Photo
Office Location
400 Pacific Street (former CNS Building)

Email Address
fwehling@exchange.miis.edu

Phone Number
831.647.3084

Language(s)
Русский

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Fred L. Wehling

Associate Professor, Nonproliferation and Terrorism Studies


Fred Wehling is  an Associate Professor for Nonproliferation and Terrorism Studies in the Graduate School of International Policy and Management at the Monterey Institute of International Studies and a Fellow of the James Martin Center for Nonproliferation Studies. Before coming to the Monterey Institute in 1998, Wehling was a consultant at RAND, Coordinator of Policy Research for the University of California's Institute on Global Conflict and Cooperation (IGCC), and a researcher at the Cooperative Monitoring Center (CMC) at Sandia National Laboratories. In addition to teaching courses on policy analysis, nuclear proliferation, terrorism, and other topics, Wehling develops online courses and instructional materials, and conducts research on terrorism with chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear materials (CBRN) and ethical issues in nonproliferation and counterterrorism. He is contributor to The Four Faces of Nuclear Terrorism (2005), co-author of World Politics in a New Era, 3rd ed. (2003) and author of various other books, articles, and reports.

Prof. Wehling explains his philosophy of teaching in his TEDx Monterey talk, Nuking Boredom and Deterring Burnout.

Expertise

Fissile material control; terrorism with nuclear, chemical, biological, and radiological weapons; nuclear nonproliferation; former Soviet Union; international security; online learning

Education

Ph.D., Political Science, UCLA, MA, Instructional Design, CSUMB, BA, International Relations, University of Southern California

Courses

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

IPOL 8501 - Policy Analysis      

This course introduces students to the theory and practice of policy analysis. Students will be introduced to the stages of the public policy process, including agenda setting, formulation, implementation, and evaluation. Students will also develop basic policy analysis skills, including problem structuring, stakeholder identification, summarization of current policy, development of policy options, elaboration of criteria for selection, and recommendation of course of action. These concepts are illustrated by examples policies that fall within students' range of interests. This course also introduces students to scientific methods that are used as a means for structuring policy inquiry. A series of research approaches and techniques are presented in the context of forecasting, monitoring, and evaluation for the analysis of domestic and international policies.

Spring 2011 - MIIS, Spring 2012 - MIIS

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IPOL 8574 - Intro to WMD Nonproliferation      

This course surveys the issues surrounding the proliferation of nuclear, chemical, and biological weapons and ballistic missiles. It also provides an introduction to nuclear and radiological terrorism, and an overview of the international nonproliferation regime.

The course is divided into three main parts: Part 1 provides an overview of the trends and technologies of WMD proliferation. Part 2 considers the nonproliferation regime in detail, concentrating on the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT), the conventions banning chemical and biological weapons, supplier regimes and export controls, and verification and compliance issues. Part 3 returns to challenges to the nonproliferation regime, including states of proliferation concern known or believed to be developing WMD outside or in defiance of the NPT, CWC, and BWC and tensions within the nonproliferation regime, and discusses the range of international, multilateral, and unilateral responses to these challenges

Spring 2010 - MIIS, Fall 2010 - MIIS

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IPOL 8617 - Sem:Partner w/Bus.for Sust.Dev      

Business is increasingly partnering with governments and NGOs to deliver a wide variety of global sustainable development goals, including poverty reduction, carbon mitigation, clean energy, access to clean water, and eco-resilience and climate adaptation. While there have some high-profile success stories, business partnerships have also suffered from "culture clashes", lack of clarity about goals, poor performance measurement, and lack of accountability mechanisms.

This course examines and critically evaluates four types of emerging global business partnerships: 1) business-government “private-public” partnerships in the provision of public infrastructure, especially water; 2) multi-stakeholder “collaborative governance” of global markets (e.g. forests, sea food, bio-fuels); 3) capacity-building business-NGO partnerships involving business philanthropy; and 4) “investment” partnerships aimed at increasing finance for sustainable development.

We will first explore the context for the emergence of business partnerships, examine the meaning and measurement of "sustainable development", and consider obstacles in both business and NGO culture to effective partnering. We will then examine case studies of the four types of partnerships in developing countries and conclude by considering what innovations in business, NGO and government practice would make partnerships more effective, scale-able and accountable. Students will work in teams to produce and orally present a collaborative case study.

Spring 2011 - MIIS

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IPOL 8654 - Sem:NucWpnsProlifratn &theM.E.      

Many analysts believe we are on the verge of a cascade of nuclear weapons proliferation in the Middle East, prompted principally but not solely by Iran’s nuclear activities. But others regard such dire predictions as overstated, and key regional actors are pushing forward efforts to work toward a region free of weapons of mass destruction. This seminar will begin by thoroughly delving into the literature on why states do and don’t pursue nuclear weapons. We will then apply this literature to key countries in the Middle East. We will conclude by assessing three competing visions of the role of nuclear weapons in the future of the region--a highly nuclearized region, relative status quo, and a highly denuclearized region--and think systematically about how much traction theory and empirics give us on which is more likely to emerge and the conditions under which each is more or less likely to emerge. We will touch on chemical and biological weapons but our focus will be on nuclear weapons.

Spring 2010 - MIIS

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IPSG 8505 / IPOL 8505 - Global Politics      

The course introduces students to key analytical concepts and normative views such as balance of power, unipolarity, multipolarity, unilateralism, multilateralism, etc., and major theoretical perspectives for analysis of international politics, as well as the major international events of the past century that have shaped the international system. Students will learn ways that international actors, including sovereign states and non-state entities such as multinational corporations, international organizations, and nongovernmental organizations, exercise power to pursue goals and influence international outcomes. Students will also learn how international institutions, norms, and structures of governance affect the exercise of power and other forms of influence and shape international outcomes. Students will also be introduced to some contemporary issues of national, international, and human security, including the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, and terrorism, as well as issues of globalization, food security, the plight of the LDC’s, and human rights.

Spring 2012 - MIIS, Fall 2012 - MIIS, Spring 2013 - MIIS, Fall 2013 - MIIS, Spring 2014 - MIIS

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NPTG 8520 - Intro to Homeland Security      

This course introduces students to principles, concepts, and structures of an all-hazards approach to homeland security. The course begins with a brief overview of natural and man-made hazards and the federal, state, local, and international agencies created and reoriented to respond to these hazards since 2001. The focus then shifts to functional areas of homeland security, including intelligence, border security, transportation security, cyber security, critical infrastructure protection, and emergency response and recovery. The course concludes by considering how capabilities in each of these functional areas can be integrated and enhanced by risk assessment, planning, communications, and science and technology.

Spring 2013 - MIIS, Spring 2014 - MIIS

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NPTG 8658 / IPOL 8658 - Sem: CBRN Terrorism      

The goal of this seminar is to develop the skills necessary to analyze the motivations and capabilities of non-state actors to acquire and use weapons of mass destruction (WMD), more specifically chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear (CBRN) weapons and materials, for terrorist purposes. Through class discussions, simulation exercises, and individual research, students will review the technical aspects of CBRN, examine the history of CBRN use by terrorists, assess CBRN terrorism threats and vulnerabilities, and assess policy responses to CBRN terrorism. Students are required to have substantial background knowledge of either CBRN or terrorism before joining the seminar.

Students will prepare weekly short memos, conduct group work for integrative simulation exercises, prepare an independent research project, and have various presentation opportunities.

Fall 2010 - MIIS, Fall 2011 - MIIS, Spring 2013 - MIIS

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NPTG 9505 - Global Politics      

The course introduces students to key analytical concepts and normative views such as balance of power, unipolarity, multipolarity, unilateralism, multilateralism, etc., and major theoretical perspectives for analysis of international politics, as well as the major international events of the past century that have shaped the international system. Students will learn ways that international actors, including sovereign states and non-state entities such as multinational corporations, international organizations, and nongovernmental organizations, exercise power to pursue goals and influence international outcomes. Students will also learn how international institutions, norms, and structures of governance affect the exercise of power and other forms of influence and shape international outcomes. Students will also be introduced to some contemporary issues of national, international, and human security, including the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, and terrorism, as well as issues of globalization, food security, the plight of the LDC’s, and human rights.

Spring 2014 - MIIS

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