Photo
Office Location
McCone 118

Email Address
gshrimali@miis.edu

Phone Number
831-647-4159

Language(s)
हिन्दी

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Gireesh Shrimali

Assistant Professor, Energy Economics and Business


I am passionate about: climate change mitigation via development of new technologies

What excites me about being a professor at MIIS: is the opportunity to research in and teach internationally relevant topics

Expertise

My research focus is on policy for renewable energy, innovation in the energy sector, and climate change in general. My previous work has included topics such as design of feed in tariffs; impact of policy on penetration of renewable sources in the US; and analysis of the solar mission, low carbon innovation system and business models for sustainable cook-stoves in India. I am currently leading projects evaluating the impact of policy on the diffusion and cost of renewable technologies – in particular, solar and wind – in both US and India.

Recent Accomplishments

    • Teaching “Energy and Natural Resource Finance” – the first course of its kind at MIIS
    • Working closely with the Indian government on cost-effective renewable energy policies
    • Establishing “The CPI-ISB Energy and Environment Program” at the Indian School of Business

        Previous Work

        Before joining MIIS, I was the Interim-Director of CPI-ISB Energy and Environment Program at Climate Policy Initiative (CPI). Prior to CPI I worked as an Assistant Professor at the Indian School of Business (ISB).

        Education

        • PhD: Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, January 2008
        • MS: Electrical Engineering, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, June 1993
        • BTech: Electrical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Delhi, India, June 1991

        Bibliography

        • Gireesh Shrimali, David Nelson, Shobhit Goel, Charith Konda, and Raj Kumar, 2013, “Renewable Deployment in India: Financing Costs and Implications for Policy,” Energy Policy, 62: 28-43.
        • Gireesh Shrimali and Sumala Chetty, 2013, “Renewable Energy Certificate Markets in India: A Review,” Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, 26: 702-716.
        • Anshuman Sahoo and Gireesh Shrimali, 2013, “The Effectiveness of Domestic Content Criteria in India's Solar Mission,” Energy Policy, 62: 1470-1480.
        • Gireesh Shrimali and Steffen Jenner, 2013, “The Impact of State Policies on Deployment and Cost of Solar PV in the US: A Sector Specific Empirical Analysis,” Renewable Energy, 60: 679-690.
        • Santosh Harish, Shuba Raghavan, Milind Kandlikar, and Gireesh Shrimali, 2013, “Assessing the impact of the transition to LED-based solar lighting systems in India,” Energy for Sustainable Development, 17 (4), 363-370.
        • Carrie Armel, Abhay Gupta, Gireesh Shrimali, and Adrian Albert, 2013, “Disaggregation: The Holy Grail of Energy Efficiency?” Energy Policy, 52, 213-234.
        • Gireesh Shrimali and Sunali Rohra, 2012, “India’s Solar Mission: A Review,” Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, 16, 6317-6332.
        • Andrea Sarzynski, Jeremy Larrieu, and Gireesh Shrimali, 2012, “The Impact of State Financial Incentives on Consumer Adoption of Solar Technology in the US,” Energy Policy, 46, 550-557.
        • Gireesh Shrimali, Xander Slaski, Mark Thurber, and Hisham Zerriffi, 2011, “Improved Stoves in India: A Study of Sustainable Business Models,” Energy Policy, 39 (11), 7543-7556.
        • Gireesh Shrimali and Joshua Kneifel, 2011, “Are Government Policies Effective in Promoting Deployment of Renewable Electricity Resources (in the US)?” Energy Policy, 39 (9), 4726-4741. 
        • Gireesh Shrimali and Erin Baker, 2011, “Optimal Feed-in Tariff Schedules,” IEEE Engineering Management, 99, 1-13 

        Courses

        Courses offered in the past four years.
        indicates offered in the current term
        indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

        IEPG 8512 - Quant Mthd for Env Sci & Polcy      

        This course introduces the use of quantitative methods in environmental analysis. Students will learn how to apply basic principles of natural science to a variety of globally important environmental problems. Topics covered include estimation techniques and stock-flow modeling; population and resource use; biogeochemical cycles; acid deposition; climate change; stratospheric ozone depletion; toxic pollution and public health; and ionizing radiation. Coursework features weekly readings, bi-weekly quantitative problem sets, a mid-term exam, and a final exam. This is a challenging course for students with limited math and science backgrounds, but no student who works diligently will be left behind. The methods taught in this course have proven useful not only for aspiring environmental scientists, but also for those working in public policy, environmental law, ecological economics, international development, business, and journalism.

        Spring 2014 - MIIS

        More Information »

        IEPG 8623 - Sem:Bus Models for Sustain Dev      

        This seminar explores the growing role of the private sector in promoting sustainable development goals in low and middle income countries through core business activities. The overarching aim of such business models is to reduce poverty and promote sustainability by: 1) stimulating access to global markets and supply chains; 2) delivering affordable and sustainable goods and services; 3) responding to the demands of climate change mitigation and adaptation; and/or 4) promoting local capacities for sustainable production. The seminar will examine case studies of five business models, ranging from small-scale, for-profit and non-profit enterprises to partnerships between multinational corporations and NGOs and/or development agencies. Students will work in teams to undertake their own case studies. Together, we will seek to draw lessons for scalability.

        Spring 2014 - MIIS

        More Information »

        IEPG 8626 - Environmental Science &RiskMgt      

        The first (and major) part of the course focuses on conventional (e.g., oil, gas, and coal) and renewable (e.g., bio-fuels, wind, and solar) energy finance, using tools from corporate finance. In this course, students will study financial statement analysis, valuation and capital budgeting, and risk management. Students will also analyze case problems and learn to apply theories to “real world” practice, which goes beyond energy to general environmental problems, such as in carbon as well as natural capital management.

        The second part of the course briefly introduces the use of quantitative methods in environmental analysis. Students will learn how to apply basic principles of natural science to a variety of globally important environmental problems. The methods taught in this course have proven useful not only for aspiring environmental scientists and engineers, but also for those working in public policy, environmental law, ecological economics, international development, business, and journalism.

        Fall 2014 - MIIS

        More Information »

        IEPG 8670 - Energy & Environmntal Markets      

        In the past 30 years, some of the largest industries have made the transition from a regulated to market-based paradigm. Managers in many transportation, information technology, and energy companies have had to devise strategies to cope with changes in economic regulations and the evolution of new markets and trading platforms. The energy industries feature a complex mix of regulation and market-driven incentives. As classic economic regulation of energy markets has been reduced, however, environmental concerns have increased and spawned a new set of regulations leading to new business challenges and opportunities.
        Drawing on the tools of economics and finance, we study the business and public policy issues that these changes have raised in energy markets. Topics include the effects of competition, scarcity and seller market power on energy prices; the regulation and deregulation of energy markets; environmental impacts and policies related to energy production and use; the economics of alternative energy sources; the development and effect of organized spot, futures, and derivative markets in energy; antitrust and competition policy; and the transportation and storage of energy commodities. We examine the economic determinants of industry structure and evolution of competition among firms in these industries; investigate successful and unsuccessful strategies for entering new markets and competing in existing markets; and analyze the rationale for and effects of public policies in energy markets.

        OBJECTIVES

        • To introduce students to energy markets by examining the underlying economic principles.

        • To demonstrate how antitrust and competition policy affects the functioning of energy markets.

        • To introduce basic concepts in energy finance as related to the functioning of energy markets.

        • To examine environmental impacts and economics of energy production and use.

        • To understand how economics of alternative energy sources work differently from conventional ones.

        Fall 2013 - MIIS

        More Information »

        IEPG 8672 - Envrnmntl&NatrlResourceFinance      

        Energy is not only a multi-trillion dollar industry but is also closely linked to the global warming problem. Further, efficient natural resource management is becoming key to ensuring a sustainable future. Financing, in addition to technology and policy, will play a key part in addressing the twin goals of energy security and a greener planet.
        This is a course on natural resource finance, with focus on energy; using tools from corporate finance, with application to project finance as well as venture capital. In this course, students will study energy industry structure and terminology; financial statement analysis, capital budgeting and risk analysis, relative valuation, and risk management in the energy industry.
        Students will also analyze case problems addressing various course topics and learn to apply finance theories to “real world” practice, which goes beyond energy to general environmental problems, such as in carbon as well as natural capital management.

        Spring 2013 - MIIS

        More Information »

        IEPG 8683 - DiffusnSustTechBottomOfPyramid      

        One third of the world’s population — more than 2 billion people — lacks access to modern energy services to meet their basic energy needs with deleterious impacts on health, gender equity, socioeconomic development, and the environment. Expanding access to cleaner, more efficient energy systems for cooking, productive uses of heat and to electricity is critical to achieve the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) for reducing global poverty.

        Successful project design and implementation requires an integrated approach, that addresses not only technical aspects but also the socio-cultural, financial and institutional barriers and opportunities that projects may face. This course will provide students with a framework needed to better understand and participate in the design, implementation and evaluation of rural energy systems that are socially, financially, physically, and environmentally sustainable. The learning from this course will also be applicable to other sustainable technologies, addressing issues related to natural resource management in general.

        Specific questions to be addressed include:

         Why do rural energy projects fail?

         How does one improve adoption and use of the proposed systems?

         How does a program increase financial affordability for low-income customers?

         What are institutional barriers to energy projects and how does one address them?

        Spring 2013 - MIIS

        More Information »

        IPOL 8670 - BusinssModels&SustnablEnergy       

        Fall 2012 - MIIS

        More Information »

        MBAG 8561 / IMGT 8561 - Managerial Economics      

        This course will cover the fundamental economic principles that can enable managers to make more efficient and economical decisions. Students will be provided with selected tools that can be used to aid and improve the making of economic decisions; that is, decisions involving choice. Economic principles, theories and models will be introduced and discussed in order to develop a basis for consistently considering and evaluating economic policies, practices and activities. Student’s ability to apply the material presented in print and in lecture will be the primary measure of success in this course.

        Fall 2012 - MIIS, Fall 2013 - MIIS, Fall 2014 - MIIS

        More Information »

        MBAG 9623 - Sem:Bus Models for Sustain Dev      

        This seminar explores the growing role of the private sector in promoting sustainable development goals in low and middle income countries through core business activities. The overarching aim of such business models is to reduce poverty and promote sustainability by: 1) stimulating access to global markets and supply chains; 2) delivering affordable and sustainable goods and services; 3) responding to the demands of climate change mitigation and adaptation; and/or 4) promoting local capacities for sustainable production. The seminar will examine case studies of five business models, ranging from small-scale, for-profit and non-profit enterprises to partnerships between multinational corporations and NGOs and/or development agencies. Students will work in teams to undertake their own case studies. Together, we will seek to draw lessons for scalability.

        Spring 2014 - MIIS

        More Information »

        MBAG 9670 - Energy & Environmntal Markets      

        In the past 30 years, some of the largest industries have made the transition from a regulated to market-based paradigm. Managers in many transportation, information technology, and energy companies have had to devise strategies to cope with changes in economic regulations and the evolution of new markets and trading platforms. The energy industries feature a complex mix of regulation and market-driven incentives. As classic economic regulation of energy markets has been reduced, however, environmental concerns have increased and spawned a new set of regulations leading to new business challenges and opportunities.
        Drawing on the tools of economics and finance, we study the business and public policy issues that these changes have raised in energy markets. Topics include the effects of competition, scarcity and seller market power on energy prices; the regulation and deregulation of energy markets; environmental impacts and policies related to energy production and use; the economics of alternative energy sources; the development and effect of organized spot, futures, and derivative markets in energy; antitrust and competition policy; and the transportation and storage of energy commodities. We examine the economic determinants of industry structure and evolution of competition among firms in these industries; investigate successful and unsuccessful strategies for entering new markets and competing in existing markets; and analyze the rationale for and effects of public policies in energy markets.

        OBJECTIVES

        • To introduce students to energy markets by examining the underlying economic principles.

        • To demonstrate how antitrust and competition policy affects the functioning of energy markets.

        • To introduce basic concepts in energy finance as related to the functioning of energy markets.

        • To examine environmental impacts and economics of energy production and use.

        • To understand how economics of alternative energy sources work differently from conventional ones.

        Fall 2013 - MIIS

        More Information »

        MBAG 9672 - Envrnmntl&NatrlResourceFinance      

        Energy is not only a multi-trillion dollar industry but is also closely linked to the global warming problem. Further, efficient natural resource management is becoming key to ensuring a sustainable future. Financing, in addition to technology and policy, will play a key part in addressing the twin goals of energy security and a greener planet.

        This is a course on natural resource finance, with focus on energy; using tools from corporate finance, with application to project finance as well as venture capital. In this course, students will study energy industry structure and terminology; financial statement analysis, capital budgeting and risk analysis, relative valuation, and risk management in the energy industry.

        Students will also analyze case problems addressing various course topics and learn to apply finance theories to “real world” practice, which goes beyond energy to general environmental problems, such as in carbon as well as natural capital management.

        Spring 2013 - MIIS

        More Information »

        MBAG 9683 - DiffusnSustTechBottomOfPyramid      

        One third of the world’s population — more than 2 billion people — lacks access to modern energy services to meet their basic energy needs with deleterious impacts on health, gender equity, socioeconomic development, and the environment. Expanding access to cleaner, more efficient energy systems for cooking, productive uses of heat and to electricity is critical to achieve the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) for reducing global poverty.

        Successful project design and implementation requires an integrated approach, that addresses not only technical aspects but also the socio-cultural, financial and institutional barriers and opportunities that projects may face. This course will provide students with a framework needed to better understand and participate in the design, implementation and evaluation of rural energy systems that are socially, financially, physically, and environmentally sustainable. The learning from this course will also be applicable to other sustainable technologies, addressing issues related to natural resource management in general.

        Specific questions to be addressed include:

         Why do rural energy projects fail?

         How does one improve adoption and use of the proposed systems?

         How does a program increase financial affordability for low-income customers?

         What are institutional barriers to energy projects and how does one address them?

        Spring 2013 - MIIS

        More Information »

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