Middlebury Institute of International Studies at Monterey

Kent Glenzer

Dean, Graduate School of International Policy and Management

Associate Professor Kent Glenzer was appointed dean of the Graduate School of International Policy and Management in January 2015. Glenzer serves as the academic leader overseeing the school’s degree programs in Business Administration (MBA), International Education Management, International Environmental Policy, International Policy and Development, Nonproliferation and Terrorism Studies, and Public Administration (MPA), as well as a variety of related non-degree programs. In this role, he also serves as a member of the Institute’s senior leadership team.

What I am most passionate about: I’m most passionate about transforming higher education so as to better prepare young professionals to work on complex, wicked problems. This requires us to rethink and reinvent relationships between public, private, and nonprofit enterprises to connect disciplinary silos and expertise in new ways, and adopt transformative andragogical approaches in our programs. What the world doesn’t need is more competent, obedient, rule-following technocrats. What it does need is feral professionals who can transform systems and reconfigure long-standing relationships of power.

What excites me about being a professor at MIIS: I spent 25 years working with nonprofit agencies focused on international development before coming to MIIS. I came to MIIS because I wanted to help students avoid the mistakes my generational colleagues and I made. I wanted to do so in a post-graduate institute that put high value on practical tools, approaches, and both personal and team strategies. I looked for a place with a commitment to praxis and interdisciplinarity. And I found MIIS, which satisfied all these standards. I get very excited when, in working with graduate students here at MIIS, we find ways to connect with external clients, deliver high value for money, and so enhance a program, a project, a strategy, or an organization.

Expertise

I have extensive work and research experience in sub-Saharan Africa, having lived there for 13 years and focused on it as both an external and internal consultant to NGOs and public sector agencies for 10 more years. I have a strong background, both practically and academically, in civil society, social movements, and policy advocacy. I specialize in organizations, organizational development, organizational behavior and culture, institutional and organizational fields, and organizational evolution and learning processes.

All my work and thinking centralizes on the power dynamics, inequalities, and identity politics that surround and constitute development processes, programs, policies, and strategies.

Recent Accomplishments

  • Co-editor and chapter contributor in the forthcoming Action Research Handbook (3rd edition).
  • Appointed to Editorial Board of the Action Research Journal.
  • Led the formative evaluation of Save the Children’s $5 million program devoted to global knowledge sharing and building robust communities of practice related to food security programming.
  • Consulted with Geneva Global on a long-term program to build the civil society sector in western China. This work is ongoing.
  • Consulted with the Ford Foundation in China – and NGO partners there – on a strategic monitoring, evaluation, and learning system for the country office.
  • Contributed a chapter to a book on understanding culture and cultural change for the Army Research Institute, a book targeted at army officers, as well as being lead expert for a training module for army staff on using appreciative inquiry to advise host country staff on organizational development and change.
  • Authored Oxfam America’s Rights-Oriented Programming for Effectiveness and Oxfam International’s Program Principles, which both served to strategically frame the organization’s long-term and rights-based approaches to development and social change.
  • Oversaw a three-year, multi-level portfolio assessment of CARE’s work on women’s empowerment and oversaw the massaging of evaluation results into organizational practice.

Previous Work

Prior to accepting an appointment at MIIS, I worked for Oxfam America for four years, CARE USA for 12 years, during which time I had the opportunity to live and work in Mali for nearly seven years, Mozambique for four years, and Ethiopia for more than two years. My consulting has taken me to more than 30 countries in Africa, south and east Asia, and Latin America and the Caribbean. I’ve also worked with the Program for Appropriate Technology in Health and I was a Peace Corps volunteer in Mali.

Education

  • Bachelor in Journalism, Northwestern University, 1983
  • Masters in Communication, Cornell University, 1990
  • Ph.D., Emory University, 2005

Careers in Strategic Planning and Management

Students working with me will be well prepared for consulting on or full-time positions in program/project monitoring and evaluation, strategic planning, project and program management, and facilitating organizational change processes. You might find yourself in the human resources department of a large international NGO, as a learning or staff/management development specialist. You might find yourself the manager of a civil society strengthening project in sub-Saharan Africa financed by a philanthropic foundation. You might find yourself part of a team contracted to evaluate a program or project of Oxfam or CARE.

Publications/Professional Products

Course List

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

FMSC 8609 - CrossCulturalCompetnc&Survival      

Spring 2015 - MIIS

More Information »

IPMG 9609 - CrossCulturalCompetnc&Survival      

Spring 2015 - MIIS

More Information »

IPSG 9507 - QualitativeDataAnalysisMash-Up      

This lively, hands-on course focuses on analysis of qualitative data. By “data”, we mean interview, focus group, written reports and visual records, hundreds of pages of them. Students will have a choice of qualitative data sets – there is no time in this short course to engage in primary data collection -- and our entire focus will be on a) deciding how to interrogate the data (what is it you wish to know, demonstrate, reveal, test?), b) developing code books and coding, c) inter-coder reliability, and d) a wide variety of analytical approaches you can use, once you have qualitative data reduced and organized. The first seven weeks of the course focus on a-c. Then, during a final weekend workshop, students will engage in hands-on analysis, using techniques introduced rapid fire during the workshop: expect to practice no fewer than 20 qualitative analysis techniques over three days. This course emphasizes the importance of studying/reading high quality qualitative research studies as fundamental to learning – we will dissect one study each week to understand how the researchers put it together – while also emphasizing learning-through-doing, making mistakes, and collaborative analysis (qualitative inquiry is almost always improved through collaboration). Your final product will be a 10-page analysis, due two weeks after the final workshop.

Fall 2014 - MIIS

More Information »

MBAG 8501 - Intl Organizational Behavior      

International Organizational Behavior focuses on organizational culture and how it enables – or sometimes hinders – bottomline results in international contexts. We will look at bottomline results across public, for profit, and nonprofit worlds. This course, at its heart, is about the people side of the enterprise.

Themes covered include diagnosing and changing organizational culture, managing and motivating individuals, leading and working in teams, leading organizational change, development, and transformation, and new organizational forms/structures emerging in response to complex business and social challenges. The relentless focus of the course is on practical strategies, frameworks, and analytical tools that managers and leaders deploy to improve business performance in international organizations.

This course seeks to challenge assumptions about what organizations are, broaden understandings of effectiveness, and expand analytical repertoires and management skills. Competencies for effective teamwork suffuse the syllabus, as do those related to changing and improving organizational performance through people.

Fall 2013 - MIIS, Spring 2014 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS, Fall 2015 - MIIS

More Information »

MBAG 8693 - Intl Business Consulting      

This course will address the key activities involved in delivering management consulting services to multinational corporations. Elements covered will include identifying consulting opportunities, framing the question with the client, developing the proposal, managing the engagement, delivering the results, understanding organizational change implications, managing client relations and client follow-up. The course will be delivered in a case format illustrating how the above elements were used in actual client situations that have been successfully carried out by the professor and his consulting teams. Students will have the opportunity to develop a client proposal and engagement plan.

Spring 2014 - MIIS

More Information »

MBAG 9508 - Power,SocialChange,Organizatns      

Fall 2014 - MIIS

More Information »

MPAG 8507 - QualitativeDataAnalysisMash-Up      

This lively, hands-on course focuses on analysis of qualitative data. By “data”, we mean interview, focus group, written reports and visual records, hundreds of pages of them. Students will have a choice of qualitative data sets – there is no time in this short course to engage in primary data collection -- and our entire focus will be on a) deciding how to interrogate the data (what is it you wish to know, demonstrate, reveal, test?), b) developing code books and coding, c) inter-coder reliability, and d) a wide variety of analytical approaches you can use, once you have qualitative data reduced and organized. The first seven weeks of the course focus on a-c. Then, during a final weekend workshop, students will engage in hands-on analysis, using techniques introduced rapid fire during the workshop: expect to practice no fewer than 20 qualitative analysis techniques over three days. This course emphasizes the importance of studying/reading high quality qualitative research studies as fundamental to learning – we will dissect one study each week to understand how the researchers put it together – while also emphasizing learning-through-doing, making mistakes, and collaborative analysis (qualitative inquiry is almost always improved through collaboration). Your final product will be a 10-page analysis, due two weeks after the final workshop.

Fall 2014 - MIIS

More Information »

MPAG 8508 - Power,SocialChange,Organizatn      

“Complex social problems are beyond the capacity of any single organization – or sector -- to solve. This case-based course looks at different ways of structuring, managing, and leading inter-organizational collaboration. First, we theorize power itself. Second, we build a sophisticated understanding of debates regarding how structural social change actually happens…vs. how we may wish it happens. Then, we look at specific, real-world cases – relative success stories -- where relations and structures of power have been de- and re-institutionalized. The goal is to understand what managers, leaders, and activists can actually do, pragmatically, to foster such social, political, and cultural change. Central to the course is looking at organizations themselves as social and cultural constructions, as sites where larger political struggles over power get enacted. In other words: the course will de-romanticize “NGOs” or “Social Enterprises” and unpack them as instantiations of extant power relations and forms of structural inequality rather than heroic actors somehow immune from such things. Our goal in this course is not to identify which kind of collective effort is uniformly best – students seeking black-and-white certainty and infallible “tools” will be very disappointed. Rather, our aim is to understand the strengths, weaknesses, limits, and opportunities of different approaches to collective action, depending on program goals and the operating context. Students will leave the course armed with broad strategies, approaches, tactics, and historical, comparative knowledge about what has worked, in what contexts…and the understanding that when it comes to shifting power relations in sustained ways…the next challenge demands creative thinking, not application of past “best practice.””

Fall 2014 - MIIS

More Information »

MPAG 8605 - Capstone:Rsch&Writing Proj-PA      

Overview

The capstone requirement has two objectives. First, it enables you to acquire, demonstrate, integrate, reflect on, apply, and deepen competencies central to the MPA degree and to your future. Second, a capstone project prepares you for a position you hope to get upon graduation. Your capstone project is a public demonstration of your learning process here at MIIS: through it, you show your peers and faculty how far you have progressed. A public sharing of your work is required. How you do that is open for negotiation.

The capstone seminar helps you produce a deliverable which you are proud to submit to employers, working professionals in the field you wish to enter, and/or journals. Choice of capstone projects is limitless and students who perform best are those that creatively identify a project and product that is meaningful to them.

Approach

My role as seminar faculty is threefold. I am process guide; I am learning/support group facilitator; I am quality standard upholder. I am not content help. I am not responsible for reminding you of everything you have or should have learned in your classes here at MIIS. Capstone is your chance to interrogate yourself, to look deep to see what you have and have not learned, to revisit previous class contents and tools. You should expect no new content, as a result, apart from – perhaps – public speaking and presentation/argumentation competencies.

While we have a formal weekly meeting time, we will not use it every week. Our schedule of meetings will be established month-by-month.

Fall 2013 - MIIS

More Information »

MPAG 8644 - Sem:ProgramEvaluation for SCOs      

This course will introduce different aspects of Program Evaluation in the first half of the semester. In the second half, students will conduct an evaluation in the field. Students will evaluate selected programs in organizations in the Monterey Bay area. The goals of the course include: a) understanding the process of evaluation; b) gaining familiarity with evaluation concepts, techniques and issues; c) choosing among different alternatives for conducting development evaluations, including data collection, analysis and reporting; and, d) designing an evaluation. We will have specific sessions on the following topics: a) evaluation models; b) new development evaluation approaches; c) impact, descriptive and normative evaluation designs; d) data collection and sampling; e) data analysis and interpretation; e) building a performance-based evaluation; and f) political, social and economic contexts of evaluation.

Spring 2014 - MIIS

More Information »

MPAG 8685 - Sem:Advanced Evaluation      

Special Topics in Evaluation locates itself within current debates about “impact evaluation” in social development. The’00s witnessed the rise of heated debate about evaluation, impact, rigor, and the production of knowledge. Far from merely academic or philosophical puffery, these debates are influencing policy, strategy, fundraising, hiring, and organizational behavior of donors, NGOs, governments, and private sector agencies. The broad goal of this seminar is to give students hands-on experience applying a core set of evaluation competencies while, at the same time, equipping students to understand how recent paradigmatic debates may be changing ideas of those very competencies. <B>

The seminar, therefore, will cover competencies such as developing logic models, hypothesis generation and testing, operationalizing concepts, kinds of indicators, evaluation designs, budgeting, and matching methods to questions and to the expectations of stakeholders. We will then move from core concepts and competencies to seeing how they inform some evaluation methods/approaches that are controversial yet (may) solve certain measurement challenges that have plagued social development. Specifically, we will look at evaluative practices – and concrete cases – in relation to:

• randomized controlled trials (RCTs)

• social return on investment (SROI)

• participatory numbers (“parti-numbers”)

• qualitative comparative analysis (QCA)

• portfolio or sector-wide evaluation

• collective impact assessment

• Comparative Constituency Voice (CCV)

• “watchdog” agencies‟ assessment of nonprofit organization‟s program quality and results

Fall 2013 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS

More Information »

Faculty Program Tags