MIIS community.

Fall 2012 - MIIS

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IPOL 8582 - Evaluation Methods      

The course is designed for all students in all GSIPM curricula seeking to add the critical skill of program evaluation to their portfolio. For MPA students it counts as one of the three Program Evaluation courses that satisfy that MPA core requirement. The course is organized in three parts. In the first quarter of the course we look at program evaluation --- “a robust arena of activity directed at collecting, analyzing, interpreting, and communicating information about the effectiveness of social programs undertaken for the purpose of improving social conditions”-- - in its practical application: purposes and types of evaluations, participants and stakeholders, identifying issues and formulating questions, needs assessment, assessing program theory, program monitoring and strategies for impact assessment. In the second quarter of the course we systematically explore the various data-generation methods used in program evaluation. Methods to be examined may include but are not limited to statistical analysis, survey research, key informant interviews, field research and observation, focus groups, and ethnographic techniques. In the last half of the course students will conduct an evaluation of actual programs conducted in the larger Monterey area, using the concepts and data-generation techniques learned in the first half of the course.

Spring 2011 - MIIS

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IPOL 8585 - International Organizations      

The upsurge in truly global problems since the end of the Cold War has resulted in the rise of International Governmental Organizations (IGOs) as vital actors in the global governance, or management, of these issues. This course will study and analyze IGOs acting on a wide range of global issues, allowing students in a variety of programs and specializations to gain a better understanding of how such issues are managed - nonproliferation, terrorism, development, environment, trade, et al. This course is also appropriate for MPA students wishing to understand the behavior of IGOs. Topics include IGOs as bureaucracies, IGOs as independent actors or controlled by national governments, (authority and autonomy), power of IGOs, pathologies of IGOs and organizational change.

Fall 2010 - MIIS, Fall 2011 - MIIS

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IPOL 8634 - Sem:SecurityJustice&Developmnt      

The main focus of this course is addressing the challenge to the achievement of the Millennium Development Goals. A growing level of insecurity and armed violence is preventing desperately needed economic, social and political development (good governance), especially in fragile states emerging from conflict. As governments, NGOs and IGOs collaborate to solve this problem, several specific challenges or obstacles to development have emerged that fall under the umbrella concept of "Security, Justice and Development." They include: 1) the presence of anti-personnel landmines that deny the use of land and exact a humanitarian toll; 2) the negative effects of excessive proliferation, accumulation availability and misuse of small arms and light weapons; 3) the presence of corrupt and poorly trained and equipped security forces which requires security sector reform and governance; 4) the lack of human security - freedom from fear, injustice and want; 5) the disarmament, demobilization and reintegration (DDR) of former combatants, 6) the need for conflict prevention and resolution, and most recently 7) the need for the state to operate under the rule of law. All of these problems are major components of post-conflict reconstruction. Students will select one or more of these as the focus of a major research paper, in either a single country or a comparative context.

Fall 2010 - MIIS, Spring 2011 - MIIS, Fall 2011 - MIIS, Fall 2012 - MIIS

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IPSG 8501 - Policy Analysis      

This course introduces students to the theory and practice of policy analysis. Students will be introduced to the stages of the public policy process, including agenda setting, formulation, implementation, and evaluation. Students will also develop basic policy analysis skills, including problem structuring, stakeholder identification, summarization of current policy, development of policy options, elaboration of criteria for selection, and recommendation of course of action. These concepts are illustrated by examples policies that fall within students' range of interests. This course also introduces students to scientific methods that are used as a means for structuring policy inquiry. A series of research approaches and techniques are presented in the context of forecasting, monitoring, and evaluation for the analysis of domestic and international policies.

Fall 2014 - MIIS

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IPSG 8544 / IPOL 8544 - Intro to HumanSecurity&Dvlpmnt      

The focus of this course is human security, the everyday security of individuals and the communities in which they live rather than the security of states and borders. The course explores how the lack of human security affects development, broadly defined. Approaches to human security in the course include conflict analysis, management and resolution, human rights, peacebuilding, legitimate institutions and good governance, rule of law and justice, and programmes and policies designed to improve human security and lower armed violence. The central theme of the course is how these approaches are integrated in practice. Examples of this approach can be found at the following:

http://www.un.org/largerfreedom/contents">In Larger Freedom<a>

http://wdr2011.worldbank.org/fulltext">Conflict, Security, Development. World Bank

http://www.peacestudiesjournal.org.uk">Conflict, Security and Development. Journal<a>

Spring 2012 - MIIS, Spring 2013 - MIIS

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IPSG 8611 / IPOL 8611 - Sem:ArmedViolence & Developmnt      

Armed violence resulting from intrastate conflict and criminal activity is posing a serious obstacle to political, social and economic development at the global, regional, national and local level. This seminar describes the global reality of armed violence and its negative effects. The focus is on the instruments of armed violence, namely, small arms and light weapons (SALW), to include land mines. Topics include the sources and methods of illegal arms proliferation, diversion from legal to illegal arms possession, misuse or proliferation, gang violence, election violence, the public health approach to armed violence reduction, and the path from conflict to armed conflict. Emphasis is placed on policies and programs at the local, national and global level to reduce armed violence and enable development, to include Disarmament, Demobilization and Reintegration of ex-combatants, weapons exchange for development programs, reducing access to SALW, and the efforts to integrate armed violence and development. The typical student project is a research paper which develops (or evaluates) a program to reduce or prevent armed violence and enhance development at the local, national or global level.

Spring 2012 - MIIS, Spring 2013 - MIIS, Spring 2014 - MIIS

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IPSG 9541 - ResrchMethdsForDvlpmntPractice      

The focus of this course is on the methods used in designing, implementing and evaluating development programs, broadly defined. The methods covered are those currently in use in a variety of contexts. Examples of methods covered include data analysis (SPSS and Excel), survey research, interviewing, key informant interviewing, focus groups, direct observation, developing tools for analysis, rapid assessment, stakeholder analysis and conflict analysis. The methods will be taught in modular form, all involving completing a small team project utilizing the method. While much of the work will be done in teams, each student will be evaluated separately. Some projects will be conducted with local government and nonprofit organizations, while others will involve the MIIS community.

Fall 2013 - MIIS

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IPSG 9547 - Intl Orgs & Global Governance      

This course studies those global problems which have a multilateral element as part of the effort to manage and provide solutions- nonproliferation, terrorism, humanitarian crises, migration, armed violence, human rights and security, crime , public health and economic, political and social development. The course starts with a full inquiry into global governance (not world government!). [See the Council on Foreign Relations’ Global Governance Monitor at http://www.cfr.org/global-governance/global-governance-monitor/p18985] Who are the actors? What are the norms that govern national behavior? Which governments do/do not comply with these norms and why? Which problems are more “globally governed” than others? The second half of the course focuses on the role of international governmental organizations (IGOs)- their structure, influence, level of autonomy, etc. Are IGOs actors or just an arena where national governments make the decisions? Students have the opportunity to focus on those organizations involved in the management of their global problem of interest.

Spring 2014 - MIIS

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MPAG 8547 - Intl Orgs & Global Governance      

This course studies those global problems which have a multilateral element as part of the effort to manage and provide solutions- nonproliferation, terrorism, humanitarian crises, migration, armed violence, human rights and security, crime , public health and economic, political and social development. The course starts with a full inquiry into global governance (not world government!). [See the Council on Foreign Relations’ Global Governance Monitor at http://www.cfr.org/global-governance/global-governance-monitor/p18985] Who are the actors? What are the norms that govern national behavior? Which governments do/do not comply with these norms and why? Which problems are more “globally governed” than others? The second half of the course focuses on the role of international governmental organizations (IGOs)- their structure, influence, level of autonomy, etc. Are IGOs actors or just an arena where national governments make the decisions? Students have the opportunity to focus on those organizations involved in the management of their global problem of interest.

Spring 2014 - MIIS

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MPAG 8605 - Capstone:Rsch&Writing Proj-PA      

The capstone experience is a culminating learning opportunity for students in MPA program. The capstone requirement has two main objectives. First, it enables students to demonstrate, integrate, reflect on, apply, and deepen their knowledge and skills (such as those related to policy analysis, management, research methods, data analysis, communication, etc.) acquired in the MPA program to diagnose and solve actual problems in public and nonprofit organizations. In this course students will have opportunity to link theory with practice; deepen their knowledge and advance the skills applicable to their professional career objectives; apply relevant frameworks, skills, and other tools to gain better understanding of problems and needs of public and nonprofit organizations; and generate comprehensive, innovative, well-informed and thought-out solutions.

Second, this experience is designed to help students prepare for specific career paths they wish to pursue upon graduation. Ideally, capstone should serve as a stepping stone for the job a student wants to get upon graduation. Therefore for their capstone projects students are encouraged to select and explore the pressing themes, issues and problems concerning the organization/field they want to work with in the future. For example, students can do a thorough analysis of an emerging policy problem, do an organizational assessment, or evaluate programs or projects of the entities they are interested in working with. Students are encouraged to select capstone projects that build on their comparative advantage and/or their previous professional experiences and incorporate comparative approach.

Ultimately this seminar aims to help students produce a deliverable which they will be proud to submit to employers and/or journals. Be innovative, creative, critical, daring, and passionate in your research and writing. Make this capstone opportunity work for you.

The capstone deliverables – the final report and its presentation to the MIIS community – must demonstrate the student’s mastery of the MPA core competencies.

Content: Every capstone project must have a specific client who will benefit from student’s capstone work. Students will choose applied projects – the questions and tasks which will help existing organization and/or field – which can be pursued individually or in teams of students' choice. The capstone projects must focus on creating positive impact on actual practice of public administration, and should respond to public and/or nonprofit organizations’ needs and/or potential. Specific examples of capstone projects undertaken by MPA students are provided in the appendix.

Format: Capstone deliverables can take any form – a research paper, a website, a video etc. Select the format that which meets and facilitates the purposes of the capstone project best.

Spring 2013 - MIIS

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MPAG 8635 - Eval Practicum: DPP AOL system      

This course will allow students hands-on experience in developing an “Assessment of Learning (AOL)” system for the Development Practice and Policy program. Students will conduct primary research (interviews, FGDs) and data analysis related to faculty, student, and administration preferences on the system; review of best practices for AOL in other universities in the US; and a review of the academic literature pertaining to high quality AOL systems for Masters-level education. Students will have a chance to get wider, practical experience in action research, mixed methods research, formulating recommendations, and creating a high quality final report. Students in the class will form a single team and grading will be based on peer reviews of contributions to team products and process, participation in class, and quality of overall deliverable. The principal audience for the final deliverable will be the Chairs of the IPS and MPA degree programs.

Fall 2014 - MIIS

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MPAG 9541 - ResrchMethdsForDvlpmntPractice      

The focus of this course is on the methods used in designing, implementing and evaluating development programs, broadly defined. The methods covered are those currently in use in a variety of contexts. Examples of methods covered include data analysis (SPSS and Excel), survey research, interviewing, key informant interviewing, focus groups, direct observation, developing tools for analysis, rapid assessment, stakeholder analysis and conflict analysis. The methods will be taught in modular form, all involving completing a small team project utilizing the method. While much of the work will be done in teams, each student will be evaluated separately. Some projects will be conducted with local government and nonprofit organizations, while others will involve the MIIS community.

Fall 2013 - MIIS

More Information »

NPTG 9547 - Intl Orgs & Global Governance      

This course studies those global problems which have a multilateral element as part of the effort to manage and provide solutions- nonproliferation, terrorism, humanitarian crises, migration, armed violence, human rights and security, crime , public health and economic, political and social development. The course starts with a full inquiry into global governance (not world government!). [See the Council on Foreign Relations’ Global Governance Monitor at http://www.cfr.org/global-governance/global-governance-monitor/p18985] Who are the actors? What are the norms that govern national behavior? Which governments do/do not comply with these norms and why? Which problems are more “globally governed” than others? The second half of the course focuses on the role of international governmental organizations (IGOs)- their structure, influence, level of autonomy, etc. Are IGOs actors or just an arena where national governments make the decisions? Students have the opportunity to focus on those organizations involved in the management of their global problem of interest.

Spring 2014 - MIIS

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NPTG 9611 - Sem:ArmedViolence & Developmnt      

Armed violence resulting from intrastate conflict and criminal activity is posing a serious obstacle to political, social and economic development at the global, regional, national and local level. This seminar describes the global reality of armed violence and its negative effects. The focus is on the instruments of armed violence, namely, small arms and light weapons (SALW), to include land mines. Topics include the sources and methods of illegal arms proliferation, diversion from legal to illegal arms possession, misuse or proliferation, gang violence, election violence, the public health approach to armed violence reduction, and the path from conflict to armed conflict. Emphasis is placed on policies and programs at the local, national and global level to reduce armed violence and enable development, to include Disarmament, Demobilization and Reintegration of ex-combatants, weapons exchange for development programs, reducing access to SALW, and the efforts to integrate armed violence and development. The typical student project is a research paper which develops (or evaluates) a program to reduce or prevent armed violence and enhance development at the local, national or global level.

Spring 2014 - MIIS

More Information »

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